HEAVENLY SECRETS
Emanuel Swedenborg

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AC GENESIS Chapter 24

AC 3004. That the deepest arcana lie concealed in the internal sense of the Word, which have heretofore come to no one‘s knowledge, may appear from what has been already said and shown, and also from what of the Lord’s Divine mercy will be shown in the following pages. The same can be very plainly seen from the internal sense of the two names of our Lord, Jesus Christ. When these names are used, few have any other idea than that they are proper names and almost like the names of any other man, but more holy. The more learned indeed are aware that Jesus signifies Saviour, and that Christ means Anointed; and from this they conceive some interior idea; but still these are not the things the angels in heaven perceive from the names in question. The things they perceive are still more Divine. By the name "Jesus," when named by a man who is reading the Word, the angels perceive Divine good; and by "Christ," Divine truth; and by the two names, the Divine marriage of good and truth, and of truth and good; thus the whole Divine in the heavenly marriage, which is heaven. What the heavenly marriage is, see (n. 2173, 2803).

AC 3005. That "Jesus" in the internal sense is Divine good, and that "Christ" is Divine truth, may be seen from many things in the Word. That "Jesus" is Divine good comes from the fact that "Jesus" means "safety," "salvation," and " Saviour;" and because it means these, it signifies the Divine good; for all salvation is from the Divine good which is of the Lord‘s love and mercy; and thus is effected by the reception of that good. That "Christ" is Divine truth comes from the fact that the name means "Messiah," "Anointed," and "King;" and that these names signify the Divine truth will he evident from what follows.

AC 3006. These are the things the angels perceive when" Jesus Christ" is named; and this is what is meant when it is said that there is salvation in no other name, as also by the Lord so often speaking of His "name." As in John:--

Whatsoever ye shall ask in My name, that will I do (John 14:13).

These things are written that ye may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God; and that believing ye may have life in His name (John 20:31);

and in other places. That the "name" is all in one complex by which the Lord is worshiped, and thus denotes the quality of all worship and doctrine, may be seen above (n. 2724); and therefore here it denotes the good of love and of charity conjoined with the truth of faith, which is the complex of all doctrine and of all worship.

AC 3007. That "Christ" is the same as "Messiah," "Anointed," and "King," and that these names are the same as the Divine truth, may be seen from what now follows.

AC 3008. First: That "Christ" is the same as "Messiah," "Anointed," and "King," is evident from the following passages in the Word. In John:--

Andrew findeth his own brother Simon, and saith unto him, We have found the Messiah, which is being interpreted the Christ (John 1:41).

Many of the multitude when they heard the word said, This is of a truth the Prophet; others said, This is the Christ; but others said, Shall Christ come out of Galilee? doth not the Scripture say that the Christ cometh of the seed of David, and from Bethlehem, the town where David was? (John 7:40-42);

"the Christ" here plainly means the Messiah whom they expected. In the same:--

Have the rulers then indeed known that this is truly the Christ? Howbeit we know this man whence he is; but when the Christ cometh no one knoweth whence He is (John 7:26, 27);

"the Christ" denotes the Messiah; that no one would know whence He is, was because He would not be acknowledged. In the same:--The Jews came round about Jesus, and said unto Him, How long dost thou hold our soul in suspense? If thou art the Christ, tell us plainly. Jesus answered them, I told you, but ye believe not (n. 24, 25). Here also "the Christ" denotes the Messiah whom they expected. In the same:--

The multitude answered, We have heard out of the Law that the Christ abideth forever (John 12:34);

"the Christ" meaning the Messiah. In the same:--

Martha said, I have believed that Thou art the Christ, the Son of God, who was to come into the world (John 11:27);

that is, that He was the Messiah. In Luke:--

There was a man in Jerusalem whose name was Simeon and to him was the answer made by the Holy Spirit that he should not see death before he had seen the Lord’s Christ (Luke 2:25, 26);

meaning that he should see the Messiah, or the Anointed of Jehovah. In the same:--

Jesus said to the disciples, But who say ye that I am? Peter answering said, The Christ of God (Luke 9:20; Mark 8:29; Matt. 26:63, 64; John 6:68, 69; Mark 14:61, 62).

[2] Now as "Christ" and "Messiah" are the same, and as "Christ" in the Greek and "Messiah" in the Hebrew signify the "Anointed," it is evident that "Christ" is the same as the "Anointed;" and likewise the same as "King," for kings in general were called the "anointed," as is evident from the historic and prophetic parts of the Word in many passages. As in David:--

The kings of the earth set themselves, and (the rulers) took counsel together, against Jehovah and against His Anointed (Ps. 2:2).

Again:--

Now know I that Jehovah saveth His Anointed; He will answer Him from the heavens of His holiness, in the powers of the salvation of His right hand (Ps. 20:6).

Again:--

Jehovah is their strength, and a stronghold of salvations to His Anointed (Ps. 28:8).

In Samuel:--

Jehovah will give strength unto His King, and exalt the horn of His Anointed (1 Sam. 2:10).

In these and many other passages the "Anointed" denotes the "King." In the original language the reading is "Messiah." In these prophetic utterances the Lord is treated of in the internal sense; and that He is the "King" is also plain from passages in the New Testament. As in Matthew:--

The governor asked Jesus, Art Thou the King of the Jews? Jesus said unto him, Thou sayest (Matthew 27:11).

And in Luke:--

Pilate asked Jesus, saying, Art Thou the King of the Jews? And He answering him said, Thou sayest (Luke 23:3; Mark 15:2).

And in John:--

They cried out, Hosanna, blessed is He that cometh in the name of the Lord, even the King of Israel (John 12:13).

And again:--

Nathaniel said, Rabbi, Thou art the Son of God, Thou art the King of Israel (John 1:49).

AC 3009. Second: That "Messiah," "Anointed," and "King," are the same as the Divine truth, is evident from very many passages in the Word, and has been shown several times in the explications (n. 1672, 1728, 2015, 2069); and the Lord Himself so teaches in John:--

Pilate said unto Jesus, Art Thou not a king then? Jesus answered, Thou sayest that I am a King; for this was I born, and for this am come into the world, that I should bear witness unto the truth; every one who is of the truth heareth My voice (John 18:37).

It is evident from this that it is the Divine truth itself from which the Lord was called "King." That kings were anointed, and were therefore called the anointed, was because the oil with which they were anointed signified good (n. 886, 2832), denoting that the truth signified by a "king" was from good, consequently was the truth of good; and thus that the royal office with kings might represent the Lord as to the Divine truth which is from Divine good, and thus the Divine marriage of good in truth; while the priestly office represented the Divine marriage of truth in good. The latter is signified by "Jesus;" the former by "Christ."

AC 3010. Hence it is evident what is signified by the "Christs" in Matthew:--

See that no man seduce you; for many shall come in My name, saying, I am the Christ; and shall seduce many. Then if anyone shall say unto you, Lo here is the Christ, or there, believe it not; for there shall arise false Christs, and false prophets (Matthew 24:4, 5, 23, 24; Mark 13:21, 22).

Here by "false Christs" are signified truths not Divine, or falsities; and by "false prophets," those who teach them (n. 2534). And again:--

Be not ye called masters, for one is your Master, even Christ (Matthew 23:10);

"Christ" denotes truth Divine. Hence it is evident what a Christian is, namely, one who is in truth from good.

AC 3011. From what has been said it may be seen what hidden things the Word has stored within it; which can by no means come to anyone‘s knowledge except from the internal sense.

GENESIS 24:1-67

1. And Abraham being old was come into days; and Jehovah blessed Abraham in all things.

2. And Abraham said unto his servant, the elder of his house, who administered all that he had, Put I pray thy had under my thigh.

3. And I will make thee swear by Jehovah the God of heaven and the God of the earth, that thou shalt not take a woman for my son of the daughters of the Canaanite, in the midst of whom I dwell;

4. But thou shalt go unto my land, and to my nativity; and take a woman for my son for Isaac.

5. And the servant said unto him, Peradventure the woman will not be willing to follow me unto this land; bringing shall I bring back thy son unto the land whence thou camest out?

6. And Abraham said unto him, Beware that thou bring not back my son thither.

7. Jehovah the God of heaven, that took me from my father’s house, and from the land of my nativity, and that spake unto me, and that swear unto me, saying, Unto thy seed will I give this land, He shall send His angel before thee, and thou shalt take a woman for my son from thence.

8. And if the woman be not willing to follow thee, then thou shalt be clear from this mine oath; only thou shalt not bring back my son thither.

9. And the servant put his hand under the thigh of Abraham his lord, and sware to him concerning this word.

10. And the servant took ten camels, of the camels of his lord, and departed, and every good of his lord was in his hand; and he arose and went to Aram-naharaim, unto the city of Nahor.

11. And he made the camels kneel down, without the city, by the well of waters, about the time of evening, about the time the drawers go out.

12. And he said, O Jehovah God of my lord Abraham, cause to meet I pray before me this day; and do mercy with my lord Abraham.

13. Behold, I stand by the fountain of waters; and the daughters of the men of the city come out to draw waters.

14. And let it come to pass, that the damsel to whom I shall say, Let down thy pitcher, I pray thee, that I may drink, and she shall say, Drink, and I will give thy camels drink also, her hast Thou appointed for Thy servant Isaac; and thereby shall I know that Thou hast done mercy with my lord.

15. And it came to pass that scarcely had he done speaking, when behold Rebekah came out, who was born to Bethuel the son of Milcah, the wife of Nahor, Abraham‘s brother, with her pitcher upon her shoulder.

16. And the damsel was exceeding good to look upon, a virgin, neither had any man known her; and she went down to the fountain, and filled her pitcher, and came up.

17. And the servant ran to meet her, and said, Let me I pray sip a little water from thy pitcher.

18. And she said, Drink, my lord; and she hasted, and let down her pitcher upon her hand, and made him drink.

19. And she finished making him drink, and she said, I will draw for thy camels also, until they have done drinking.

20. And she hasted, and emptied her pitcher into the trough, and ran again unto the well to draw, and drew for all his camels.

21. And the man marveling at her, withheld himself, to know whether Jehovah had prospered his way or not.

22. And it came to pass when the camels had done drinking, that the man took a jewel of gold, of half a shekel weight, and two bracelets for her hands, ten of gold their weight.

23. And he said, Whose daughter art thou? Tell me I pray is there room in thy father’s house for us to pass the night? 24. And she said unto him, I am the daughter of Bethuel the son of Milcah, whom she bare unto Nahor.

25. And she said unto him, We have both straw and much provender, also room to pass the night.

26. And the man bent himself, and bowed himself down to Jehovah.

27. And he said, Blessed be Jehovah the God of my lord Abraham, who hath not forsaken His mercy and His truth from my lord. I being in the way, Jehovah hath led me to the house of my lord‘s brethren.

28. And the damsel ran, and told her mother’s house according to these words.

29. And Rebekah had a brother, and his name was Laban; and Laban ran out of doors unto the man, unto the fountain.

30. And it came to pass when he saw the jewel, and the bracelets upon his sister‘s hands, and when he heard the words of Rebekah his sister, saying, Thus spake the man unto me, that he came unto the man; and behold be stood by the camels at the fountain.

31. And he said, Come thou blessed of Jehovah, wherefore standest thou without? For I have swept the house, and there is room for the camels.

32. And the man came into the house, and loosed the camels, and gave straw and provender for the camels, and water to wash his feet, and the feet of the men that were with him.

33. And there was set before him to eat; and he said, I will not eat until I have spoken my words. And he said, Speak.

34. And he said, I am Abraham’s servant.

35. And Jehovah hath blessed my lord exceedingly, and hath made him great, and hath given him flock and herd, and silver and gold, and menservants and maidservants, and camels and asses.

36. And Sarah, my lord‘s wife, bare a son to my lord after she was old; and he hath given unto him all that he hath.

37. And my lord made me swear, saying, Thou shalt not take a woman for my son of the daughters of the Canaanite, in whose land I dwell.

38. But thou shalt go unto my father’s house, and to my family, and take a woman for my son.

39. And I said unto my lord, Peradventure the woman will not follow me.

40. And he said unto me, Jehovah, before whom I have walked, will send His angel with thee, and prosper thy way; and thou shalt take a woman for my son from my family, and from my father‘s house.

41. Then shalt thou be clear from my oath, when thou comest to my family; and if they give not to thee, thou shalt be clear from my oath.

42. And I came this day unto the fountain, and said, O Jehovah God of my lord Abraham, if now Thou do prosper my way wherein I do walk;

43. Behold I stand by the fountain of waters; and let it come to pass that the maiden which cometh forth to draw, and to whom I shall say, Let me drink I pray a little water from thy pitcher;

44. And she shall say to me, Both drink thou, and I will also draw for thy camels, let her be the woman whom Jehovah hath appointed for my lord’s son.

45. I scarcely had done speaking in mine heart, when behold Rebekah came forth; and her pitcher on her shoulder; and she went down unto the fountain and drew; and I said unto her, Let me drink, I pray.

46. And she made haste, and let down her pitcher from upon her, and said, Drink, and I will give thy camels drink also; and I drank, and she gave drink to the camels also.

47. And I asked her, and said, Whose daughter art thou? And she said, The daughter of Bethuel, the son of Nahor, whom Milcah bare unto him. And I put the jewel upon her nose, and the bracelets upon her hands.

48. And I bent and bowed myself down to Jehovah, and blessed Jehovah God of my lord Abraham, who led me into the way of truth, to take the daughter of my lord‘s brother for his son.

49. And now if ye will do mercy and truth with my lord, tell me; and if not, tell me; and I will look to the right hand, or to the left.

50. And Laban and Bethuel answered and said, The word hath gone forth from Jehovah; we cannot speak unto thee evil or good.

51. Behold Rebekah is before thee; take her, and go, and let her be the woman of thy lord’s son, as Jehovah hath spoken.

52. And it came to pass that when Abraham‘s servant heart their words, he bowed himself down to the earth unto Jehovah.

53. And the servant brought forth vessels of silver and vessels of gold, and garments, and gave to Rebekah; he gave also precious things to her brother and to her mother.

54. And they did eat and drink, he and the men that were with him; and they passed the night; and they rose up in the morning, and he said, Send me away unto my lord.

55. And her brother and her mother said, Let the damsel abide with us days, at least ten; afterwards thou shalt go.

56. And he said unto them, Do not delay me, and Jehovah hath prospered my way; send me away, and I will go to my lord.

57. And they said, Let us call the damsel, and inquire at her mouth.

58. And they called Rebekah, and said unto her, Wilt thou go with this man? And she said, I will go.

59. And they sent away Rebekah their sister, and her nurse, and Abraham’s servant, and his men.

60. And they blessed Rebekah, and said unto her, Our sister, be thou for thousands of ten thousands; and may thy seed inherit the gate of those that hate thee.

61. And Rebekah arose, and her damsels, and they rode upon the camels, and followed the man; and the servant took Rebekah, and went away.

62. And Isaac came from coming from Beer-lahai-roi; and he dwelt in the land of the south.

63. And Isaac went out to meditate in the field toward evening; and he lifted up his eyes and saw, and behold there were camels coming.

64. And Rebekah lifted up her eyes, and saw Isaac, and she alighted from off the camel.

65. And she said unto the servant, What man is this that walketh in the field to meet us? And the servant said, It is my lord. And she took a veil and covered herself.

66. And the servant told Isaac all the words that he had done.

67. And Isaac brought her into his mother Sarah‘s tent; and he took Rebekah, and she was to him for a woman, and he loved her; and Isaac was comforted after his mother.

THE CONTENTS

AC 3012. In the internal sense there is described the whole process of the conjunction of truth with good in the Lord’s Divine rational; in this chapter, the process of initiation which precedes conjunction. "Isaac" is the good of the rational; "Rebekah" here is truth to be initiated into good; "Laban" is the affection of good in the natural man.

AC 3013. In the internal sense the process of initiation is the described: When the state was prepared, and all things had been reduced by the Lord into Divine celestial order, so that Divine truth might be conjoined with the Divine good of His rational, and this by the common way from the natural man, that is, from the memory-knowledges, knowledges, and doctrinal things therein, then by the Lord‘s Divine influx truths were called forth thence; were initiated into good in the rational; and were made Divine. Thus was the rational made Divine by the Lord in respect to truth as well as in respect to good.

AC 3014. From this chapter, and from those which follow, it may be seen what arcana are contained in the internal sense of the Word.

THE INTERNAL SENSE

AC 3015. Verse 1. And Abraham being old was come into days and Jehovah blessed Abraham in all things. "Abraham being old was come into day," signifies when the state was at hand that the Lord’s Human should be made Divine; "and Jehovah blessed Abraham in all things," signifies when all things were disposed by the Lord into Divine order.

AC 3016. Abraham being old was come into days. That this signifies when the state was at hand that the Lord‘s Human should be made Divine, is evident from the representation of Abraham, as being the Lord (n. 1893, 1965, 1989, 2011, 2172, 2198, 2501, 2833, 2836); and from the signification of "old," or of "old age," as being to put off what is human, and put on what is heavenly (n. 1854, 2198); and when predicated of the Lord, as being to put on the Divine. The same is evident also from the signification of "day," as being state (n. 23, 487, 488, 493, 893, 2788) and hence from the signification of "coming into days," as being when the state was at hand. Such things are signified by "old" and "coming into days," for the reason that the angels have no idea of old age, or of the advancing age which is meant by "coming into days;" but an idea of state in regard to the life in which they are; and therefore when mention is made in the Word of advancement in age, and of old age, the angels who are with man can have no other idea than of the state of life in which the persons are, and in which men are while passing through their ages even to the last; namely, that they thus successively put off what is human and put on what is heavenly. For human life, from infancy to old age, is nothing else than a progression from the world to heaven; and the last age, which is death, is the transition itself. Therefore burial is resurrection, because it is a complete putting off (n. 2916, 2917). As the angels are in such an idea, nothing else can be signified by "coming into days" and by "old age" in the internal sense which is principally for angels and for men who are angelic minds.

AC 3017. And Jehovah blessed Abraham in all things. That this signifies when all things were disposed by the Lord into Divine order, or what is the same, when the Lord had disposed all things into Divine order, is evident from the fact that "Jehovah" is the Lord as to the Divine Itself (n. 1343, 1736, 1815, 2004, 2005, 2018, 2025, 2921); and that in this case Abraham represents the Lord as to the Divine Human (n. 2833, 2836); and therefore when it is said that "Jehovah blessed Abraham in all things," in the internal sense is meant that the Lord from the Divine Itself in His Human disposed all things into Divine order; for to "bless," when said of the Lord’s Human, signifies these things. For to "be blessed," when predicated of man, means to be enriched with spiritual and celestial good (n. 981, 1096, 1420, 1422); and he is enriched with it when the things in him are disposed by the Lord into spiritual and celestial order, thus into the image and likeness of Divine order (n. 1475); the regeneration of man being nothing else. But what is meant when it is said that all things were disposed by the Lord into Divine order in His Human, is evident from what follows in this chapter, namely, that His Divine rational, represented by Isaac, which was conceived from the Divine Good represented by Abraham, and was born of the Divine Truth represented by Sarah, was now disposed into such Divine order that Divine truths from the Human itself could be conjoined with it. These are the arcana contained in this chapter in the internal sense, concerning which the angels have clear light from the Lord. For in the light of heaven these things are open as in clear day; whereas in the light of the world in which man is, scarcely anything is so, except something in an obscure manner with one who is regenerate, for he also is in some light of heaven.

AC 3018. Verse 2. And Abraham said unto his servant, the elder of his house, who administered all that he had, Put I pray thy hand under my thigh. "Abraham said unto his servant, the elder of his house," signifies the arrangement in order and influx of the Lord in His natural, which is "the servant, the elder of the house;" "who administered all that he had," signifies the offices of the natural man; "Put I pray thy hand under my thigh," signifies the pledging of it according to its power to the good of conjugial love.

AC 3019. Abraham said unto his servant, the elder of his house. That this signifies the arrangement in order and influx of the Lord in His natural, which is the "servant the elder of the house," is evident from the signification here of "saying" as being to command, because it is said to a servant; and as the subject here treated of is the disposition by the Divine of the things that are in the natural man, "to say" denotes to arrange in order and to flow in; for all that is done in the natural or external man is arranged in order by the rational or internal man, and is effected by influx. That the "servant the elder of the house" is the natural, or the natural man, is evident from the signification of "servant," as being that which is lower and which serves what is higher; or what is the same, that which is outer and serves what is inner (n. 2541, 2567). All things that are of the natural man, such as memory-knowledges of whatever kind, are nothing but things of service; for they serve the rational by enabling it to think equitably and will justly. That the "elder of the house" is the natural man, may be seen from what follows.

AC 3020. Who administered all that he had. That this signifies the offices of the natural man, is evident from the signification of "administering,‘ and indeed of "administering all things," as being to discharge offices or duties. That the natural man in respect to the rational, or what is the same, the external man in respect to the internal, is like the administrator in a house, may be seen above, (n. 1795). All things that are in man are as one household (that is, as one family) in this respect, that there is one who fills the office of master of the house, and others who fill that of servants. The rational mind itself is that which disposes all things as master of the house, and arranges them in order by influx into the natural mind; but it is the natural mind that ministers and is the administrator.

[2] As the natural mind is distinct from the rational mind and is in a degree below it, and as it also acts as if from what is its own, it is called relatively a "servant the elder of the house," and it is said to administer all the things in itself that belong to it. That the natural mind is distinct from the rational, and is in a lower degree, and is as if in what is its own, may be seen from the things within it, and from its offices. The things which are therein are all memory-knowledges, thus also all knowledges of every kind whatever; in a word, they are all things in both general and particular that belong to the outer or corporeal memory (n. 2471, 2480). To this mind also belongs all the imaginative faculty, which is the interior sensuous with man, and which is in the greatest vigor with children; and in the first age of adolescence; to the same mind belong also all natural affections that man has in common with brute animals; all of which shows what its offices are.

[3] But the rational mind is more internal. The knowledges in it are not open before man, but while he lives in the body are imperceptible; for they are all things in both general and particular that belong to the interior memory (n. 2470-2474, 2489, 2490). To this mind also belongs all the thinking faculty that is perceptive of what is equitable and just, and of what is true and good; also all spiritual affections, which are properly human, and by which man is distinguished from the brute animals. From these things this mind flows into the natural mind, and excites the things that are therein, and views them with a kind of sight, and in this manner judges and forms conclusions. That these two minds are distinct is clearly evident from the fact that with many persons the natural mind bears rule over the rational mind; or what is the same, the external man over the internal man; and that it does not bear rule but serves with those only who are in the good of charity, that is, who suffer themselves to be led by the Lord.

AC 3021. Put I pray thy hand under my thigh. That this signifies pledging it according to its power to the good of conjugial love, is evident from the signification of "hand," as being power (n. 878); and from the signification of "thigh," as being the good of conjugial love, concerning which in what follows. That it is pledging to the extent of its power, is evident from the fact that they who were pledged to anything that related to conjugial love, by an ancient rite placed the hand under the thigh of him to whom they were being pledged, and in this manner they were put under oath by him; and this for the reason that the "thigh" signified conjugial love, and the "hand" power, or so far as was possible; for all the parts of the human body correspond to spiritual and celestial things in the Grand Man which is heaven, as was shown above (n. 2996, 2998); and as will be shown more fully, of the Lord’s Divine mercy hereafter. The thighs themselves together with the loins, correspond to conjugial love. These things were well known to the men of the most ancient times; and therefore they had a number of rites based on this correspondence, of which one was that they placed the hands under the thigh when they were pledged to any good of conjugial love. The knowledge of such things, which was in highest esteem among the ancients, and was one of the chief things of their knowledge and intelligence, is at this day wholly lost; so completely that it is not even known that there is any correspondence and some may therefore wonder that such things are signified by the rite here described. The rite is mentioned in the present case because the betrothing of Isaac to some one of the family of Abraham is treated of, and the discharge of the duty was intrusted to the elder servant.

[2] That as before said the "thigh" from correspondence signifies conjugial love, may also be seen from other passages in the Word; as from the process enjoined when a woman was accused by her husband of adultery. In Moses:--

The priest shall cause the woman to swear with the oath of cursing; and the priest shall say unto the woman, Jehovah make thee a curse and an oath in the midst of thy people, when Jehovah doth make thy thigh to fall away, and thy belly to swell. And when he hath given her the water to drink, then it shall come to pass, if she be defiled, and hath trespassed a trespass against her husband, that the waters that are accursed shall enter into her and become bitterness, and her belly shall swell, and her thigh shall fall away, and the woman shall be a curse among her people (Num. 5:21, 27).

That the "thigh should fall away," signified evil relating to conjugial love, that is, it signified adultery. The other particulars mentioned in the same process signify each of them some special thing belonging to the subject, so that there is not the least thing that does not involve something, however surprising this may seem to a man who reads the Word without any idea of its sanctity. Because of the signification of the "thigh" as being the good of conjugial love, mention is sometimes made of "coming forth from the thigh,"-as is said of Jacob:--

Be fruitful and multiply; a nation and a company of nations shall be of thee, and kings shall come forth from thy the (Gen. 35:11).

And in another place:--

Every soul that came with Jacob into Egypt, that came forth from his thigh (Gen. 46:26; Exod. 1:5).

And of Gideon:--

Gideon had seventy sons that came forth from his thigh (Judges 8:30).

[3] And as the "thighs" and the "loins" signify the things belonging to conjugial love, they also signify the things of love and charity, for the reason that conjugial love is the fundamental love of all loves (n. 686, 2733, 2737-2739); for all loves are from the same origin, that is, from the heavenly marriage, which is that of good and truth (n. 2727-2759). That the "thigh" signifies the good of celestial love and the good of spiritual love, is evident from the following passages. In John:--

He that sat on the white horse had upon His vesture and upon His thigh a name written: King of kings, and Lord of lords (Rev. 19:16).

That He who sat on the white horse is the Word, thus the Lord who is the Word, may be seen above (n. 2760-2762); also that "vesture" is the Divine truth (n. 2576); therefore He is called "King of kings" (n. 3009). Hence it is plain what the "thigh" is, namely, the Divine good which is of His love; from which He is also called "Lord of lords" (n. 3004-3011). And because this is the Lord‘s quality, it is said that He "had thereon a name written;" for "name" signifies quality (n. 1896, 2009, 2724, 3006).

[4] In David:--

Gird Thy sword upon Thy thigh, 0 Mighty One, in Thy glory and honor (Ps. 45:3)

speaking of the Lord; where "sword" denotes truth combating (n. 2799); and "thigh" the good of love; to "gird the sword upon the thigh" signifies that the truth from which He would fight would be from the good of love. In Isaiah:--

Righteousness shall be the girdle of His loins, and truth the girdle of His thighs (Isaiah 11:5);

speaking here too of the Lord; and because "righteousness" is predicated of the good of love (n. 2235), it is called the girdle of the loins;" and because truth is from good, it is called the "girdle of the thighs;" thus "loins" are predicated of the love of good, and "thighs" of the love of truth.

[5] In the same:--

None shall be weary nor stumble in Him, He shall not slumber nor sleep, neither is the girdle of His thighs loosed, nor the latchet of His shoes broken off (Isaiah 5:27).

This again is said of the Lord, and the "girdle of His thighs" denotes the love of truth, as before. In Jeremiah:--

Jehovah said unto Jeremiah that he should buy a linen girdle and put it on his loins, but should not pass it through water; and that he should go to the Euphrates and hide it in a hole of the rock; and having done this, when he went and took it from the place, it was marred (Jeremiah 13:1-6).

The "linen girdle" denotes truth, and "putting it on the loins" was a representative that truth was from good. Every one can see that these are representatives, and their signification cannot be known except from correspondences, concerning which of the Lord’s Divine mercy something will be said at the end of certain chapters.

[6] So too with the signification of the things seen by Ezekiel, by Daniel, and by Nebuchadnezzar. As In Ezekiel:--

Above the expanse that was over the heads of the cherubim was the likeness of a throne, as the appearance of a sapphire stone and upon the likeness of the throne was a likeness as the appearance of a man above upon it. And I saw as the appearance of a burning coal, as the appearance of fire within it round about; from the appearance of his loins and upward, and from the appearance of his loins and downward, I saw as it were the appearance of fire, and there was brightness round about Him as the appearance of the bow that is in the cloud in the day of rain, so was the appearance of the brightness round about, so was the appearance of the likeness of the glory of Jehovah (Ezekiel 1:26-28).

That this was representative of the Lord and of His kingdom is evident; and that the appearance of the loins upward and the appearance of the loins downward has reference to His love, is evident from the signification of "fire," as being love (n. 934); and from the signification of "brightness" and a "rainbow" as being the derivative wisdom and intelligence (n. 1042, 1043, 1053).

[7] Concerning Daniel it is said:--

A man appeared to him clothed in linen, whose loins were girded with pure gold of Uphaz his body also was like the tharshish stone, and his face as the appearance of lightning, and his eyes as lamps of fire, and his arms and feet like the shining of burnished brass (Dan. 10:5, 6).

What is signified by these particulars-by "loins," "body," "face," "eyes," "arms," and "feet"--can appear to no one except from representations and their correspondences. From these it is evident that the Lord‘s celestial kingdom is thus represented, in which the "loins" are Divine love; and the "gold of Uphaz" with which these were girded, is the good of wisdom which is from love (n. 113, 1551, 1552).

[8] Concerning what was seen by Nebuchadnezzar we read in Daniel:--

The head of the statue was good gold; its breast and its arms were silver; its belly and thighs were brass; the feet were part iron and part clay (Daniel 2:32, 33).

By that statue were represented the successive states of the church; by the "head which was gold," the first state, which was celestial, because it was a state of love to the Lord; by the breast and arms which were silver," the second state, which was spiritual, as it was a state of charity toward the neighbor; by the "belly and thighs which were brass," the third state, which was a state of natural good, for this is " brass," (n. 425, 1551). Natural good is of love or charity toward the neighbor in a degree below spiritual good. By the "feet which were iron and clay" is meant the fourth state, which was one of natural truth, which is "iron," (n. 425, 426); and also of no coherence with good (which is "clay"). From all these things it may be seen what is signified by the "thighs" and the "loins," namely, in the chief place conjugial love, and from this all genuine love, as is evident from the passages quoted, and likewise from others (Gen. 32:25, 32; Isa. 20:2-4; Nahum 2:1; Ps. 69:23; Exod. 12:11; Luke 12:35, 36). In the opposite sense also are signified the opposite loves, which are the loves of self and of the world (1 Kings 2:5; Isa. 32:10, 11; Jer. 30:6; 48:37; Ezek. 29:7; Amos 8:10).

AC 3022. Verses 3, 4. And I will make thee swear by Jehovah the God of heaven and the God of the earth, that thou shalt not take a woman for my son of the daughters of the Canaanite, in the midst of whom I dwell; but thou shalt go unto my land, and to my nativity; and take a woman for my son for Isaac. " And I will make thee swear by Jehovah the God of heaven and the God of the earth," signifies a most holy pledging to the Divine which is in the highest and in that which is therefrom; "that thou shalt not take a woman for my son of the daughters of the Canaanite," signifies that the Divine rational was not to be conjoined with any affection disagreeing with truth; "in the midst of whom I dwell," signifies the discordant things in the maternal human, that encompass "but thou shalt go unto my land, and to my nativity," signifies to the Divine celestial and spiritual things which the Lord had acquired to Himself; "and take a woman for my son for Isaac," signifies that thence was the affection of truth which should be conjoined with the affection of good of the rational.

AC 3023. I will make thee swear by Jehovah the God of heaven and the God of the earth. That this signifies a most holy pledging to the Divine which is in the highest and in that which is therefrom, is evident from the signification of "causing to swear," as being to pledge by oath; for to cause to swear is nothing else than to pledge; and this is most holy when it is by Jehovah the God of heaven and the God of the earth, that is, to the Divine which is above and which is beneath, or what is the same, to the Divine which is in the highest and in that which is therefrom. "Jehovah the God of heaven," being said of the Lord, denotes Jehovah Himself who is called the Father, from whom He was conceived, thus who was His Divine Essence; for the conception itself gave the veriest essence from which He was. "Jehovah the God of the earth" in this case means Jehovah who is called the Son, thus His Human essence; this came forth from the Divine essence when the Lord made it also Divine. Thus by "Jehovah the God of heaven" is signified the Divine that is in the highest; and by "Jehovah the God of the earth" is signified the Divine that is in that which is therefrom But the Lord is called "Jehovah the God of heaven" from His Divine that is in the heavens; and He is called the "God of the earth" from His Divine that is on earth. The Divine in the heavens is also that which is with man in his internals; but the Divine on earth is that which is in his externals; for the internals of man are his heaven, because by them he is conjoined with the angels; but his externals are his earth, for by them he is conjoined with men (n. 82, 913, 1411, 1733). When a man is regenerate, the internals flow into the externals, and the externals are from the internals. Hence also it may be known what the internals of the church are, and what its externals.

AC 3024. That thou shalt not take a woman for my son of the daughters of the Canaanite. That this signifies that the Divine rational was not to be conjoined with any affection disagreeing with truth, is evident from the signification of "taking a woman," as being to be conjoined by a covenant of marriage; from the signification of "my son," namely Isaac, as being the Lord’s Divine rational (n. 1893, 2066, 2083, 2630); from the signification of "daughters," as being affections (n. 489-491, 568, 2362); and from the signification of the "Canaanite," as being evil (n. 1444, 1573, 1574); from which it is that the "daughters of the Canaanite" are affections that do not agree with truth. The subject here treated of is the Divine truth that was to be adjoined to the Divine good of the Lord‘s rational, (n. 3013). By the "woman" who was to be associated by a covenant of marriage, is meant that truth itself, which was to be called forth from the natural man by the common way; by "my son" is meant the Lord’s rational in respect to good, to which it was to be adjoined or associated; hence it may be known that by "not taking a woman from the daughters of the Canaanite," is signified that this rational was not to be conjoined with any affection that disagreed with truth. All conjunction of truth with good is effected by means of affection; for no truth can possibly enter into man‘s rational and be conjoined there, except by means of affection; for in affection is the good of love, which alone conjoins (n. 1895); as may also be known to anyone who reflects.

[2] That the "daughters of the Canaanite" signify affections which disagree with truth, that is, affections of what is false, is evident from the signification of "daughters;" for daughters are mentioned in many passages of the Word, and every one can see that daughters are not there meant,-as where it is said, the "daughter of Zion," the "daughter of Jerusalem," the "daughter of Tarshish," the "daughter of My people." That by these are signified affections of good and of truth, has been shown in passages quoted above. And because they are affections of good and of truth, they are also churches, for churches are churches from these affections. Thus by the "daughter of Zion" is signified the celestial church, and this from the affection of good; but by the "daughter of Jerusalem" is signified the spiritual church, from the affection of truth (n. 2362); this is also signified by the "daughter of My people" (Isa. 22:4; Jer. 6:14, 26; 8:19, 21-22; 14:17; Lam. 2:11; 4:6; Ezek. 13:17).

[3] From this it is evident what is signified by the "daughters" of the nations; as by the "daughters of the Philistines," the "daughters of Egypt," the "daughters of Tyre and of Zidon," the "daughters of Edom," the "daughters of Moab," the "daughters of the Chaldeans" and "of Babel," and the "daughters of Sodom," namely, the affections of evil and falsity from which were their religious systems, and thus the religious systems themselves. That such is the signification of "daughters," may be seen from the passages that follow. In Ezekiel:--

The daughters of the nations shall lament for Egypt. Wail for the multitude of Egypt, and cause her to go down, her and the daughters of the famous nations, unto the earth of the regions below, with them that go down into the pit (Ezekiel 32:16, 18).

The "daughters of the famous nations" denote the affections of evil. In Samuel:--

Tell it not in Gath, publish it not in the streets of Ashkelon; lest the daughters of the Philistines rejoice, lest the daughters of the uncircumcised triumph (2 Sam. 1:20).

In Ezekiel:--

Thou hast committed whoredom with the sons of Egypt; I have delivered thee unto the will of them that hate thee, the daughters of the Philistines, before thy wickedness was discovered, as at the time of the reproach of the daughters of Syria, and of all that are round about her, the daughters of the Philistines which do despite unto thee round about (Ezekiel 16:26, 27, 57).

That daughters are not meant here, anyone can see; but the religiosities of such as are signified by the Philistines, which are of such a kind that they tale much about faith and lead no life of faith (n. 1197, 1198); for this reason they are also called the "uncircumcised," that is, those who are devoid of charity.

[4] In Jeremiah:--

Go up into Gilead, and take balm, 0 virgin daughter of Egypt. 0 thou daughter that dwellest in Egypt, make thee vessels of exile. The daughter of Egypt shall be put to shame, she is delivered into the hand of the people of the north (Jer. 46:11, 19, 24).

The "daughter of Egypt" denotes the affection of reasoning from memory-knowledges concerning the truths of faith, as to whether they be so; thus she denotes the kind of religion that arises from this, which is such that nothing is believed except that which is comprehended by the senses, and thus nothing of the truth of faith (n. 215, 232, 233, 1164, 1165, 1186, 1385, 2196, 2203, 2209, 2568, 2588).

[5] In Isaiah:--

He said, Thou shalt no more exult, 0 thou oppressed daughter of Zidon (Isa. 23:12).

And in David:--

The daughter of Tyre with a gift, the rich among the people shall intreat thy faces (Ps. 45:12).

What is meant by the "daughter of Zidon" and the "daughter of Tyre," is evident from the signification of Zidon and of Tyre (n. 1201). In Jeremiah:--

Rejoice and be glad 0 daughter of Edom. Thine iniquity is consummated, 0 daughter of Zion. He will no more cause thee to migrate; thine iniquity shall be visited, 0 daughter of Edom (Lam. 4:21, 22).

In Isaiah:--

As a wandering bird, a nest sent forth, shall the daughters of Moab be (Isa. 16:2).

Again:--

Come down and sit in the dust, 0 virgin daughter of Babel sit on the earth, without a throne, 0 daughter of the Chaldeans. Sit thou silent, and enter into darkness, 0 daughter of the Chaldeans, for thou shalt no more be called the lady of kingdoms (Isaiah 47:1, 5).

In Jeremiah:--

A people cometh from the north set in array as a man to the battle, against thee, O daughter of Babel (Jer. 50:41, 42).

Again:--

The daughter of Babel is like a threshing-floor, it is time to thresh her (Jer. 51:33).

In Zechariah:--

Alas 0 Zion, escape, thou that dwellest with the daughter of Babel (Zechariah 2:7).

In David:--

The daughter of Babel is laid waste (Ps. 137:8).

In Ezekiel:--

Thy sisters, Sodom and her daughters, shall return to their ancient estate, and Samaria and her daughters shall return to their ancient estate (Ezekiel 16:55).

[6] Any one can see that in these passages by "daughters" are not meant daughters, but affections that disagree with truth, and thus religiosities that come from this source; but what these religiosities are, is evident from the signification of the peoples named,-as Edom, Moab, the Chaldeans, Babel, Sodom, and Samaria, which have been treated of in many places in the explications of the foregoing chapters of Genesis. Hence now it is evident what is here meant by the "daughters of the Canaanite."

[7] That the Israelites were not to contract marriages with the daughters of the Canaanites, also had regard to the spiritual laws that good and falsity, and evil and truth are not to be joined together; for thence comes profanation. The prohibition was also representative of the matter concerning which we read in (Deuteronomy 7:3); and in Malachi:--

Judah hath profaned the holiness of Jehovah, in that he hath loved and hath married the daughter of a strange god (Malachi 2:11).

AC 3025. In the midst of whom I dwell. That this signifies things discordant in the maternal human which encompass, is evident from the signification of "dwelling in the midst," her( of the Canaanite, as referring to the things that are round about, or that encompass; and that these are in disagreement with truth is evident from what was said above respecting the signification of the " daughters of the Canaanite." That these are the things which the Lord received hereditarily from the mother, and which He afterwards expelled when He made His Human Divine, is evident from what has been said and shown before on the same subject (n. 1414, 1444, 1573, 2159, 2574, 2649).

AC 3026. But thou shalt go unto my land and to my nativity. That this signifies to the Divine celestial and spiritual things which the Lord acquired to Himself, is evident from the signification of "land," as being the celestial of love (n. 1413, 1607); and from the signification of "nativity," as being the spiritual of love (n. 1145, 1255); here Divine celestial and spiritual things, because the Lord is treated of; and that He acquired these to Himself by His own power, may be seen above (n. 1815, 1921, 2025, 2026, 2083, 2500).

AC 3027. And take a woman for my son for Isaac. That this signifies that thence was the affection of truth that was to be conjoined with the affection of good of the rational, is evident from what was said above (n. 3024).

AC 3028. Verses 5, 6. And the servant said unto him, Peradventure the woman will not be willing to follow me unto this land; bringing shall I bring back thy son into the land whence thou camest out? And Abraham said unto him, Beware thou that thou bring not back my son thither. "The servant said unto him," signifies the Lord’s perception concerning the natural man; "Peradventure the woman will not be willing to follow me unto this land," signifies a doubt of the natural man concerning that affection as to whether it was separable "bringing shall I bring back thy son unto the land whence thou camest out?" signifies a question whether it could nevertheless be conjoined with the Divine good of the rational "Abraham said unto him," signifies the Lord‘s perception from the Divine; "Beware thou that thou bring not back my son thither," signifies that it could by no means be conjoined.

AC 3029. The servant said unto him. That this signifies the Lord’s perception concerning the natural man, is evident from the signification of "saying," as being to perceive (n. 1791, 1815, 1819, 1822, 1898, 1919, 2080, 2506, 2515, 2552); and from the signification here of "servant," as being the natural man (n. 3019, 3020). Whatever is done in the natural man, and what the quality of the natural man is, is perceived in the rational; for that which is lower in man is perceived by that which is higher (n. 2654). Hence it is that by "the servant said unto him" is signified the Lord‘s perception concerning the natural man.

AC 3030. Peradventure the woman will not be willing to follow me unto this land. That this signifies a doubt of the natural man concerning that affection, as to whether it was separable, is evident from the signification of "woman," as being truth, here from the natural, which was to be conjoined with the Divine good of the rational. And as all conjunction is effected by means of affection (n. 3024), so by "woman" is signified the affection of that truth: and also from the signification of "going after" or "following me unto this land," as being to be separated from the natural and conjoined with the rational; for "land" here as above (n. 3026) is the good of love that is of the rational. That there is doubt is seen from its being said, "Peradventure she be not willing."

[2] From what has been said above, it is evident what is involved in these words, and in what follows to (verse 8), and further; and in order that these things may be better understood, we may say a few words more. The genuine rational is from good, but comes forth (existit) from truth. Good flows in by an internal way; but truth by an external way. Good thus conjoins itself with truth in the rational, and they cause the rational to be. Unless the good therein is conjoined with truth, there is no rational; although there appears to be, because the man can reason (n. 1944). This is the common way in which the rational is formed with man.

[3] As the Lord was born like another man, and as it was His will to be instructed like another man, so did He will to make His rational Divine in a similar way, namely, as to good by influx from His Divine by the internal way, and as to truth by influx through the external way. When therefore the rational as to good had been so far formed as to be in a state for receiving truth (which is meant by the words in the beginning of this chapter, "Abraham being old was come into days, and Jehovah blessed Abraham in all things," by which is signified when the state was at hand that the Lord’s Human should be made Divine, and when all things should be disposed into Divine order, (n. 3016, 3017), there next follows that truth is to be conjoined with the good of the rational, and this, as before said, by the common way, that is, by means of memory-knowledges and knowledges from the natural man.

[4] The good itself of the rational, which is formed by the internal way, is the very ground; but truth is the seed which is to be sown in this ground. The genuine rational is never born in any other way. In order that it might come forth with the Lord in the same way, and be made Divine by His own power, the Lord came into the world, and it was His will to be born as are other men. Otherwise He might have assumed a human without birth, as was frequently done in ancient times when He appeared to men.

[5] These are the things contained in this chapter, namely, how truth, called forth from the natural man, was to be conjoined with the good of the rational; and as the good there was Divine, how the truth there should also be made Divine. To man these things (especially to one who does not know that the rational is something distinct from the natural, and who therefore does not know that the rational is formed successively, and this by knowledges) are very obscure, so that they are not understood; but still they are among things easily understood by those who have any knowledge concerning the rational and the natural man, and who are in enlightenment. The angels see them all as in clear day.

[6] Some idea of them may be obtained from what has been said and shown above, namely: That the rational as to truth is formed by influx into memory-knowledges and knowledges (n. 1495, 1563, 1900, 1964) That it is not born from these two kinds of knowledges, but from the affection of them (n. 1895, 1900): That these two kinds of knowledges are only vessels for good (n. 1469, 1496): That empty memory-knowledges must be destroyed (n. 1489, 1492, 1499, 1500): That in the rational, the affection of good is as a soul in the affection of truth (n. 2072): What is the affection of rational truth, and of the truth of mere memory (n. 2503): That by knowledges the external man is conjoined with the internal, that is, the rational man with the natural, when knowledges are being implanted in things celestial, which are those of love and charity (n. 1450, 1451, 1453, 1616).

AC 3031. Bringing shall I bring back thy son unto the land whence thou camest out? That this signifies a question whether it could nevertheless be conjoined with the Divine good of the rational, is evident from what was said above concerning Abraham, and concerning the land whence he came forth (n. 1353, 1356, 1992, 2559); from which it is evident that the land whence Abram came was Syria, where was the second Ancient Church, called the Hebrew Church from Eber by whom it was established (n. 1238, 1241, 1327, 1343). But about the time of Abraham this church also fell away from the truth, and some of its households to such an extent that they were wholly ignorant of Jehovah, and worshiped other gods. This is the "land" here meant, and concerning which the servant asked Abraham whether he should bring back his son to the land whence he came out; and it is from this that by the "land" is here signified an affection which does not agree with truth. And because this is its meaning, by bringing back the son, or what is the same, by his marrying a woman there, and remaining there with her, is signified to conjoin an affection that does not agree with truth, with the Divine good of the rational. But that this could not be done is declared by Abraham‘s answer, the consideration of which now follows.

AC 3032. Abraham said unto him. That this signifies the Lord’s perception from the Divine, is evident from the signification of "saying," as being to perceive (n. 3029); and from the representation of Abraham, as being the Lord as to the Divine Human, from which comes this perception.

AC 3033. Beware thou that thou bring not back my son thither. That this signifies that it could by no means be conjoined, is evident from what was said above (n. 3031), where it was explained what is signified in the internal sense by bringing back his son to the land from which Abraham went forth. That an affection which does not agree with truth cannot be Conjoined with the good of the rational, is evident from what has been said above concerning the conjunction of good and truth, or what is the same, concerning the heavenly marriage (n. 2173, 2507, 2727-2759). That on this account the ancients instituted a marriage between the affection of good and the affection of truth, may be seen above, (n. 1904); also that falsity cannot possibly be conjoined with good, or truth with evil, because they are of a contrary nature, (n. 2388, 2429, 2531); and that good is insinuated into the knowledges of truth as its own recipient vessels, and that thus conjunction is effected, (n. 1469, 1496, 1832, 1900, 1950, 2063, 2189, 2261, 2269, 2428, 2434, 2697).

[2] That there can be no conjunction of falsity with good, or of truth with evil, but only of falsity with evil, and of truth with good, it has been given me to perceive to the life; and I have perceived that the case is as follows: When a man has the affection of good, that is, when he wills good from the heart, then whenever anything is to be thought of that is to be willed and done, his good willing flows into his thinking, and there it applies itself to the knowledges which are there, and joins itself with them as its recipient vessels, and by this conjunction impels him so to think, to will, and to act. It is as it were an ingrafting of good in truths or in the knowledges of truth. But when a man has not the affection of good, but the affection of evil, that is, then he wills evil (as when he believes all to be good that is for himself, so that he may become great and may be rich, thus possess honor and wealth, and this is his end), then when anything is to be thought of that is to be willed and done, his willing equally flows into his thinking, and there excites knowledges which appear in the semblance of truth; and so it impels the man to think, to will, and to do; and this by a wrong application of knowledges, and by looking upon certain general truths which he has drawn from the sense of the letter of the Word or from other knowledge as being applicable in every sense: it is in this way that evil is coupled with falsity, for in this case the truth which is therein is deprived of all the essence of truth.

[3] In the other life such persons (however much in this life they may have seemed to be more highly instructed than others) are more stupid than others and so far as they are in the persuasion that they are in truth, they induce thick darkness on others. Such have at times been with me; but they were not susceptible of any affection of good from truth, howsoever the truths were recalled to their mind which they had known in the life of the body; for evil was with them, with which truths could not be conjoined. Neither can such persons be in the company of the good; but if there is anything of natural good with them, they are vastated even till they know nothing of truth; and then there is insinuated into the remaining good something of truth, as much as the little remaining good can receive. But they who have been in the affection of good from the heart, are able to receive all truth in accordance with the amount and the quality of the good that has been with them.

AC 3034. Verse 7. Jehovah the God of heaven, that took me from my fathers house, and from the land of my nativity, and that shake unto me, and that sware unto me, saying, Unto thy seed will I give this land, He shall send His angel before thee, and thou shalt take a woman for my son from thence. "Jehovah the God of heaven," signifies the Lord‘s Divine Itself; "that took me from my father’s house, and from the land of my nativity," signifies by virtue of which it was that the Lord freed Himself from the things of the mother as to evils and falsities; "and that spake unto me, and that sware unto me, saying," signifies by virtue of which was His Divine willing and understanding; "Unto thy seed will I give this land," signifies the Divine truth pertaining to the Lord‘s Human "He shall send His angel before thee," signifies the Divine providence; "and thou shalt take a woman for my son from thence," signifies that the affection of truth was indeed thence, but from a new source.

AC 3035. Jehovah the God of heaven. That this signifies the Lord’s Divine Itself, is evident from what was said above (n. 3023), namely, that "Jehovah the God of heaven," is the Lord‘s Divine Itself; for by "Jehovah," so often named in the Word of the Old Testament, is meant the Lord alone for all things therein in general and particular treat of Him in the internal sense; and all and each of the rites of the church represented Him (n. 1736, 2921); and that the men of the most ancient times, who were of the celestial church, understood by Jehovah no other than the Lord (n. 1343). In the sense of the letter here and elsewhere the appearance is that another, who is higher, is meant by "Jehovah;" but the sense of the letter is such as to separate what the internal sense unites; and this for the reason that the man who is to be instructed from the sense of the letter cannot have an idea of a one, unless he first has an idea of more than one; for a one with man is formed from many; or what is the same, from successive things is formed that which is simultaneous. There are many things in the Lord, and all are Jehovah. This is the reason why the sense of the letter makes a distinction, while heaven by no means does so; but acknowledges one God in a simple idea, and no other than the Lord.

AC 3036. That took me from my father’s house, and from the land of my nativity. That this signifies by virtue of which it was that the Lord freed Himself from the things of the mother as to evils and falsities, is evident from the signification here of the "father‘s house" and of the "land of nativity," as being the maternal, or that which was hereditary from the mother, from which came the evil and falsity against which the Lord fought, and which He expelled, and thus made His Human Divine by His own power. See what was said above, (n. 3031), concerning the house and the land from which Abram came; also what was said concerning the Lord’s heredity: That from Jehovah there was what was Divine, and from the mother what was evil (n. 1414, 1444): That He fought against the evil inherited from the mother; but that He had no actual evil (n. 1444, 1573): That the Lord put off all that was inherited from the mother, so that at length He was not her son (n. 2159, 2574, 2649): This heredity from the mother is what is signified in the internal sense by the "father‘s house" and the "land of nativity;" by the "father’s house," the maternal heredity as to evil; and by the "land of nativity," the maternal heredity as to falsities for where evil is, there are falsities, for they are conjoined with each other: These He expelled by His own power (n. 1616, 1813, 1921, 2025, 2026, 2083, 2523).

AC 3037. And that spake unto me, and that sware unto me, saying. That this signifies by virtue of which was the Lord‘s Divine willing and understanding, is evident from the signification of "speaking," as being to perceive (n. 3029), and to will (n. 2626); and from the signification of "swearing,’ as being confirmation from the Divine, and as being predicated of truths, which belong to the understanding (n. 2842). then it is said concerning Jehovah that He "speaks," in the internal sense it is meant that He wills; for whatever Jehovah speaks, He wills; and when it is said concerning Jehovah that He "swears," it is meant in the internal sense that He understands it to be true; thus by "swearing," when predicated of Jehovah, is signified understanding, as may also be seen from the passages adduced from the Word (n. 2842).

AC 3038. Unto thy seed will I give this land. That this signifies the Divine truth pertaining to the Lord‘s Human, is evident from the signification of "seed," as being the faith of charity, and also those who are in the faith of charity (n. 1025, 1447, 1610, 2848); and because all the good and truth of faith is from the Lord, it is the Divine truth itself that is meant by "seed" in the supreme sense: and also from the signification of "this land," namely, Canaan, as being heaven, or the Lord’s kingdom (n. 1413, 1437, 1607); and because it is heaven, or the Lord‘s kingdom, it is the Lord’s Divine Human itself that is meant in the supreme sense by the "land of Canaan;" for the Divine Itself cannot flow into heaven except through the Lord‘s Divine Human; which also the Lord showed plainly in Matthew:--

All things are delivered unto Me of My Father; and no one knoweth the Son but the Father, neither knoweth anyone the Father but the Son, and he to whom the Son willeth to reveal Him (Matthew 11:27).

And in John:--

No man hath seen God at any time; the Only-begotten Son, who is in the bosom of the Father, He hath declared Him (John 1:18).

The "Son" is the Lord’s Divine Human. He who believes that any other Father than the Lord is adored in heaven, is much mistaken.

AC 3039. He shall send His angel before thee. That this signifies the Divine providence, is evident from the signification of "angel" in the Word, as being the Lord; but what of the Lord is meant, appears from the series (n. 1925); and that the Divine providence is meant here is evident. That the Lord is meant by "angels" in the Word, is because all that was spoken in the Word by the prophets and others under the dictation of angels, is from the Lord, that is, belongs to the Lord Himself. The angels in heaven also acknowledge and perceive that nothing of good and truth is from themselves, but all from the Lord; and this so fully that they are averse to all things that induce any other idea. Hence it is that by "angels," that is, by good angels, is meant the Lord; but what of His, becomes apparent from the series, or connection.

AC 3040. And thou shalt take a woman for my son from thence. That this signifies that the affection of truth was indeed thence, but from a new source, is evident from the signification of a "woman," as being the affection of truth (concerning which see above); for by Rebekah, of whom this chapter treats, is represented the Divine truth that was to be conjoined with the Divine good of the rational, which is"‘ Isaac." That the affection of truth is thence, that is, from what is signified by the "house of the father" and the "land of nativity," but from a new source, cannot as yet be explained, but it is treated of in many things that follow. I may however briefly state that all the affection of truth in the natural man comes forth by an influx from the affection of good out of the rational, or through the rational from the Divine; the affection of truth which through this influx comes forth in the natural man is not in the beginning the affection of genuine truth; for genuine truth comes by successive steps, and is also by successive steps substituted in place of former things that were not in themselves truths, but only means leading to genuine truth. From these few words it may be seen what is meant by its being said that the affection of truth is indeed therefrom, but from a new source.

AC 3041. Verses 8, 9. And if the woman be not willing to follow thee, then thou shalt be clear from this mine oath; only thou shalt not bring back my son thither. And the servant put his hand under the thigh of Abraham his lord, and swore to him concerning this word. "If the woman be not willing to follow thee," signifies here as before, if the affection of truth should not be separated; "then thou shalt be clear from this mine oath." signifies the freedom belonging to the natural man; "only thou shalt not bring back my son thither," signifies here as before that from thence there could be no conjunction. "And the servant put his hand under the thigh of Abraham his lord," signifies here as before the pledging of the natural man, according to power, to the good of conjugial love "and sware to him concerning this word," signifies a sacred obligation.

AC 3042. If the woman be not willing to follow thee. That this signifies, if the affection of truth should not be separated, is evident from the signification of a "woman," as being the affection of truth; and from the signification of " going after," or "following thee to this land," as being to be separated from the natural, and conjoined with the rational (n. 3030), where are the same words.

AC 3043. Then thou shalt be clear from this mine oath. That this signifies the freedom belonging to the natural man, is evident from the signification of the "servant" of whom these things are said, as being the natural man (n. 3019); and from the signification of "being clear if the woman is not willing to follow," as being in the proximate sense, that he would be under no pledge if the affection of truth should not be separated. That these words involve the freedom belonging to the natural man, is evident; for the affection of truth here treated of, and the separation also, are predicated in the internal sense of the natural man in the historical sense there is another connection, but in the internal sense it is such as has been stated.

[2] Concerning man’s freedom, see what was said and shown above (n. 892, 905, 1937, 1947, 2744, 2870-2893) from which it is evident how the case is with freedom. Freedom is predicated of the natural man, but not in the same way of the rational; for good flows through the rational into the natural in heavenly freedom from the Lord. The natural man is that which is to receive this good; and in order that it may receive it, and may thus be conjoined with the heavenly freedom which flows in through the rational, the natural is left in freedom. For freedom is of love or affection; and unless the natural man receives the affection of truth from the inflowing affection of good, it cannot possibly be conjoined with the rational. Such is the case with man; and that he is reformed of the Lord through freedom may be seen (n. 1937, 1947, 2876-2878, 2881).

[3] In regard to the Lord, He likewise left the natural in freedom when He made His rational Divine as to truth; that is, when He adjoined Divine truth to the Divine good of the rational; for it was His will to make His Human Divine in the usual manner, that is, in the way in which man is reformed and regenerated. The reformation and regeneration of man is therefore itself a kind of image; by reformation and regeneration also a man is made new, and hence is said to be born anew and created new; and in so far as he is reformed, in so far he has as it were what is Divine in him. But there is this difference, that the Lord made Himself Divine from His own power, while man cannot do the least thing from his own power, but only from the Lord. It is said "as it were what is Divine," because man is but a recipient of life; whereas the Lord as to each essence is life itself (n. 1954, 2021, 2658, 2706, 3001).

AC 3044. Only thou shalt not bring back my son thither. That this signifies that from thence there could be no conjunction, is evident from what was said above (n. 3031, 3033), where the same words occur.

AC 3045. And the servant put his hand under the thigh of Abraham his lord. That this signifies the pledging of the natural man, according to power, to the good of conjugial love, is evident from what was said above (n. 3021), where also the same words occur.

AC 3046. And sware to him concerning this word. That this signifies a sacred obligation, is evident from the signification of "swearing," as being a binding pledge, and indeed a most holy one, because he swore by Jehovah the God of heaven and the God of the earth (n. 3023); and thus a sacred obligation, for a sacred obligation is nothing else than a binding pledge.

AC 3047. Verse 10. And the servant took ten camels, of the camels of his lord, and departed, and every good of his lord was in his hand; and he arose and went to Aram-naharaim, unto the city of Nahor. "The servant took ten camels, of the camels of his lord, and departed," signifies general Divine memory-knowledges in the natural man; "and every good of his lord was in his band," signifies the goods and truths of these knowledges with it;" " and he arose," signifies elevation; "and went to Aram-naharaim," signifies the knowledges of truth therefrom; "to the city of Nahor," signifies kindred doctrinal things.

AC 3048. The servant took ten camels, of the camels of his lord, and departed. That this signifies general memory-knowledges in the natural man, is evident from the signification here of " servant," as being the natural man (n. 3019, 3020) and from the signification of "ten," as being remains. That these are goods and truths with man stored up by the Lord, may be seen above, (n. 468, 530, 560, 561, 660, 661, 1050, 1906, 2284); and that "ten," or remains, when predicated of the Lord, are the Divine things which the Lord acquired for Himself, (n. 1738, 1906); and also from the signification of "camels," as being general memory-knowledges; and because these were Divine, or acquired by the Lord, it is said that they were "ten," and then it is said that they were "camels, of the camels of his lord." That he "departed," signifies the initiation thereby which is treated of in this chapter.

[2] The subject here is the process of the conjunction of truth with good in the Lord‘s Divine rational; first, the process of initiation (n. 3012, 3013), the nature of which is described in a series; here, that the Lord separated in the natural man the things which were from Himself, that is, which were Divine, from those which were of the maternal. The things which were from Himself, or which were Divine, are the things by which the initiation was effected; and they are here the "ten camels, of the camels of his lord." And hence it is that in the following verses much mention is made of "camels," as that he made the camels fall on their knees without the city (verse 11); that Rebekah also gave drink to the camels (verses 14, 19, 20); that they were brought into the house, and that straw and provender were given them (verses 31, 32); and further, that Rebekah and her damsels rode upon the camels (verse 61); and that Isaac saw the camels coming; and when Rebekah saw Isaac, that she alighted off her camel (verses 63, 64). Camels are mentioned so often because of the internal sense, in which they signify the general memory-knowledges in the natural man, from which comes the affection of truth which is to be initiated into the affection of good in the rational, and this in the usual way, as shown above; for the rational as to truth cannot possibly be born and perfected without memory-knowledges and knowledges.

[3] That "camels" signify general memory-knowledges, is evident from other passages in the Word where they are mentioned, as in Isaiah:--

The prophecy of the beasts of the south: In the land of straitness and distress; from whence come the young lion and the old lion, the viper and the flying fire-serpent; they carry their riches upon the shoulder of young asses, and their treasures upon the hump of camels, to a people that shall not profit; for Eat shall help in vain and to no purpose (Isaiah 30:6, 7).

The "beasts of the south" denote those who are in the light of knowledges, or in knowledges, but in a life of evil; "carrying their riches upon the shoulder of young asses," denotes the knowledges pertaining to their rational. That a "young ass" is rational truth may be seen above, (n. 2781); "their treasures upon the hump of camels," denotes the knowledges pertaining to their natural; the camels’ "hump" is what is natural; the "camels" themselves signify the general memory-knowledges which are there; the "treasures" are the knowledges which they hold as precious; that "Egypt shall help in vain and to no purpose," denotes that memory-knowledges are of no use to them; that "Egypt" is memory-knowledge may be seen above (n. 1164, 1165, 1186, 1462, 2588). That "camels" here are not camels, is plain; for it is said "the young lion and the old lion carry their treasures upon the hump of camels;" and anyone can see that some arcanum of the church is hereby signified.

[4] Again:--

The prophecy of the wilderness of the sea: Thus hath the Lord said, Go, set a watchman let him declare what he seeth: and he saw a chariot, a pair of horsemen, a chariot of an ass, a chariot of a camel, and he hearkened diligently. And he answered and said, Babel is fallen, is fallen (Isa. 21:1, 6, 7, 9).

The "wilderness of the sea" here denotes the emptiness of memory-knowledges that are not for use; a "chariot of an ass," a collection of particular memory-knowledges; a "chariot of a camel," a collection of general memory-knowledges in the natural man. It is the empty reasonings with those signified by "Babel" which are thus described.

[5] Again:--

Thy heart shall be enlarged because the multitude or the sea shall be converted unto thee, the wealth of the nations shall come unto thee. The abundance of camels shall cover thee, the dromedaries of Midian and Ephah; all they from Sheba shall come they shall bring gold and incense, and they shall proclaim the praises of Jehovah (Isaiah 60:5, 6).

This is concerning the Lord, and concerning the Divine celestial and spiritual things in His natural: the "multitude of the sea" denotes the immense supply of natural truth; the "wealth of the nations," the immense supply of natural good; the "abundance of camels," the abundant supply of general memory-knowledges; "gold and frankincense," goods and truths, which are the "praises of Jehovah;" "from Sheba" is from the celestial things of love and faith (n. 113, 117, 1171). That The queen of Sheba came to Solomon to Jerusalem with exceeding great riches, with camels that bare spices, and very much gold, and precious stones (1 Kings 10:1, 2) represented the wisdom and intelligence which came to the Lord, who in the internal sense here is "Solomon." The "camels bearing spices, gold, and precious stones" are the things of wisdom and intelligence in the natural man.

[6] In Jeremiah:--

To Arabia, and to the kingdoms of Hazor, which Nebuchadnezzar king of Babel smote: Arise ye, go up to Arabia, and lay waste the sons of the East. Their tents shall they take, and they shall carry away for themselves their curtains, and all their vessels, and their camels. And their camels shall be a booty, and I will scatter them to every wind (Jer. 49:28, 29, 32).

Here "Arabia and the kingdoms of Hazor," in the opposite sense, denote those who are in knowledges of celestial and spiritual things, but for the end of no other use than that they may be esteemed wise and intelligent by themselves and the world; the "camels which should be taken away from them, and should be for a booty, and should be scattered to every wind," are in general the memory-knowledges and the knowledges of good and truth which are also taken away from Them in the life of the body by their believing contrary things, and in the other life wholly.

[7] In Zechariah:--

And this shall be the plague wherewith Jehovah will smite all the peoples that shall fight against Jerusalem; thus shall be the plague of the horse, of the mule, of the camel, and of the ass, and of every beast (Zech. 14:12, 15).

Here the "plague of the horse, of the mule, of the camel, and of the ass," denotes the privation of intellectual things, which thus succeed in order from rational things to natural things. What is meant by the "horse," may be seen above, (n. 2761, 2762); what by the "mule" (n. 2781); and what by the "ass," (n. 2781); "camels" denote the general memory-knowledges in the natural man. The like was signified by the murrain in Egypt, which was "upon the cattle in the field, upon the horses, upon the asses, upon the camels, upon herd and upon flock" (Exod. 9:2, 3).

[8] From these passages it is evident that by "camels" in the internal sense of the Word are signified the general memory-knowledges of the natural man. General memory-knowledges are those which include in themselves many particulars, and these singulars; and they form in general the natural man as to the intellectual part of it.

AC 3049. And every good of his lord was in his hand. That this signifies the goods and truths of these knowledges with the natural man, is evident from the signification of "every good of his lord," as being both good and truth; for in itself truth is good, because from good; and truth is the form of good, that is to say, when good is formed so as to be perceived intellectually, it is then called truth: and also from the signification of "hand," as being power (n. 878); "in his hand" therefore meaning that which he had. In themselves general memory-knowledges are not goods, nor are they alive; it is the affection of them that causes them to be goods, and to be alive; for when there is this affection they are for the sake of use; since no one is affected by any memory-knowledge or truth except for some use; use makes it a good; and such as the use is, such is the good.

AC 3050. And he arose. That this signifies elevation, is evident from the signification of "arising," as involving something of elevation wherever it is mentioned (n. 2401, 2785, 2912, 2927); here, that the Divine truth from memory-knowledges was to be initiated into the Divine good of the rational.

AC 3051. And went to Aram-naharaim. That this signifies the knowledges of truth therefrom, is evident from the signification of "Aram" or "Syria," as being the knowledges of good (n. 1232, 1234); but "Aram-naharaim," or "Syria-of-the-rivers," signifies the knowledges of truth, from naharaim or "rivers;" because "rivers" signify the intelligence which is of the knowledges of truth, as may be seen from the passages of the Word collected above (n. 108, 109, 2702); and from many others, concerning which, of the Lord‘s Divine mercy elsewhere.

AC 3052. To the city of Nahor. That this signifies kindred doctrinal things, is evident from the signification of a "city," as being doctrine (n. 402, 2449); and from the representation of "Nahor," as being what is akin; for Nahor was the brother of Abram, and from him came Bethuel, from whom was Rebekah. Memory-knowledges and doctrinal things are distinct from each other in this way doctrinal things come from memory-knowledges, for they look to use, and are procured from memory-knowledges by means of reflection. They are here said to be "kindred," by reason of their derivation from things Divine.

AC 3053. Verse 11. And he made the camels kneel down, without the city, by the well of waters, about the time of evening, about the time that the drawers go out. "He made the camels kneel down," signifies a holy disposing of general memory-knowledges; "without the city," signifies removal from doctrinal things; "by the well of waters," signifies for receiving the truths of faith; " about the time of evening," signifies a state of more obscurity at that time; "about the time that the drawers go out," signifies a state of instruction.

AC 3054. He made the camels kneel down. That this signifies a holy disposing of general memory-knowledges, is evident from the signification of "making to kneel down," as being to dispose themselves to what is holy; and from the signification of "camels," as being general memory-knowledges (n. 3048).

AC 3055. Without the city. That this signifies removal from doctrinal things, is evident from the signification of a "city," as being doctrine (n. 402, 2449); thus "without the city" evidently means outside of doctrinal things; thus removal from them.

AC 3056. About the time of evening. That this signifies a state of more obscurity at that time, is evident from the signification of "time," as being state (n. 2625, 2788, 2837); and from the signification of " evening" as being what is obscure; for "evening" in the Word signifies the state which precedes the last state of a church that is coming to its close, which last state is called "night;" and it also signifies the first state of a church just rising, which state is called "morning" (n. 2323); in either sense it denotes what is obscure, which is signified by "evening," but it here denotes the obscurity that precedes the morning.

AC 3057. About the time that the drawers go out. That this signifies a state of instruction, is evident from the signification of "time," as being state (n. 3056); and from the signification of a "drawer," that is, one who draws water, as being to be instructed, to be explained in what follows. What has now been told (n. 3054) is what is signified in the internal sense by the things related historically in this verse; but what these particulars involve in a series is not easily made plain to one who has not been instructed concerning the natural man, and concerning the memory-knowledges and doctrinal things therein, and also how truths are elevated therefrom into the rational, and become rational; and still less if he does not know what is the quality of the rational relatively to the natural, that is, the quality of the things in the rational relatively to those in the natural.

[2] The things in the rational are not apparent to man while he lives in the body; for those in the natural are what come to perception, and seldom those in the rational, except by a certain kind of light illuminating the things in the natural, or as an inflowing capacity by which the ideas of thought are disposed into order; and also as a faculty of perceiving that which the mind is considering. Unless these and other things be known, what is contained in this verse can with difficulty be explained to the apprehension,-as that there is a holy disposing of the general memory-knowledges, and then a removal from doctrinal things for receiving the truths of faith; and that when this is taking place there is an obscure state, and that such is the state of instruction. Nevertheless we may briefly state as much as can be apprehended, and here, how the case is with a man then he is being reformed by the Lord; for the reformation of a man is a kind of image of what took place with the Lord then He was in the world (n. 3043).

[3] When a man is being reformed, the general things in his natural man are disposed by the Lord to correspondence with those which are in heaven. What correspondence is, and that it is between spiritual things and natural things, may be seen above, (n. 2987, 2989-2991, 3002). General things are first disposed, in order that particulars may be successively insinuated into them by the Lord, and singulars into the particulars; for if the general things are not in order, there cannot come forth order in the particulars, because the particulars enter into the generals, and confirm them; still less can there be order in the singulars, because these enter into the particulars as into their generals, and illustrate them. These are the things that are meant by a holy disposing of general memory-knowledges; and this is meant in the internal sense by "making the camels kneel down;" for so they submit themselves for the reception of influx.

[4] When the general memory-knowledges are being disposed in this way, doctrinal things are removed, as they are conclusions from these knowledges; for there flows in through the rational as it were a dictate that this is true, and this not true; but in this way-that it is true because it agrees with the orderly disposition of the general memory-knowledges; and that it is not true because it disagrees; there is no other influx as to truths. Doctrinal things are indeed there before, but they are not doctrinal things until they are believed, but are merely memory-knowledges; and therefore when the man thinks about them, no conclusion is drawn from them, but only concerning them, from other things. This is what is meant by removal from doctrinal things, and it is what is herb signified in the internal sense by "without the city." But this is the state that is called an obscure state, and is signified by the "time of evening;" whereas when doctrinal things have been confirmed, so that they are believed, then comes the "morning," or a state of light. The other things contained in this verse are evident from what has been already stated.

AC 3058. That to "draw waters" signifies instruction, and likewise enlightenment from it, comes from the fact that in the internal sense "waters’ signify the truths of faith (n. 2702); and therefore to "draw waters" is nothing else than to be instructed in the truths of faith, and thereby to be enlightened. In Isaiah:--

With joy shall ye draw waters out of the fountains of salvation. In that day shall ye confess unto Jehovah (Isa. 12:3, 4).

To "draw waters" is to be instructed, to understand, and to be wise. Again:--

Bring ye waters to meet him that is thirsty, ye inhabitants of the land of Tema (Isaiah 21:14).

To "bring waters to meet him that is thirsty," means to instruct Again:--

The afflicted and the needy seek waters, and there are none, and their tongue faileth for thirst (Isaiah 41:17).

" They that seek waters," are they who desire to be instructed in truths. That "there are none," signifies that no one has truths. Moreover by the "drawers of water" were represented in the Jewish Church those who continually desire to know truths, but for no other end than to know them, while caring nothing for the use. Such were accounted among the lowest, and were represented by the Gibeonites concerning whom see (Joshua 9:21, 23, 27).

AC 3059. Verses 12-14. And he said, O Jehovah God of my lord Abraham, cause to meet I pray before me this day; and do mercy with my lord Abraham. Behold I stand by the fountain of waters; and the daughters of the men of the city come out to draw waters. And let it come to pass that the damsel to whom I shall say, Let down thy pitcher I pray thee that I may drink, and she shall say, Drink, and I will give thy camels drink also, her hast Thou appointed for Thy servant Isaac; and thereby shall I know that Thou hast done mercy with my lord. "He said," signifies communication; "Jehovah God of my lord Abraham," signifies of the Divine Itself which is the Father, with the Divine Human which is the Son; "cause to meet I pray before me this day,: signifies providence from eternity; "and do mercy," signifies an influx of love; "with my lord, Abraham," signifies the Divine Human. "Behold I stand by the fountain of waters," signifies the state of the conjunction of truth Divine with the Human; "and the daughters of the men of the city come out to draw waters," signifies the affections of truth, and instruction through them; "and let it come to pass that the damsel to whom I shall say," signifies an affection in which is innocence; "let down thy pitcher I pray thee," signifies the submission of memory-knowledges; "that I may drink," signifies instruction in truth therefrom; "and she shall say, Drink," signifies the reciprocal thereto; "and I will give thy camels drink also," signifies the consequent enlightenment of all the memory-knowledges in the natural man; "her hast Thou appointed for Thy servant Isaac," signifies the conjunction of truth Divine with Divine good in the rational; "and thereby shall I know that Thou hast done mercy with my lord," signifies that from the Divine love there is a marriage.

AC 3060. He said. That this signifies communication, is evident from the signification of "saying" in the historical portions of the Word, as being to perceive and to will (concerning which often before); and because it signifies these, it also signifies to communicate, for from perceiving and willing comes communication.

AC 3061. Jehovah God of my lord Abraham. That this signifies of the Divine Itself which is the Father, with the Divine Human which is the Son (that is, communication), is evident from what has been so often said and shown above, namely, that " Jehovah God" is the Divine Itself of the Lord, which is called the "Father;" and that by Abraham is represented His Divine Human (n. 2833, 2836). It may be seen above, that in the Word of the Old Testament "Jehovah" is the Lord Himself (n. 1736, 1815, 2921); and that the Most Ancient Church before the flood and the Ancient Church after the flood understood by "Jehovah" no other than the Lord (n. 1343, 1676, 1990, 2016, 3035). Also that in the Lord is the Trinity-the Divine Itself, the Divine Human, and the proceeding Divine Holy-and these are a one (n. 1999, 2149, 2156, 2288, 2329, 2447). That all the Trinity in the Lord is Jehovah (n. 2156, 2329); and that each and all things in the Lord are Jehovah (n. 1902, 1921). That the Lord is one with the Father, and that no other is understood in heaven by the Father (n. 14, 15, 1725, 1729, 1733, 1815, 2005, 2018, 2025, 2803, 3038). That the Lord is the universal heaven, for He is the all there and that from Him is the all of innocence, of peace, of love, of charity, of mercy, of conjugial love; and all good and truth. That Moses and the Prophets, thus the Word in every particular, is concerning Him; and that all the rites of the church represented Him (n. 2751). That the Lord as to the Divine Human is called the "Son" (n. 2628). That the Divine Human of the Lord was not only conceived, but was also born of His Divine Essence, which is Jehovah (n. 2798); and that thereby the Lord as to the Human was made Jehovah, and Life of Himself (n. 1603, 1737).

[2] That the Lord was from eternity, is plainly evident from the Word (n. 2803), although He was afterwards born in time; for He spake by Moses and the Prophets; He likewise had appeared to many, and it is there said that He was Jehovah. But this deepest of arcana could be revealed to none but those who are in Divine perception, thus to scarcely any but the men of the Most Ancient Church, who were celestial and in this perception. From these I have heard that Jehovah Himself was the Lord as to the Divine Human when He descended into heaven and flowed in through heaven; for heaven represents one man as to all his members, and is therefore also called the Grand Man (n. 684, 1276, 2996, 2998, 3021). The Divine Itself in heaven, that is, in the Grand Man, was the Divine Human, and was Jehovah Himself thus clothed with the Human.

[3] But when mankind became such that the Divine Itself, clothed as the Divine Human, could no longer affect them (that is, when Jehovah could no longer come to man, because man had so far removed himself), then Jehovah, who is the Lord as to the Divine Essence, descended and took upon Himself a Human, by conception Divine, and by birth from a virgin such as is that of another man; but this He expelled, and by Divine means made Divine the Human that was born, from which proceeds all the Holy. Thus the Divine Human became an essence by itself which fills the universal heaven, and which also makes it possible for those to be saved who could not be saved before. This then is the Lord, who as to the Divine Human is alone Man, and from whom man has it that he is man (n. 49, 288, 477, 565, 1894).

AC 3062. Cause to meet I pray before me this day. That this signifies providence from eternity, is evident from the signification of "causing to meet," as being to provide; and from the signification of "this day," as being from eternity (n. 2838) and moreover it is evident that what is here treated of, and for which supplication was made, is of Providence.

AC 3063. And do mercy. That this signifies an Influx of love, is evident from the essence of mercy, as being love. Love is itself turned to mercy and becomes mercy when anyone who is in need of help is regarded from love or charity; hence mercy is the effect of love toward the needy and miserable. But here by "mercy" in the internal sense is meant love; and by "doing mercy" is meant an influx of love, because it is from the Lord‘s Divine Itself into His Divine Human; for it was the Lord’s Divine love through which He made His Human Divine; for love is the very being of life, and no one has Divine love but the Lord. See what has been said before concerning the Lord‘s love, namely: That His life was love toward the universal human race, (n. 2253): That from this love He fought, (n. 1690, 1789, 1812, 1813, 1820): That it transcends all understanding, (n. 1799, 2077): That the Lord is Divine love itself, (n. 2077, 2500, 2572): That "Jehovah" is love, (n. 1735): That nothing lives but love, (n. 1589): That whoever has mutual love has the Lord’s life, (n. 1799, 1802, 1803): That love and charity are the celestial itself, (n. 1419, 1824).

AC 3064. With my lord Abraham. That this signifies the Divine Human, is evident from the representation of Abraham here, as being the Lord‘s Divine Human (n. 2833, 2836).

AC 3065. Behold I stand by the fountain of waters. That this signifies the state of conjunction of truth Divine in the Human, is evident from the signification of a "fountain," as being truth (n. 2702); here truth Divine, because the Lord is treated of. The state of conjunction itself is signified by "standing by the fountain;" that this conjunction was in the Human, is evident from the series.

AC 3066. And the daughters of the men of the city come out to draw waters. That this signifies the affections of truth and instruction through them, is evident from the signification of "daughters," as being affections (n. 489-491, 2362); and from the signification of "the men of the city," as being truths. The inhabitants of a city are frequently called in the Word the "men of the city," and frequently the "inhabitants of the city;" when they are called the "men of the city," truths are signified, and when they are called the "inhabitants," goods are signified; what "men" signify, may be seen above, (n. 265, 749, 915, 1007, 2517); and what "inhabitants," (n. 2268, 2451, 2712); what a "city," (n. 402, 2450, 2943). The signification of the above words is evident also from the signification of "drawing water," as being to be instructed (n. 3058). Hence it is evident that by the "daughters of the men of the city coming out to draw waters," are signified the affections of truth, and instruction through them. No one is ever instructed by means of truths, but by means of one affections of truth; for truths apart from affection do indeed come to the ear as sound, but do not enter into the memory; that which causes them to enter into the memory and to abide in it, is affection. For the good of affection is like soil, in which truths are sown as seeds; but such as the soil is (that is, such as the affection is), such is the produce of that which is sown. The end or use determines the (quality of the soil, or of the affection, and thus the quality of the produce of what is sown; or, if you prefer to say so, the love itself determines it; for in all things the love is the end and the use, for nothing is regarded as the end and use except that which is loved.

AC 3067. And let it come to pass, that the damsel to whom I shall say. That this signifies an affection in which is innocence, is evident from the signification of a " damsel." In the Word the affections of good and of truth are called "little children," " damsels," "girls," and "daughters;" but in all cases with a difference as to state: when "daughter" is named, affection in general is signified; when "girl" is named, affection in which is charity is signified; but when it is said damsel," affection in which is innocence is signified, because the age of girlhood is next to that of infancy, which in the internal sense is innocence. The case is the same with "boy," or "little boy," by which is signified a state in which is innocence (n. 430).

AC 3068. Let down thy pitcher, I pray thee. That this signifies the submission of memory-knowledges, is evident from the signification of "letting down," as being to submit; and from the signification of a "pitcher," as being memory-knowledges. That a "water-jar" or "pitcher" signifies memory-knowledges, comes from the fact that "water" signifies truth (n. 680, 739, 2702); and a pitcher is a vessel containing water, just as memory-knowledge is a vessel in which is truth; for every memory-knowledge is a vessel for truth, and every truth is a vessel for good. Memory-knowledge without truth is an empty vessel; and so too is truth without good; but memory-knowledge in which there is truth, and truth in which there is good, are full vessels. Affection which is of love is that which conjoins so that they may be within in order; for love is spiritual conjunction.

AC 3069. That I may drink. That this signifies instruction in truth therefrom, is evident from the signification of "drinking," as being to be instructed. In the Word throughout mention is made of "drinking;" and where the good and truth of faith are treated of, there "drinking" signifies being instructed in them and receiving them. As in Isaiah:--

The new wine shall mourn, the vine languisheth, all the glad of heart shall sigh they shall not drink wine with a song, strong drink shall be bitter to them that drink it (Isaiah 24:7, 9);

"not drinking wine with a song," denotes not being instructed from the affection of truth and not being delighted thereby; that "strong drink shall be bitter to them that drink it," denotes aversion. In the same:--

It shall be as when a thirsty one dreameth, and behold he drinketh; but he awaketh, and behold he is weary, and his soul hath appetite (Isaiah 29:8);

a "thirsty one" denotes one who desires to be instructed; "drinking," being instructed, but in things that are vain

[2] In Jeremiah:--

We have drunk our water for silver; our wood cometh for a price (Lam. 5:4)

"drinking waters for silver" denotes being instructed not with-out cost, and also attributing truth to one’s self. That it is given free of cost, and thus that it is not from one‘s self, but from the Lord, is thus taught in Isaiah:--

Ho every one that thirsteth, come ye to the waters, and be that hath no silver come ye, buy (Isa. 55:1).

Also in John:--

Jesus said, If anyone thirst, let him come unto Me and drink; whosoever believeth in Me, out of his belly shall flow rivers of living water (John 7:37, 38);

where by "drinking" is signified being instructed, and receiving. In Luke:--

They shall say, We did eat and drink in Thy presence, and Thou didst teach in our streets but the Lord says, I know you not whence ye are; depart from Me, all ye workers of iniquity (Luke 13:26, 27);

where "eating and drinking in the Lord’s presence," denotes instructing and preaching the good and truth of faith from knowledges that are from the Word, which is meant by the words, "Thou didst teach in our streets." But as they did this from themselves, for the sake of their own honor and gain, and thus from no affection of good and truth, and were thus in knowledges of truth but in a life of evil, it is said, "I know you not whence ye are; depart from Me all ye workers of iniquity."

[3] In the same:--

Jesus, speaking to the disciples, said, That ye may eat and drink at My table in My kingdom (Luke 22:30).

That they do not eat and drink in the kingdom of the Lord, and that there is no table there, is plain to every one; so that by "eating and drinking at the Lord‘s table in His kingdom," something else is signified, namely, enjoying the perception of good and truth. So too with what the Lord says in Matthew:--

I say unto you, that I will not drink henceforth of this product of the vine, until that day when I shall drink it with you in My Father’s kingdom (Matthew 26:29);

where "drinking" signifies instructing to the life concerning truths, and giving perception of good and truth. These words of the Lord:--

Be not anxious for your life (anima), what ye shall eat, or what ye shall drink, nor yet for your body, what ye shall put on (Matt. 6:25, 31; Luke 12:29);

are significative of spiritual things, namely, that the all of faith as to good and truth is given by the Lord. In John:--

Jesus said to the woman of Samaria, Every one that drinketh of this water shall thirst again but whosoever drinketh of the water that I shall give him shall never thirst but the water that I shall give him shall become in him a fountain of water springing up unto eternal life (John 4:7-14);

where "drinking" manifestly denotes being instructed in good and truth, and receiving them.

AC 3070. And she shall say, Drink. That this signifies the reciprocal thereto, is evident from its being a response, and confirmation, consequently what is reciprocal.

AC 3071. And I will give thy camels drink also. That this signifies the enlightenment of all memory-knowledges in the natural man therefrom, is evident from the signification of "camels," as being general memory-knowledges, thus these knowledges in general, or all (n. 3048); and from the signification of "giving to drink," as being to enlighten. That "drawing water" denotes to instruct, was shown above (n. 3058); thus to "give to drink" denotes to enlighten; for enlightenment comes from instruction.

AC 3072. Her hast Thou appointed for Thy servant Isaac. That this signifies the conjunction of truth Divine with Divine good in the rational, is evident from the signification of "appointing," that is to say, for a wife, as being to conjoin by a covenant of marriage and from the representation of Isaac, as being the Divine good of the rational (n. 3024). That "she," or Rebekah, represents the truth Divine that is to be conjoined with the Divine good of the rational, has been stated above in several places; and the same is evident from the particulars in the internal sense of this chapter.

AC 3073. And thereby shall I know that Thou hast done mercy with my lord. That this signifies that the marriage is from Divine love, is evident from the signification of "mercy," as here in the internal sense being the Divine love (n. 3063). And because the subject treated of is the betrothing of Rebekah to Isaac, that is, of the conjunction of Divine truth with the Divine good of the rational; by "doing mercy with my lord" nothing else is signified than a marriage, thus a marriage from Divine love. This also is the conclusion of his supplication, and the end that was had in view.

AC 3074. What is contained in these three verses in the internal sense, may in some measure be seen from the explication. But as these things are disconnected, that which they involve in their series cannot appear unless they are all collected together into a single idea, and the mental view is then withdrawn from the sense of the letter; for so long as the attention is there; not only is the idea confused, but the mind is also held in doubt; and so far as it is in doubt, it is obscured. A summary description is here given of the process in which truth appears by means of memory-knowledges, and is elevated from them out of the natural man into the rational, and becomes rational truth (in the Lord, Divine); namely, that this is effected by the influx of the Divine love into the Human, from which comes the affection of truth in which is innocence. By virtue of such an influx, the memory-knowledges in the natural man were enlightened, and the truths made their appearance that were to be elevated into the rational and there conjoined with the good of the Divine love. The same things are described more particularly in what follows. But he who does not know that all things in general and in particular are disposed, even in the natural man, by an influx of love, and from this of an affection in which there is innocence, can have but a very obscure idea, if any, of what was said above and of what has now been said.

AC 3075. Verses 15, 16. And it came to pass that scarcely had he done speaking, when behold Rebekah came out, who was born to Bethuel the son of Milcah, the wife of Nahor, Abraham‘s brother, with her pitcher upon her shoulder. And the damsel was exceeding good to look upon, a virgin, neither had any man known her; and she went down to the fountain, and filled her pitcher, and came up. "And it came to pass that scarcely had he done speaking,; signifies the effect of will; "when behold Rebekah came out," signifies the affection of truth from doctrinal things "who was born to Bethuel the son of Milcah, the wife of Nahor, Abraham’s brother," signifies all the origin of this affection "with her pitcher upon her shoulder," signifies receptions of truth, and endeavor; "and the damsel was exceeding good to look upon," signifies the beauty of the affection of truth; "a virgin, neither had any man known her," signifies pure from all falsity; "and she went down to the fountain," signifies truth Divine; "and filled her pitcher," signifies the vessels of reception; "and came up," signifies elevation.

AC 3076. And it came to pass that scarcely had he done speaking. That this signifies the effect of will, is evident from what immediately follows, that is, that all things in general and particular came to pass according to his prayer, or were accomplished as he wished. That "speaking" signifies willing may be seen above (n. 2626, 3037).

AC 3077. And behold Rebekah came out. That this signifies the affection of truth from doctrinal things, is evident from the representation of Rebekah, as being the truth Divine that was to be conjoined with the Divine good of the rational; but here, before she was betrothed, she puts on the representation of the affection of truth from doctrinal things; for from this comes truth, truth not being truth unless it has life, and its life is affection which is of love. That Rebekah represents the truth Divine that was to be conjoined with the Divine good of the rational, is evident from the several things contained in this chapter in the internal sense, and also from the fact that Isaac represents the Lord‘s Divine rational (n. 1893, 2066, 2083, 2630); thus Rebekah, who became wife to Isaac, represents that in the rational which was conjoined as a wife to a husband; and it may be seen that this is Divine truth. For in the same way Abraham represented the Divine good itself, and Sarah his wife the Divine truth itself conjoined with the Divine good (n. 1468, 1901, 2063, 2065, 2904); and it is the same with Isaac and Rebekah, but in the Lord’s Divine Human, namely, in His rational. In general, by a husband in the Word is signified good, and by a wife its truth (n. 1468, 2517). Moreover the essence of all marriage also (that is, conjugial love) is from the Divine marriage of good and truth, and of truth and good, in the Lord (n. 2508, 2618, 2728, 2729, 2803). That the affection of truth is from doctrinal things, is because it is said that she "came out," that is, from the city; and that by a "city" are signified doctrinal things, may be seen above (n. 402, 2451). Moreover truths are from doctrinal things.

AC 3078. Who was born to Bethuel the son of Milcah, the wife of Nahor, Abraham‘s brother. That this signifies all the origin of this affection, is evident from the representation of Bethuel, and also of Milcah, and of Nahor, and of Abraham. What each represents specifically cannot be set forth and presented to the apprehension, for the reason that the first affection of truth did indeed derive its origin from the Divine things acquired by the Lord in the natural man (n. 3019), but still things from the mother were there, which could not be separated in a moment, and the affection was from them also. The quality of this affection in its origin is described in the internal sense by the words, "born to Bethuel the son of Milcah, the wife of Nahor, Abraham’s brother."

[2] Every affection, although it appears simple and as one thing, nevertheless contains within it things so innumerable that it cannot be comprehended by any idea, still less be described; for in every affection there is the man‘s whole life that has been acquired from his infancy even to the time of life when he is in the affection; nay, there are other things besides, namely, those which he has inherited from father and mother, grandparents and great-grandparents; for the affection is the whole man such as he is. In the other life, by a manifestation of the affection there is sometimes presented to view how much there is in anyone of the love of self, and how much of the love of the world; and how much of the love of principles, and for what end and use; also how much of the love of good and truth, and what is the quality of that good and truth, and also how the good and truth are disposed, that is, how far conjoined, approximating, or separate; thus how much they agree or disagree with heavenly order. As just stated, all these things are presented to view by a manifestation of the affection, because the affection is the whole man. That such is the case appears incredible to man, and yet it is true.

AC 3079. With her pitcher upon her shoulder. That this signifies receptions of truth, and endeavor, is evident from the signification of a "pitcher," as being memory-knowledge, and thus a receptacle of truth (n. 3068); and from the signification of the "shoulder," as being all power, and thus endeavor (n. 1085). That "pitchers" or "water-jars," also vessels in general, signify in the internal sense things which are in the position of being a receptacle (as are memory-knowledges and knowledges in relation to truths, and as are truths themselves in relation to good), may be seen from many passages in the Word. The "vessels" of the temple and of the altar have no other signification, and because they signified such things they were also holy, their holiness being from no other source.

[2] And when Belshazzar, with his great men and his wives, was drinking wine out of the vessels of gold and of silver that Nebuchadnezzar his father had brought from the temple of Jerusalem, and they were praising the gods of gold, silver, brass, iron, wood, and stone, it was because of such signification of the vessels that the writing then appeared on the wall of his palace (Dan. 5:2). The "vessels of gold and of silver" denote the knowledges of good and truth, which were profaned; for the Chaldeans denote those who are in knowledges, but such as have been profaned by the falsities that are in them (n. 1368); so that the knowledges serve them to worship gods of gold and silver; for Belshazzar is called king of the chaldeans in this same chapter (Daniel 5:30).

[3] That "vessels" signify the externals of spiritual things, is also plain from other passages in the Word, as in Isaiah:--

As the sons of Israel bring their offering in a clean vessel into the house of Jehovah (Isa. 66:20);

where the Lord’s kingdom is treated of. The "offering in a clean vessel" is representative of the external man relatively to the internal; that which brings the gift is the internal man; the "clean vessel" is the external man that is in agreement, thus it denotes the things in the external man, which are memory-knowledges, knowledges, and doctrinal things.

[4] In Jeremiah:--

The cry of Jerusalem is gone up, and their nobles have sent their little ones to the waters; they came to the pits, they found no waters, they returned with their vessels empty, they are ashamed (Jer. 14:2, 3);

"empty vessels" denote knowledges wherein there is no truth, and also truths wherein there is no good. Again:--

Nebuchadnezzar king of Babel hath devoured me, he hath troubled me, he hath made me an empty vessel (Jer. 51:34);

where an "empty vessel" has a similar meaning. That it is Babel that lays waste, may be seen above (n. 1327). In Moses:--

As the valleys are they planted, as gardens by the river‘s side waters shall flow from his buckets, and his seed shall be at many waters (Num. 24:6, 7).

This is Balaam’s parable concerning Jacob and Israel; "waters flowing from his buckets," signify that truths flow from knowledges.

[5] In the parable of the ten virgins, five of whom took oil in their vessels with their lamps, while the foolish did not (Matt. 25:4), by the "virgins" are signified affections. That the wise "took oil in their vessels," denotes that there was good in truths, and thus charity in faith. That "oil" denotes good, may be seen above (n. 886); "lamps" denote love.

AC 3080. And the damsel was exceeding good to look upon. That this signifies the beauty of the affection of truth, is evident from the signification of a "damsel," as being an affection in which is innocence (n. 3067). That "exceeding good to look upon" signifies beauty (here the beauty of the affection of truth, because it is said of the damsel) comes from the fact that all beauty is from good in which there is innocence. Good itself when it flows in from the internal man into the external, makes beauty; and from this is all human beauty. This may likewise be seen from the fact that no one is affected by the face of another, but by the affection which beams forth from the face; and that they who are in good are affected by the affection of good which is there, and in the measure in which there is innocence in the good. Thus it is the spiritual in the natural which affects, but not the natural without the spiritual. In like manner they who are in good are affected by little children, who appear to them beautiful in proportion to the innocence of charity in their faces, gestures, and speech. That goodness and charity are what form and cause beauty, see (n. 553). Hence then it is that the "damsel exceeding good to look upon" signifies the beauty of the affection of truth in which there is good.

AC 3081. A virgin, neither had any man known her. That this signifies pure from all falsity, is evident from the signification of a "virgin." A "virgin" is often mentioned in the Word, and there signifies the Lord‘s kingdom, and likewise the church, and consequently every one who is a kingdom of the Lord or who is a church; and this from the conjugial love in chaste virgins. In the spiritual sense conjugial love is the affection of good in truth, and the affection of truth from good, from which affections, conjoined as it were in marriage, comes conjugial love (n. 2508, 2618, 2727-2729). And because as before said this is seen in a virgin, the kingdom of the Lord, which is also compared to marriage and is called a marriage, is called a "virgin." That by "a man had not known her," is signified pure from all falsity, is because by a "man" in the Word is signified not only rational truth, but also in the opposite sense falsity (n. 265, 749, 1007); thus to be "known by a man" is to be contaminated with falsity, and "not to be known by a man" is to be pure from falsity: by a "man" is not here meant a husband (vir conjugii).

[2] That by a "virgin" in the Word are signified those who are in the kingdom of the Lord, or what is the same, those in whom the kingdom of the Lord is, is evident in John:--

These are they who were not defiled with women, for they are virgins; these are they who follow the Lamb whithersoever He goeth, for they are without spot before the throne of God (Rev. 14:4, 5).

Here those are plainly called "virgins" who follow the Lamb, that is, who are in the Lord’s kingdom; and they are also said to be "without spot."

[3] In the proper sense, those are "virgins" who are in love to the Lord, that is, the celestial, and thus those who are in the affection of good. Those also are called "virgins" who are in charity toward the neighbor, that is, the spiritual, and thus who are in the affection of truth; as may be seen from passages in the Word. Thus in Isaiah:--

The virgin daughter of Zion hath despised thee, and hath mocked thee; the daughter of Jerusalem hath shaken her head after thee (Isa. 37:22).

This is said to the king of Asshur; the "virgin daughter of Zion" denotes the celestial church; the "daughter of Jerusalem," the spiritual church.

[4] In Jeremiah:--

Again will I build thee, and thou shalt be built, O virgin of Israel; again shalt thou deck thy timbrels, and shalt go forth in the dance of them that make merry. Their soul shall be as a watered garden; and they shall not sorrow any more at all. Then shall the virgin be glad in the dance, and the young men and the old together (Jer. 31:4, 12, 13).

The "virgin of Israel" denotes the spiritual church; the affection of truth from good in this church is described here, as in other places, by "timbrels and dances." In the same:--

The ways of Zion do mourn, her priests do sigh, her virgins are sad. The Lord hath trodden the winepress, for the virgin daughter of Judah. Behold my sorrow; my virgins and my young men are gone into captivity (Lam. 1:4, 15, 18).

"Virgins" denote the affections of good and of truth. And again in the same:--

The women in Zion were ravished, the virgins in the cities of Judah (Lam. 5:11).

Here the " virgins" denote the affections of good.

[5] In Amos:--

They shall run to and fro to seek the word of Jehovah, and shall not find it. In that day shall the fair virgins and the young men faint for thirst (Amos 8:12, 13).

The "fair virgins" denote the affections of truth; the "young men," truths, or what is the same, those who are in them; concerning these it is said that "they shall run to and fro to seek the word of Jehovah, and shall not find it," and consequently "they shall faint for thirst."

[6] In Zechariah:--

Jehovah their God shall preserve them in that day, as the flock of His people; for how great is His goodness and how great is His beauty: corn shall make the young men grow (germinare), and new wine the virgins (Zech. 9:16, 17);

"young men" denoting truths, and "virgins," affections. In David:--

The King‘s daughter is all glorious within; her clothing is of inweavings of gold. She is led unto the King in broidered work; the virgins, her companions, that follow her, are brought unto Thee (Ps. 45:13, 14).

The "King’s daughter" denotes the Lord‘s spiritual kingdom; the "virgins, her companions, that follow her," denote the affections of truth.

[7] In the same:--

They have seen Thy goings, O God, the goings of my God in, the sanctuary. The singers went before, the players on the harp followed after, in the midst of the damsels playing the timbrels (Ps. 68:24, 25).

The "damsels playing the timbrels" also denote the affections of truth, the term "virgin" being used in distinction from "damsel" to express innocence. "Virgins" are so called from conjugial love, and thus denote those who are in innocence; for conjugial love is innocence itself (n. 2736). In John therefore in the passage quoted from the Apocalypse, they are said to "follow the Lamb whithersoever He goeth;" for by the "Lamb" is meant the Lord as to innocence; and all who are in heaven are called "virgins" from the innocence which is in their good. According to the amount and quality of the innocence in good, they " follow the Lamb."

AC 3082. And she went down to the fountain. That this signifies Divine truth, is evident from the signification of the "fountain," as being Divine truth (n. 2702, 3065).

AC 3083. And filled her pitcher. That this signifies vessels of reception, is evident from the signification of a "pitcher," which being a vessel for the reception of water, is in the internal sense a recipient of the knowledges of truth, and also of truth itself, which is signified by "water." That "water" in the internal sense denotes knowledges, and also truth, see (n. 28, 680, 2680, 2702, 3058).

AC 3084. And came up. That this signifies elevation, is evident from the signification of "coming up," as being to be elevated. Being elevated is said of passing from what is lower to what is higher, and also therefore of passing from what is exterior to what is interior, which is the same thing; for what is lower or higher in a human idea is exterior or interior in the angelic idea; for instance, heaven, which appears to man higher, but to angels interior; and the natural with man--this is exterior relatively to his spiritual; and so again is the spiritual relatively to the celestial; or what is the same, memory-knowledge, which is of the natural man, is exterior relatively to truth, and truth is exterior relatively to good; and therefore memory-knowledge relatively to truth is called a veil and also clothing, and truth likewise is so called relatively to good; and it is from this that one is said to "go up" to Jerusalem, but to "go down" from Jerusalem; also to "go up from Jerusalem to Zion," and to "go down from Zion to Jerusalem;" for by what is round about Jerusalem are signified the exteriors of the church, but by Jerusalem the interiors, and by Zion the inmosts. As in the passage before us in the internal sense there is described the first of the elevation of truth out of the natural man to the rational, it is therefore said first that the affection of truth represented by Rebekah "went down to the fountain," and then that she "came up;" for, as before said (n. 3074), the Divine love flows into the affection of good and from this into the affection of truth, and vivifies and enlightens the things that are in the natural man, and then disposes them in order (this is signified by "going down"); and by virtue of this, truths are raised out of the natural man into the rational, and are conjoined with the good there (this is signified by "going up").

AC 3085. In these two verses is described the affection of truth as to origin, as to quality, and as to the first of initiation; as to origin, by the words, "Rebekah came out, who was born to Bethuel the son of Milcah, the wife of Nahor, Abraham’s brother," by which in the internal sense is set forth all the origin of this affection (n. 3077, 3078) as to quality, by the words, "her pitcher was upon her shoulder; and the damsel was exceeding good to look upon," by which is described the quality (n. 3079-3081); as to the first of initiation, by the words, "she went down to the fountain, and filled her pitcher, and came up" (n. 3082-3084).

[2] But as before said, these things are not only beyond ordinary apprehension, but are also beyond that of more cultivated men--that is to say, such things as are contained in the internal sense in this chapter and in some that follow. The reason of this is that it scarcely enters the mind of anyone that there is a continual Divine influx through the internal man into the external; that is, an influx of celestial and spiritual things through the rational man into the natural, or what is the same into the natural things of the external man; and that by this influx truths are continually called forth from the natural man, are elevated, and are implanted in the good which is in the rational. As it is not known that this takes place, how should all the process be known, and in what manner it is effected; a process of wisdom so great (because from the Divine) that it can never be explored as to a ten-thousandth part; the things that can be seen being only the most general?

[3] And as such is the case, let no one wonder that the things here contained in the internal sense cannot be described to the apprehension, and that what are described transcend the apprehension; for they treat of this process and describe it. And besides, the internal sense is principally for the angels; and this in order that through the Word there may be communication between heaven and man; and by the angels such things as are referred to above are accounted as things most delightful, because heavenly food is nothing else than all that which is of intelligence and wisdom; and to them the blessedness of wisdom and intelligence is whatever treats of the Lord.

AC 3086. That some idea, although a most general one, may be formed of what is here contained in the internal sense, be it known that this whole chapter treats of the truth Divine that has to be conjoined with the Divine good; to wit that Divine good flowed into the natural man, that is, into the memory-knowledges, the knowledges, and the doctrinal things therein, for these are of the natural man in so far as they are in its memory; and that by this influx it enlightened, vivified, and disposed into order all things therein; for all light, life, and order in the natural man are from influx from the Divine, as may be known to every one if he attends to it. By means of this influx there comes forth affection; first, the general affection of truth, treated of in these two verses in regard to its origin (n. 3077, 3078); its quality (n. 3079-3081); and the first of initiation (n. 3082-3084); but in the verses now immediately following, the process is further described in the internal sense, namely, the exploration of that truth, also the separation of the things from the mother, which at first were adjoined to it, and so on.

[2] But I know that these are arcana too deep to fall within apprehension; and this as before said for the reason that they are things unknown; but as the internal sense describes them, and this as to all their circumstances, they must needs be set forth, no matter how much they may appear to be above the apprehension. At the very least it may in this way be seen what great arcana there are in the internal sense of the Word; also that the arcana are such as scarcely to be seen in the light of the world, in which man is during his life in the body, but that they always appear more distinctly and clearly in proportion as man comes from the light of the world into the light of heaven, into which he comes after death; thus into the light in which blessed and happy souls are, that is, the angels.

AC 3087. Verses 17-20. And the servant ran to meet her, and said, Let me I pray sip a little water from thy pitcher. And she said, Drink, my lord; and she hasted, and let down her pitcher upon her hand, and made him drink. And she finished making him drink, and she said, I will draw for thy camels also, until they have done drinking. And she hasted, and emptied her pitcher into the trough, and ran again unto the well to draw, and drew for all his camels. "The servant ran to meet her, and said," signifies exploration from Divine good; "let me I pray sip a little water from thy pitcher," signifies inquiry whether anything of truth from this source can be conjoined; "and she said, Drink, my lord," signifies reciprocation; "and she hasted, and let down her pitcher upon her hand," signifies submission of the recipients from power; "and made him drink," signifies initiation. "And she finished making him drink," signifies what is successive; "and she said, I will draw for thy camels also, until they have done drinking," signifies reciprocation as to the enlightenment of all the memory-knowledges in the natural man. "And she hasted, and emptied her pitcher into the trough," signifies the separation of the affection of truth which was being initiated into Divine good; "and ran again unto the well," signifies a lower affection of truth "and drew for all his camels," signifies whereby the general memory-knowledges were enlightened.

AC 3088. The servant ran to meet her, and said. That this signifies exploration from Divine good, is evident from the signification of "running to meet her," as being an exploration as to whether the case was as he had spoken in his heart (the internal sense so dictates); also from the signification of "saying," as being to perceive (often shown before) and thud to explore. That this was from Divine good, is because the servant here acts in the stead of his lord, that is, of Abraham and also of Isaac; for he that is sent puts on the personality of him who sends. This is often the case in the Word, as when angels are spoken of who are first mentioned as angels and are afterwards called "Jehovah", as the angel who appeared to Moses in the bush, (Exod. 3:2, 4); and the angel that appeared to Gideon, (Judges 6:11, 12, 14). For the same reason Rebekah addresses him as "my lord" in the next verse.

AC 3089. Let me I pray sip a little water from thy pitcher. That this signifies inquiry whether anything of truth from this source could be conjoined, is evident from the signification of "sipping," as being similar to that of "drinking;" but diminutively, because exploring is implied. That "to drink", is to perceive, see (n. 3069). In the internal sense "to drink" also denotes to be communicated and to be conjoined, and is predicated of what is spiritual, as "to eat" is predicated of what is celestial (n. 2187, 2343). The same is further evident from the signification of "water," as being truth (n. 680, 739, 2702). Here therefore the words "let me I pray sip a little water from thy pitcher," signify exploring whether anything of truth from this source could be conjoined. The "pitcher" is the recipient, in which and out of which is truth (n. 3068, 3079). That there was an exploration is because the first affection of truth was attended with something from the maternal, which was to be separated (n. 3040, 3078). With a man about to be regenerated the case is that his first affection of truth is very impure; for there is in it an affection of use and an end for the sake of himself, for the sake of the world, for the sake of glory in heaven, and the like, which ends regard himself, but not the community, the Lord‘s kingdom, and still less the Lord. Such an affection necessarily precedes; nevertheless it is successively purified by the Lord, till at last falsities and evils are removed and are cast as it were into the circumference; and yet they had been of service as means.

AC 3090. And she said, Drink, my lord. That this signifies reciprocation, is evident from the assent or consent. What the reciprocation of truth is when it is to be conjoined with good, is apparent from marriages; for marriage comes from the fact that there is consent on both sides. This has its origin from the marriage of good and truth; on the side of good there is will, and on that of truth there is consent, and from this comes the conjunction. Although this reciprocation is not apparent with man when he is being regenerated, that is, when he is entering into the heavenly marriage, it nevertheless takes place. The same is more manifest from the fact that when a man is being regenerated, there is effected a likeness of a marriage between the will and the understanding; good being of the will, and truth of the understanding. Therefore the ancients instituted a marriage between the will and the understanding, and between the several things of the will and those of the understanding (n. 54, 55).

AC 3091. And she hasted, and let down her pitcher upon her hand. That this signifies submission of the recipients from power, is evident from the signification of "letting down," as being submission; from the signification of a "pitcher" being a recipient (n. 3068, 3079); and from the signification of the "hand," as being power (n. 878). The submission of the recipients, from power, consists in the doctrinal things, the knowledges, and the memory-knowledges, which are the recipients, (n. 3068, 3079), applying themselves. There is a chain of subordination, thus of application, and consequently of submission, from the First of life, or the Lord. As the things which are in a lower place ought to serve the higher, they must be in submission; for without their submission there is no conjunction. The "power" here spoken of is from truth; this causes the things which are below to submit. In the Word power is especially attributed to truth; and therefore the "hands," "arms," and "shoulders" (by which in the internal sense powers are signified) are predicated of truth (n. 878, 1085); and the power which appears to be from truth is itself from good, through truth.

AC 3092. And made him drink. That this signifies initiation, is evident from the signification of "giving to drink (potare), in that it is almost the same as that of "drinking (bibere);" but "drinking" here involves more activity on the part of him who drinks. That "drinking" is receiving, and also being conjoined, may be seen above (n. 3069, 3089); thus "making him drink (facere potare)" denotes to give an opportunity to receive, which is the first of initiation.

AC 3093. And she finished making him drink. That this signifies what is successive of initiation, is evident from the fact that "finished," or "to finish," involves the end of the act that precedes and the beginning of the act that follows, and thus what is successive; and also from the signification of "making to drink," as being to be initiated (n. 3092).

AC 3094. And she said, I will draw for thy camels also, until they have done drinking. That this signifies reciprocation as to the enlightenment of all the memory-knowledges in the natural man, is evident from the signification of "camels," as being general memory-knowledges in the natural man (n. 3048, 3071); and from the signification of "drawing," that is, "drawing water," as being to instruct and also to enlighten (n. 3058, 3071). It is evident that this is reciprocation because she said that she would do this, and also did it; that is, drew water for the camels. The enlightenment that is here treated of is on the part of truth, although it is from good through truth. As regards the enlightenment of memory-knowledges in the natural man the case is this: All enlightenment is from good for the good which is of love is comparatively as the sun’s flame, from which are heat and light; but truth is as the object through which the flame shines, by which there is enlightenment from light; and such as is the light therefrom, such is the enlightenment.

[2] There is nothing else that receives good but truth, and such as is the truth, such is the reception, and such is the consequent enlightenment. When therefore there is enlightenment by means of truth, the enlightenment appears to be from the truth, as if it were its own; although it is of good, which thus gives light through the truth. Moreover the enlightenment of good by means of truth penetrates still further, and affects more deeply, and produces a lower affection of truth, which will be spoken of presently. The light of heaven is from the Divine good of the Lord through His Divine truth; and because it is through the Divine truth in His Human, it penetrates not only to those who are celestial, but also to the spiritual, and enlightens with wisdom and intelligence all who are in heaven. And because this is the source of wisdom and intelligence, therefore the Divine good and the Divine truth in the Lord‘s Human are so much treated of in the internal sense of the Word; and in the present passage, this sense treats of the first enlightenment of truth from good, and of good through truth.

AC 3095. And she hasted and emptied her pitcher into the trough. That this signifies the separation of the affection of the truth which was being initiated into Divine good, is evident from the signification of "emptying the pitcher," as being to separate the truth; for by a "pitcher," as a containing vessel, is signified not merely the memory-knowledge in which is truth, but also the truth in which is good (n. 3068, 3079); and here, because initiation is treated of, it signifies the truth which was being initiated into Divine good. And because truth itself cannot possibly be conjoined with good except through its affection (n. 3024, 3066), for in affection is the life through which is conjunction, therefore here it is the affection of truth that is meant. The meaning of the passage is also evident from the signification of a "trough," or "watering place," as being the good of truth; for the water in the trough signifies truth (n. 739, 2702), and the trough itself signifies the same as wood, namely, good (n. 2784, 2812). The good of truth is that which is produced from good by means of truth, and is like an offspring born of truth as a mother, and of good as a father. All the genuine good in the natural man is from this, that is, from the marriage of good and truth in the rational. This good is that which is called the good of truth, and is signified in the Word by a "trough," or "watering place."

AC 3096. And she ran again unto the well to draw. That this signifies a lower affection of truth, is evident from the signification of a "well," as being truth (n. 2702), but truth that is lower; and as the initiation of truth is here treated of, a lower affection of truth is signified, as just said (n. 3094) The difference of signification in the internal sense between a "fountain" and a "well" may be seen in the number already cited (n. 2702), namely, that the term "fountain" is used when a purer and a higher truth is treated of, but "well" when a truth not so pure and also lower; as is the case in this chapter likewise, in which it is sometimes said a "fountain" and sometimes a "well." Natural truth is lower truth; and the affection of natural truth is a lower affection of truth; from this affection, proximately, are the general memory-knowledges enlightened; and that this enlightenment penetrates further and affects more deeply, see (n. 3094).

AC 3097. And drew for all his camels. That this signifies that general memory-knowledges were enlightened thereby, is evident from the signification of "drawing," as being to instruct, and also to enlighten (n. 3058, 3071); and from the signification of "camels," as being general memory-knowledges (n. 3048).

AC 3098. The things contained in the internal sense from (n. 3088) to this point, are also such as can be apprehended by those only who have been instructed concerning the internals of man, and who are in truths; for through truths and according to truths, comes enlightenment. The subject here is the first initiation of truth into good; for as before said good itself flows into the natural through the rational, thus by an internal way, and enlightens the things which are therein; whereas truth itself inflows into the natural through the sensuous part, especially that of hearing and sight, and thus by an external way. Truth has its rise from this source, as may be known to every one who reflects; but the conjunction of good and truth is not there, but is in the rational; therefore truth is called forth therefrom, thus out of the natural sphere into the spiritual; for the truth that is to be conjoined with good is spiritual. How the case is with the truth that is first called forth thence, is treated of in these verses (n. 3087-3097).

AC 3099. Verses 21, 22. And the man marveling at her, withheld himself, to know whether Jehovah had prospered his way or not. And it came to pass when the camels had done drinking, that the man took a jewel of gold, of half a shekel weight, and two bracelets for her hands, ten of gold their weight. "And the man marveling at her, withheld himself," signifies a state of perception as to those things; "to know whether Jehovah had prospered his way or not," signifies concerning Divine truth, what it was; "and it came to pass when the camels had done drinking," signifies acknowledgment from enlightenment in general memory-knowledges; "that the man took a jewel of gold," signifies Divine good; "of half a shekel weight," signifies sufficient for initiation; "and two bracelets," signifies Divine truth; "for her hands," signifies the power of the affection of truth; "ten of gold their weight," signifies what is full for initiation.

AC 3100. The man marveling at her, withheld himself. That this signifies a state of perception as to those things, is evident from the signification of "marveling," and of "withholding himself" (when he saw that those things which he spake in his heart had come to pass), as being somewhat of acknowledgment, and at the same time of waiting to see whether it was not so; for he marveled because he acknowledged that it had so come to pass, and he withheld himself because he waited to see whether it was not so; this is the state of perception which is signified.

AC 3101. To know whether Jehovah had prospered his way or not. That this signifies inquiry concerning Divine truth, what it was, is evident from the signification of a "way," as being truth (n. 627, 2333); whether it was Divine is signified by its being said "whether Jehovah had prospered it," which is the same as inquiring whether it was from Jehovah, or from the Divine, and thus what truth it was; for truths which are called forth from the natural man into the rational are not all received; but only those which agree with the good there, and thus by insemination and insertion act as one with it; the rest, although they had appeared as truths before they were elevated, still are not received, because they are not acknowledged. It is good that acknowledges its own truth, and it is truth that acknowledges its own good. That the truth was acknowledged for what it was, and that thus it was received, is also clear from what now follows.

AC 3102. And it came to pass when the camels had done drinking. That this signifies acknowledgment from enlightenment in general memory-knowledges, is evident from the fact that the two expressions, "it came to pass," and "had done," signify what is successive, and involve the end of the act that precedes and the beginning of the act that follows (n. 3093); here therefore they signify acknowledgment, as shown just above. The same is evident also from the signification of "camels," as being general memory-knowledges (n. 3048, 3071); and from the signification of "drinking," as being here the same as "drawing waters" (n. 3097), and also the same as "giving to drink" (n. 3058, 3071), namely, being enlightened. Hence it is evident that by these words, "and it came to pass when the camels had done drinking," is signified the acknowledgment of truth Divine from enlightenment in general memory-knowledges.

[2] The case is really this: Every truth that is elevated out of the natural man, that is, out of memory-knowledges (or out of knowledges and doctrinal things, for these are of the natural man) into the rational, and there received, must first be acknowledged for what it is, and whether it is in agreement with the good that is in the rational or not; if it is in agreement, it is received; and if not, it is rejected. There are many apparent truths in a single company; but only those are conjoined which acknowledge the good there, and thus which mutually love each other. In order however that they may be acknowledged to be such, there must be enlightenment in the natural man, by which all things there both in general and in particular may be seen at one view, and that thus there may be choice. This enlightenment in the natural man is from good, but still is by means of truth (n. 3094). It is this enlightenment that is signified by Rebekah’s drawing for the camels, and making them drink, or giving them to drink.

AC 3103. And the man took a jewel of gold. That this signifies Divine good, is evident from the signification of a "jewel of gold," as being good; and here, because in the internal sense the Lord is treated of, it signifies the Divine good; and because this is from the rational, the term "man (vir)" is used. That a "man" denotes the rational, see (n. 265, 749, 1007). In ancient times, when the forms of worship in churches were representative, and it was known what they signified, when marriages were being entered upon it was customary to give the bride a jewel of gold and bracelets, because the church was represented by the bride, its good by the jewel, and its truth by the bracelets; and because it was known that the conjugial love with the bride and the wife descends from the marriage of the Lord‘s Divine good and Divine truth (n. 2508, 2618, 2727-2729). The jewel of gold was put upon the nose, as is evident also from what is said afterwards, that he put the jewel upon her nose" (verse 47), for the reason that the nose signified the life of good, from the respiration there, which in the internal sense is life, and also from the fragrance, which is what is grateful to the love, the good of which it is (n. 96, 97).

[2] That the "jewel" was the badge of marriage as to good, is evident also from other passages of the Word, as in Ezekiel:--

I decked thee with ornaments, and I put bracelets upon thy hands, and a chain upon thy throat; and I put a jewel upon thy nose (Ezek. 16:11, 12);

concerning the Ancient Church, here called "Jerusalem," which is described as a bride, to whom were given bracelets, a chain, and a jewel. "Bracelets upon the hands" were a badge representative of truth; and a "jewel upon the nose" was a badge representative of good.

[3] In Isaiah:--

Because the daughters of Zion are haughty, the Lord will make bald the crown of their head, and will take away the rings, and the nose jewels, the changes of garments, and the mantles (Isa. 3:16-18, 21, 22).

The "daughters of Zion who are haughty," denote the affections of evil within the church (n. 2362, 3024); the "rings and the nose jewels which will be removed," denote good and its badges; the "changes of garments and the mantles," truth and its badges.

[4] In Hosea:--

I will visit upon her the days of the Baalim to which she burned incense; and she put on her nose jewel and her ornaments, and went after her lovers (Hosea 2:13);

treating of the perverted church, and the new church after it. The "nose jewel" here also denotes a badge of the good of the church. When these jewels were fitted to the ears, they also signified good, but good in act; and in the opposite sense evil in act (Gen. 35:4; Exod. 32:2, 3).

AC 3104. Of half a shekel weight. That this signifies sufficient for initiation, is evident from the signification of a "shekel," a "half shekel," and "weight." That a "shekel" is the price or estimation of good and truth, and that a "half shekel" is the determination of its quantity, see (n. 2959). That "weight" signifies the state of a thing as to good will be seen presently; and thus it is evident that "of half a shekel weight" signifies and involves the quantity in respect to the good meant by the jewel of gold. That it is for initiation, follows from what precedes and follows.

[2] That "weight" is the state of a thing as to good, is evident from the following passages of the Word. In Ezekiel:--

The prophet was to eat food by weight, twenty shekels a day; and was to drink water by measure, the sixth part of a hin; for behold, I will break the staff of bread in Jerusalem, and they shall eat bread by weight and with anxiety, and they shall drink water by measure and with astonishment, that they may want bread and water (Ezek. 4:10, 11, 16, 17).

Here the vastation of good and of truth is treated of, a representation of which was made by the prophet. The state of vastated good is signified by their,"eating food and bread by weight;" and the state of vastated truth by their "drinking water by measure". That "bread" is the celestial, and thus is good, see (n. 276, 680, 1165, 2177); also that "water" is the spiritual, and thus is truth, (n. 739, 2702, 3058); hence it is evident that "weight" is predicated of good, and "measure" of truth.

[3] Again:--

There shall be balances of justice, and an ephah of justice, and a bath of justice (Ezek. 45:10).

This is said of the holy land, by which is signified the Lord’s kingdom in the heavens, as may be known from the several particulars there mentioned by the prophet; where there will be no balances, ephah, and bath, but goods and truths which are signified by these weights and measures. In Isaiah:--

Who hath measured the waters in the hollow of his hand, and hath made ready the heavens with the palm of his hand, and hath comprehended the dust of the earth in a measure, and weighed the mountains in scales, and the hills in a balance? (Isa. 40:12).

To "weigh the mountains in scales, and the hills in a balance," denotes that from the Lord are the celestial things of love and charity, and that He alone disposes their states. That "mountains and hills," concerning which such weights are predicated, are the celestial things of love, see (n. 795, 796, 1430, 2722).

[4] In Daniel:--

The writing upon the wall of the palace of Belshazzar was, Mene, Mene, Tekel, Upharsin. This is the interpretation: Mene, God hath numbered thy kingdom, and finished it; Tekel, thou art weighed in the balances, and art found wanting; Peres, thy kingdom is divided and given to the Mede and the Persian (Daniel 5:25-28);

where mene or "hath numbered," is predicated of truth; while tekel or "weighed in the balances" is predicated of good; in the internal sense consummation is treated of.

AC 3105. And two bracelets. That this signifies Divine truth, is evident from the signification of "bracelets," as being truth, here Divine truth, because the Lord is treated of in the internal sense; they are said to have been "two," to denote fullness. Bracelets were placed on the hands of a bride, because by a bride was signified the church, and by her hands were signified powers from truth. That "hands" are predicated of truth, see (n. 3091). That "bracelets" have such a signification, see (Ezek. 16:11; 23:42); (n. 3103). Bracelets were not only for a bride, but also for a king, but for a king they were on the arm, as appears in (2 Sam. 1:10), for the reason that royalty was representative and significative of Divine truth pertaining to the Lord (n. 1672, 1728, 2015, 2069, 3009); and the "arm" is significative of power (n. 878).

AC 3106. For her hands. That this signifies the power of the affection of truth, is evident from the signification of a " hand," as being power (n. 878, 3091); and from the representation of Rebekah--here meant by "her"--as being the affection of truth (n. 2865, 3077).

AC 3107. Ten of gold their weight. That this signifies what is full for initiation, is evident from the signification of "ten," as being a full state, like a "hundred" (n. 1988, 2636); and from the signification of "gold," which is here a kind of coin from the weight of which the valuation was made; and from the signification of "weight," as being the state of a thing as to good (n. 3104). Hence it is evident that "ten of gold their weight" signifies a full state of what is estimated, as to good. That it is for initiation, is evident from the several particulars in this chapter in which initiation is treated of, that is, betrothal.

AC 3108. These two verses treat of the initiation of truth into good; but what is the nature of this initiation does not easily fall into the idea of thought with anyone who has been enlightened only by such things as are of the light of the world, and not at the same time by such things as are of the light of heaven, from which light the things which are of the light of the world may themselves be enlightened. They who are not in good, and thence in faith, have no other ideas of thought than those which have been formed from objects of the light of the world. These do not know that there is anything spiritual, nor indeed what the rational is in the genuine sense, but only the natural to which they attribute all things; and this is the reason why these things which are said in the internal sense concerning the initiation of truth into good, are to them too remote to appear to amount to anything; when yet to those who are in the light of heaven these are among their precious things. As regards the initiation of truth into good the case is this: Before truth has been initiated and rightly conjoined, it is indeed with man, but it has not been made as it were of him, or as his own; but as soon as it is being initiated into his good, it is appropriated to him; and it then vanishes from his external memory, and passes into the internal memory; or what is the same, it vanishes from the natural or external man, and passes into the rational or internal man, and puts on the very man, and makes his human, that is, his quality as to the human. much is the case with all truth that is being conjoined with a man‘s good; such also is the case with the falsity that is being conjoined with evil which he calls good; but the difference is that the former opens the rational, and so makes the man rational; whereas the latter closes the rational and makes the man irrational; although he seems to himself, in the darkness in which he then is, to be pre-eminently rational.

AC 3109. Verses 23-25. And he said, Whose daughter art thou? Tell me I pray is there room in thy father’s house for us to pass the night? And she said unto him, I am the daughter of Bethuel the son of Milcah, whom she bare unto Nahor. And she said unto him, We have both straw and much provender, also room to pass the night. "He said, Whose daughter art thou?" signifies further exploration concerning innocence; "tell me I pray is there room in thy father‘s house for us to pass the night;" signifies exploration concerning the good of charity; "and she said unto him, I am the daughter of Bethuel the son of Milcah, whom she bare unto Nahor," signifies here as above the whole of its origin; "and she said unto him," signifies perception; "we have both straw," signifies truths in the form of memory-knowledge; "and much provender," signifies their goods; "also room to pass the night," signifies the state.

AC 3110. He said, Whose daughter art thou? That this signifies further exploration concerning innocence, is evident from the question, "Whose daughter art thou?" as being exploration; that here it is further exploration, is evident from what has been said above (n. 3088, 3101). That it was exploration concerning innocence, is evident from the signification of a damsel, as being an affection in which is innocence (n. 3067). In this verse indeed the word "damsel" is not found; but in (verses 14 and 16) Rebekah is called a damsel, and the question is here addressed to her, therefore "thou" here means nothing else than damsel.

[2] As regards the thing itself here treated of, namely, that truth was explored as to who innocence it had, and then also as to what charity, before it was initiated into good and conjoined with it, this cannot but appear wonderful to those who have no knowledge of the subject; but still let them know that in regard to the initiation and conjunction of truth with good in every man there is the most exquisite exploration, and such as surpasses all belief. To the veriest good there is never admitted anything but the veriest truth; for when anything not so true approaches, it does not conjoin itself with good itself, but with some good that in itself is not good, but appears as good; if falsity approaches, the good withdraws itself inward, and the falsity conjoins itself outwardly with some evil which it believes to be good.

[3] This Divine disposal is effected by the Lord, spirits and angels being the mediums; and in this world it is very secret, but it is perfectly well known in the other. Moreover every one who is of sound reason is able to know it, or at least to have some apprehension of it; for evil and falsity together are hell, and flow in from hell; whereas good and truth together are heaven, and also flow in through heaven from the Lord; and since this is so, evil and truth can no more be joined together than can hell and heaven; wherefore there is a more exquisite balance applied in these things than it is possible for anyone to believe; and this is what is meant by exploration.

AC 3111. Tell me I pray is there room in thy father’s house for us to pass the night? That this signifies exploration concerning the good of charity, is evident from the signification of "tell me I pray is there," as being exploration; from the signification of a "house," as being good (n. 2048, 2233, 2331); and from the signification of "father," in this case, Bethuel, as being the good of charity such as there is with the better Gentiles (n. 2865)--the very origin of the affection of truth represented by Rebekah being from such good--and from the signification of "room to pass the night," as being a state of "abiding" (n. 3115).

[2] That there is in the internal sense a description of the exploration concerning the origin of the affection of truth as to innocence and the good of charity, is for the reason that the truth which is to be initiated and conjoined with good derives its first origin from no other source, as may be seen from all those with whom truth is received and wedded to good. Within the church, they who have not some measure of innocence and of charity toward the neighbor, howsoever they may be acquainted with truth and profess it with the lips, yet in no wise do they acknowledge it at heart. Outside of the church, among the Gentiles who are called to the truth of faith, or are instructed concerning it in the other life, no others receive it than those who are in innocence, and who live together in mutual charity; for innocence and charity produce the ground in which the seeds of faith can take root and grow.

AC 3112. And she said unto him, I am the daughter of Bethuel the son of Milcah, whom she bare unto Nahor. That this signifies the whole of its origin, that is, the whole of the origin of the affection of truth, is evident from the representation of Bethuel, and also of Milcah and of Nahor, as being the origin of the affection of truth, which is represented by Rebekah (n. 3078).

AC 3113. And she said unto him. That this signifies perception, is evident from the signification in the historical parts of the Word of "saying," as being in the internal sense to perceive, as frequently shown above.

AC 3114. We have both straw and much provender. That "straw" signifies truths in the form of memory-knowledge, and that "much provender" signifies their goods, is evident from the signification of "straw" and of provender." That "straw" signifies these truths, is because it is spoken of as being the food of camels; for when by "camels" is signified the natural man as to the general memory-knowledges therein, then by their food, namely, by straw, nothing else than these can be signified; for the natural man has no other food which is the food of its life, seeing that its nourishment is from such truths; for if such food should fail it, that is, knowing, it would not continue to exist. That this is the case, is evident from the life after death; for then such things are to spirits in place of food (n. 56-58, 680, 681, 1480, 1695, 1973, 1974). In the natural man, as in the rational, there are two classes of things in general which constitute its essence, namely, those of the understanding and those of the will. To the things of the understanding pertain truths; to those of the will pertain goods. The truths of the natural man are truths in the form of memory-knowledge, that is, whatever things are in his external memory; these are what are signified by "straw," when camels, and also when horses, mules, and asses are treated of. But the goods of the natural man are delights, chiefly those of the affection of such truths.

AC 3115. Also room to pass the night. That this signifies the state, is evident from the signification of "room," as being state (n. 2625, 2837); and from the signification of "passing the night," as being to abide or have an abode (n. 2330); here therefore there is signified the state of the affection of truth, in regard to its origin. Its origin is described by the things represented by Bethuel, Milcah, and Nahor; and its relationships by "Laban" in the verses that follow. And because this origin was obscure, its state is signified by "room to pass the night," as also above.

AC 3116. These three verses treat of the exploration of the truth which is to be initiated and thus conjoined with good; and this indeed especially in regard to its origin, for on the origin depend all things in general and in particular; from it the derived things have their form, as from their root, or their seed, as a plant or a tree has from its root or seed. These truths the Lord saw and explored in Himself from the Divine, and from His own wisdom and intelligence initiated; that is to say He initiated truths into the good of the rational. The exploration itself is here described in the internal sense; but the things contained therein can be explained only very briefly. Exploration takes place likewise with every man who is being reformed, and also with every one who receives remains; but of this exploration the man knows nothing at all; it is so entirely in obscurity with him that he does not even believe that there is any; when yet it is taking place every moment, but from the Lord, who alone sees man‘s state--not only his present state, but also his future state to eternity. The exploration is a most exquisite balancing, to prevent even the least of falsity from being conjoined with good, and the least of truth from being conjoined with evil; for if there should be such conjunction, the man would perish eternally; because then in the other life he would hang between hell and heaven; and by reason of the good he would be spewed out from hell, and by reason of the evil from heaven.

AC 3117. Verses 26, 27. And the man bent himself and bowed himself down to Jehovah; and he said, Blessed be Jehovah the God of my lord Abraham, who hath not forsaken His mercy and His truth from my lord; I being in the way, Jehovah hath led me to the house of my lord’s brethren. "The man bent himself, and bowed himself down to Jehovah," signifies gladness and joy; "and he said, blessed be Jehovah the God of my lord Abraham," signifies here as before, from the Divine Itself and the Divine Human; "who hath not forsaken His mercy," signifies a perception of the influx of love; "and His truth from my lord," signifies the influx of charity therefrom; "I being in the way," signifies in a state of the conjunction of truth with good in the rational; "Jehovah hath led me to the house of my lord‘s brethren," signifies to the good of truth.

AC 3118. The man bent himself, and bowed himself to Jehovah. That this signifies gladness and joy, is evident from the signification of "bending himself," and of "bowing himself down," as denoting to be glad and to rejoice. Bending and bowing down are gestures of humiliation, that is, they are humiliation in act, whether in a state of grief or in a state of joy--in a state of grief when that which is wished for does not come to pass, but in a state of joy when it does come to pass; as in this case, that Rebekah, according to the vow of his heart, gave him to drink out of her pitcher, and made his camels drink also. That "bowing down" is a gesture of joy also, see (n. 2927, 2950). The term gladness is used, and also "joy," for the reason that in the Word "gladness" is predicated of truth, and "joy" of good. Moreover gladness is of the countenance, but joy of the heart; or what is the same, gladness is of spiritual affection or of truth, but joy is of celestial affection or of good; thus gladness is in a degree less than joy, as bending is likewise less than bowing down; which is also evident from the fact that the man of the spiritual church merely bends himself before the Lord, and invokes grace; whereas the man of the celestial church bows himself down before the Lord and implores mercy (n. 598, 981, 2423). Both terms are used by reason of the marriage of truth and good in every single thing of the Word (n. 683, 793, 801, 2516, 2712).

AC 3119. And he said, Blessed be Jehovah the God of my lord Abraham. That this signifies from the Divine Itself and the Divine Human, is evident from what was said above (n. 3061), where the same words occur, except that the word "blessed" is here added. "Blessed be Jehovah" was a form of thanksgiving, thus also of joy and gladness, when wished-for events took place. What the ancients meant by "blessing Jehovah," see (n. 1096, 1422).

AC 3120. Who hath not forsaken His mercy. That this signifies a perception of the influx of love, is evident from the signification of "mercy," as being love (n. 1735, 3063, 3073). That "who hath not forsaken His mercy" signifies a perception of the influx of love, is because these are words of acknowledgment and confession; and all acknowledgment and confession are from the perception of influx.

AC 3121. And His truth from my lord. That this signifies an influx of charity therefrom, is evident from the signification of "truth," as being charity. "Truth" in its proper sense signifies the same as "faith," and in the Hebrew language faith is expressed by a like word; so that what is called "truth" in the Word of the Old Testament is in various places called "faith" in the Word of the New Testament; and for this reason also it has been so often said in the foregoing pages that truth is of faith and good is of love. And yet that in the internal sense faith is nothing else than charity, may be seen from what has been said and shown above in many places--as that there is no faith except by love (n. 30-38): That no faith is possible except where there is charity (n. 654, 724, 1162, 1176, 2261): That faith is the faith of charity (n. 1608, 2049, 2116, 2343, 2349, 2419): That charity makes the church, not faith separate from charity (n. 809, 916, 1798, 1799, 1834, 1844, 2190, 2228, 2442). From all this it is evident that in the internal sense truth or faith is the same as charity; for all faith is from charity; the faith which is not from charity not being faith; or what is the same, in the internal sense all truth is good; for all truth is from good, and the truth which is not from good is not truth, truth being nothing else than the form of good (n. 3049); its birth is from no other source, and its life is from no other.

AC 3122. Moreover in regard to this truth by which is signified charity, the case is this: The most ancient people, who were celestial, by mercy and truth from the Lord understood nothing else than the reception of the influx of love to the Lord, and of the derivative charity toward the neighbor. But the ancients, who were spiritual, by the mercy and truth from the Lord with themselves, understood charity and faith; the reason of which is, that the celestial never thought concerning those things which are of faith or truth, but concerning those which are of love or good, as may be seen from what has been said above concerning the celestial man (n. 202, 337, 2669, 2715). Moreover celestial men when being reformed and regenerated were introduced into love to the Lord through charity toward the neighbor. It is evident therefore that by "mercy from the Lord" nothing else is signified than a perception of the influx of love to Him; and by "truth," a derivative influx of charity toward the neighbor.

[2] But it is otherwise with the spiritual; these think concerning the things of faith; and when being reformed and regenerated they are introduced by means of the things of faith into charity toward the neighbor. And therefore when the spiritual are treated of, by "mercy from the Lord" is meant an influx of charity toward the neighbor; and by "truth" is meant an influx of faith. But still this faith, when the spiritual man has been regenerated, becomes charity; for be then acts from charity; insomuch that one who does not act from charity is not regenerate, but he who acts from charity is regenerate; and in this case he is not solicitous about the things of faith or truth, for he lives from the good of faith, and no longer from its truth; for truth has so conjoined itself with good that it no longer appears, except merely as the form of charity.

[3] From what has been said we can see what the most ancient people, and what the ancients, understood by "mercy and truth," so frequently mentioned in the Word. As in David:--

The king shall dwell before God forever; O prepare mercy and truth, that they may preserve him (Ps. 61:7).

Again:--

Mercy and truth shall meet together, righteousness and peace shall kiss each other (Ps. 85:10).

Again:--

Thou O Lord art a God great in mercy and truth (Ps. 86:15).

Again:--

My truth and My mercy shall be with Him (Ps. 89:24).

Again:--

Jehovah hath remembered His mercy and His truth toward the house of Israel (Ps. 98:3).

Again:--

O Jehovah, not unto us, but unto Thy name give glory, for Thy mercy and for Thy truth’s sake (Ps. 115:1).

In Micah:--

Jehovah God will give the truth to Jacob, the mercy to Abraham, which Thou hast sworn unto our fathers from the days of old (Micah 7:20);

where "Jacob" denotes the Lord‘s external man, and "Abraham" the internal, as to the Human. In Hosea:--

Jehovah hath a controversy with the inhabitants of the land, because there is no truth, and no mercy, and no knowledge of God (Hosea 4:1).

"No truth" denotes no reception of the influx of charity; "no mercy," no reception of the influx of love; "no knowledge of God," no reception of the influx of the truth of faith.

AC 3123. I being in the way. That this signifies in a state of the conjunction of truth with good in the rational, is evident from the signification of a "way," as being truth (n. 627, 2333). That "in the way" here denotes the conjunction of truth with good in the rational, is because this is the subject treated of in this chapter (n. 3012, 3013); for one is said to be "in the way" when he is making progress toward the place to which he intends to go.

AC 3124. Jehovah hath led me to the house of my lords brethren. That this signifies to the good of truth, is evident from the signification of the "house of the brethren," of which was Rebekah, as being the good from which is the truth. That the "house of the brethren" is good, here the good from which is the truth, is evident from the signification of a "house," as being good (n. 2233, 2234, 2559); and of "brethren," as being the origin of that good from which is the truth represented by Rebekah.

AC 3125. The foregoing verses treat of the exploration of the truth which was to be conjoined with good in the rational, in regard to innocence, to charity, and to origin. For inasmuch as the Lord, by His own proper power, made His rational Divine in respect to truth as well as in respect to good, He therefore explored the truth which He conjoined with good. But with men, truth is never conjoined with good by their own power, but by the power of the Lord; which may be seen from the fact that all good and truth flow in from the Lord, and that all reformation and regeneration are from the Lord, and that man does not know one whit of how he is regenerated. At the present day he does not even know that he is regenerated by truth and good, still less that truth is initiated and conjoined with good, and that this is effected as by exploration, that is, most exactly. These two verses treat of perception in regard to the quality of truth, and whence it was; and at the same time of joy because of it. Therefore in what now follows the initiation is treated of.

AC 3126. Verses 28-30. And the damsel ran, and told her mother’s house according to these words. And Rebekah had a brother, and his name was Laban; and Laban ran out of doors unto the man, unto the fountain; and it came to pass when he saw the jewel, and the bracelets upon his sisters hands, and when he heard the words of Rebekah his sister, saying, Thus spake the man unto me; that he came unto the man; and behold he stood by the camels at the fountain. "And the damsel ran," signifies the desire (animus) of that affection; "and told her mother‘s house according to these words," signifies toward natural good of every kind whithersoever enlightenment could reach; and Rebekah had a brother," signifies the affection of good in the natural man; "and his name was Laban," signifies the quality of that affection; "and Laban ran out of doors unto the man, unto the fountain," signifies its desire (animus) toward the truth which was to be initiated into truth Divine; "and it came to pass when he saw the jewel, and the bracelets upon his sister’s hands," signifies when it was observed that Divine good and Divine truth were in the power of the affection of truth which is the "sister;" "and when he heard the words of Rebekah his sister," signifies the inclination of that affection; "saying, Thus spake the man unto me," signifies the propensity or inclination of truth in the natural man; "that he came unto the man," signifies that it adjoined itself; "and behold he stood by the camels," signifies presence in general memory-knowledges; "at the fountain," signifies their enlightenment from truth Divine.

AC 3127. The damsel ran. That this signifies the desire (animus) of that affection, is evident from the signification of "running," as meaning that which is of the inclination or of the desire; and from the signification of a "damsel," as being an affection in which is innocence (n. 3067, 3110).

AC 3128. And told her mother‘s house according to these words. That this signifies toward natural good of every kind whithersoever enlightenment could reach, is evident from the signification of the "mother’s house," as being the good of the external man, that is, natural good. That a "house" denotes good, see (n. 2233, 2234, 2559); also that man‘s external or natural is from the mother, but the internal from the father, (n. 1815). The good with man is compared in the Word to a "house," and on this account a man who is in good is called a "house of God;" but internal good is called the "father’s house," and the good that is in the same degree is called the "house of the brethren;" but external good, which is the same as natural good, is called the "mother‘s house." Moreover all good and truth are born in this manner, namely, by the influx of internal good as of a father into external good as of a mother.

[2] As this verse treats of the origin of the truth which is to be conjoined with good in the rational, it is therefore said that Rebekah (by whom this truth is represented) ran to the house of her mother, for that was the origin of this truth. For as before said and shown, all good flows in by an internal way (that is, by the way of the soul) into man’s rational, and through this into his faculty of knowing, even into that which is of the senses; and by enlightenment there it causes truths to be seen. Truths are called forth thence, and are divested of their natural form, and are conjoined with good in the midway, that is, in the rational, and at the same time they make the man rational, and at last spiritual. But how these things are accomplished is utterly unknown to man; because at this day it is scarcely known what good is, and that it is distinct from truth; still less that man is reformed by means of the influx of good into truth, and by the conjunction of the two; neither is it known that the rational is distinct from the natural. And when these things, which are most general, are not known, it cannot possibly be known how the initiation of truth into good, and the conjunction of the two, is effected--which are the subjects treated of in this chapter in its internal sense. But whereas these arcana have been revealed, and are manifest to those who are in good, that is, who are angelic minds, therefore however obscure they may appear to others, they nevertheless are to be set forth, because they are in the internal sense.

[3] Concerning the enlightenment from good through truth in the natural man, which is here called the "mother‘s house," the case is this: Divine good with man inflows into his rational, and through the rational into his natural, and indeed into its memory-knowledges, that is, into the knowledges and doctrinal things therein, as before said; and there by a fitting of itself in, it forms truths for itself, through which it then enlightens all things that are in the natural man. But if the life of the natural man is such that it does not receive the Divine good, but either repels it, or perverts it, or suffocates it, then the Divine good cannot be fitted in, thus it cannot form for itself truths; and consequently the natural can no longer he enlightened; for enlightenment in the natural man is effected from good through truths; and when there is no longer enlightenment, there can be no reformation. This is the reason why in the internal sense the natural man also is much treated of in regard to its quality; thus whence truth is, namely, that it is from good there.

AC 3129. And Rebekah had a brother. That this signifies the affection of good in the natural man, is evident from the signification of a "brother" and a "sister" in the Word, namely, that a "brother" is the affection of good, and a "sister" is the affection of truth (n. 367, 2360, 2508, 2524); for in the natural man, as in the rational, there are relationships by both blood and marriage of all the things therein (n. 2556, 2739). And it also is from this that the mind, both the rational and the natural, is called a "house" (or family), where parents, brothers, sisters, kinsmen, and other relatives exist in order.

AC 3130. And his name was Laban. That this signifies the quality of that affection, is evident from the signification of name," as being the quality of anyone (n. 144, 145, 1754, 1896, 2009, 2724). "Laban" therefore is the quality of that affection which is here treated of.

AC 3131. And Laban ran out of doors unto the man, unto the fountain. That this signifies its desire, that is, the desire of the affection of good, toward the truth which was to be initiated into truth Divine, is evident from the signification of running," as manifesting the inclination or desire (n. 3127); from the representation of Laban, as being the affection of good (n. 3129, 3130); from the signification of "the man," as being truth (n. 265, 749, 1007); and from the signification of a "fountain," as also being truth, here truth Divine (n. 2702, 3096, 3137).

[2] From these and from the other things here treated of, we can see what is the quality of the internal sense, and what arcana there are in it. Who could know, except from an interior searching of the Word, and at the same time from revelation, that these words, "Laban ran out of doors unto the man, unto the fountain," signify the desire of the affection of good toward the truth that was to be initiated into truth Divine? And yet this is what the angels perceive when these words are read by man; for such are the correspondences between a man’s ideas and an angel‘s that while the man takes these words according to the sense of the letter, and has the idea of Laban as running out of doors to the man unto the fountain, the angel perceives the desire of the affection of good toward the truth which was to be initiated into truth Divine. For the angels have no idea of Laban, nor of running, nor of a fountain, but they have spiritual ideas corresponding to these. That there is such a correspondence of actual things, and thence of ideas, natural and spiritual, may be seen from what was said above concerning correspondences (n. 1563, 1568, 2763, 2987-3003, 3021).

[3] As regards the actual thing itself, namely, that truth was to be initiated into truth Divine, the case is this: The first truth in the natural man was not truth Divine, but was truth that appeared as if Divine; for in its first infancy no truth is truth, but is apparent truth; but in process of time it puts off the appearance, and puts on the essence of truth. In order that this may be comprehended, it may be illustrated by examples, but for the present merely by the following. It is a truth Divine that the Lord is never angry, never punishes anyone, still less does evil to anyone, and that from the Lord there never comes anything but good; nevertheless in its first infancy this truth takes the form that the Lord is angry when anyone sins, and that therefore the Lord punishes; nay, with some that evil is from the Lord; but as a man advances from childhood, and grows up and matures in judgment, he puts off that which was as truth to him from its appearing to be so, and gradually puts on the real truth, namely that the Lord is never angry, that He does not punish, that still less does He do what is evil; and thus by the former truth he is initiated into this. For that which first enters is the general truth, which in itself is obscure, and in which scarcely anything appears until it has been enlightened by particulars, and these by singulars; and when it has been enlightened the interior things are clear. Thus fallacies and appearances, which in time of ignorance are truths, are dissipated and shaken off.

AC 3132. And it came to pass when he saw the jewel, and the bracelets upon his sister’s hands. That this signifies when it was observed that Divine good and Divine truth were in the power of the affection of truth which is the " sister," is evident from the signification of "seeing," as being to observe (n. 2150); from the signification of the "jewel," as being Divine good (n. 3103, 3105); from the signification of "bracelets," as being Divine truth (n. 3103, 3105) from the signification of "hands," as being power (n. 878, 3091); and from the signification of " sister," as being the affection of truth (n. 2508, 2524, 2556); from all which it is evident that to "see the jewel and the bracelets upon his sister‘s hands," is to observe that Divine good and Divine truth were in the power of the affection of truth.

[2] The case herein is this: The conjunction of Divine good and Divine truth in the Lord is the very Divine marriage from which is the heavenly marriage, which is likewise a marriage of good and truth; from this also comes conjugial love (n. 2727-2759). Hence it is that where marriage is treated of in the Word, in the internal sense there is signified the heavenly marriage, which is that of good and truth; and in the supreme sense the Divine marriage, which is in the Lord; wherefore nothing else is here meant by the marriage between Isaac and Rebekah. The conjunction of good and truth is the marriage itself, but the initiation is the betrothal, or the state preceding marriage. But the state that precedes betrothal is what is here described. As in this state it is within the power of the damsel to be betrothed, and afterwards as a wife to be conjoined with a husband, so it is within the power of the affection of truth to be initiated into Divine truth, and in this manner to be conjoined with Divine good. And further: in the first affection and afterwards in every affection of truth with the Lord, there was inmostly the Divine good itself and the Divine truth itself, because there was Jehovah Himself; from this came the power that is here treated of.

AC 3133. And when he heard the words of Rebekah his sister. That this signifies the inclination of that affection, is evident from the affection in these words; and also from the affection in the words that precede; for they bear witness to the inclination on the part of the affection of truth which is here represented by Rebekah the sister.

AC 3134. Saying, Thus spake the man unto me. That this signifies the inclination of truth in the natural man, is in like manner evident from the affection in these words, and also from what the man, or Abraham’s servant, spake to Rebekah; from which it is evident that it is the inclination that is signified; and also from the signification of a "man" as being truth (n. 265, 749, 1007), here truth in the natural man from the Divine--because the man is here Abraham‘s elder servant, by whom is signified the natural man (n. 3019). In the Word, especially the prophetic, the word "man (vir)" often occurs; as "man and wife," "man and woman," "man and inhabitant," also "man (vir) and man (homo); "and in such places by "man (vir)" in the internal sense is signified that which is of the understanding, which is truth; and by "wife," "woman," "inhabitant," and "man (homo)," that which is of the will, which is good. As in Isaiah:--

I see, and there is no man; even among them, and there is no counselor (Isa. 41:28);

"no man" denotes no one intelligent, thus no truth. Again:--

I came, and there was no man; I called, and there was none to answer (Isa. 50:2);

the meaning here being the same.

[2] Again:--

Truth hath stumbled in the street, and uprightness cannot enter; and truth hath been taken away; and he that departeth from evil is mad. And Jehovah saw, and it was evil in His eyes that there was no judgment, and no man, and He was amazed (Isa. 59:14-16).

"No man" plainly means no one intelligent, and thus in the universal sense no truth. It here treats of the last time of the church, when there is no longer any truth; and it is therefore said, "truth hath stumbled in the street, uprightness cannot enter, truth hath been taken away." That "street" also is predicated of truth, see (n. 2336); and "judgment" (n. 2235). In Jeremiah:--

Run ye to and fro through the streets of Jerusalem, and see now, and know, and seek in the broad places thereof, if ye can find a man, if there be any that doeth judgment, that seeketh truth (Jer. 5:1).

Here a "man" evidently denotes one who is intelligent; and also truth. In Zephaniah:--

I will make their streets desolate, that none passeth by; their cities shall be devastated, so that there shall be no man; that there shall be no inhabitant (Zeph. 3:6).

"No man" denotes no truth; "no inhabitant," no good (n. 2268, 2451, 2712).

AC 3135. He came unto the man. This signifies that it (that is, the affection of good that is represented by Laban, (n. 3129, 3130) adjoined itself to the truth signified by the "man" (n. 3134), both of them in the natural man.

AC 3136. And behold he stood by the camels. That this signifies presence in general memory-knowledges, is evident from the signification of "standing by," as being to be present; and from the signification of "camels," as being general memory-knowledges (n. 3048, 3071).

AC 3137. At the fountain. That this signifies their enlightenment from Divine truth, is evident from the signification of a "fountain," as being truth (n. 2702, 3096), here Divine truth (n. 3131). As the Word is Divine truth, it is called a "fountain." That in the internal sense "to stand at the fountain" here involves the enlightenment of those things which are in the natural man, follows from the series; for where there is Divine truth, there is also enlightenment.

AC 3138. These three verses treat of the preparation and enlightenment of the natural man in order that the truth might be called forth thence which was to be conjoined with good in the rational. But with preparation and enlightenment the case is as follows: There are two lights which form the intellectual things of man--the light of heaven, and the light of the world; the light of heaven is from the Lord, who to angels in the other life is a Sun and Moon (n. 1053, 1521, 1529, 1530); the light of the world is from the sun and moon which appear before the bodily sight. The internal man has its sight and its understanding from the light of heaven; but the external man has its sight and its understanding from the light of the world. The influx of the light of heaven into the things which are of the world’s light, effects enlightenment and at the same time observance; an observance of truth if there is correspondence, and an observance of falsity instead of truth if there is not correspondence. But enlightenment and observance are impossible unless there is affection or love, which is spiritual heat, and which gives life to the things that are enlightened by the light; comparatively as the sun‘s light does not give life to the things of the vegetable kingdom, but the heat that is in the light, as is evident from the seasons of the year.

[2] In the verses which next follow, the preparation is further described--namely, that the light of heaven which is the Lord’s Divine light inflowed into the things that were of the light of the world in His natural man, in order that He might bring out thence the truth which was to be conjoined with good in the rational; thus by the ordinary way. And therefore in order that the Lord might make the human Divine by the ordinary way, He came into the world; that is, it was His will to be born as a man, and to be instructed as a man, and to be re-born as a man; but with the difference that man is re-born of the Lord, whereas the Lord not only regenerated Himself, but also glorified Himself, that is, made Himself Divine; and further, that a man is made new by an influx of charity and faith, but the Lord, by the Divine love which was in Him and which was His. Hence it may be seen that the regeneration of man is an image of the glorification of the Lord; or what is the same, that in the process of the regeneration of man may be seen as in an image, although remotely, the process of the Lord‘s glorification.

AC 3139. Verses 31-33. And he said, Come, thou blessed of Jehovah, wherefore standest thou without? for I have swept the house, and there is room for the camels. And the man came into the house, and loosed the camels; and he gave straw and provender for the camels, and water to wash his feet and the feet of the men that were with him. And there was set before him to eat; and he said, I will not eat until I have spoken my words. And he said, Speak. "He said, Come, thou blessed of Jehovah," signifies an invitation of the Divine within Him; "wherefore standest thou without?" signifies somewhat therefrom; "for I have swept the house," signifies that all things were prepared and full of goods; "and there is room for the camels," signifies a state for all things that would be serviceable to Him; "and the man came into the house," signifies influx into the good therein; "and loosed the camels," signifies freedom for those things which were to serve; "and he gave straw and provender for the camels," signifies instruction in truths and goods; "and water to wash his feet," signifies purification there; "and the feet of the men that were with him," signifies purification of all things belonging to Him, in the natural man; "and there was set before him to eat," signifies that good in the natural man desired these things should "and he said, I will not eat," signifies refusal; "until I have spoken my words," signifies until instruction should be given; "and he said, Speak," signifies longing.

AC 3140. He said, Come, thou blessed of Jehovah. That this signifies an invitation of the Divine within Him, is evident from the signification of "Come," as being a" invitation; and from the signification of the "blessed of Jehovah," as being the Divine; that the "blessed Jehovah" is the Divine Itself, may be seen above (n. 1096, 1420, 1422); and it follows that the blessed of Jehovah" is the Divine therefrom. Good is the Divine Itself, but truth is the Divine thence derived. By the "man" here who was sent by Abraham, is signified the truth which was from the Divine, in the natural man (n. 3134); it is Divine truth which is called the "blessed of Jehovah," and which is invited.

AC 3141. Why standest thou without? That this signifies somewhat therefrom, is evident without explication. The case herein is as follows: The Lord’s Divine rational was born of the Divine truth itself conjoined with the Divine good. The Divine rational is Isaac, who was born to Abraham (who here is the Divine good) of Sarah who here is the Divine truth; as before shown. The rational of the Lord alone was thus born Divine, and indeed from Himself; for the veriest being of the Lord was Jehovah or the Divine good itself; and the veriest beings of the Lord from this was of Jehovah or was the Divine truth itself. The Divine good in the rational, which is "Isaac," was thus born; and this was not food separate from truth, but was Divine good with Divine truth; and yet both together are called good in the rational, with which was to be conjoined truth from the natural man, which truth is "Rebekah." In order that the Lord might make His human Divine, both as to good and as to truth, and this by the ordinary way (n. 3138), it could not be done otherwise; for such is the Divine order, according to which is all regeneration, and thus according to which was the Lord‘s glorification (n. 3138).

[2] This Divine good through Divine truth in the rational, was that which was flowing into the natural man, and was enlightening all things there. The process itself is here described, namely, that at first it flowed in somewhat more remotely, which is meant here by there being "somewhat therefrom," and that it was not willing to flow in with fuller presence before instruction. For the ordinary way is that instruction must precede, and that influx takes place according to the degrees of instruction; and that truth continually comes into existence thence, which is initiated, and is afterwards conjoined with the good of the rational. From all this it may be seen what is the nature of the arcana that are contained in the internal sense of the Word; and that these arcana are such as to be scarcely apprehended by man even as to their most general things; and yet that they are evident to the angels, together with in numerable particulars which can never be uttered in words.

AC 3142. For I have swept the house. That this signifies that all things were prepared, and full of goods, is evident from the signification of "sweeping," as being to prepare and to be filled (of which we shall speak presently); and from the signification of a "house" as being good (n. 2233, 2234, 2559); and that man himself, from the good which is in him, is called a house, (n. 3128). The reason "to sweep" signifies to prepare and to be filled, is that nothing else is required of man than to sweep the house; that is, to reject the cupidities of evil and the derivative persuasions of falsity; for he is then filled with goods, because good is continually flowing in from the Lord-- but into "the house," that is, into the man who is purified from such things as impede the influx, that is, which reflect, or pervert, or suffocate the inflowing good. Hence it was common with the ancients to speak of sweeping or cleaning the house, and of sweeping and preparing the way; and by sweeping the house was meant to purify one’s self from evils, and thereby to prepare one‘s self for goods to enter; but by sweeping the way was meant to prepare one’s self so that truths might he received, for by a "house" was signified good, (n. 3128); and by a "way," truth, (n. 627, 2333).

[2] As in Isaiah:--

The voice of one crying in the wilderness, Sweep (prepare) ye the way of Jehovah; make straight in the desert a highway for our God (Isa. 40:3).

In the same:--

Cast up, cast up, sweep (prepare) the way, take away the stumbling block out of the way of My people (Isa. 57:14).

Again:--

Go through, go through the gates, sweep (prepare) the way of the people; cast up, cast up the highway, gather out the stones (Isa. 62:10).

In Malachi:--

Behold I send Mine angel, and He shall sweep (prepare) the way before Me; and the Lord, whom ye seek, shall suddenly come to his temple (Mal. 3:1).

In these passages, to "sweep the way" signifies to make themselves ready and prepare to receive truth. The subject treated of therein is the advent of the Lord, for which they were to prepare themselves for receiving the truth of faith, and thereby the good of charity, and by this eternal salvation.

[3] In David:--

Thou hast brought a vine out of Egypt, Thou didst drive out the nations and plantedst it; Thou didst sweep before it, and didst cause its root to be rooted, and it filled the land (Ps. 80:8, 9);

where in the supreme sense the Lord is treated of; the "vine out of Egypt" is truth from memory-knowledges; "driving out the nations" is purifying from evils; "sweeping before it," is making ready so that goods may fill. In the opposite sense "to sweep the house" is said also of the man who deprives himself of all goods and truths, and thus is filled with evils and falsities; as in Luke:--

The unclean spirit, finding no rest, says, I will return into my house whence I came out; and when he is come he findeth it swept and garnished; then goeth he and taketh to him seven other spirits worse than himself, and they enter in and dwell there (Luke 11:24-26; Matt. 12:43-45).

AC 3143. And there is room for the camels. That this signifies a state for all things that would be serviceable to Him, is evident from the signification of " room," as being state (n. 1273-1277, 1376-1381, 2625); and from the signification of "camels," as being general memory-knowledges (n. 3048, 3071). That these are things for service may be seen above (n. 1486, 3019, 3020); for all things that belong to the natural man are for no other use than to serve the spiritual; wherefore also menservants, maidservants, camels, and asses, in the internal sense chiefly signify the things which belong to the natural man.

AC 3144. And the man came into the house. That this signifies influx into the good therein, is evident from the signification of "coming;" here, to flow in; and from the signification of a house," as being good (n. 2233, 2234, 2559).

AC 3145. And loosed the camels. That this signifies freedom for those things which were to serve, is evident from the signification of "loosing," as being to make free; and from the signification of "camels," as being general memory-knowledges, and thus the things which were to serve (n. 3143) The real case herein is this: Without freedom no production of truth in the natural man is possible, nor any calling forth therefrom into the rational, and conjunction with good there. All these things take place in a free state; for it is the affection of truth from good which produces freedom. Unless truth is learned from affection, thus in freedom, it is not implanted; still less is it exalted toward the interiors and there made faith. That all reformation is effected in freedom, and that all freedom is of affection, and that the Lord keeps man in freedom, so that he may from himself and from what is his own be affected with truth and good and thereby be regenerated, may be seen above (n. 2870-2893). This is what is signified by "loosing the camels;" for if they were not significative of such things, these particulars would be too trifling to be recorded.

AC 3146. And he gave straw and provender for the camels. That this signifies instruction in truths and goods, is evident from the signification of "straw," as being the truths of the natural man, and from the signification of "provender" as being the goods therein (n. 3114). Because these things are signified by "straw and provender," it follows that to "give straw and provender" is to instruct in truths and goods. That freedom is for the sake of these things, namely, that man may be instructed in the affection and from the affection of truth, and thus that truths may be insinuated even to the spiritual man, or even to the soul, and may there be conjoined with good, may be seen from what was shown above concerning freedom (n. 2870-2893). much is the inrooting of faith, or of the truth which is of faith, that unless it is coupled with good in the rational, the truth of faith never receives any life, nor does any fruit come from it; for all that which is called the fruit of faith, is the fruit of the good of love and charity through the truth of faith. Unless spiritual heat, which is the good of love, operated by spiritual light, which is the truth of faith, the man would be as ground hard frozen as in winter time, when nothing grows, still less bears fruit. For as light without heat produces nothing, so faith produces nothing without love.

AC 3147. And water to wash his feet. That this signifies purification there, is evident from the signification of "water for washing," or of washing with water, as being to purify (concerning which presently); and from the signification of "feet," as being natural things, or what is the same, the things in the natural man (n. 2162). In the representative church it was customary to wash the feet with water, and thereby to signify that the unclean things of the natural man were washed away. The unclean things of the natural man are all those things which are of the love of self and of the love of the world; and when these unclean things have been washed away, then goods and truths flow in, for it is solely these unclean things that hinder the influx of good and truth from the Lord.

[2] For good is continually flowing in from the Lord, but when it comes through the internal or spiritual man to his external or natural man, it is there either perverted, turned back, or suffocated. But when the things which are of the love of self and of the love of the world are removed, then good is received there and is made fruitful; for then man practises the works of charity. This is evident from many considerations; as when in misfortune, distress, and sickness-, the things that belong to the external or natural man are merely lulled, the man forthwith begins to think piously and to will what is good, and also to practise works of piety in so far as he is able; but when the state is changed, there is a change also in all this.

[3] These things were signified by the washings in the Ancient Church, and the same were represented in the Jewish Church, The reason why they were signified in the Ancient Church, but represented in the Jewish church, was that the man of the Ancient Church regarded the rite as a something external in worship, and did not believe that he was purified by that washing, but by the washing away of the impurities of the natural man, which as before said are the things which are of the love of self and of the world. But the man of the Jewish Church believed that he was purified by that washing; neither knowing nor desiring to know that the purification of the interiors was signified.

[4] That by "washing" is signified a cleansing from the impurities referred to, is evident in Isaiah:--

Wash you, make you clean, put away the evil of your doings from before Mine eyes, cease to do evil (Isa. 1:16)

where it is evident that to "wash themselves" means to make themselves pure and to put away evils. Again:--

When the Lord shall have washed away the filth of the daughters of Zion, and shall have purged the blood of Jerusalem from the midst thereof, in the spirit of judgment and in the spirit of expurgation (Isa. 4:4)

where "washing away the filth of the daughters of Zion, and purging the blood of Jerusalem," denotes purifying from evils and falsities. In Jeremiah:--

O Jerusalem, wash thy heart from wickedness, that thou mayest be saved. How long shall the thoughts of thine iniquity lodge within thee? (Jer. 4:14).

[5] In Ezekiel:--

I washed thee with water, and I washed away thy bloods from upon thee, and anointed thee with oil (Ezek. 16:9)

concerning Jerusalem, by which is there meant the Ancient Church; "washing with waters" denotes purifying from falsities; "washing away bloods" denotes purging from evils; "anointing with oil" denotes filling then with good. In David:--

Wash me from mine iniquity, and cleanse me from my sin. Thou shalt purge me with hyssop, and I shall be clean; Thou shalt wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow (Ps. 51:2, 7).

Here "being washed" plainly denotes being purified from evils and their falsities.

[6] These are the things that were signified by "washing" in the representative church; and it was commanded for the sake of the representation that when they had become unclean they should wash the skin, the hands, the feet, and also the garments, and should be cleansed; by all which things were signified those which are of the natural man. Lavers also, of brass, were placed outside the temple, namely, the brazen sea and the ten brazen lavers (1 Kings 7:23-39); and a laver of brass at which Aaron and his sons were to wash was placed between the tent of meeting and the altar; and thus outside the tent (Exod. 30:18, 19, 21); by which also was signified that only external or natural things were to be purified for unless these have been purified, that is, unless the things that are of the love of self and of the world have been removed, the internal things which are of love to the Lord and toward the neighbor cannot possibly flow in, as before said.

[7] For the better understanding of how these things are circumstanced, namely, that external things are to be purified, take as an example and illustration good works, or what is the same, the goods of charity which at this day are called the fruits of faith; these are external things, because they are the exercises of charity. Good works are evil works unless those things are removed which are of the love of self and of the world; for when works are done before these have been removed, they indeed appear good outwardly, but are inwardly evil; for they are done either for the sake of reputation, or for gain, or for the sake of one‘s honor, or for recompense, thus they are either self-meritorious or hypocritical; for that which is of the love of self and the world causes the works to be such. But when these evils are removed, the works then become good; and they are goods of charity; that is, in them there is not regard to self, to the world, to reputation, to recompense; thus they are neither self-meritorious nor hypocritical for then celestial love and spiritual love flow in from the Lord into the works and cause them to be love and charity in act; and then the Lord through these loves also purifies the natural or external man, and disposes it into order, so as to receive correspondently the celestial and spiritual things that flow in.

[8] This is clearly evident from what the Lord taught when He washed the feet of the disciples, as we read in John:--

Then cometh He to Simon Peter; and Peter saith unto Him, Lord, dost Thou wash my feet? Jesus answered and said unto him, What I do thou knowest not now, but thou shalt know hereafter. Peter saith unto Him, Thou shalt never wash my feet. Jesus answered him, If I wash thee not, thou hast no part with Me. Simon Peter saith unto Him, Lord, not my feet only, but also my hands and my head. Jesus saith to him, He that hath been washed, needeth not save to wash his feet, but is clean every whit ye are clean already, but not all (John 13:4-17).

"He that hath been washed, needeth not save to wash his feet," signifies that he who has been reformed, has need only to be cleansed as to natural things, that is, has need that evils and falsities should be removed from them; and then all things are disposed into order by the influx of spiritual things from the Lord. Moreover to wash the feet was an office of charity, as meaning not to reflect on the evils of another; and it was also an office of humility, as meaning to cleanse another from evils as from impurities; as also is evident from the Lord’s words in the passage just quoted (verses 12-17); also (Luke 7:37, 38, 44, 46; John 11:2; 1 Sam. 25:41).

[9] Everybody can see that washing himself does not purify anyone from evils and falsities, but only from the impurities that cling to him; nevertheless, as washing was among the rites commanded in the church, it follows that it involves something special, namely, spiritual washing, that is, purification from the uncleannesses which inwardly adhere to man. Therefore they who knew these things in that church, and thought about the purification of the heart, or the removal of the evils of the love of self and of the love of the world from the natural man, and who endeavored to effect this with all diligence, observed the rite of washing as external worship according to commandment; but those who did not know this and did not desire to know it, but thought that the mere rite of washing their garments, skin, hands, and feet, would purify them, and that provided they did these things they might be allowed to live in avarice, hatreds, revenge, unmercifulness, and cruelties, which are spiritual in, purity, practised this rite as an idolatrous one. Nevertheless they could represent by it, and by representation exhibit something of the church, whereby there might be some conjunction of heaven with man before the Lord‘s advent; yet such conjunction as affected the man of the church little or not at all.

[10] The Jews and Israelites were such that they had no thought about the internal man, nor willingness to know anything about it; thus none at all concerning celestial and spiritual things, relating to the life after death. But yet lest all communication with heaven and thus with the Lord should perish, they were bound to external rites, whereby internal things were signified. All their captivities and plagues were in general for the end that external rites might be strictly observed for the sake of the representation. Hence then it was that Moses washed Aaron and his sons with water at the door of the tent, that they might be sanctified (Exod. 29:4; 40:12; Lev. 8:6) that Aaron and his sons were to wash their hands and feet before they entered into the tent of meeting and came near to the altar to minister, that they might not die; and that this was to be to them a statute forever (Exod. 30:18-21; 40:30, 31) that Aaron was to wash his flesh before he put on the garments of ministry (Lev. 16:4, 24); that the Levites were to be purified by being sprinkled with the water of expiation; and that they were to cause a razor to pass over their flesh, and to wash their garments, and thus should be pure (Num. 8:6, 7) that whoever should eat the carcass even of a clean beast, or one that was torn, should wash his garments, and bathe himself in water; and if he did not wash himself and bathe his flesh, he should bear his iniquity (Lev. 17:15, 16) that whoever touched the bed of one affected with the flux, or who sat upon a vessel on which he had sat, and whoever touched his flesh, should wash his garments, and bathe himself with water, and should be unclean till the evening (Lev. 15:5-7, 10-12); that whoever let go the he-goat, as a scape-goat, should wash his flesh (Lev. 16:26); that when a leprous person was cleansed, he was to wash his garments, shave off all his hair, and wash himself with water, and he should be clean (Lev. 14:8, 9); nay, that the very vessels which were made unclean by the touch of things unclean, should be passed through water, and should be unclean until evening (Lev. 11:32). From these things it may be seen that no one was made clean or pure as to internal things by the rite of washing, but only represented one pure or spiritually clean, for the reason given above. That this is so, the Lord teaches plainly in (Matthew 15:1, 2, 20; Mark 7:1-23).

AC 3148. And the feet of the men that were with him. That this signifies the purification of all things belonging to Him, in the natural man, is evident from the signification of "feet," as being the things of the natural man (n. 2162); and from the signification of "the men that were with him," as being all things there. It was the custom for travelers, when they came into any house, to wash their feet; as when the brethren of Joseph were introduced into Joseph’s house (Gen. 43:24); and when the Levite and his attendant were received into the house of the old man (Judges 19:21); and when Uriah on his return home was commanded by David to go down to his house and to wash his feet (2 Sam. 11:8). The reason was that traveling and journeying signified what relates to instruction, and thence to life (n. 1293, 1457, 1463, 2025); and that these were to be purified was shown above; and further, lest the impurity understood in the spiritual sense should adhere, and defile the house, that is, the man; as is also evident from the fact that the disciples were to shake off the dust of the feet, if the city or the house would not receive peace (Matt. 10:14).

AC 3149. And there was set before him to eat. That this signifies that it was the will of the affection of good in the natural man that these things should be appropriated, is evident from the representation of Laban, by whom it was set, as being the affection of good in the natural man (n. 3129, 3130); and from the signification of "eating," as being to be communicated and appropriated (n. 2187, 2343), namely, the Divine things treated of above (n. 3140, 3141).

AC 3150. And he said, I will not eat. That this signifies refusal, that is, that they were not yet to be so appropriated, is evident without explication.

AC 3151. Until I have spoken my words. That this signifies until instruction should be given, is evident from the signification of "speaking words," as being to instruct. Moreover the things which he spoke, and that follow in the series, belong to instruction. That Divine things flow into those which are in the natural man, according to the instruction and the consequent progress, may be seen above (n. 3141).

AC 3152. And he said, Speak. That this signifies longing, is evident from the signification of "speaking words," as being to instruct; here, in the imperative form, as meaning that he should instruct. It is evident that these words involve a longing.

AC 3153. What is contained in these three verses, in the internal sense, is indeed manifest from the explication, namely, that the things of the natural man were being prepared for receiving what is Divine, and that so the truths signified by "Rebekah," which were to be initiated and conjoined with the good of the rational, were being made Divine, and this by influx. But the things in the internal sense here are such that if they are not seen in one view of the thought, they appear too obscure for comprehension, and this the more because they are things not known - for example, how truths are called forth out of the natural man, and are initiated into good in the rational, when man is being regenerated. To most persons at this day these things are so wholly unknown that they do not even know that this takes place; chiefly because at this day there are few who are being regenerated; and those who are lo not know from doctrine that it is the good of charity into which the truth of faith is initiated and with which it is conjoined, and this in the rational; and that then the state is wholly changed, and this so that the man no longer thinks from the truth of faith to the good of charity, but from this good to truth. With the Lord however there was not regeneration, but glorification; that is, all things were made Divine by Him, both those in the rational and those in the natural. How this was done is described in the internal sense.

AC 3154. Verses 34-48. And he said, I am Abraham‘s servant. And Jehovah hath blessed my lord exceedingly, and hath made him great, and hath given him flock and herd, and silver and gold, and menservants and maidservants, and camels and asses. And Sarah, my lord’s wife, bare a son to my lord after she was old; and he hath given unto him all that he hath. And my lord made me swear, saying, Thou shalt not take a woman for my son of the daughters of the Canaanite, in whose land I dwell. But thou shalt go unto my father‘s house, and to my family, and take a woman for my son. And I said unto my lord, Peradventure the woman will not follow me. And he said into me, Jehovah, before whom I have walked, will send His angel with thee, and prosper thy way; and thou shalt take a woman for my son from my family, and from my father’s house. Then shalt thou be clear from my oath, when thou comest to my family‘; and if they give not to thee, thou shalt be clear from my oath. And I came this day unto the fountain, and said, O Jehovah God of my lord Abraham, if now Thou do prosper my way wherein I do walk; behold I stand by the fountain of waters; and let it come to pass that the maiden which cometh forth to draw, and to whom I shall say, Let me drink, I pray, a little water from thy pitcher; and she shall say to me, Both drink thou, and I will also draw for thy camels, let her be the woman whom Jehovah hath appointed for my lord’s son. I scarcely‘ had done speaking in my heart, when behold Rebekah came forth, and her pitcher on her shoulder; and she went down unto the fountain and drew; and I said into her, Let me drink, I pray. And she made haste, and let down her pitcher from upon her, and said, Drink, and I will give thy camels drink also; and I drank, and she gave drink to the camels also. and I asked her, and said, Whose daughter art thou? And she said, The daughter of Bethuel, the son of Nahor, whom Milcah bare unto him. And I put the jewel upon her nose, and the bracelets upon her hands. And I bent and bowed myself down to Jehovah, and blessed Jehovah God of my lord Abraham, who led me into the way of truth, to take the daughter of my lord’s brother for his son.

[2] "He said, I am Abraham‘s servant," signifies that it was from the Divine good; "and Jehovah hath blessed my lord exceedingly, and hath made him great," signifies the Divine Human as to good and as to truth; "and hath given him flock and herd," signifies goods in general; "and silver and gold," signifies truths in general; "and menservants and maidservants, and camels and asses," signifies truths specifically. "And Sarah, my lord’s wife, bare a son to my lord," signifies the Divine rational, from Divine truth; "after she was old," signifies when the state was; "and he hath given unto him all that he hath," signifies that to the Divine rational belong all Divine things.

[3] "And my lord made me swear," signifies here as before, a binding pledge, and a sacred obligation "saying, Thou shalt not take a woman for my son of the daughters of the Canaanite," signifies here as before, that the Divine rational was not to be conjoined with any affection not in agreement with truth; "in whose land I dwell," signifies the discordant things in which Divine good is. "But thou shalt go unto my father‘s house," signifies good which is from the Divine; " and to my family," signifies truth which is from the Divine; "and take a woman for my son." signifies that thence should be conjunction.

[4] "And I said unto my lord, Peradventure the woman will not follow me," signifies here as before the doubting of the natural mind concerning that affection, as to whether it was separable; "and he said unto me," signifies instruction; "Jehovah, before whom I have walked, will send His angel with thee," signifies here as before, the Divine providence; "and prosper thy way," signifies as to truth "and thou shalt take a woman for my son," signifies that there should be conjunction; "from my family, and from my father’s house," signifies from the good and truth which are there from the Divine. "Then shalt thou be clear from my oath," signifies here as before, the freedom which the natural man has; "when thou comest to my family, and if they give not to thee," signifies as to the separation; "thou shalt be free from my oath," signifies that then there shall be no blame to the natural man. The other words, to (verse 48), signify the same as before.

AC 3155. An explication of these particulars may be omitted, because they have been already explained in this chapter. They were repeated for the sake of the instruction of the natural man. For with the initiation and conjunction of truth with good, the case is as when a virgin is betrothed and afterwards joined to a husband that is to say, she ought to be instructed in all things before she gives consent. Although such things do not appear with a man when the truths in the natural are being initiated and conjoined, that is, when the man is being reformed, still they take place; that is, instruction precedes, of good concerning truth, and of truth concerning good; and afterwards there is consent on each side, concerning which see what now follows.

AC 3156. Verses 49-51. And now if ye will do mercy and truth with my lord, tell me; and if not, tell me; and I will look to the right hand or to the left. And Laban and Bethuel answered, and said, The word hath gone forth from Jehovah; we cannot speak unto thee evil or good. Behold Rebekah is before thee; take her, and go, and let her be the woman of thy lord‘s son, as Jehovah hath spoken. "Now if ye will do mercy and truth with my lord," signifies exploration of the consent from each of their faculties, that of the will, and that of the understanding; "tell me and if not, tell me," signifies their free state of deliberation; "and I will look to the right hand or to the left," signifies reciprocal freedom. "And Laban and Bethuel answered and said, The word hath gone forth from Jehovah; we cannot speak unto thee evil or good," signifies acknowledgment that it was of the Lord alone. "Behold Rebekah is before thee; take her, and go, and let her be the woman of thy lord’s son, as Jehovah hath spoken," signifies consent inspired from the Lord.

AC 3157. Now if ye will do mercy and truth with my lord. That this signifies exploration of the consent from each of their faculties, that of the will, and that of the understanding, is evident from the signification of "mercy," as being what is of good or of love (n. 3063, 3073, 3120); and from the signification of "truth," as being what is of truth, or of faith (n. 3121, 3122) and because the good which is of love is of the will, and the truth which is of faith is of the understanding, and these things are said to Laban and Bethuel, thus to men, that they should do mercy and truth, they signify what is from each of their faculties, namely, the will and the understanding. That it is exploration of consent, is evident both from its being said, "if ye will do," and from the words that follow, "tell me; and if not, tell me; and I will look to the right hand or to the left." In the regeneration of man, which is an image of the Lord‘s glorification (n. 3138), the case is that the truth of faith is indeed learned, but is not acknowledged, still less received by good, unless there is consent from each faculty, namely, the will and the understanding. Consent is acknowledgment itself; by this is effected reception, and indeed from the will, for good is there; and when the truth of faith has been received by the will, or what is the same, by good, then the man is regenerate for then truth is of good, or faith is of charity, or as to life is charity itself (n. 3121).

AC 3158. Tell me; and if not, tell me. That this signifies their free state of deliberation, is evident from the sense of the words. From all that precedes it is evident that the words which in the sense of the letter in this chapter treat of the betrothal and marriage of Rebekah with Isaac, in the internal sense treat of the initiation and conjunction of good and truth; for the initiation and conjunction of good and truth are spiritual betrothal and spiritual marriage. In each there is required a free state of deliberation. That this is necessary in betrothal and marriage, is well known; but that it is required in the initiation and conjunction of good and truth, is not so well known, because it is not apparent to the natural man, and because such initiation and conjunction are among the things that are accomplished without man’s reflecting upon them; nevertheless during every moment when man is being reformed and regenerated, it comes to pass that he is in a state of freedom when truth is being conjoined with good.

[2] Every one may know, if he only considers, that nothing is ever man‘s, as his, unless it is of his will; what is only of the understanding does not become man’s until it becomes of the will also; for what is of the will constitutes the being (esse) of a man‘s life; but what is of the understanding constitutes the coming forth (existere) of his life thence derived. Consent from the understanding alone is not consent, but all consent is from the will; wherefore unless the truth of faith which is of the understanding is received by the good of love which is of the will, it is not at all truth which is acknowledged, and thus it is not faith. But in order that truth may be received by the good which is of the will, it is necessary that there be a free state. All that is of the will appears free; the very state of willing is liberty; for that which I will, that I choose, that I long for, because I love it and acknowledge it as good. All this shows that truth, which is of faith, never becomes man’s as his until it has been received by the will, that is, until it has been initiated and conjoined with the good there; and that this cannot be effected except in a free state.

AC 3159. And I will look to the right hand, or to the left. That this signifies reciprocal freedom, is evident without explication. The case is this: Good from the Lord is continually flowing in through the internal man into the external, and in the earliest appears it appears in the external man under the form of the affection of truth. So far as a man looks to celestial and spiritual good as the end, so far truth is initiated and conjoined with good; or what is the same, so far the affection of truth is initiated and conjoined with the affection of good. But so far as a man looks to good that is his own, and thus to himself and the world, as the end, so far does celestial and spiritual good recede. This is the reciprocal freedom which is signified by "looking to the right or to the left."

AC 3160. And Laban and Bethuel answered and said, The word hath gone forth from Jehovah; we cannot speak unto thee evil or good. That this signifies acknowledgment that it was of the Lord alone, may be seen from the explication of the several words as to the internal sense; but that this is the conclusion from them, is evident without such explication. That "the word hath gone forth from Jehovah," signifies from the Lord, is evident; for by "Jehovah," so often named in the Old Testament, no other is ever meant than the Lord (n. 1343, 136, 1815, 2156, 2329, 3023, 3035). That these things involve arcana, is evident from the fact that here Laban made answer, who was a brother, and then Bethuel who was the father; but not the father and mother; and that the virgin did not answer till afterwards. The reason of this is that by Laban as a brother is represented the affection of good in the natural man (n. 3129, 3130); and by Bethuel, the origin of the affection of good. The affection of good and the affection of truth in the natural man are as brother and sister; and the affection of truth called forth from the natural man into the rational and there conjoined with good, is as a married woman.

[2] The secret reason why Laban and Bethuel answered, that is, the brother first and then the father, is that while good from the rational man is flowing into the natural, it does not flow immediately into the truth there, but into the good there, and through the good into the truth; and unless there is this influx the affection of truth cannot come into actual being. The affection of good in the natural man is that which acknowledges, and thus is that which first consents; for there is an immediate communication between rational good and natural good, but not between rational good and natural truth. Concerning the parallelism of these see (n. 1831, 1832). Two ancient formulas of speech are found here, namely, "The word hath gone forth from Jehovah," meaning that it was done of Jehovah; and "We cannot speak unto thee evil or good," meaning that they neither dared to deny nor to affirm. Concerning the acknowledgment that it was of the Lord alone, see what now follows.

AC 3161. Behold Rebekah is before thee; take her and go, and let her be the woman of thy lord‘s son, as Jehovah hath spoken. That this signifies consent inspired from the Lord, is also evident from the explication of the several words, of which in the internal sense this is a general conclusion. The case herein is this: When the Lord lived in the world He by His own power made the human in Himself Divine. The human begins in the inmost of the rational (n. 2106, 2194); and it is here described how He made this Divine; namely, that as this had been done before as to good, so now it is done as to truth; for the rational consists of good and truth. The good there, was from His veriest Divine, that is, from Jehovah the Father, of whom He was conceived; but the truth was to be procured in the ordinary way, as with other men.

[2] For it is well known that man is not born rational, but only into the capacity of becoming rational; and that he becomes so through memory-knowledges, namely through knowledges of many genera and species, the first of which are means leading to those which follow next, and this in order even to the last, which are knowledges of the spiritual things of the Lord’s kingdom, and are called doctrinal things. That these are learned in part from the doctrine of faith, in part immediately from the Word, and so in part by the man‘s own study, is also well known. So long as these doctrinal things are only in the memory, they are only truths in the form of memory-knowledge; nor are they yet appropriated to the man as his; but they are for the first time appropriated to him when he begins to love them for the sake of life, and still more when he applies them to life. When this is done, the truths are raised out of the natural memory into the rational, and are there conjoined with good; and when thee have been conjoined, they are no longer of memory-knowledge merely, but of the life; for then the man no longer learns from truths how he should live, but lives from them, and thereby the truths are appropriated to him, and become of the will. Thus man enters into the heavenly marriage; for the heavenly marriage is the conjunction of good and truth in the rational. These things the Lord does with men.

[3] But in Himself the Lord did all these things from Himself; and from the Divine Itself He not only begat the rational as to good, but also through this the natural as to truth, which He conjoined with good for it is good that chooses truth for itself, and also forms it, since good acknowledges nothing else as truth than that which is in agreement. In this way did the Divine good, which was the Lord’s, make for itself truth; nor did it acknowledge as truth anything else than that which agreed with Divine good, that is, that was Divine from Him. Thus He did all things both in general and in particular from His own power. All this is what is signified by the acknowledgment that it was of the Lord alone, and by consent inspired from the Lord.

AC 3162. Verses 52-54. And it came to pass that when Abraham‘s servant heard their words, he bowed himself down to the earth unto Jehovah. And the servant brought forth vessels of silver and vessels of gold, and garments, and gave to Rebekah; he gave also precious things to her brother and to her mother. And they did eat and drink, he and the men that were with him; and they passed the night; and they rose up in the morning, and he said, Send me away unto my lord. "And it came to pass that when Abraham’s servant heard their words, he bowed himself down to the earth unto Jehovah," signifies a perception of joy in the natural man; "and the servant brought forth vessels of silver and vessels of gold, and garments," signifies truth and good, and their adornments; "and gave to Rebekah," signifies which then were for the affection of truth; "he gave also precious things to her brother," signifies spiritual things thence for natural good; "and to her mother," signifies for natural truth also; "and they did cat and drink," signifies the appropriation of good and of truth thus initiated; "he and the men that were with him," signifies which are in the natural man; "and they passed the night," signifies its peace; "and they rose up in the morning," signifies a degree of elevation; "and he said, Send me away unto my lord," signifies the affection of conjunction.

AC 3163. And it came to pass that when Abraham‘s servant heard their words, he bowed himself down to the earth unto Jehovah. That this signifies a perception of joy in the natural man, is evident from the signification of "hearing the words," as being to perceive; from the representation of the servant of Abraham, as being in general the natural man in so far as it serves the rational, here the Divine (n. 3019, 3020); and from the signification of "bowing himself down to Jehovah," as being to rejoice (n. 2927, 2950, 3118).

AC 3164. And the servant brought forth vessels of silver, and vessels of gold, and garments. That this signifies truth and good, and their adornments, is evident from the signification of "vessels of silver, vessels of gold, and garments," in the internal sense. That "silver" signifies truth, see (n. 1551, 2048); also that "gold" signifies good, (n. 113, 1551, 1552). "Vessels" of silver and "vessels" of gold are here mentioned, because they are predicated of the affection of truth, which here is " Rebekah;" for regarded in itself truth is but a vessel or recipient of good (n. 1496, 1832, 1900, 2063, 2261, 2269, 3068) "vessels of silver" specifically are memory-knowledges, for these are recipients of truth; "vessels of gold" specifically are truths, for these are recipients of good; and that "garments" denote adornments, is evident without explication. In ancient times such things were given to a virgin when she was betrothed; and this because of the representation and signification in order that the betrothed virgin might represent the truth of the church that is to be conjoined with good. So also is described the Ancient Church, in its first age. in Ezekiel:--

When it was the time of loves, I clothed thee with broidered work, I girded thee about with fine linen, and covered thee with silk, I decked thee also with ornament, and I put bracelets upon thy hands, and a necklace upon thy throat, and I put a jewel upon thy nose, and earrings in thine ears, and a crown of adornment upon thy head. Thus wast thou decked with gold and silver, and thy raiment was of fine linen and silk and broidered work (Ezek. 16:8-13).

And when the same church fell away from truth and good, it is thus described in the same chapter:--

Thou didst take of thy garments, and madest for thee high places with divers colors thou didst take the vessels of thine adornment, of My gold and of My silver, which I had given thee, and madest for thee images of a male; and thou tookest thy broidered garments, and coveredst them (Ezekiel 16:16-18).

From these passages it plainly appears that " silver, gold, and garments" denote nothing else than the things which are of the church, namely, truth and good, and the things which are of truth and good.

AC 3165. And gave to Rebekah. That this signifies which then were of the affection of truth, is evident from the representation of Rebekah, as being the affection of truth (n. 2865, 3077). By the things mentioned just above - the vessels of silver, the vessels of gold, and the garments - is described the affection of truth, as a bride; wherefore by these words is signified that such then was the affection of truth; or what is the same, that those things then were of the affection of truth.

AC 3166. He gave also precious things to her brother. That this signifies spiritual things thence for natural good, is evident from the signification of "precious things," as being spiritual things, whereof we shall speak presently; and from the signification of her "brother," as being natural good (n. 3160) Laban also, who is here the brother, is the affection of good in the natural man (n. 3129, 3130). That "precious things" signify spiritual things, is evident from other passages in the Word, as where Joseph is treated of, in Moses:--

Blessed of Jehovah be his land, for the precious things of heaven, for the dew, and for the deep lying beneath and for the precious things of the produce of the sun, and for the precious things of the growth of the months, and for the precious things of the hills of eternity, and for the precious things of the earth, and of the fullness thereof (Deut. 33:13-16).

where by the "precious things of heaven, the precious things of the produce of the sun, the precious things of the growth of the months, the precious things of the hills of eternity, and the precious things of the earth," are signified various kinds of spiritual things. Moreover the things called precious were precious stones, pearls, balsams, spices, and the like, all which signify spiritual things.

[2] What spiritual things are, has been frequently stated above, namely, that in the Lord’s kingdom there are celestial things and spiritual things, and that celestial things are of good, and spiritual things are of the derivative truth. There is nothing in the universe that does not refer to good and truth; whatever is of use, and of life, refers to good; but whatever is of doctrine and memory-knowledge, especially concerning use and life, refers to truth; or what is the same, whatever is of the will, is called good or evil; but whatever is of the understanding is called truth or falsity; and therefore good, which is solely of love and charity, and which flows in from the Lord, is celestial; whereas truth, which is therefrom, is spiritual. The reason why precious things were given to the brother, when vessels of silver, vessels of gold, and garments were given to the sister, on her becoming a bride, is that the "brother" signified good in the natural man, and this good is enlightened when truth is being initiated into good in the rational; for all the enlightenment of good and of truth in the natural man is thence.

AC 3167. And to her mother. That this signifies for natural truth also (namely, that it thence has spiritual things, as is the case with natural good, concerning which see just above) is evident from the signification of "mother," as being the church, which is called "mother" from truth (n. 289, 2717). In order that it may be known how it is that natural good and natural truth have spiritual things from the fact that truth is initiated into good in the rational, this may be briefly explained. Every man has an internal and an external; his internal is called the internal man, and his external the external man; but what the internal man is, and what the external, is known to few. The internal man is the same as the spiritual man, and the external is the same as the natural man; the spiritual man is that which understands and is wise from those things which are of the light of heaven, but the natural man from those things which are of the light of the world. Concerning which two lights see (n. 3138). For in heaven there are nothing but spiritual things, whereas in the world there are nothing but natural kings. Man has been so created that in him spiritual things and natural things, that is, his spiritual and natural man, should agree or make a one; but in this case the spiritual man ought to dispose all things in the natural, and the natural ought to obey, as a servant his lord.

[2] But by the fall the natural man began to exalt itself above the spiritual man, and thus inverted Divine order itself; hence the natural man separated itself from the spiritual, and no longer possessed any spiritual things, except such as could enter as through chinks, and confer the capacity of thinking and speaking. But in order that spiritual things might again flow into the natural man, this had to be regenerated by the Lord; that is, truth out of the natural man must be initiated and conjoined with good in the rational; and when this is effected, spiritual things come to the natural man, for then the light of heaven flows in and enlightens the things in the natural man, and causes them to receive light; the goods therein the heat of light, that is, love and charity; and the truth the rays of light, that is, faith; and in this way natural good and natural truth receive spiritual things. In this case natural good is all the delight and pleasure that come from having as an end the being of service to what is spiritual, thus to the neighbor, still more to the public weal, and still more to the Lord‘s kingdom, and above all to the Lord; and natural truth is all the doctrine and memory-knowledge that has as an end to be wise, that is, the doing of these things.

AC 3168. And they did eat and drink. That this signifies the appropriation of the good and of the truth thus initiated, appears from the signification of "eating," as being to be communicated and conjoined, thus to be appropriated (n. 2187, 2343); and as this is predicated of bread, and by "bread" is signified good (n. 276, 680, 2165, 2177, 2187), it is the appropriation of good which is signified by "eating "-and also from the signification of "drinking," as also being to be communicated and conjoined, thus to be appropriated (n. 3089); but as this is predicated of wine, and by "wine" is signified truth (n. 1071, 1798), it is the appropriation of truth which is signified by "drinking." The real case herein is as before said (n. 3167), that when truth is being initiated into good, and still more when it is being conjoined with it, in the rational, the good and truth of the spiritual man, that is, spiritual things, are appropriated to the natural man.

AC 3169. He and the men that were with him. That these words signify the things in the natural man, appears from the representation of the servant, who here is "he," as being the natural man (n. 3019, 3020); and from the signification of "the men that were with him," as being all things in the natural man (n. 3148).

AC 3170. And they passed the night. That this signifies the peace thereof, appears from the signification of "passing the night," as being to rest, and in the internal sense to have peace The case herein is this: When spiritual things are being appropriated to the natural man, those things recede which belong to cupidity of evil and persuasion of falsity, thus which induce unrest; and those approach which belong to the affection of good and of truth, consequently those things which cause peace; for all unrest is from evil and falsity, and all peace is from good and truth. What peace is, and what is the quality of its state, (n. 92, 93, 1726, 2780).

AC 3171. And they rose up in the morning. That this signifies a degree of elevation, appears from the signification of "rising up," as involving elevation (n. 2401, 2785, 2912, 2927); and from the signification of "morning," as being the Lord, also His kingdom, and likewise a state of peace thence derived (n. 2405, 2780). The natural is said to be "elevated" when spiritual things are appropriated to it; for all elevation is from things spiritual and celestial, as by these man is elevated toward heaven, thus nearer to the Lord.

AC 3172. And he said, Send me away unto my lord. That this signifies the affection of conjunction, is evident from the general sense which results from the internal sense of the words; for his desiring to be sent to his lord was of affection, in order that the affection of truth, which is " Rebekah," might be conjoined; for the betrothal, that is the initiation, was already accomplished; the affection of conjunction being that which is here signified.

AC 3173. Verses 55-58. And her brother and her mother said, Let the damsel remain with us days, at least ten; afterwards thou shalt go. And he said unto them, Do not delay me, and Jehovah hath prospered my way; send me away, and I will go to my lord. And they said, Let us call the damsel, and inquire at her mouth. And they called Rebekah, and said unto her, Wilt thou go with this man? And she said, I will go. "Her brother and her mother said," signifies a doubting of the natural man "let the damsel remain with us," signifies detention by them; "days, at least ten; afterwards thou shalt go," signifies the state for departure, appearing to them full; "and he said unto them, Do not delay me," signifies the will of the affection of good; "and Jehovah hath prospered my way," signifies that all things were now provided; "send me away, and I will go to my lord," signifies as to the state of initiation "and they said, Let us call the damsel and inquire at her mouth," signifies the consent solely of the affection of truth; "and they called Rebekah, and said unto her, Wilt thou go with this man? And she said, I will go," signifies its full consent.

AC 3174. Her brother and her mother said. That this signifies a doubting of the natural man, appears from the signification of "brother," as being good in the natural man (n. 3160); and from the signification of "mother," as being the truth there (n. 3167); consequently "brother" and "mother" signify the natural man, for this is constituted of good and truth; that there is doubt is manifest, namely, whether the damsel should remain some days, or should go at once with the man.

AC 3175. Let the damsel remain with is. That this signifies a detention by them, appears from the signification of remaining," as here being to be detained, as is also evident from the series in the internal sense. For the case is this Man is never born into any truth, not even into any natural truth - as that he should not steal, should not kill, should not commit adultery, and the like; still less is he born into any spiritual truth as that there is a God, and that he has an internal which will live after death. Thus of himself man knows nothing that relates to eternal life. Man learns both these kinds of truth, otherwise he would be much worse than a brute animal; for from his hereditary nature he loves himself above all and desires to possess all things in the world. Hence unless he were restrained by civil laws and by fears for the loss of honor, of gain, of reputation, and of life, he would steal, kill, and commit adultery, without any perception of conscience. That this is the case is very evident; for a man, even when instructed, commits such crimes without conscience, nay, defends them, and by many considerations confirms himself in the commission of them so far as he is allowed; what then would he not do if he had not been instructed? The case is the same in spiritual things; for of those who are born within the church, who have the Word, and are constantly instructed, there are still very many who ascribe little or nothing to God, but everything to nature; thus who do not at heart believe that there is any God, and therefore do not believe that they shall live after death; and who accordingly have no wish to learn anything relating to eternal life.

[2] From all this it is evident that man is born into no truth, but that he has all to learn, and this by an external way, namely, that of hearing and seeing. By this way truth has to be insinuated, and implanted in his memory; but so long as the truth is there only, it is merely memory-knowledge; and in order that truth may pervade the man it must be called forth thence, and be conveyed more toward the interiors; for his human is more internal, being in his rational; for unless man is rational, he is not man; and therefore according to the quality and the measure of a mass rational, such is the quality and the measure of the man. man cannot possibly be rational unless he possesses good. The good whereby man surpasses the animals, is to love God, and to love the neighbor; all human good is from this. Into this good truth must be initiated and conjoined, and this in the rational. Truth is initiated into good and conjoined with it when man loves God and loves his neighbor, for then truth enters in to good, inasmuch as good and truth mutually acknowledge each other, all truth being from good, and having respect to good as its end and as its soul, and thus as the source of its life.

[3] But truth cannot without difficulty be separated from the natural man, and be thence elevated into the rational; for in the natural man there are fallacies, and cupidities of evil, and also persuasions of falsity; and so long as these are there and adjoin themselves to the truth, so long the natural man detains truth with himself, and does not suffer it to be elevated from itself into the rational; and this is what is signified in the internal sense by the words, "Let the damsel remain with us days, at least ten, afterwards thou shalt go." The reason is that the natural man puts truth in doubt, and reasons about it as to whether it is so; but as soon as the cupidities of evil and persuasions of falsity, and the derivative fallacies, are separated by the Lord, and the man begins from good to be averse to reasonings against truth, and to be superior to doubts, then truth is in a state to depart from the natural and to be elevated into the rational, and to put on a state of good; for then truth becomes of good and has life.

[4] For the better comprehension of this, let us take examples. It is a spiritual truth that all good is from the Lord, and all evil from hell: this truth must in many ways be confirmed and illustrated before it can be elevated out of the natural man into the rational, nor can it ever be elevated until the man is in the love of God; for before this it is not acknowledged, consequently is not believed. The case is similar in regard to other truths, as in regard to the truth that the Divine Providence is in the veriest singulars; and that unless it is in these, it is not in what is universal. Again: in regard to the truth that man first begins to live when that perishes which in the world he believes to be the all of life; and that the life which he then receives is relatively ineffable and unlimited; and that he is altogether ignorant of this so long as he is in evil-these and similar truths can never be believed, unless the man is in good; for it is good which comprehends, because the Lord through good flows in with wisdom.

AC 3176. Days, at least ten, afterwards thou shalt go. That this signifies the state for departure appearing to them full, is evident from the signification of "day," as being state (n. 23, 487, 488, 493, 893, 2788); and from the signification of "ten,"as being what is fall (n. 1988, 3107); here, appearing full to the natural; and from the signification of "going," as being to depart From this it is evident that "days, at least ten, afterwards thou shalt go," signifies the state for departure appearing to them full; wherefore it now follows, "he said to them, do not delay me," by which is signified the "way" of the affection of good.

AC 3177. Jehovah hath prospered my way. That this signifies that all things were now provided, is evident without explication; for that "Jehovah prospers the way" signifies that He provides here, as to the truth which was to be conjoined with good; for by "way" is signified truth (n. 627, 2333).

AC 3178. Send me away, and I will go to my lord. That this signifies as to the state of initiation, is evident from the sense which results from the internal sense of these words. The same words also imply the affection of conjunction, for this affection pertains to the state of initiation.

AC 3179. And they said, Let us call the damsel and inquire at her mouth. That this signifies the consent solely of the affection of truth, appears from the signification of a "damsel," as being an affection wherein is innocence (n. 3067, 3110) here the affection of truth, because she is Rebekah, who, before she consents, is called "damsel," but when she consents, as presently follows, is called "Rebekah". That "Rebekah" is the affection of truth, see (n. 3077); and from the signification of "inquiring at her mouth," as being to perceive whether this consents; thus it is the consent solely of the affection of truth that is here signified.

[2] The case is this: Truth itself, which is to be initiated into good, acknowledges its own good; because good acknowledges its own truth; hence comes consent, but that it is a consent inspired into truth from good may be seen above (n. 3161). With man it never appears that there is any consent on the part of truth when it is being initiated and conjoined with good (that is, when man is being regenerated), nor on the part of good as knowing its own truth, and initiating and conjoining such truth with itself; and yet these things are effected precisely in this way; for the things that take place during man’s regeneration are altogether unknown to him; and if he were to know only one out of ten thousand of them he would be astounded. There are innumerable, nay, illimitable secret things by which man is at that time led of the Lord, some only of which shine forth from the internal sense of the Word.

[3] The Ancient Church formed for itself an idea of these things from marriages; namely, from the state of a virgin before betrothal, from her state after betrothal, from her state when she was to be wedded, afterwards when she was married, and lastly when she bore offspring to her husband; the fruits of truth from good, or of faith from charity, they called children, and so on. Such was the wisdom of the Ancient Church; their books were also written in this way; and this manner of writing was transmitted from them to the Gentiles; for it was their desire by things which are in the world to express those which are in heaven, and indeed from natural things to see spiritual ones but at the present day this wisdom is altogether lost.

AC 3180. And they called Rebekah, and said unto her, Wilt thou go with this man? And she said, I will go. That this signifies full consent, is evident from the sense resulting from the internal sense of these words; for when to the question she replied, "I will go," it denotes that she fully consented. The full consent of truth is given when truth perceives in itself an image of good, and in good the very effigy of itself from which it is.

AC 3181. Verses 59-61. And they sent away Rebekah their sister, and her nurse, and Abraham‘s servant and his sister. And they blessed Rebekah, and said unto her, Our sister, be thou for thousands of ten thousands, and may thy seed inherit the gate of those that hate thee. And Rebekah arose, and her damsels, and they rode upon the camels, and followed the man, and the servant took Rebekah and went away. "They sent away Rebekah their sister," signifies separation from the affection of Divine truth; "and her nurse," signifies from the innocence pertaining thereto; "and Abraham’s servant and his men," signifies from Divine things in the natural man; "and they blessed Rebekah, and said unto her," signifies devout wishes from Divine enlightenment; "Our sister, be thou for thousands of ten thousands," signifies the fructification of the affection of truth to infinitude; "and may thy seed inherit the gate of those that hate thee," signifies the Lord‘s spiritual kingdom from the marriage of good and truth in the Divine Human, to which kingdom belong charity and faith where before were evil and falsity; "and Rebekah arose," signifies the elevation of the affection of truth, and the consequent separation; "and her damsels," signifies the subservient affections; "and they rode upon the camels," signifies the intellectual part elevated upon natural memory-knowledges; "and followed the man," signifies under the auspices of Divine truth natural; "and the servant took Rebekah and went away," signifies that Divine good natural performed the initiation.

AC 3182. They sent away Rebekah their sister. That this signifies separation from the affection of Divine truth, is evident from the signification of "sending," as denoting to be separated; and from the representation of Rebekah the sister, is being the affection of Divine truth (n. 3077, 3179); that "sister" is truth, see (n. 1495, 2508, 2524, 2556, 3160). How the case herein is, may be seen from what has been said and shown above in this chapter; but to make the matter plainer, a few words more shall be said. When the truth which is to be initiated and conjoined with good is elevated out of the natural, it is separated from what is therein; and this separation is what is signified by their sending away Rebekah their sister. Truth is separated when the man no longer from truth regards good, but from good truth; or what is the same, when he no longer from doctrine regards life, but from life doctrine. For example: doctrine teaches the truth that no one is to be held in hatred; for whoever holds another in hatred, kills him every moment. In early life a man scarcely admits the truth of this, but as he advances in age and is being reformed, he accounts this as one of the doctrinal things according to which he ought to live. At last he lives according to it; and then he no longer thinks from the doctrine, but acts from the life. When this is the case, this truth of doctrine is elevated out of the natural, and indeed is separated from the natural and implanted in good in the rational; and this being effected he no longer suffers the natural man by any of its sophistry to call it in doubt; nay, he does not suffer the natural man to reason against it.

AC 3183. And her nurse. That this signifies from the innocence appertaining thereto (that they also sent this away, that is, separated it from themselves), appears from the signification of a "nurse," or one that gives suck, as being innocence. Repeated mention is made in the Word of those that suck, and of those that give suck; and by the former is signified the first state of infants, which state it is evident must be a state of innocence; for when first born, man is introduced into a state of innocence, in order that this may be a plane for all the succeeding states, and be the inmost in them; which state is signified in the Word by a "suckling." Next he is introduced into a state of the affection of celestial good, that is, of love toward his parents, which with such infants is in the place of love to the Lord; and this state is signified by an "infant." Afterwards he is introduced into a state of the affection of spiritual good, or of mutual love, that is, of charity toward his playmates, which state is signified by "boys." As he advances further in age, he is introduced into a state of the affection of truth; this is signified by "young men;" and the subsequent states are signified by "men," and finally by "old men." This last state, signified by "old men," is the state of wisdom, in which is the innocence of infancy; thus the first state and the last are united; and man when old, being again a little child, but wise, is introduced into the Lord’s kingdom.

[2] From all this it is evident that innocence is the first state, which is that of the sucking child. Hence also she that gives suck signifies innocence; for of the giver and the receiver, as of the actor and the one acted upon, a similar state is perceived. It is here said that they sent away also the nurse (or her who gave suck), to the intent that the affection of truth might be described, namely, that it was from innocence; for the affection of truth is not the affection of truth unless innocence is in it (n. 2526, 2780, 3111); for by innocence the Lord flows into this affection, and indeed with wisdom, since true innocence is wisdom itself (n. 2305, 2306); and in the eyes of the angels they who are in innocence appear as infants (n. 154, 2306).

[3] That in the Word a "sucking child" signifies innocence, is also evident from other passages; as in David:--

Out of the mouth of babes and sucklings hast Thou founded strength (Ps. 8:2; Matt. 21:16);

where "babes" denote celestial love, and "sucklings," innocence. In Jeremiah:--

Wherefore commit ye great evil against your souls, to cut off from you man and woman, the infant and the suckling out of the midst of Judah, that I should leave you none remaining? (Jer. 44:7)

where the "infant and the suckling" in like manner denote celestial love and the innocence thereof; and when these become none, then there are no longer any "remains," that is, any good and truth remaining stored up by the Lord in the internal man. That these are remains, see (n. 1906, 2284); for all goods and truths perish together with innocence, inasmuch as innocence is immediately from the very Divine, and thus is the very essential in them all.

[4] Again:--

The infant and the suckling faint in the streets of the city (Lam. 2:11);

"there the signification is the same. Again:--

The whales draw out the breast, they give suck to their young ones the daughter of My people is become cruel the tongue of the suckling cleaveth to the roof of his mouth for thirst; the little children ask bread, and no man reaches it unto them (Lam. 4:3, 4)

the "suckling" again denoting innocence; "little children," the affections of good. In Moses:--

Without shall the sword bereave, and from the chambers terror, both the young man, and the virgin, the suckling with the old man (Deut. 32:25)

the "sword bereaving the young man, the virgin, the suckling with the old man," signifies that falsity will destroy the affection of truth, and the affection of good; also innocence together with wisdom. In Isaiah:--

They shall bring thy sons in their bosom, and thy daughters shall be carried upon the shoulder, and kings shall be thy nourishers, and their queens those who give thee suck (Isa. 49:22, 23)

where "kings thy nourishers" denotes intelligence; and "queens those who give thee suck," wisdom: and that this is of innocence, has been stated above.

AC 3184. And Abraham‘s servant, and his men. That this signifies from Divine things in the natural man, is evident from the signification of "Abraham’s servant," as being the natural man (n. 3019, 3020); and from the signification of "his men," as being all things therein (n. 3169); it is evident that Divine things in the natural man are signified, because the servant was sent by Abraham, who, as has been abundantly shown above, represents the Divine of the Lord.

AC 3185. And they blessed Rebekah, and said unto her. That this signifies devout wishes from Divine enlightenment, is evident from the signification of "blessing," in saying farewell to one who is departing, as being devout wishes for success and happiness; that here these were from Divine enlightenment, is evident from what presently follows; and also because enlightenment flows into the natural man through the affection of truth, which is " Rebekah," when being initiated into good, which is "Isaac."

AC 3186. Our sister, be thou for thousands of ten thousands. That this signifies the fructification of the affection of truth to infinitude, appears from the signification of "sister," who is Rebekah, as being the affection of truth (n. 3077, 3179, 3182); and from the signification of "being for thousands of ten thousands," as being fructification to infinitude; "thousands of ten thousands" here denote what is infinite, because the subject treated of is the Lord, in whom all things both in general and in particular are infinite. With man the case is this: Goods are not fructified and truths are not multiplied with him, until the conjunction of truth and of good has been effected in his rational, that is, until he is regenerate for then the fruits or offspring come forth from legitimate or heavenly marriage, which is that of good and truth. It is true that previously to this time the goods which he does appear as if they were goods and the truths appear as if they were truths; but they are not genuine, for the very soul, which is good wherein is innocence from the Lord, is not in them; thus neither do they affect the man and make him happy. The affection of love and of charity, together with the happiness thereof, which affection is the soul, is given of the Lord when man is being regenerated.

[2] That by "thousands" is signified much, and also what is infinite, may be seen above (n. 2575); and still more by "ten thousands," and still more by "thousands of ten thousands," as also in other passages. Thus in Moses:--

When the ark rested, he said, Return Jehovah, the ten thousands of the thousands of Israel (Num. 10:36)

where by "the ten thousands of the thousands" is also signified what is infinite, because it is predicated of the Lord, who is here "Jehovah." Again:--

Jehovah rose from Seir unto them; He shone forth from Mount Paran, and came from the ten thousands of holiness (Deut. 33:2)

where "ten thousands" also denote what is infinite. In David:--

The chariots of God are ten thousands of thousands of peaceable ones (Ps. 68:17);

where the "chariots of God" denote those things which are of the Word and of the doctrine thence derived; "ten thousands of thousands" denote the infinite things which are therein. In John:--

I saw, and I heard the voice of many angels round about the throne their number was ten thousands of ten thousands, and thousands of thousand (Rev. 5:11);

denoting that they were innumerable.

AC 3187. And may thy seed inherit the gate of those that hate thee. That this signifies the Lord‘s spiritual kingdom derived from the marriage of good and truth in the Divine Human, to which kingdom pertain charity and faith where before were evil and falsity, may appear from what was said and explained above (n. 2851), where nearly the same words occur. That "seed" denotes those who are called the spiritual, thus in the universal sense all who constitute the Lord’s spiritual kingdom, or what is the same, that kingdom itself, is evident from the signification of "seed," as being charity and faith (n. 1025, 1447, 1610, 1940), and accordingly those who are in charity through faith. That these are the spiritual, see (n. 2088, 2184, 2507, 2708, 2715, 2954); also that these have charity and faith from the marriage of good and truth in the Lord‘s Divine Human, thus that they have salvation therefrom, (n. 2661, 2716, 2833, 2834).

[2] In the Ancient Church this was a customary devout wish to a betrothed virgin, when she was going to be married:-’,Be thou for thousands of ten thousands, and may thy seed inherit the gate of thine enemies," or of "them that hate thee;" but the wise ones of that church by these words understood spiritual things; namely, that when they entered into the marriage of good and truth, that is, when they were regenerate, then goods and truths would be fructified to thousands of ten thousands, that is, immeasurably; and that charity and faith would succeed in the place where evil and falsity were before; but when the wisdom of the Ancient Church expired, they then no longer received from this devout wish any spiritual sense, but a wholly worldly sense, namely, that the posterity might be innumerable, and that it might take possession of and inherit the land of the Gentiles. Pre-eminently did the descendants of Jacob so understand these words; and they confirmed themselves in so doing by the fact that they not only increased immensely, but also inherited the land, which was to them the gate of their enemies; not knowing that all these things were representative, that is, representative of the Lord‘s celestial and spiritual kingdom, and that on the expulsion thence of evils and falsities there would succeed in their place good and truth; which meaning will clearly appear when of the Lord’s Divine mercy these representatives are opened.

[3] In particular, that is, with every man who becomes a kingdom of the Lord, the case also is this: Before he becomes this kingdom, that is, before he is being regenerated, he is inwardly nothing but evil and falsity; and infernal and diabolical spirits have possession of that which is called the "gate" (n. 2851); but when he is becoming a kingdom of the Lord, that is, when he is being regenerated, then evils and falsities, or what is the same, infernal and diabolical spirits, are driven out, and good and truth enter and inherit that place; and then there is in him a conscience of good and truth. And as the case is in particular, so also is it in general. From all this it is evident what is meant in the internal sense by the above words.

AC 3188. And Rebekah arose. That this signifies the elevation of the affection of truth and a consequent separation, that is, an elevation to the rational, and a separation from the natural; appears from the signification of "arising," as implying elevation (n. 2401, 2785, 2912, 2927, 3171); and whereas it implies elevation, it implies also separation and also from the representation of Rebekah, as being the affection of truth (n. 3077, 3179). From this it is evident that Rebekah arising" signifies the elevation of the affection of truth, and a separation from the natural (n. 3182).

AC 3189. And her damsels. That this signifies the subservient affections, is evident from the signification of "damsel," when Rebekah was so called, as being an affection in which is innocence (n. 3067, 3110); but when they are so called who followed Rebekah to serve her, they signify subservient affections. Every affection appears as something simple, or as one thing; but that it contains things innumerable, see (n. 3078); all things which are therein are affections, consociated in an incomprehensible form; they are also mutually subordinate to one another, for there are some which administer, and some which serve. The societies of heaven are in such a form, nay, so is the whole heaven, being arranged in order by the Lord according to the Divine form which is in Himself. The form of the Lord‘s spiritual kingdom comes forth in accordance with the orderly arrangement of the affections in His Divine Human, which orderly arrangement is treated of in the internal sense of this chapter and the following one. But there are very few things herein which can be unfolded to the apprehension, they being adapted to the perception of angels.

AC 3190. And they rode upon the camels. That this signifies the intellectual part elevated above natural memory-knowledges, is evident from the signification of "riding," as being to be elevated as to the intellectual part (n. 2761, 2762) and from the signification of "camels," as being general memory-knowledges in the natural man (n. 3048, 3071), thus natural memory-knowledges. The case herein is this: then truth is elevated out of the natural into the rational, it is taken out of the sphere of worldly light into the sphere of heavenly light, thus as it were from the obscurity of night into the clearness of day; for the things which are of the light of the world, in which are all natural things, are relatively as in night, but the things which are of the light of heaven, in which are spiritual things, are relatively as in day; and therefore when truth is elevated out of the natural toward the rational, the man is at the same time elevated into intelligence and into wisdom; moreover all intelligence and wisdom with man are from this source. This is what is signified by the intellectual part being elevated above natural memory-knowledges.

AC 3191. And followed the man. That this signifies under the auspices of Divine truth natural, is evident from the signification of "going after" or "following," as being here in the internal sense under the guidance or auspices; and from the signification of the "man," as being truth (n. 3134); here, Divine truth natural (n. 3184).

AC 3192. And the servant took Rebekah and went away. That this signifies that Divine good natural effected the initiation, is evident from the signification of the "servant," as being Divine good natural (n. 3184); and from the signification of "taking Rebekah and going away," as being to initiate, that is, to introduce to Isaac; that is, to Divine good in the rational; as may appear without further explication. The case herein is this: Truth out of the natural could not be elevated to good in the rational, except through Divine truth and Divine good, both natural; Divine truth natural, which is called the "man," must show the way and lead; Divine good natural, which is called the "servant," must introduce and initiate. To speak comparatively, these are as two wings which uplift. But these things cannot as yet be more fully unfolded to the apprehension; for it must first be known what Divine truth natural is, and what Divine good natural, which subjects are treated of in the internal sense in the following chapters concerning Joseph.

AC 3193. Verses 62, 63. And Isaac came from coming from Beer-lahai-roi; and he dwelt in the land of the south. And Isaac went out to meditate in the field toward evening; and he lifted up his eyes and saw, and behold there were camels coming. "Isaac came from coming from Beer-lahai-roi," signifies Divine good rational born from the Divine truth itself: "and he dwelt in the land of the south," signifies consequently in Divine light; "and Isaac went out to meditate in the field," signifies the state of the rational in good; "toward evening," signifies relatively to those things which are beneath; "and he lifted up his eyes and saw," signifies attention; "and behold there were camels coming," signifies directed to the general memory-knowledges in the natural man.

AC 3194. Isaac came from coming from (or to) Beer-lahai-roi. That this signifies Divine good rational born from Divine truth itself, is evident from the representation of Isaac, as being the Lord’s Divine rational (n. 2083, 2630); here, as to the Divine good therein, because Divine truth called forth out of the natural (which Divine truth is represented by Rebekah) was not as yet conjoined with good; this conjunction is treated of in the verses which follow;-and also from the signification of "to come from coming from Beer-lahai-roi," as denoting to be born from Divine truth; Beer-lahai-roi in the original tongue signifies "the fountain to the Living One that seeth me;" as above (Gen. 16:13, 14) where we read:--Hagar called the name of Jehovah that was speaking unto her, "Thou art the God that seeth me for she said, Have I also here seen after Him that seeth me I Therefore she called the fountain Beer-lahai-roi (the fountain to the Living One that seeth me). What is signified by these words may be seen above (n. 1952-1958); where also it is evident that the "fountain" is Divine truth; and that the "Living One that seeth me" is Divine good rational, which is there called the Lord‘s interior man, from Divine truth. The case in regard to this very deep arcanum is this: The veriest Divine has Good and Truth; the Lord as to the Divine Human came forth from the Divine good, and was born of the Divine truth; or what is the same, the very esse (or being) of the Lord was Divine good, and the very existere (or manifestation) was Divine truth; and this was the source of the Lord’s Divine good rational, with which He conjoined the Divine truth from the Human.

AC 3195. And he dwelt in the land of the south. That this signifies consequently in Divine light, is evident from the signification of "dwelling," as being to live (n. 1293), and as being predicated of good (n. 2268, 2451, 2712); and from the signification of the "land of the south," as being Divine light; for the "south" signifies light, and indeed the light of intelligence, which is wisdom (n. 1458); but the "land of the south" signifies the place and state where this light is; so here, that " Isaac came from coming from Beer-lahai-roi, and he dwelt in the land of the south," signifies that Divine good rational, because born from Divine truth, was in Divine light.

[2] In the Word frequent mention is made of "light," and by this in the internal sense is signified the truth which is from good but in the supreme internal sense there is signified the Lord Himself, because He is good and truth itself. Moreover there actually is light in heaven, but infinitely brighter than the light on earth (n. 1053, 1117, 1521-1533, 1619-1632); and in this light spirits and angels see one another, and by means of it is displayed all the glory which is in heaven. In regard to its lucidity, this light does indeed appear like the light in the world; but still it is not like it, for it is not natural, but spiritual, having in it wisdom; so that it is nothing else than wisdom which so shines before the eyes of the angels; and therefore the wiser the angels are, the brighter is the light in which they are (n. 2776). Moreover this light illumines the understanding of man, especially that of a regenerate man; but it is not perceived by man so long as he is in the life of the body, because of the light of the world, which then is regnant. Moreover the evil spirits in the other life see one another, and also see many representatives which exist in the world of spirits, and this indeed they do from the light of heaven; but their lumen is such as proceeds from a fire of coals, for the light of heaven is changed into such a lumen when it comes to them.

[3] As regards the very origin of light, this has been from eternity from the Lord alone; for Divine good itself and Divine truth, from which light comes, is the Lord. The Divine Human, which was from eternity (John 17:5), was this light itself. And whereas this light could no longer affect the human race, which had removed itself so far from good and truth, thus from light, and had cast itself into darkness, therefore the Lord willed to put on by birth the human itself; for thus He could illumine not only the rational but also the natural things of man; for He made both the rational and the natural in Himself Divine, in order that He might also he a light to those who were in such gross darkness.

[4] That the Lord is light, that is, good itself and truth itself, and that thus from Him is all intelligence and wisdom, consequently all salvation, is evident from many passages in the Word, as in John:--

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and God was the Word; in Him was life, and the life was the light of men. John came to bear witness of the light; he was not that light, but came that he might bear witness of the light. That was the true light which enlighteneth every man that cometh into the world (John 1:1, 4, 7-9).

The "Word" was the Divine truth, thus the Lord Himself as to the Divine Human, concerning which it is said that "that Word was with God, and God was the Word."

[5] In the same Evangelist:--

This is the judgment, that light is come into the world, but men loved the darkness rather than the light (John 3:19)

where "light" denotes the Divine truth. Again:--

Jesus said, I am the light of the world he that followeth Me shall not walk in darkness, but shall have the light of life (John 8:12).

Again:--

Yet a little while is the light with you walk while ye have the light, lest darkness seize upon you; while ye have the light, believe in the light, that ye may be sons of light (John 12:35, 36).

Again:--

He that seeth Me seeth Him that sent me I am come a light into the world, that whosoever believeth in Me may not abide in the darkness (John 12:46, 46).

In Luke:--

Mine eyes have seen Thy salvation, which Thou hast prepared before the face of all peoples, a light for revelation to the Gentiles, and the glory of Thy people Israel (Luke 2:30-32).

This is the prophecy of Simeon concerning the Lord when He‘ was born.

[6] In Matthew:--

The people that sat in darkness saw a great light, and to them that sat in the region and shadow of death, did light spring up (Matthew 4:16; Isa. 9:2);

from which passages it is very plain that the Lord as to the Divine good and truth in the Divine Human, is called "light." Also in the prophecies of the Old Testament, as in Isaiah:--

The light of Israel shall be for a fire, and his Holy One for a flame (Isa. 10:17).

Again:--

I Jehovah have called thee in righteousness, and I will give thee for a Covenant of the people, for a light of the Gentiles (Isa. 42:6).

Again:--

I have given thee for a light of the Gentiles, that thou mayest be My salvation, unto the end of the earth (Isa. 49:6).

Again:--

Arise, shine, for thy light is come, and the glory of Jehovah is risen upon thee. The Gentiles shall walk to thy light, and kings to the brightness of thy rising (Isa. 60:1, 3).

[7] That all the light of heaven, consequently wisdom and intelligence, is from the Lord, is thus taught in John:--

The holy city New Jerusalem, descending from God out of heaven, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband, hath no need of the sun, neither of the moon, to shine in it the glory of God will enlighten it, and the Lamb is the lamp thereof (Rev. 21:2, 23).

Again, speaking of the same:--

There shall be no night there, and they need no lamp, neither light of the sun, for the Lord God giveth them light (Rev. 22:5).

[8] Again in Isaiah:--

The sun shall be no more thy light by day, neither for brightness shall the moon give light unto thee but Jehovah shall be unto thee an everlasting light, and thy God thy glory thy sun shall no more go down, neither shall thy moon withdraw itself, for Jehovah shall be thine everlasting light (Isaiah 60:19, 20).

The sun shall be no more thy light by day, neither for brightness shall the moon give light unto thee," denotes that this will be the case with the things not of natural, but of spiritual light, which is signified by "Jehovah being an everlasting light." That "Jehovah," as mentioned here and elsewhere in the Old Testament, is the Lord, may be seen above (n. 1343, 1736, 2156, 2329, 2921, 3023, 3035).

[9] And that He is the light of heaven He also manifested to the three disciples, Peter, James, and John, at His transfiguration, when His face did shine as the sun, and His raiment became as the light (Matt. 17:2). His "face as the sun" was the Divine good; His "raiment as the light" was the Divine truth. Hence it may be known what is meant by the expression in the benediction:--

Jehovah make His faces shine upon thee, and be merciful unto thee (Num. 6:25)

that the "faces of Jehovah" are mercy, peace, and good, may be seen above (n. 222, 223); and that the "sun" is the Divine love; thus that it is the Divine love of the Lord which appears as a sun in the heaven of angels, may also be seen above (n. 30-38, 1053, 1521, 1529-1531, 2441, 2495).

AC 3196. And Isaac went out to meditate in the field. That this signifies the state of the rational in good, is evident from the representation of Isaac, as being the Divine rational (concerning which often above); and from the signification of "meditating in the field," as being its state in good; for meditating is a state of the rational when it applies the mind intently; but a "field" is doctrine and the things of doctrine (n. 368); thus the things of the church as to good (n. 2971); hence came the ancient form of expression, "to meditate in the field," denoting to cogitate in good; which is the act of a man not married, when thinking about a wife.

AC 3197. Toward evening. That this signifies in respect to those things which are beneath, is evident from the signification of "evening," as being what is obscure (n. 3056); and whereas those things with man which are beneath, namely, those which are of the natural mind, relatively to those which are above, that is, in the rational mind, are obscure, therefore by "evening" is signified what is relatively in obscurity, as is evident from the series of things in the internal sense; for the subject here treated of is truth from the natural, which was to be conjoined with good in the rational; and whereas this conjunction is here treated of, and the enlightenment of the natural man thereby, therefore by "meditating in the field toward evening," is signified the state of the rational in good relatively to those things which are beneath; the state in good being described by "dwelling in the land of the south," that is, in Divine light, relatively to which the things beneath were in the "evening," that is, before the conjunction of truth and good was effected, and before the natural also was made Divine.

AC 3198. And he lifted up his eyes and saw. That this signifies attention, is evident from the signification of "lifting up the eyes," as being to think (n. 2789, 2829), here attention, because it is said, " he lifted up his eyes and saw," and it is predicated of rational good, with which truth from the natural was not yet conjoined.

AC 3199. And behold there were camels coming. That this signifies directed to the general memory-knowledges in the natural man, is evident from the signification of "camels," as being general memory-knowledges in the natural man (n. 3048, 3071) attention was directed to these because truth was expected to come from them, as is evident from what has been frequently said and shown above in this chapter.

AC 3200. In these two verses is described the state of rational good when it is in expectation of the truth that is to be conjoined with it as a bride to a husband. In the two verses which immediately follow, is described the state of truth when it is near, and perceives the good with which it is to be conjoined. But it is to be known that these states did not come forth once only, but continually during the Lord’s whole life in the world, until He was glorified. The case is the same with the regenerate; for they are not regenerated at once, but continually during their whole life, and even in the other life; for man can never be perfected.

AC 3201. Verses 64, 65. And Rebekah lifted up her eyes, and saw Isaac, and she alighted from off the camel. And she said unto the servant, What man is this that walketh in the field to meet us? And the servant said, It is my lord. And she took a veil and covered herself. "Rebekah lifted up her eyes, and saw Isaac," signifies the reciprocal attention of the affection of truth; "and she alighted from off the camel," signifies the separation thereof from the memory-knowledges in the natural man at the perception of rational good; " and she said unto the servant," signifies exploration from the Divine natural; "what man is this that walketh in the field to meet us?" signifies concerning the rational which was in good alone; "and the servant said, It is my lord," signifies acknowledgment. "And she took a veil and covered herself," signifies the appearances of truth.

AC 3202. Rebekah lifted up her eyes, and saw Isaac. That this signifies the reciprocal attention of the affection of truth, appears from the signification 3325 of "lifting up the eyes and seeing," as being attention (n. 3198); here, reciprocal, because it was before said of Isaac that he "lifted up his eyes and saw," and here it is said of Rebekah, that she "lifted up her eyes, and saw Isaac;" and also from the representation of Rebekah, as being the affection of truth, concerning which see above in many places.

AC 3203. And she alighted from off the camel. That this signifies the separation thereof from the memory-knowledges in the natural man at the perception of rational good, is evident from the signification of "alighting," as being to be separated; and from the signification of "camels," as being the memory-knowledges in the natural man (n. 3048, 3071). That it was at the perception of the rational good which is represented by Isaac, is evident.

[2] What it is to be separated from the natural man, was stated and shown above (n. 3161, 3175, 3182, 3188, 3190), namely, that the affection of truth is separated therefrom when it is no longer a matter of memory-knowledge, but becomes of the life; for when it becomes of the life, by habit the man becomes imbued with it like his disposition or nature; and when he is thus imbued with it, it then flows forth into act as it were spontaneously, and this without his thinking about it from any memory-knowledge; nay, when it becomes of the life it can then exercise command over the memory-knowledges, and draw from them innumerable things which confirm. Such is the case with all truth; in the first age it is a matter of memory-knowledge, but as the man advances in age it becomes of the life. The case herein is like that of children when they are learning to walk, to speak, to think, also to see from the understanding, and to conclude from the judgment which things, when by habit they have become voluntary, and thus spontaneous, vanish from among matters of memory-knowledge, and flow forth of their own accord

[3] So also is it with those things which are of the knowledges of spiritual good and truth with men who from the Lord are being regenerated or born again; in the beginning such men are not unlike children, and at first spiritual truths are to them mere memory-knowledges; for doctrinal things, when being learned and inserted in the memory, are nothing else; but these are successively called forth thence by the Lord, and are implanted in the life, that is, in good; for good is life. When this has been effected there takes place as it were a turning round, namely, that the man begins to act from good, that is, from life, and no longer as before from memory-knowledge. Thus he who is being born anew is in this respect like a child (although the things imbibed are of the spiritual life); until he no longer acts from what is doctrinal, or truth; but from charity, or good; and when this is the case, he then for the first time is in a blessed state, and is in wisdom.

[4] All this shows what it is to be separated from the memory-knowledges in the natural man, which is signified by Rebekah‘s alighting from off the camel; and this before she knew that it was Isaac; in which circumstances, as every one can see, some arcana are involved.

AC 3204. And she said unto the servant. That this signifies exploration from the Divine natural, appears from the signification here of "saying," as denoting to explore; for she asked, "I’,hat man is this that walketh in the field to meet us?" and from the signification of the "servant," as being the Divine natural (n. 3191, 3192).

AC 3205. What man is this that walketh in the field to meet us? That this signifies concerning the rational which was in good alone, namely, exploration respecting it, appears from what was said above concerning Isaac, that "he went out to meditate in the field," by which is signified the state of the rational in good (n. 3196); here, the rational is signified by "this man;" and its being in good is signified by "walking" (that is, meditating) "in the field." "To meet us" denotes for conjunction.

AC 3206. And the servant said, I it is my lord. That this signifies acknowledgment, namely, by the Divine natural, which is here the "servant," is evident without explication. That initiation is effected by the Divine natural, see (n. 3192); also that good recognizes its own truth; and truth its own good (n. 3179).

AC 3207. And she took a veil and covered herself. That this signifies appearances of truth, is evident from the signification of the veil with which brides covered the face when they first saw the bridegroom, as being appearances of truth; for among the ancients brides represented the affections of truth, and bridegrooms the affections of good; or what is the same, brides represented the church, which was called a "bride" from the affection of truth; the affection of good which is from the Lord being the bridegroom, and hence all through the Word the Lord Himself is called the "bridegroom." Brides veiled their faces on their first coming to the bridegroom, in order that they might represent appearances of truth. Appearances of truth, are not truths in themselves, but they appear as truths; concerning which see below. The affection of truth cannot approach the affection of good except through appearances of truth; nor is it stripped of appearances until it is being conjoined; for then it becomes the truth of good, and becomes genuine in so far as the good is genuine.

[2] Good itself is holy, because it is the Divine proceeding from the Lord, and flows in by the higher way or gate in man; but in so far as its origin is concerned, truth is not holy; because it flows in by a lower way or gate, and at first is of the natural man; but when it is elevated thence toward the rational man it is by degrees purified; and at the first sight of the affection of good it is separated from memory-knowledges, and puts on appearances of truth, and thus comes near to good; an indication that such is its origin, and that it could not endure the first sight of Divine good until it has entered into the bridegroom‘s chamber (that is, into the sanctuary of good), and the conjunction has been effected; for then truth no longer looks at good from appearances, or through appearances; but it is looked at from good apart from them.

[3] Be it known however that neither with man, nor indeed with an angel, are any truths ever pure, that is, devoid of appearances; for all both in general and in particular are appearances of truth; nevertheless they are accepted by the Lord as truths, provided good is in them. To the Lord alone belong pure truths, because Divine; for as the Lord is Good itself, so He is Truth itself. But see what has been said concerning truths and their appearances; namely, That the coverings and veils of the tent signified appearances of truth (n. 2576): That truths with man are appearances tainted with fallacies (n. 2053): That the rational things of man are appearances of truth (n. 2516): That truths are in appearances (n. 2196, 2203, 2209, 2242): That Divine good flows into appearances, even into fallacies (n. 2554): That appearances of truth are adapted by the Lord as if they were truths (n. 1832): That the Word is written according to appearances (n. 1838).

[4] But what appearances are, may be clearly seen from those passages of the Word where it speaks according to appearances. There are however degrees of appearances of truth. Natural appearances of truth are mostly fallacies; but with those who are in good they are not to be called fallacies, but appearances, and even in some respects truths; for the good which is in therein, and in which is the Divine, causes another essence to be in them. But rational appearances of truth are more and more interior; in them are the heavens, that is, the angels who are in the heavens (n. 2576).

[5] In order that some idea may be formed of what appearances of truth are, let the following examples serve for illustration. I. Man believes that he is reformed and regenerated through the truth of faith; but this is an appearance; he is reformed and regenerated through the good of faith, that is, through charity toward the neighbor and love to the Lord. II. Man believes that truth enables us to perceive what good is, because it teaches; but this is an appearance; it is good that enables truth to perceive, for good is the soul or life of truth. III. Man believes that truth introduces to good when he lives according to the truth which he has learned; but it is good which flows into truth, and introduces it to itself. IV. It appears to man that truth perfects good, when yet good perfects truth. V. Goods of life appear to man to be the fruits of faith; but they are the fruits of charity. From these few examples it may in some measure be known what appearances of truth are. Such appearances are innumerable.

AC 3208. Verses 66, 67. And the servant told Isaac all the words that he had done. And Isaac brought her into his mother Sarah’s tent. And he took Rebekah, and she was to him for a woman, and he loved her; and Isaac was comforted after his mother. "The servant told Isaac all the words that he had done," signifies perception from the Divine natural, as to how the case was "and Isaac brought her into his mother Sarah‘s tent," signifies the sanctuary of truth in the Divine Human; "and be took Rebekah, and she was to him for a woman, and he loved her," signifies conjunction; "and Isaac was comforted after his mother, signifies a new state.

AC 3209. The servant told Isaac all the words that he had done. That this signifies perception from the Divine natural as to how the case was, appears from the signification of telling, as being to perceive; for perception is a kind of internal telling; wherefore perceiving, in the historicals of the Word, is expressed by "telling," and also by "saying" (n. 1791, 1815, 1819, 1822, 1898, 1919, 2080, 2619, 2862);--and also from the signification here of the "servant," as being the Divine natural (concerning which presently); and from the signification of "words," as being actual things (n. 1785); from which considerations it is plain that "the servant told all the words that he had done," signifies that Divine good rational perceived from the Divine natural how the case was. The case herein is this: The rational is in a degree above the natural, and rational good in the Lord was Divine; but the truth which was to be elevated out of the natural was not Divine until it was conjoined with the Divine good of the rational. In order therefore that the good of the rational might flow into the natural, there must be a medium; this medium could be nothing else than something natural which should partake of the Divine; and this is represented by the "elder servant in Abraham’s house, administering all things which he had" (n. 3019, 3020); and that this "servant" signifies the Divine natural, may be seen above (n. 3191, 3192, 3204, 3206).

AC 3210. And Isaac brought her into his mother Sarah‘s tent. That this signifies the sanctuary of truth in the Divine Human, is evident from the signification of "tent," as being what is holy (n. 414, 1102, 2145, 2152, 2576), and thus a sanctuary; and from the signification of "Sarah the mother," as being Divine truth (n. 1468, 1901, 2063, 2065, 2904), of which was born the Divine Human, whose rational is represented by the son Isaac; whence it is evident that "Isaac brought her into his mother Sarah’s tent," signifies that rational good brought with it the truth which is represented by Rebekah, into the sanctuary of truth.

[2] What the sanctuary of truth is may be seen from what was said above (n. 3194) concerning the Lord‘s Divine Human; namely, that the veriest Divine has Good and Truth; and that the Lord, as to the Divine Human, came forth from the Divine good, and was born (namely, as to the Divine Human of the Divine truth; or what is the same, that the very esse of the Lord was Divine good, but the very existere was Divine truth: from this was the Divine good rational, with which He conjoined Divine truth from the Human. Concerning this very deep arcanum more cannot be said. We will only add that it is the veriest Divine good and truth in the Lord’s Divine Human with which truth from the Human was conjoined, that was signified by the Sanctuary, or Holy of holies, in the tabernacle, and in the temple; and its quality was represented by the things therein contained, as by the golden altar, by the table on which were the show-breads (panes propositionis), by the candlestick, and still more internally by the propitiatory, and by the ark, and inmostly by the testimony, which was the law promulgated from Sinai, and which was the very Holy of Holies, or the Sanctuary of truth.

AC 3211. And he took Rebekah, and she was to him for a woman, and he loved her. That this signifies the conjunction, namely, of good and truth, is evident without explication. The reason it is said that Rebekah was to him "for a woman," and not for a wife, is that between rational good and the truth called forth from the natural and made Divine, it is not marriage that takes place, but a covenant resembling a marriage covenant. The Divine marriage itself which is in the Lord is the union of the Divine Essence with the Human Essence, and of the Human Essence with the Divine Essence (n. 2803). This is the reason why Rebekah is called "woman," not wife.

AC 3212. And Isaac was comforted after his mother. That this signifies a new state, is evident from the signification of "receiving comfort," as being a new state; for a state of consolation is new; and that it succeeded to the foregoing is signified by "after his mother." This new state is the state of glorification of the rational; as before in respect to good, so now in respect to truth. The rational was glorified when it was made Divine in respect to both.

[2] That the Lord as to the human was made new, that is, glorified (or what is the same, was made Divine), no one can possibly conceive (thus neither believe) who is in worldly and corporeal loves for he is altogether ignorant what the spiritual and celestial is, nor indeed is he willing to know. But he who is not in worldly and corporeal loves, is capable of perceiving this, for he believes that the Lord is one with the Father, and that from Him proceeds all that is holy; consequently that He is Divine even as to the Human; and whoever believes, perceives in his own way.

[3] The state of the Lord‘s glorification may in some manner be conceived from the state of the regeneration of man, for the regeneration of man is an image of the glorification of the Lord (n. 3043, 3138). When man is being regenerated, he is then becoming altogether another, and is being made new; therefore also when he has been regenerated, he is called "born again," and "created anew." Then, although he has a similar face and a similar speech, yet his mind is not similar; his mind, when he is regenerate, is open toward heaven, and there dwells therein love to the Lord and charity toward his neighbor, together with faith. It is the mind that makes a man another, and a new man. This change of state cannot be perceived in the body of man, but in his spirit, the body being merely the covering of his spirit; and when it is put off, then his spirit appears, and this (provided he has been regenerated) in altogether another form, for it then has the form of love and charity in beauty inexpressible (n. 553), instead of its pristine form, which was that of hatred and cruelty with a deformity also inexpressible. This shows what a regenerate person is, or one who is born again, or created anew; namely, that he is altogether another, and is a new man.

[4] From this image it may in some measure be conceived what the glorification of the Lord is. He was not regenerated as a man is; but became Divine, and this from the very Divine Love itself, for He was made the Divine Love itself. What his form then was, was made apparent to Peter, James, and John when it was given them to see Him, not with the eyes of the body but with the eyes of the spirit, namely--that His countenance shone like the sun (Matt. 17:2); and that this was His Divine Human is evident from the voice which then came out of the cloud, saying, "This is my beloved Son"’ (Matthew 17:5). That the "Son" is the Divine Human, may be seen above (n. 2628).

CONTINUATION CONCERNING REPRESENTATIONS AND CORRESPONDENCES

AC 3213. In the world of spirits there come forth innumerable and almost continual representatives, which are forms of actual things spiritual and celestial, not unlike those which are in the world. Whence these come it has been granted to me to know by daily intercourse with spirits and angels. They inflow from heaven, and from the ideas and speech of the angels there; for the ideas of angels and their derivative speech, when they come down to spirits, are exhibited representatively in various ways. From these representations upright and well disposed spirits are enabled to know what the angels are saying among themselves, for inwardly within the representatives there is something angelic, which, in consequence of its power to excite affection, is perceived even as to its quality. Angelic ideas and speech cannot be exhibited before spirits in any other way; for as compared with the idea of a spirit an angelic idea contains things illimitable; and unless it were formed and exhibited representatively, and thus visibly by images, a spirit would scarcely understand any thing of its contents, which are for the most part unutterable. But when the ideas are represented by forms, then in so far as the more general things are concerned they become comprehensible to spirits. And wonderful to say there is not even the smallest thing in that which is represented which does not express something spiritual and celestial that is in the idea of the angelic society from which the representative flows down.

AC 3214. Representatives of things spiritual and celestial sometimes come forth in a long series, continued for an hour or two, in such an order successively as is marvelous. There are societies in which these representatives take place; and it has been given me to be with them for many months. But these representations are of such a nature that it would take many pages to relate and describe a single one of them in its order. They are very delightful, for something new and unexpected continually follows in succession, and this until what is represented is being fully perfected; and when all things have been perfectly represented, it is possible to contemplate everything in one view; and then it is at the same time given to take note of what is signified by each detail. Moreover good spirits are in this way initiated into spiritual and celestial ideas.

AC 3215. The representatives that come forth before spirits are of an incredible variety; yet they are for the most part similar to things which exist on the earth, in its three kingdoms. For the better understanding of their nature, see what has been related above concerning them, (n. 1521, 1532, 1619-1625, 1807, 1808, 1971, 1974, 1977, 1980, 1981, 2299, 2601, 2758).

AC 3216. In order that it may be still better known how the case is with representatives in the other life, that is, with those things which appear in the world of spirits, take some further examples. When the angels are speaking about the doctrinal things of charity and faith, then sometimes in a lower sphere, where there is a corresponding society of spirits, there appears the form or pattern of a city or cities, with palaces therein exhibiting such skill in architecture as is amazing, so that you would say that the very art itself was there in its native home; not to mention houses of varied aspect; and wonderful to say in all these objects both in general and in particular there is not the smallest point, or visible atom, that does not represent something of the angelic idea and speech: so that it is evident what innumerable things are contained in these; and also what is signified by the cities seen by the prophets in the Word; and likewise what by the holy city or New Jerusalem; and what by the cities in the prophetic Word; namely, the doctrinal things of charity and faith (n. 402, 2449).

AC 3217. When the angels are discoursing of that which relates to the understanding, then in the world of spirits, beneath the angels, or in the corresponding societies, there appear horses; and these of a size, form, color, attitude, and varied equipment, in accordance with the ideas which the angels have concerning the understanding. There is also a place at some depth a little to the right, which is called the abode of the intelligent, where horses continually appear, and this by reason of those present being in thought about what is of the understanding; and when angels whose discourse is about this subject flow into their thoughts, there is a representation of horses. This shows what was signified by the horses seen by the prophets, and also by the horses mentioned elsewhere in the Word; namely, the things of the understanding (n. 2760-2762).

AC 3218. When the angels are in affections, and are at the same time discoursing about them, then in the lower sphere among spirits such things fall into representative species of animals. When the discourse is about good affections, there are presented beautiful, tame, and useful animals, such as were used in sacrifice in the representative Divine worship in the Jewish Church-as lambs, sheep, kids, she-goats, ran‘s, he-goats, calves, bullocks, oxen; and then whatever appears upon the animal presents some image of their thought, which it is given to upright and well disposed spirits to perceive. This shows what was signified by the animals that were employed in the rites of the Jewish Church; and what by the same when mentioned in the Word; namely, affections (n. 1823, 2179, 2180). But the discourse of the angels about evil affections is represented by beasts that are repulsive. fierce, and useless, such as tigers, bears, wolves, scorpions, serpents, mice, and the like; and these affections are also signified by the same beasts in the Word.

AC 3219. When the angels are conversing about knowledges, and ideas, and influx, there then appear in the world of spirits as it were birds, formed in accordance with the subject of their discourse. Hence it is that in the Word "birds" signify rational things, or those which are of thought (n. 40, 745, 776, 991). There were once presented to my view birds, one dark and unsightly, but two noble and beautiful; and when I saw them, there then fell upon me some spirits with such violence as to strike a tremor into my nerves and bones. I imagined that then, as several times before, evil spirits were assaulting me, with intent to destroy me; but this was not the case; for when the tremor ceased, together with the emotion of the spirits who fell upon me, I spoke with them, asking what was the matter.

[2] They said that they had fallen down from a certain angelic society in which there was discourse concerning thoughts and influx; and that they had held the opinion that things relating to thought flow in from without, that is, through the external senses, according to the appearance; whereas the heavenly society in which they were, held the opinion that they inflow from within; and as they (the speakers) were in falsity, they fell down-not that they were cast down, for the angels cast no one down from them, but being in falsity they fell down of themselves; and they said that this was the cause.

[3] By this it was given to know that discourse in heaven concerning thoughts and influx is represented by birds; and that of those who are in falsity by dark and unsightly birds; but that of those who are in the truth, by birds noble and beautiful. I was at the same time instructed that all things of thought inflow from within, and not from without, although it appears so; and I was told that it is contrary to order for the posterior to flow into the prior, or the grosser into the purer; thus for the body to inflow into the soul.

AC 3220. When the angels are discoursing about things of intelligence and wisdom, and about perceptions and knowledges, the influx from them into the corresponding societies of spirits falls into representations of such things as are in the vegetable kingdom; as into representations of paradises, of vine-yards, of forests, of meadows with flowers, and into many lovely forms that surpass all human imagination. Hence it is that things which are of wisdom and intelligence are described in the Word by paradises, vineyards, forests, meadows; and that where these are mentioned, such things are signified.

AC 3221. The discourses of the angels are sometimes represented by clouds, and by their forms, colors, movements, and changes; things affirmative of truth by bright and ascending clouds; things negative by dark and descending clouds; things affirmative of falsity by dusky and black clouds; consent and dissent by the various gatherings together and partings asunder of the clouds, and these latter as in a sky like that of the heavens in the night.

AC 3222. Moreover loves and their affections are represented by flames, and this with inexpressible variation; whereas truths are represented by lights, and by innumerable modifications of light. This shows whence it is that by "flames" in the Word are signified the goods which are of love; and by "lights" the truths which are of faith.

AC 3223. There are two lights whereby man is enlightened--the light of the world, and the light of heaven. The light of the world is from the sun; the light of heaven is from the Lord. The light of the world is for the natural or external man, thus for those things which are in hint, and although the things which are therein do not appear to be of this light, they nevertheless are so; for nothing can be comprehended by the natural man except by such things as come forth and appear in the solar world, thus except they have somewhat of form from the light and shade therein. All ideas of time and ideas of space, which are of so much account in the natural man that he cannot think without them, are also of the light of the world. But the light of heaven is for the spiritual or internal man. Man’s interior mind, in which are his intellectual ideas that are called immaterial, is in this light. Man is unaware of this, although he calls his intellect sight, and ascribes light to it; the reason is that so long as he is in worldly and corporeal things he has a perception only of such things as are of the light of the world, but not of such things as are of the light of heaven; the light of heaven is from the Lord alone, and the universal heaven is in this light.

[2] This light (namely, that of heaven) is immensely more perfect than the light of the world; the things which in the light of the world make one ray, in the light of heaven make myriads; within the light of heaven there are intelligence and wisdom. This light is that which flows into the light of the world which is in the external or natural man, and causes him to perceive sensuously the objects of actual things; and unless this light flowed in, man could not have any perception, for the things which are of the light of the world derive from it their life. Between these lights, or between the things which are in the light of heaven and those in the light of the world, there exists a correspondence when the external or natural man makes one with the internal or spiritual man, that is, when the former is subservient to the latter; and the things which then come forth in the light of the world are representative of such things as come forth in the light of heaven.

AC 3224. It is surprising that man does not as yet know that his intellectual mind is in a certain light that is altogether different from the light of the world; but such is the condition that to those who are in the light of the world the light of heaven is as it were darkness, and to those who are in the light of heaven the light of the world is as it were darkness. This arises principally from the loves, which are the heats of the light. They who are in the loves of self and of the world, thus only in the heat of the light of the world, are affected solely by evils and falsities, and these are the things which extinguish truths, which are of the light of heaven. But they who are in love to the Lord and in love toward the neighbor, thus in spiritual heat, which is of the light of heaven, are affected with goods and truths, which extinguish falsities; but still with these persons there exists a correspondence.

[2] Spirits who are only in the things which are of the light of the world, and are thence in falsities derived from evils, have indeed light from heaven in the other life, but such a light as is fatuous, or as that which issues from a lighted coal or firebrand; but on the approach of the light of heaven this light is at once extinguished, and becomes thick darkness. They who are in this light are in phantasies, and the things which they see in phantasies they believe to be truths, nor to them is anything else truth. Their phantasies are also closely bound to filthy and obscene objects, with which they are most especially delighted; thus they think like persons who are insane and delirious. In regard to falsities, they do not reason whether these be so or not, but they instantly affirm them; whereas in regard to goods and truths they carry on a continual ratiocination, which terminates in what is negative.

[3] For truths and goods, which are from the light of heaven, flow into the interior mind, which with them is closed; wherefore the light flows in around and outside of this mind, and becomes such that it is modified solely by the falsities which appear to them as truths. Truths and goods cannot be acknowledged, except with those whose interior mind is open, into which the light from the Lord may inflow; and so far as this mind is open, truths and goods are acknowledged. This mind is open only with those who are in innocence, in love to the Lord, and in charity toward their neighbor; but not with those who are in the truths of faith, unless they are at the same time in the good of life.

AC 3225. From all this then it is evident what correspondence is and whence it is, also what representation is and whence; namely, that there is correspondence between those things which are of the light of heaven and those which are of the light of the world, that is, between those things which are of the internal or spiritual man and those which are of the external or natural man; and that there is representation in regard to whatever comes forth in the things which are of the light of the world (that is, in regard to whatever comes forth in the external or natural man), relatively to those which are of the light of heaven, that is, which are from the internal or spiritual man.

AC 3226. Among the eminent faculties which man possesses, although he is ignorant of it, and which he carries with him into the other life when he passes thither after his liberation from the body, is that he perceives what is signified by the representatives which appear in the other life; also that he is able by the sense of his mind to express fully in a moment of time what he could not express during hours in the body; and this by ideas from those things which are of the light of heaven, assisted and given as it were wings by suitable appearances representative of the subject of discourse, which are such as cannot be described; and whereas man after death comes into these faculties, and in the other life has no need to be instructed respecting them, it is evident that he is in them (that is, that they are in him) during his life in the body, although he does not know it.

[2] The reason of this is that there is a continual influx with man through heaven from the Lord. This influx is an influx of spiritual and celestial things, which fall into his natural things and are there presented representatively. In heaven among the angels nothing else is thought of than the celestial and spiritual things of the Lord‘s kingdom; but in the world, with man, scarcely anything else is thought of than the corporeal and natural things which belong to the kingdom in which he is, and to the necessaries of life. And since the spiritual and celestial things of heaven which flow in are presented representatively with man In his natural things, they therefore remain implanted, and when a man puts off the body and leaves the world behind, he is in them.

AC 3227. The subject of Representations and Correspondences is continued at the end of the next chapter.


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