HEAVENLY SECRETS
Emanuel Swedenborg

Back | Next | Index | Home


AC GENESIS Chapter 26

AC 3353. Most men believe that when the Last Judgment comes, all things in the visible world will be destroyed; that the earth will be consumed by fire; the sun and the moon dissipated; that the stars will vanish away; and that a new heaven and a new earth will afterwards arise. They have conceived this opinion from the prophetic revelations in which such things are mentioned. But that the case is very different may be seen from what has been shown above concerning the Last Judgment (n. 900, 931, 1850, 2117-2133) from which it is manifest that the Last Judgment is nothing else than the end of the church with one nation, and its beginning with another, which end and beginning occur when there is no longer any acknowledgment of the Lord, or what is the same, when there is no faith. There is no acknowledgment, or no faith, when there is no charity; for faith is impossible except with those who are in charity. That at such a time there is an end of the church, and a transference of it to others, is plainly evident from all the things the Lord Himself taught and foretold in the Evangelists concerning that last day, or consummation of the age (Matt. 24, Mark 13, and Luke 21).

[2] But as these passages cannot be comprehended by anyone without the key, which is the internal sense, I may unfold in regular order the things contained in them, beginning here with these words in Matthew:--

The disciples came unto Him privately, saying, Tell us, when shall these things be? and what shall be the sign of Thy coming, and of the consummation of the age? And Jesus answered and said unto them, See that no man lead you astray. For many shall come in My name, saying, I am the Christ and shall lead many astray. And ye shall hear of wars and rumors of wars; see that ye be not troubled; for these things must needs come to pass; but the end is not yet. For nation shall be stirred up against nation, and kingdom against kingdom and there shall be famines, and pestilences, and earthquakes in divers places. But all these things are the beginning of sorrows (Matthew 24:3-8).

It is impossible for those who remain in the sense of the letter to know whether these things and those which follow in the chapter were spoken concerning the destruction of Jerusalem and the dispersion of the Jewish nation, or concerning the end of days, called the Last Judgment; but they who are in the internal sense see clearly that the end of the church is here treated of, which end is what is here and elsewhere called the coming of the Lord and the consummation of the age. And because this is the end which is meant, it may be known that all these expressions signify things of the church; but what they signify may appear from the several particulars in the internal sense, as when it is said that "many shall come in My name, saying, I am the Christ; and shall lead many astray," where "name" does not signify name, nor " Christ" Christ; but "name" signifies that by which the Lord is worshiped (n. 2724, 3006); and "Christ" signifies truth itself (n. 3009, 3010); thus it is meant that there would come those who would say, " This is of faith," or " This is true," when yet it is neither of faith, nor true, but false. That they "should hear of wars and rumors of wars" denotes that there would be disputes and strife concerning truths, which are wars in the spiritual sense. That " nation should be stirred up against nation, and kingdom against kingdom" signifies that evil would fight with evil, and falsity with falsity. "Nation" signifies good, but in the opposite sense evil, (n. 1259, 1260, 1416, 1849); and also "kingdom" signifies truth, but in the opposite sense falsity, (n. 1672, 2547). "And there shall be famines, and pestilences, and earthquakes in divers places," signifies that there would be no longer any knowledges of good and of truth, and thus that the state of the church would be changed, which is an "earthquake."

AC 3354. From these things it is manifest what is meant by these words of the Lord, namely, the first state of the church‘s perversion, which comes to pass when men begin no longer to know what is good and what is true, but dispute among themselves concerning them, whence arise falsities. As this is the first state, it is said that "the end is not yet," and that "these things are the beginning of sorrows;" and this state is called "earthquakes in divers places," which signifies in the internal sense a change of the state of the church in part, or at first. That all this was said to the disciples, signifies that it is said to all who are of the church, for the twelve disciples represented all such (n. 2089, 2129, 2130); and therefore it is said, " See that no man lead you astray;" also, " Ye shall hear of wars and rumors of wars; see that ye be not troubled."

AC 3355. That in the internal sense an "earthquake" signifies a change in the state of the church, is evident from the signification of "earth," as being the church (n. 566, 662, 1066, 1067, 1262, 1733, 1850, 2117, 2118, 2928); and from the signification of "quaking," or movement, as being a change of state; here, as to the things of the church, namely, in respect to good and truth. The same is also evident from other passages in the Word, as in Isaiah:--

It shall come to pass that he who fleeth from the voice of the dread shall fall into the pit and he that cometh up out of the midst of the pit shall be taken in the snare for the cataracts from on high were opened, and the foundations of the earth were shaken in breaking the earth is broken; in moving the earth is moved; reeling the earth reeleth like a drunken man, and sways to and fro like a hut; and the transgression thereof is heavy upon it; and it shall fall and not rise again. And it shall come to pass In that day that Jehovah shall visit upon the army of the height on high, and upon the kings of the ground upon the ground (Isa. 24:18-21).

In this passage the "earth" is the church, for it is the church that is treated of, whose foundations are said to be "shaken," and itself to be "broken and moved, and to reel and sway to and fro," when good and truth are no longer known. The "kings of the ground" are truths; here, falsities, upon which there will be visitation. "Kings" are truths, and in the opposite sense falsities, (n. 1672, 2015); and that "ground," like "earth," denotes the church, but with a difference, (n. 566, 1068).

[2] Again:--

I will make a man more rare than fine gold, and a man than the gold of Ophir therefore I will shake the heaven, and the earth shall be shaken out of her place in the indignation of Jehovah of Armies, and in the day of the wrath of His anger (Isa. 13:12, 13)

speaking of the day of judgment; and in this passage also "earth" clearly denotes the church, which is said to be "shaken out of its place," when it is changed as to state. "Place" is state, (n. 1273-1275, 1377, 2625, 2837). Again:--

Is this the man that shaketh the earth, that shaketh kingdoms, that maketh the world as a wilderness, and destroyeth the cities thereof? (Isa. 14:16, 17)

speaking of Lucifer the "earth" denotes the church, which he is said to "shake" when man attributes to himself all things of it. "Kingdoms" are the truths of the church, (n. 1672, 2547).

[3] In Ezekiel:--

It shall come to pass in that day, when Gog cometh upon the land of Israel, that My wrath shall rise in Mine anger; in My zeal and in the fire of My indignation I will speak, Surely in that day there shall be a great earthquake upon the ground of Israel (Ezek. 38:18-20);

"Gog" denotes external worship separate from internal, and thus become idolatrous (n. 1151) the "earth" and the "ground of Israel" denote the spiritual church; the "earthquake," a change in its state. In Joel:--

The earth quaked before Him, the heavens trembled, the sun and the moon became black, and the stars withdrew their brightness (Joel 2:10)

where also the subject is the clay of the Last Judgment the "earth quaking" denotes a changed state of the church; the "sun and moon," the good of love and its truth (n. 1599, 1530, 9441, 2495), which are said to "become black," when goods and truths are no longer acknowledged; the "stars" denote the knowledges of good and truth (n. 2495, 2849). In David:--

The earth was shaken and quaked, and the foundations of the mountains trembled and were shaken, because He was wroth (Ps. 18:7)

the "earth shaken and quaking" denotes the state of the church become perverted.

[4] In John:--

And I beheld when he opened the sixth seal, and lo there was a great earthquake, and the sun became black as sackcloth of hair, and the whole moon became as blood, and the stars of heaven fell unto the earth (Rev. 6:12, 13);

where the "earthquake, sun, moon, and stars" have a like signification as above in Joel. Again:--

In that hour there was a great earthquake, and the tenth part of the city fell; and them were killed in the earthquake names of men seven thousand (Rev. 11:13).

From all these passages it is evident that an "earthquake" is nothing else than a change in the state of the church; and that in the internal sense the "earth" is nothing else than the church; and as the "earth" is the church, it is evident that by the "new heaven and new earth," which were to succeed in place of the former (Isa. 65:17; 66:22; Rev. 21:1), there is signified nothing else than a new church internal and external (n. 1733, 1850, 2117, 2118).

AC 3356. The reason a" quaking" or "motion" denotes a change of state, is that it takes place in space and in time and in the other life there is no idea of space and of time but in their stead there is state. It is indeed true that in the other life all things appear as in space, and follow one another as if in time; but in themselves the space and time are changes of state, for they come from this source. This is perfectly well known to every spirit, even to the wicked, who by changes of state induced on others cause them to appear in another place, when yet they are not there. Men may know the same from the fact that in so far as a man is in a state of the affections and of the derivative joy; and in so far as he is in a state of the thoughts and of a consequent absence from the body, so far he is not in time; for many hours then appear to him scarcely as one; and this because his internal man or spirit has states to which the spaces and times in the external man correspond. "Motion" therefore being a successive progression in space and time, is in the internal sense a change of state.

GENESIS 26:1-35

1. And there was a famine in the land, besides the former famine that was in the days of Abraham. And Isaac went unto Abimelech king of the Philistines, unto Gerar.

2. And Jehovah appeared unto him, and said, Go not down into Egypt; dwell in the land of which I tell thee.

3. Sojourn in this land, and I will he with thee, and will bless thee; for unto thee, and unto thy seed, I will give all these lands, and I will set up the oath which I sware unto Abraham thy father.

4. And I will cause thy seed to be multiplied as the stars of the heavens, and I will give unto thy seed all these lands and in thy seed shall all the nations of the earth be blessed.

5. Because that Abraham hearkened to My voice, and kept My charge, My commandments, My statutes, and My laws.

6. And Isaac dwelt in Gerar.

7. And the men of the place asked him concerning his woman and he said, She is my sister; for he feared to say, She is my woman; lest the men of the place should kill me for Rebekah; because she was good to look upon.

8. And it came to pass, because the days were there prolonged to him, that Abimelech king of the Philistines looked out through a window, and saw, and behold Isaac was laughing with Rebekah his woman.

9. And Abimelech called Isaac, and said, Surely behold she is thy woman, and how saidst thou, She is my sister? And Isaac said unto him, Because I said, Lest I die for her.

10. And Abimelech said, What is this thou hast done unto us, in that one of the people might lightly have lain with thy woman, and thou wouldst have brought guilt upon us?

11. And Abimelech commanded all the people, saying, He that toucheth this man and his woman, dying he shall die.

12. And Isaac sowed in that land, and found in that year a hundred measures, and Jehovah blessed him.

13. And the man increased, and went on going and increasing until he became exceeding great.

14. And he had acquisition of flock, and acquisition of herd, and much service; and the Philistines envied him.

15. And all the wells that his father’s servants digged in the days of Abraham his father, the Philistines stopped them up, and filled them with dust.

16. And Abimelech said unto Isaac, Go away from us; for thou art much mightier than we.

17. And Isaac departed thence, and encamped in the valley of Gerar, and dwelt there.

18. And Isaac returned, and digged again the wells of waters which they had digged in the days of Abraham his father; and the Philistines stopped them up after the death of Abraham; and he called their names after the names which his father called them.

19. And the servants of Isaac digged in the valley, and found there a well of living eaters.

20. And the shepherds of Gerar strove with Isaac‘s shepherds, saying, The waters are ours; and he called the name of the well Esek, because they contended with him.

21. And they digged another well, and they strove over that also, and he called the name of it Sitnah.

22. And he removed from thence, and digged another well, and for this they strove not, and he called the name of it Rehoboth; and he said, For now Jehovah hath made us to be enlarged, and we shall be fruitful in the land.

23. And he went up from thence to Beer-sheba.

24. And Jehovah appeared to him in that night, and said, I am the God of Abraham thy father; fear not, for I am with thee, and I will bless thee, and will multiply thy seed, for the sake of Abraham My servant.

25. And he builded an altar there, and called upon the name of Jehovah, and pitched his tent there, and there the servants of Isaac digged out a well.

26. And Abimelech went to him from Gerar, and Ahuzzath his companion, and Phicol the captain of his army.

27. And Isaac said unto them, Wherefore are ye come unto me, and ye have hated me, and have sent me away from you.

28. And they said, Seeing we have seen that Jehovah was with thee; and we said, Now let there be an oath between us, between us and thee, and let us cut out a covenant with thee.

29. If thou shalt do evil to us, as we have not touched thee, and as we have done unto thee nothing but good, and have sent thee away in peace; thou art now the blessed of Jehovah.

30. And he made them a feast, and they did eat and drink.

31. And they rose early in the morning, and sware a man to his brother; and Isaac sent them away, and they departed from him in peace.

32. And it came to pass in that day, that the servants of Isaac came and showed him concerning the well which they had digged; and they said unto him, We have found waters.

33. And he called it Shibah; therefore the name of the city is Beer-sheba unto this day.

34. And Esau was a son of forty years, and he took for a woman Judith the daughter of Beeri the Hittite, and Basemath the daughter of Elon the Hittite.

35. And they were bitterness of spirit to Isaac and to Rebekah.

THE CONTENTS

AC 3357. In the internal sense of this chapter the subject treated of is appearances of truth of three degrees, and how these were adjoined to truth Divine in order that truths and their doctrinal things might be received; and that a church might come into existence.

AC 3358. In (verses 1 to 6) are described the appearances of truth of a higher degree which are in the internal sense of the Word, in which appearances are the angels, and in which there is Divine truth and good. And that Divine good and truth cannot be comprehended, thus cannot be received, unless they are in appearances (verses 7 to 13).

AC 3359. Appearances of truth of a lower degree, which are in the interior sense of the Word-in which appearances those men may be who are of the internal church-are then treated of (verses 14 to 17).

AC 3360. Afterwards, appearances of truth are described of a still lower degree, which are of the literal sense of the Word, in which appearances those men may be who are of the external church (verses 18 to 25); and that through these there may still be conjunction with the Lord (verses 26 to 33).

AC 3361. Concerning truths of the memory adjoined to good therein (verses 34, 35).

THE INTERNAL SENSE

AC 3362. In the twenty-first chapter Abimelech was treated of, in that he made a covenant with Abraham, and that then Abraham reproved him concerning a well of waters which his servants had seized. In the present chapter a nearly similar occurrence is repeated between Abimelech and Isaac, resembling it also in this respect, that just as Abraham had said that his wife was his sister, so also said Isaac; from which it is evident that some Divine arcanum therein is the reason why these things occurred a second time, and were again related; and also that on both occasions mention is made of wells, concerning which it would little concern us to know, unless something Divine were concealed therein. But the internal sense teaches what is therein, and that the subject is the conjunction through truths of the Lord with those who are in His kingdom in the heavens and on earth; with the angels through appearances of truth of a higher degree; and with men through appearances of truth of a lower degree; consequently through the Word, in the internal and external senses of which are contained these appearances. For truths Divine themselves are such that they can never be comprehended by any angel, still less by any man, because they surpass every faculty of their understanding. Yet in order that there may be conjunction of the Lord with them, truths Divine flow in with them in appearances; and when truths Divine are with them in such appearances, they can be both received and acknowledged. This is effected by adaptation to the comprehension of each person; and therefore appearances, that is, truths angelic and human, are of three degrees. These are the Divine arcana contained in the internal sense of that which was related in a former chapter concerning the doings of Abimelech and Abraham; and in this chapter concerning those of Abimelech and Isaac.

AC 3363. Verse 1. And there was a famine in the land, besides the former famine that was in the days of Abraham. And Isaac went unto Abimelech king of the Philistines, unto Gerar. "And there was a famine in the land, besides the former famine that was in the days of Abraham," signifies a lack of the knowledges of faith; "and Isaac went unto Abimelech king of the Philistines, unto Gerar," signifies the doctrinal things of faith; "Abimelech" is the doctrine of faith that looks to rational things; the "king of the Philistines" denotes doctrinal things and "Gerar" is faith.

AC 3364. And there was a famine in the land, besides the former famine that was in the days of Abraham. That this signifies a lack of the knowledges of faith, is evident from the signification of "famine," as being a lack of knowledges (n. 1460). That it is a lack of the knowledges of faith, is evident from what presently follows, that is, from the representation of Abimelech, and from the signification of "Gerar," as being that which is of faith. The "famine" in the days of Abraham, (Gen. 12:10), and explained above (n. 1460), denoted a lack of the knowledges which are of the natural man but the "famine" here spoken of denotes a lack of the knowledges which are of the rational man; and therefore it is said that there was a famine in the land, besides the former famine that was in the days of Abraham." In the internal sense the subject here treated of is the Lord, in that from His Divine are all the doctrinal things of faith; for there is no doctrinal thing, nor the smallest part of one, that is not from the Lord, because the Lord is doctrine itself. Hence it is that the Lord is called the "Word," because the "Word" is doctrine; but as everything that is in the Lord is Divine, and the Divine cannot be comprehended by any created being, therefore in so far as they appear before created beings, the doctrinal things that are from the Lord are not truths purely Divine, but are appearances of truth; nevertheless within such appearances there are truths Divine; and because they have these truths within them, the appearances also are called truths; and these are now treated of in this chapter.

AC 3365. And Isaac went unto Abimelech king of the Philistines, unto Gerar. This signifies the doctrinal things of faith, which is evident from the representation of Isaac, as being the Lord as to the Divine rational (n. 1893, 2066, 2072, 2083, 2630); and "Isaac" is the Lord’s Divine rational as to Divine good, (n. 3012, 3194, 3210); and also as to Divine truth, which is represented by the marriage of Isaac with Rebekah, (n. 3012, 3013, 3077); thus by Isaac is here represented the Lord as to Divine truth conjoined with the Divine good of the rational for Rebekah was with Isaac, and was called "sister;"-from the representation of Abimelech, as being the doctrine of faith that looks to rational things (n. 2504, 2509, 2510, 2530); and from the signification of the "king of the Philistines," as being doctrinal things. In the internal sense a "king" denotes the truth which is of doctrine, (n. 1672, 2015, 2069); and the " Philistines" signify the memory-knowledge of knowledges, which also is that of doctrinal things, (n. 1197, 1198);--and from the signification of "Gerar," as being faith (n. 1209, 2504). This shows what is signified by Isaac‘s going to Abimelech king of the Philistines, unto Gerar, namely, that from the Lord comes the doctrine of faith that looks to rational things; or what is the same, the doctrinal things of faith. All those things are called doctrinal which are of doctrine, and which in so far as they can be received and acknowledged in heaven by angels, and on earth by men, are said to look to rational things, for it is the rational that receives and acknowledges them. But the rational is such that it cannot possibly apprehend Divine things, for it is finite, and the finite cannot apprehend what is of the infinite; and consequently truths Divine from the Lord are presented before the rational by means of appearances. Hence it is that doctrinal things are nothing but appearances of truth Divine, that is, nothing but celestial and spiritual vessels, within which is what is Divine; and because the Divine, that is, the Lord, is in them, they affect us, whence comes the conjunction of the Lord with angels and men.

AC 3366. Verses 2, 3. And Jehovah appeared unto him, and said, Go not down into Egypt; dwell in the land of which I tell thee. Sojourn in this land, and I will be with thee, and will bless thee; for unto thee, and unto thy seed, I will give all these lands, and I will set up the oath which I sware unto Abraham thy father. "And Jehovah appeared unto him, and said," signifies thought from the Divine; " go not down into Egypt; dwell in the land of which I tell thee," signifies that he should not go down to memory-knowledges, but to rational things, which being enlightened by the Divine are appearances of truth; "sojourn in this land," signifies instruction; "and I will be with thee," signifies the Divine and will bless thee," signifies that thus there would be increase; "for unto thee," signifies good; "and unto thy seed," signifies truth; "I will give all these lands," signifies spiritual things; "and I will set up the oath which I sware unto Abraham thy father," signifies confirmation thus.

AC 3367. And Jehovah appeared into him, and said. That this signifies thought from the Divine, is evident from the signification of "appearing," when said of the Lord, who is Jehovah, as being the Divine Itself that was in Him. Jehovah was in the Lord, and the Lord Himself is Jehovah, (n. 1343, 1725, 1729, 1733, 1736, 1791, 1815, 1819, 1822, 1902, 1921, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2018, 2025, 2156, 2329, 2447, 2921, 3023, 3035, 3061), and in so far as the Lord had united the Human essence to the Divine, so far He spoke with Jehovah as with Himself (n. 1745, 1999), thus "Jehovah appearing to him," in the internal sense signifies from the Divine. Thought is signified which is evident from the signification of "saying," as being to perceive and also to think.

AC 3368. Go not down into Egypt; dwell in the land of which I tell thee. That this signifies that He should not go down to memory-knowledges, but to rational things which being enlightened by the Divine are appearances of truth, is evident from the signification of "Egypt," as being memory-knowledge (n. 1164, 1165, 1186, 1462); and from the signification of "land," as being here rational things which when enlightened by the Divine are appearances of truth; for the land which is here meant is Gerar, where Abimelech king of the Philistines was, and by " Gerar" is signified faith; by "Abimelech," the doctrine of faith that looks to rational things; and by the "king of the Philistines," doctrinal things (n. 3363, 3365); so that the "land," namely, Gerar where Abimelech was, has the above signification in the internal sense.

[2] For the signification of "land" is various (n. 620, 636, 1066), denoting the quality of the nation of which it is predicated (n. 1262). But in the proper sense "land" signifies the church (n. 3355); and because it signifies the church, it signifies also those things which are of the church, consequently the doctrinal things of charity and faith; thus also rational things which being enlightened by the Divine are appearances of truth; for that these appearances are the truths of the church, thus its doctrinal things, may be seen above (n. 3364, 3365). Whether you say rational things enlightened by the Divine, or appearances of truth, or celestial and spiritual truths such as are in the Lords kingdom in the heavens, or in heaven, and such as are in His kingdom on the earths, or in the church, comes to the same thing; and the same are also called doctrinal things, but this from the truths that are in them. The angelic and human rational is and is called rational from appearances of truth that are enlightened by the Divine, and without these it is not rational; thus rational things are these appearances of truth.

[3] The reason why it is here said that He should not go down into Egypt, that is, not to memory-knowledges, is that memory-knowledges have already been treated of; for Abraham’s sojourning in Egypt represented the Lord‘s instruction in His childhood in memory-knowledges (n. 1502). As regards the arcanum that He should not go down into Egypt, but should sojourn in the land of Gerar, that is, that He should not look to memory-knowledges, but to rational things, the case is this: All appearances of truth that have what is Divine in them belong to the rational, insomuch that rational truths and appearances of truth are the same; whereas memory-knowledges belong to the natural, insomuch that natural truths and memory-truths are the same. Rational truths, or appearances of truth, cannot possibly be and come forth except from the influx of the Divine into the rational, and through rational things into the memory-knowledges which are of the natural. The things which then take place in the rational appear in the natural; just as an image of many things appears all together in a mirror and thereby they are presented before the man, and also before an angel; before an angel however they are not presented so evidently in the natural as they are with those who are in the world of spirits and are in the spiritual natural, and hence these have representatives of truth.

[4] The case is similar with every man, for as before said the man who is in good is a little heaven, or what is the same is an image of the Grand Heaven; and because Divine truth cannot inflow immediately into memory-knowledges, which are of the natural man, but only through rational things, as before said, therefore it is here said that Isaac should not go down into Egypt, but should reside in the land of Gerar. But a clear idea cannot be had concerning these things unless the nature of influx is known, and also the nature of ideas; and therefore of the Lord’s Divine mercy these things will be treated of at the close of the chapters, where experiences are related.

AC 3369. Sojourn in this land. That this signifies instruction, is evident from the signification of sojourning," as being to instruct (n. 1463, 2025); and from the signification in this place of "land," as being rational things which when enlightened by the Divine are appearances of truth (n. 3368). Thus sojourning in this land" signifies instruction in these things.

AC 3370. And I will be with thee That this signifies the Divine, is evident from the fact that it is Jehovah who speaks, thus the Divine Itself; and when it is said by Him "I will he with thee," it signifies in this connection that thus the Divine would be in them.

AC 3371. And will bless thee. That this signifies that thus there would he increase, is evident from the signification of "blessing," as being to make fruitful in goods and to multiply in truths (n. 981, 1420, 1422, 1731, 2846, 3140); thus signifying increase.

AC 3372. For unto thee. That this signifies good, is evident from the fact that "unto thee" refers to Isaac, by whom is represented the Lord as to the Divine rational, as has been often shown; and the Lord‘s Divine rational is nothing but good; even the truth therein being good, because Divine.

AC 3373. And unto thy seed. That this signifies truth, is evident from the signification of "seed," as being truth (n. 29, 255, 1025, 1447, 1610, 1940, 2848, 3310); thus it signifies the truth which is from the Lord’s Divine, which is "thy seed." They who apprehend the Word only according to the sense of the letter cannot know but that "seed" denotes posterity, consequently here the posterity of Isaac from Esau and Jacob, and chiefly from Jacob, because the Word was in that nation and it contains so many historical facts concerning them. But in the internal sense by "seed" there is not meant any posterity from Isaac, but all those who are sons of the Lord, thus the sons of His kingdom, or what is the same, who are in good and truth from the Lord; and because these are " seed," it follows that the very good and truth from the Lord are "seed," for hence come the sons wherefore also the very truths from the Lord are called the sons of the kingdom," in Matthew:--

He that soweth the good seed is the Son of man; the field is the world the good seed are the sons of the kingdom (Matthew 13:37, 38)

hence also by " sons" in general are signified truths (n. 489, 491, 533, 1147, 2623).

[2] Every one who thinks somewhat more deeply or interiorly may know that in the Divine Word by the "seed of Abraham, of Isaac, and of Jacob," so often mentioned, and concerning which it is so frequently said that it should be blessed, and this above all nations and people in the world, cannot be signified their posterity; for above all nations they were least of all in the good of love to the Lord and of charity toward the neighbor, and were not even in any truth of faith; for they were utterly ignorant of what the Lord is, what His kingdom, thus what heaven is, and what the life after death, both because they did not want to know, and because if they had learned about these things, they would at heart have totally denied them, and would thus have profaned interior goods and truths, just as they so frequently profaned exterior ones by becoming open idolaters; which is the reason why in the sense of the letter of the Word of the Old Testament any interior things so rarely stand forth to view. Being of this nature, the Lord has said concerning them in Isaiah:--

He hath blinded their eyes, and hardened their heart, lest they should see with their eyes and understand with their heart, and should be converted, and I should heal them (John 12:40)

and again when they said:--

We are Abraham‘s seed; Abraham is our father; Jesus said unto them, If ye were Abraham’s sons, ye would do the works of Abraham ye are of your father the devil, and the desires of your father ye will to do (John 8:33, 39, 44)

by "Abraham" here is meant the Lord, as everywhere in the Word; and that the Jews were not His seed, or sons, but the seed of the devil, is plainly stated. All this shows very plainly that by the "seed of Abraham, of Isaac, and of Jacob," as mentioned in the historical and prophetical Word, are by no means meant their posterity for the Word throughout is Divine, but all those who are the Lord‘s "seed," that is, who are in the good and truth of faith in Him. From the Lord alone comes heavenly seed, that is, all good and truth, (n. 1438, 1614, 2016, 2803, 2882, 2883, 2891, 2899, 2904, 3195).

AC 3374. I will give all these lands. That this signifies spiritual things, is evident from the signification of "lands," as here being rational things, which when enlightened by the Divine are appearances of truth (n. 3368). That these appearances are truths has already been shown (n. 3364, 3365); consequently by "lands" are here meant spiritual things, for these are nothing else than truths from the Divine, as may be seen from what has been frequently said above as to what is meant by spiritual things. By the spiritual in a genuine sense is meant the very light of truth which is from the Lord, just as by the celestial is meant all the flame of good from the Lord. From this we may see that as this light inflows from the Lord into both man’s rational and his natural, the spiritual is predicated of both, and that it is the Divine as to the truth that flows in. This shows what in the genuine sense the spiritual is; and that there is a spiritual rational and a spiritual natural.

AC 3375. And I will set up the oath which I sware unto Abraham thy father. That this signifies confirmation, is evident from the signification of an "oath," or of "swearing," as being confirmation (n. 2842). It is not here said to "set up the covenant" made with Abraham, but the "oath," for the reason that a "covenant" is predicated of the celestial or of good, but an "oath" of the spiritual or of truths (n. 3037), which are the subject here treated of. And for the same reason in what follows it is not said of Isaac that he "made a covenant with Abimelech," but that he "sware a man to his brother" (verse 31); whereas it is said of Abraham that he and Abimelech "made a covenant" (Gen. 21:32; Ps. 105:8-10). By the confirmation here referred to which is signified by an "oath," there is meant the conjunction of the Lord with those who are in His kingdom; for an "oath" is the confirmation of a covenant; and by a "covenant" is signified conjunction (n. 665, 666, 1023, 1038, 1864, 1996, 2003, 2021).

AC 3376. The internal sense of these two verses is that when the Divine truth flows in by rational things, it presents appearances of truth, and thus fructifies and multiplies itself in respect to the good and truth through which the Lord conjoins Himself with angels and men. That this is the sense cannot be seen from the first exposition wherein everything is scattered, that is to say, from what was said in (n. 3366) - that there was thought from the Divine not to go down to memory-knowledges, but to rational things which when enlightened by the Divine are appearances of truth, and that from these would come instruction from the Divine, and increase, thus good and truth, which are spiritual, whereby there is conjunction of the Lord with the things in His Word. These things which before man appear thus scattered, are yet in the internal sense conjoined together in the most orderly manner, and before the angels, or in heaven, appear and are perceived in a most beautiful series and connection; nay, are attended with angelic representatives in a heavenly form; and this with inexpressible variety. Such is the Word throughout in its internal sense.

AC 3377. Verses 4, 5. And I will cause thy seed to be multiplied as the stars of the heavens, and I will give unto thy seed all these lands; and in thy seed shall all the nations of the earth be blessed; because that Abraham hearkened to My voice, and kept My charge, My commandments, My statutes, and My laws. "And I will cause thy seed to be multiplied as the stars of the heavens," signifies truths and the knowledges of faith; "and I will give unto thy seed all these lands," signifies the churches thence derived; "and in thy seed shall all the nations of the earth be blessed," signifies all those who are in good both within and without the church; "because that Abraham hearkened to My voice," signifies the union of the Lord‘s Divine Essence with the Human Essence through temptations; "and kept My charge, My commandments, My statutes, and My laws," signifies through continuous revelations from Himself.

AC 3378. And I will cause thy seed to be multiplied as the stars of the heavens. That this signifies truths and the knowledges of faith, is evident from the signification of "seed," as being truths (n. 3373) and from the signification of "stars," as being the knowledges of faith (n. 2495, 2849).

AC 3379. And I will give unto thy seed all these lands. That this signifies the churches thence derived, is evident from the signification of "seed," as being truths, thus those who are in truths, who are on this account called the "sons of the kingdom" (n. 3373) and from the signification of "lands," as being the rational things which when enlightened by the Divine are appearances of truth (n. 3368) thus those who are in rational things that are enlightened by the Divine; or what is the same those who are in heavenly light; and as those only are in such light who are in the Lord’s kingdom in the heavens (that is, in heaven) and who are in His kingdom on earth (that is, in the churches), it is evident that by these "lands" are signified the churches for churches are not churches because they are so called, and because they profess the Lord‘s name; but because they are in the good and truth of faith. The good and truth of faith is that which constitutes the church, yea, which is the church, for in the good and truth of faith is the Lord, and where the Lord is, there is the church.

AC 3380. And in thy seed shall all the nations of the earth be blessed That this signifies all who are in good, both within and without the church, is evident from the signification of "being blessed," as being to be made fruitful in good and to be multiplied in truths (n. 981, 1422, 1731, 2846, 3140); from the signification of "seed," as being the goods and truths which are from the Lord (n. 3373); and from the signification of the "nations of the earth," as being all who are in good (n. 1259, 1260, 1416, 1849). Thus by "all the nations of the earth being blessed in thy seed," is signified that through the good and truth which are from the Lord all are saved who live in mutual charity, whether they are within the church or without it. The Gentiles who are without the church and who are in good are equally saved, (n. 593, 932, 1032, 1059, 1327, 1328, 2049, 2051, 2284, 2589-2604, 2861, 2986, 3263).

AC 3381. Because that Abraham hearkened to My voice. That this signifies the union of the Lord’s Divine Essence with the Human Essence through temptations, is evident from the representation of Abraham, as being the Lord as to the Divine Human also (n. 2833, 2836, 3251) and from the signification of "hearkening to My voice," when predicated of the Lord, as being to unite the Divine Essence to the Human through temptations for in the Word it is from these that obedience is predicated of the Lord. What is here said has reference to that which is related concerning Abraham in the 12th chapter, namely, that God tempted him, and said unto him that he should take his son and offer him for a burnt-offering (Gen. 22:1, 2); and when he hearkened to this voice, it is said:--

Now I know that thou fearest God, and thou hast not withheld thy son, thine only one, from Me. In Myself have I sworn saith Jehovah, because thou hast done this word, and hast not withheld thy son, thine only one, that in blessing I will bless thee, and in multiplying I will multiply thy seed as the stars of the heavens (Gen. 22:12, 16, 17);

that by "not withholding thy son, thine only one, from Me" (which was " hearkening to the voice") is signified the unition of the Human with the Divine through the last of temptation, may be seen above (n. 2827, 2844). That this is meant by "hearkening to the voice of Jehovah," or "the Father," is evident also from the words of the Lord in Gethsemane:--

My Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from Me nevertheless not My will but Thine be done: again a second time, My Father, if this cup cannot pass from Me except I drink it, Thy will he done (Matt. 26:39, 42 Mark 14:36 Luke 22:42).

But inasmuch as Jehovah or the Father was in Him, or He in the Father and the Father in Him (John 14:10, 11), by "hearkening to the voice of Jehovah" is meant that the Lord united the Divine to the Human through temptations, by His own power; as is also evident from the words of the Lord Himself in John:--

As the Father knoweth Me, and I know the Father; and I lay down My life for the sheep. Therefore doth the Father love Me, because I lay down My life, that I may take it again. I have power to lay it down, and I have power to take it again. This commandment have I received from My Father (John 10:15, 17, 18).

The Lord by His own power united His Divine Essence to His Human Essence through temptations, (n. 1663, 1668, 1690, 1691, 1725, 1729, 1733, 1737, 1787, 1789, 1812, 1820, 2776, 3318).

AC 3382. And kept My charge, My commandments, My statutes, and My laws. That this signifies by means of continuous revelations from Himself - that is to say, as by means of temptations, so also by means of these revelations the Lord united the Divine Essence to the Human - as evident from the fact that these words, "keeping His charge, commandments, statutes, and laws," involve all things of the Word namely, "charge," all things of the Word in general; commandments," the internal things statutes, - " the external things and "laws," all things specifically. Inasmuch as this is predicated of the Lord, who from eternity was the Word, and from whom all these things are, in the internal sense it cannot he signified that He observed these things, but that He revealed them to Himself when He was in a state of unition of the Human with the Divine.

[2] These things do indeed appear at first view rather remote from the sense of the letter, and even from the proximate internal sense; but still when the words are read by man, this is their sense in heaven; for, as occasionally before said, and as may be seen from examples given (n. 1873, 1874), in its ascent toward heaven the sense of the letter is put off; and instead of it another heavenly sense comes into view, so different that it cannot he known to be from the same source. For they who are in heaven are in the idea that in the internal sense all things of the Word treat of the Lord; and also that all things of the Word are from the Lord; likewise that when He was in the world the Lord thought from the Divine and thus from Himself, and acquired for Himself all intelligence and wisdom through continuous revelations from the Divine; and therefore from the above words they perceive nothing else. For "keeping the charge, commandments, statutes, and laws," is not predicable of the Lord, because He Himself was the Word,. consequently He Himself was the charge, He Himself was the commandment, He Himself the statute, and He Himself the law; for all these things have respect to Him as the First from whom they are derived, and as the Last to whom they tend. Therefore in the supreme sense by the above words nothing else can be signified than the unition of the Lord‘s Divine with the Human, through continuous revelations from Himself. Differently from other men, the Lord thought from the Divine, thus from Himself, (n. 1904, 1914, 1935); and He acquired for Himself intelligence and wisdom by means of continuous revelations from the Divine, (n. 1616, 2500, 2523, 2632).

[3] That in the genuine sense "keeping the charge" signifies all things of the Word in general and that "commandments" signify the internal things of the Word " statutes," the external things and "laws," all things of the Word specifically, may be seen from many passages as viewed in the internal sense; some of which may be adduced. Thus in David:--

Blessed are the perfect in the way, who walk in the law of Jehovah. Blessed are they that keep His testimonies. O that my ways were directed to keep Thy statutes. I will keep Thy statutes O forsake me not utterly. With my whole heart have I sought Thee O let me not wander from Thy commandments Thy Word have I hid in my heart, that I might not sin against Thee. Blessed art Thou, O Jehovah, teach me Thy statutes. With my lips have I declared all the judgments of Thy mouth. I have rejoiced in the way of Thy testimonies. I meditate in Thy precepts; and have respect unto Thy ways. I delight myself in Thy statutes; I do not forget Thy Word. Recompense unto Thy servant, that I may live, so will I keep Thy Word. Open Thou mine eyes that I may behold wondrous things out of Thy law. Hide not Thy commandments from me. Quicken Thou me according to Thy Word. Teach me Thy statutes make me to understand the way of Thy precepts (Ps. 119:1-27).

Throughout this whole Psalm the subject treated of is the Word and the things of the Word, which are manifestly its "precepts," "statutes," "judgments," " testimonies," "commandments," and "ways;" but what these signify specifically cannot possibly be seen from the sense of the letter, in which sense they are scarcely more than repetitions of the same thing; hut it may be seen from the internal sense, in which one thing is signified by "precepts," and quite different ones by "statutes," "judgments," "testimonies," " commandments," and "ways."

[4] Again in like manner:--

The law of Jehovah is perfect, restoring the soul; the testimony of Jehovah is sure, making wise the simple. The precepts of Jehovah are right, rejoicing the heart; the commandment of Jehovah is pure, enlightening the eyes. The fear of Jehovah is clean, standing forever the judgments of Jehovah are truth (Ps. 19:7-9).

And in the first book of Kings:--

David charged Solomon his son, saying, Keep the charge of Jehovah thy God, to walk in His ways, to keep His statutes, and His commandments, and His judgments, and His testimonies, according to that which is written in the law of Moses (1 Kings 2:3).

"Keeping the charge" denotes all things of the Word in general, for it is mentioned in the first place, and looks to the things following as being less general; for "keeping the charge" is the same thing as "keeping that which is to be kept." In Moses:--

Thou shalt love Jehovah thy God, and keep His charge, and his statutes, and His judgments, and His commandments alway (Deut. 11:1);

where "keeping His charge," or keeping that which was to be kept, in like manner denotes all things of the Word in general; "statutes" denote the external things of the Word, such as rituals and those things which are representative and significative of the internal sense; but "commandments," the internal things of the Word, such as those of life and doctrine, especially those which are of the internal sense. But concerning the signification of " commandments" and "statutes," of the Lord’s Divine mercy elsewhere.

AC 3383. Verses 6, 7. And Isaac dwelt in Gerar. And the men of the place asked him concerning his woman; and he said, She is my sister, because he feared to say, She is my woman; lest the men of the place should kill me for Rebekah; because she was good to look upon. "And Isaac dwelt in Gerar," signifies the Lord‘s state in regard to the things of faith relatively to the rational things that were to be adjoined; "and the men of the place asked him concerning his woman," signifies the investigations of men concerning Divine truth; "and he said, She is my sister," signifies rational truth "because he feared to say, She is my woman; lest the men of the place should kill me for the sake of Rebekah," signifies that he could not open Divine truths themselves, for thus Divine good would not be received; "because she was good to look upon," signifies that it may easily he received from its being called Divine.

AC 3384. And Isaac dwelt in Gerar. That this signifies the Lord’s state in regard to the things of faith relatively to the rational things that were to be adjoined, is evident from the signification of "dwelling in Gerar," as being to be in the things which are of faith; thus the state in regard to these things; for "to dwell" signifies to live (n. 1293), and Gerar" signifies the things which are of faith, (n. 1209, 2504, 3365)-and from the representation of Isaac, as being the Lord as to the Divine rational (n. 1893, 2066, 2072, 2083, 2630). That it is relatively to the rational things that were to be adjoined, is evident from what goes before and from what follows; for in this whole chapter these things are treated of, namely, the rational things which when enlightened by the Divine of the Lord are appearances of truth.

[2] That "to dwell" denotes to be and to live, thus the state, is evident from many passages in the Word. As in David:--

I will dwell in the house of Jehovah for length of days (Ps. 23:6).

One thing have I asked of Jehovah, that will I seek after; that I may dwell in the house of Jehovah all the days of my life (Ps. 27:4).

He that worketh deceit shall not dwell in the midst of My house (Ps. 101:7)

where "dwelling in the house of Jehovah" denotes being and living in the good of love, for this is the "house of Jehovah." In Isaiah:--

They that dwell in the land of the shadow of death, upon them hath the light shined (Isa. 9:2)

"they that dwell in the land of the shadow of death" denotes the state of those who are in ignorance of good and truth. Again:--

Babel shall not he inhabited forever (Isa. 13:20)

denoting the state of damnation of those who are "Babel."

[3] Again:--

O Jehovah God of Israel that inhabitest the cherubim (Isa. 37:16)

O shepherd of Israel inhabiting the cherubim, shine forth (Ps. 80:1)

"to inhabit the cherubim" is the Lord as to a state of providence, lest anyone should enter into the holy things of love and faith unless prepared by the Lord (n. 308). In David:--

In face will I both lay me down and sleep, for Thou Jehovah alone makest me dwell in safety (Ps. 4:8)

"to make to dwell in safety" signifies a state of peace. In Jeremiah:--

O thou that dwellest upon many waters, great in treasures, thine end is come, the measure of thy gain (Jer. 51:13)

concerning Babel; "dwelling upon many waters" denotes being in knowledges concerning truth.

[4] In Daniel:--

God Himself revealeth the deep and secret things, He knoweth what is in the darkness, and the light dwelleth with Him (Daniel 2:22)

where "dwelling" denotes being. Again in the same Prophet Under that tree the beast of the field had shadow, and the fowls of heaven dwelt in the branches thereof (Daniel 4:12). And in Ezekiel:--

Under its branches all the wild beast of the field brought forth, and in its shadow dwelt all great nations (Ezek. 31:6)

where "dwelling" denotes being and living. In Hosea:--

The threshing-floor and the wine-press shall not feed them, and the new wine shall fail her. They shall not dwell in the land of Jehovah but Ephraim shall retain to Egypt (Hosea 9:2, 3)

"not to dwell in the land of Jehovah" denotes not to be in a state of the good of love, consequently not in the Lord‘s kingdom.

AC 3385. And the men of the place asked him concerning his woman. This signifies the investigations of men concerning Divine truth, which is evident from the signification of "asking," as being to investigate; and from the signification of the "men of the place," namely, Gerar, as being those who are in the doctrinal things of faith. "Gerar" signifies the things of faith, (n. 1209, 2504); thus the "men of the place" are men of such a state; and from the signification of "woman," who here is Rebekah, as being the Divine truth of the Lord’s Divine rational (n. 3012, 3013, 3077). In what proceeds, the appearances of truth have been treated of, in that they come forth by means of Divine influx from the Lord into man‘s rational things; and the subject here treated of is the reception of these appearances; first by those who are in the doctrinal things of faith, and who are meant by the "men of the place," or of Gerar, and are of the first class of those who are called the spiritual; for as the spiritual have not perception, like the celestial, and are comparatively in obscurity (n. 1043, 2088, 2669, 2708, 2715, 2718, 2831, 3235, 3241, 3246), they investigate whether a thing be so, and also whether it is Divine truth; and as they have no perception as to whether it is so, there is given them what appears like truth, and this according to their rational, that is, according to their apprehension, for in this way it is received. Each person is permitted to believe truths as he apprehends them; otherwise there would be no reception, because no acknowledgment. This is the subject now treated of.

AC 3386. And he said, She is my sister. That this signifies rational truth, is evident from the signification of "sister," as being rational truth (n. 1495, 2508, 2524, 2556). By rational truth is meant that which appears as true according to the apprehension, or before the rational, as just said. The arcanum that Isaac said that Rebekah was his sister; as Abraham had before said that Sarah was his sister, first in Egypt (Gen. 12:11-13, 19), and afterwards in Gerar (Gen. 20:2, 5, 12), involves what is much the same, as may be seen from the explication of the former passages; and as the same thing occurred three times, and is three times related in the Word, it is evident that there is in it an arcanum of the greatest moment, which can never be known to anyone except from the internal sense; but what the arcanum is, appears from what follows.

AC 3387. Because he feared to say, She is my woman; lest the men of the place should kill me for Rebekah. That this signifies that He could not open Divine truths themselves, because thus Divine good would not be received, is evident from the signification of "fearing to say," as being not to be able to open; from the signification of "woman," who here is Rebekah, as being the Lord’s Divine rational as to Divine truth (n. 3012, 3013, 3077) from the signification of "slaying me," as being that good is not received, for by Isaac, who here is "me," is represented the Divine good of the Lord‘s rational (n. 3012, 3194, 3210), for good is said to be slain, or to perish, when it is not received, because with him who does not receive it, it is nullified; and from the signification of the "men of the place," as being those who are in the doctrinal things of faith (n. 3385). From all this it now appears what is the internal sense of these words, namely, that if Divine truths themselves were to be opened, they would not he received by those who are in the doctrinal things of faith, because they surpass all their rational apprehension, thus all their belief, and consequently nothing of good from the Lord could flow in. For good from the Lord, or Divine good, can inflow solely into truths, because truths are the vessels of good, as often shown.

[2] Truths or appearances of truth are given man to the intent that Divine good may be able to form his understanding, and thus the man himself. For truths exist to the end that good may flow in; for without vessels or receptacles good finds no place, because it finds no state corresponding to itself; and therefore where there are no truths, or where they are not received, there is no rational or human good, consequently the man has no spiritual life. In order therefore that man may nevertheless have truths, and thereby have spiritual life, appearances of truth are given to every one according to his apprehension; which appearances are acknowledged as truths, because they are such that Divine things can be in them.

[3] In order that it may be known what appearances are, and that they are such things as serve man instead of truths Divine, let us take examples for illustration. If it should be said that in heaven there is no idea of place, thus none of distance, but that instead of these there are ideas of state, this could not possibly be apprehended by man, for this would cause him to believe that there nothing is distinct, but that everything is confused, that is, all in one, or together; when yet all things there are so distinct that nothing can he more so. The places, distances, and spaces, which exist in nature, are in heaven states, (n. 3356). Hence it is manifest that whatever is said in the Word concerning places and spaces, and from them and by means of them, is an appearance of truth; and unless it were said by means of such appearances, it would not be received at all, consequently would be scarcely anything; for so long as he is in the world, that is, in space and time, the idea of space and of time is within almost everything of man’s thought, both in general and in particular.

[4] That the language of the Word is according to appearances of space appears from almost everything in it; as in Matthew:--

Jesus asked them saying, How then doth David say, The Lord said to my Lord, Sit Thou on My right hand till I make Thine enemies Thy foot stool (Matthew 22:43, 44)

where to "sit on the right hand" comes from the idea of place, thus according to appearance, when nevertheless what is here described is the state of the Lord‘s Divine power. Again:--

Jesus said, Henceforth ye shall see the Son of man sitting at the right hand of power, and coming upon the clouds of heaven (Matthew 26:64)

here in like manner "sitting on the right hand," and also "coming upon the clouds," are derived from the idea of place with men; hut with angels the idea is of the Lord’s power. In Mark:--

The sons of Zebedee said to Jesus, Grant unto us that we may sit, one on Thy right hand, and the other on Thy left hand, in Thy glory. Jesus answered, To sit on My right hand, and on My left, is not Mine to give, except to those for whom it hath been prepared (Mark 10:37, 40).

From this it is manifest what sort of an idea the disciples had concerning the Lord‘s kingdom, namely, that it was to sit on His right hand and or, His left; and because they had such an idea, the Lord also answered them according to their apprehension, thus according to what appeared to them.

[5] In David:--

He is as a bridegroom coming out of his chamber, and rejoiceth as a strong man to run his course. His going forth is from the end of the heavens and His circuit unto the ends of it (Ps. 19:5, 6)

speaking of the Lord, whose state of Divine power is here described by such things as are of space. In Isaiah:--

How art thou fallen from heaven, O Lucifer, son of the dawning! Thou saidst in thine heart, I will ascend into the heavens, I will exalt my throne above the stars of heaven; I will ascend above the heights of the cloud (Isa. 14:12, 14)

where "falling form heaven," "ascending into the heavens," "exalting the throne above the stars of heaven," "ascending above the heights of the cloud," all of which are expressions descriptive of the love of self profaning holy things, are all derived from the idea and appearance of space or place. Inasmuch as celestial and spiritual things are presented before man by means of such things as appear to men, and in accordance with such things, therefore heaven is also described as being on high, when yet it is not on high, but is in what is internal (n. 450, 1380, 2148).

AC 3388. Because she was good to look upon. That this signifies that it might he easily received from its being called Divine, is evident from the signification of "good to look upon," as being that which pleases by its form, thus what is easily received. Those are here treated of who are in the doctrinal things of faith, and have no perception of truth from good, but only a conscience of truth from having been so taught by parents and masters. These are they who are called the "men of the place," or of Gerar (n. 3385, 3387). With such persons the first of confirmation of truth is that it is called Divine, for then they at once have an idea of what is holy, which gives a universal confirmation to everything that is stated, eve" if they do not comprehend it. But still what is stated must be adapted to their apprehension for it is not sufficient for a man to know that a thing is; he also desires to know what it is, and what is its nature, in order that he may therein find some confirmation for his intellectual part, and from this again in turn. If this be not the case, a thing may indeed be induced on the memory; but it does not remain there otherwise than as a dead thing, or as a mere sound; and unless confirmatory things from some source or other have fixed it in the memory, it is dissipated like the remembrance of some mere thing of sound.

AC 3389. Verses 8, 9. And it came to pass, because the days were there prolonged to him, that Abimelech king of the Philistines looked out through a window, and saw, and behold Isaac was laughing with Rebekah his woman. And Abimelech called Isaac, and said, Surely behold she is thy woman, and how saidst thou, She is my sister? And Isaac said unto him, Because I said, Lest I die for her. "And it came to pass, because the days were there prolonged to him," signifies a state of reception; "that Abimelech king of the Philistines looked out through a window, and saw," signifies the doctrine of faith looking to rational things in knowledges; "and behold Isaac was laughing with Rebekah his woman," signifies that Divine good was present in Divine truth "and Abimelech called Isaac, and said," signifies the Lord’s perception from doctrine " Surely behold she is thy woman, and how saidst thou, She is my sister?" signifies if Divine truth, it was not also rational "and Isaac said unto him, Because I said, Lest I die for her,"signifies that it would not be received.

AC 3390. And it came to pass, because the days were there prolonged to him That this signifies a state of reception, is evident from the signification of "being prolonged there to him," namely, to Isaac, as being that when the Divine good which is represented by Isaac was there for some time, truth was received, for in the internal sense the reception of truth by the spiritual is treated of; and from the signification of "days" as being states (n. 23, 487, 488, 493, 893, 2788).

AC 3391. And Abimelech king of the Philistines looked out through a window, and saw. That this signifies the doctrine of faith looking to rational things in knowledges, is evident From the representation of Abimelech, as being the doctrine of faith that looks to rational things (n. 2504, 2509, 2510, 2533) from the signification of king of the Philistines," as being doctrinal things (n. 3365) and from the signification of a window," as being the intellectual faculty (n. 655, 658), consequently the internal sight, for this was formerly signified by "windows." This to "look out through a window" is to perceive those things which appear by means of the internal sight, which in general are knowledges such as are of the external man. Rational things, or what is the same, appearances of truth, that is, truths spiritual, are not knowledges, but are in knowledges, for they belong to the rational, thus to the internal man, and it is the internal man which looks to the things of the external man, thus to truths in knowledges. For as knowledges are of the natural man, they are vessels that receive rational things. Truths Divine flow into the rational, and through this into the natural, and in this latter are exhibited as an image of many things in a mirror, (n. 3368).

[2] That " windows" signify the things of the internal sight that is, of the understanding which in one word are called intellectual things, is evident from those passages of the Word which were adduced in (n. 655); and further from the following. In Joel:--

They shall run to and fro in the city, they shall run upon the wall, they shall climb up into the houses, they shall enter in by the windows as a thief (Joel 2:9)

speaking of the evils and falsities of the last days of the church "climbing up into the houses" denotes destroying the goods of the will. "House" denotes the goods of the will (n. 710, 2233, 2334); and "entering in by the windows" denotes destroying truths and their knowledges which are of the understanding. In Zephaniah:--

Jehovah will stretch out His hands upon the north, and destroy Asshur; herds shall lie down in the midst of her; every wild animal of his kind both the pelican and the osprey, shall pass the night in the pomegranates thereof; a voice shall sing in the windows, drought shall be upon the threshold, because he hath laid bare the cedar (Zephaniah 2:13, 14)

where the destruction of the truths of faith by reasonings, which are " Asshur," is treated of (n. 119, 1186); that a "voice shall sing in the windows" signifies the desolation of truth, thus of the intellectual faculty as to truth.

[3] In the book of Judges:--

Through the window she looked forth, and the mother of Sisera cried through the lattice, Why is his chariot so long in coming? (Judges 5:28)

this is the prophecy of Deborah and Barak concerning the resuscitation of a spiritual church; "looking forth through a window" denotes through the reasonings of those who deny truths and thus destroy what is of the church; for such reasonings are intellectual things in the opposite sense. In Jeremiah:--

Woe unto him that buildeth his house without righteousness, and his chambers without judgment that saith I will build me a roomy house and spacious chambers and cutteth him out windows and it is ceiled with cedar, and painted with vermilion (Jeremiah 22:13, 14)

"building a house without righteousness, and chambers without judgment" denotes building up a religious system from what is not good and not true. "Righteousness and judgment" are good and truth (n. 2235); "cutting him out windows and ceiling with cedar, and painting with vermilion," denotes falsifying intellectual and spiritual truths. The windows of the temple at Jerusalem represented nothing but that which belongs to intellectual and thus to spiritual things. The like is signified by the windows of the new temple described in (Ezekiel 40:16, 22, 25, 33, 36; 41:16, 26); for anyone can see that in this Prophet the new temple, the new Jerusalem, and the new earth, are nothing else than the Lord‘s kingdom; thus that the things mentioned in regard to them are such as belong to His kingdom.

AC 3392. And behold Isaac was laughing with Rebekah his woman. That this signifies that Divine good was present in Divine truth, or that Divine good was adjoined to Divine truth, is evident from the representation of Isaac, as being the Divine good of the Lord’s rational (n. 3012, 3194, 3210); from the signification of "laughing," as being the love or affection of truth (n. 2072, 2216); and from the representation of Rebekah, as being the Divine truth of the Lord‘s rational (n. 3012, 3013, 3077). Hence it is evident that "Isaac laughing with Rebekah his woman" signifies that Divine good was present with Divine truth. The sense of the words in the series is that at first spiritual truth is received for the reason that it is called Divine; and afterwards because the Divine is in it, which is clearly seen by those who are being regenerated and are becoming men of the spiritual church. These are they who are meant by "Abimelech;" that is, who are in the doctrine of faith, and look to truths in knowledges (n. 3391).

AC 3393. And Abimelech called Isaac, and said. That this signifies the Lord’s perception from doctrine, is evident from the representation of Abimelech, as being the doctrine that looks to rational things (n. 2504, 2509, 2510, 2533, 3391); and from the representation of Isaac, as being the Lord‘s Divine rational; and from the signification of "saying," as being to perceive (n. 1898, 1919, 2080, 2862). And as "Abimelech" signifies that doctrine in which the Divine was now perceived (n. 3392), therefore by Abimelech is also represented the Lord as to that doctrine. For in the supreme sense all things in the Word in both general and particular have relation to the Lord; and the Lord is doctrine itself, that is, the Word, not only as to the supreme sense therein, but also as to the internal sense, and even as to the literal sense, for this sense is representative and significative of the internal sense, and the internal sense is representative and significative of the supreme sense; and that which in the Word is representative and significative is in its essence that which is represented and signified, thus it is the Divine of the Lord; for a representative is nothing but an image of him who is represented and is in an image the Lord Himself presented to view. This may be seen from man’s speech, and also from his gesture, these being merely images of the things which come forth within the man, in his thought and will; so that the speech and gesture are the thought and will in form; for if you take away from them the thought and will, that which is left is a mere inanimate affair, thus nothing human. This shows how the case is with the Word, even in the letter, namely, that it is Divine.

AC 3394. Surely behold she is thy woman, and how saidst thou, She is my sister? That this signifies that if Divine truth it was not also rational, is evident from the signification of "woman," here Rebekah, as being the Divine truth of the Lord‘s Divine rational (n. 3012, 3013, 3077); and from the signification of "sister," as being rational truth (n. 3386); thus "behold she is thy woman, and how saidst thou, She is my sister?" signifies that because truth is Divine, it cannot be rational.

[2] With this arcanum the case is this: The spiritual, not having perception as the celestial have, do not know that with a regenerated man Divine truth becomes rational truth. They do indeed say that all good and all truth are from the Lord; yet as these come forth in their rational, they suppose them to be their own, and thus as it were from themselves; for the spiritual cannot be separated from their own, and their own so wills it; although as regards this matter with the celestial, these perceive Divine good and truth in the rational, that is, in the rational things which when enlightened by the Divine of the Lord are appearances of truth (n. 3368), even in the natural, that is, in the things of sense and memory-knowledge; and as the celestial are in such a state, they are able to acknowledge that all good and truth flow in from the Lord; and also that there is a perceptive power of good and truth that is communicated and appropriated to them by the Lord, and that constitutes their delight, bliss, and happiness. It was from this that the most ancient people, who were celestial men, in all the objects which they saw with their eyes perceived nothing but celestial and spiritual things (n. 1409).

[3] Inasmuch as the regenerated spiritual man is here treated of, who through regeneration from the Lord has received Divine good in a new will, and Divine truth in a new understanding; and inasmuch as such persons are in no other perception than that, as before said, if truth were rational it could not be Divine, thus that if it were Divine it would have nothing in common with what is rational, therefore it is here said that if it was Divine truth it was not also rational. This likewise is the reason why such persons are desirous that the things of faith should be believed in simplicity, without any mental view of them on the part of the rational, not being aware that not anything of faith, not even its deepest secret, is comprehended by any man without some rational idea, and also a natural one, but of what quality he does not know (n. 3310). Hereby they may indeed protect themselves against those who reason about everything from what is negative as to whether it is so (n. 2568, 2588). But to those who are in the affirmative concerning the Word (namely, that it is to be believed) such a position is hurtful, as they may thus take away from anyone his freedom of thought, and even bind the conscience to that which is in the highest degree heretical by in this way dominating both the internal and the external things of a man. This and also the above is what is signified by Abimelech’s saying to Isaac, "Behold she is thy woman, and how saidst thou, She is my sister?"

AC 3395. And Isaac said unto him, Because I said, lest I die for her. That this signifies that it would not be received, is evident from what has been said above (n. 3387), at the words, "because he feared to say, She is my woman; lest the men of the place should kill me for Rebekah." That to "say" signifies to perceive and to think, is better seen here than elsewhere.

AC 3396. Verses 10, 11. And Abimelech said, What is this thou hast done unto us, in that one of the people might lightly have lain with thy woman, and thou wouldst have brought guilt upon us? And Abimelech commanded all the people, saying He that toucheth this man and his woman, dying he shall die "And Abimelech said, What is this thou hast done unto us," signifies indignation; "that one of the people might lightly have lain with thy woman, and thou wouldst have brought guilt upon us," signifies that Divine truth might have been adulterated and thus profaned; "and Abimelech commanded all the people, saying," signifies a decree " he that toucheth this man and his woman, dying he shall die," signifies that Divine truth and Divine good are not to be opened; and are not even to be approached in faith, on account of the danger of eternal damnation if they should be profaned.

AC 3397. And Abimelech said, What is this thou hast done unto us? That this signifies indignation, is evident without explication.

AC 3398. That one of the people might lightly have lain with thy woman, and thou wouldst have brought guilt upon us. That this signifies that Divine truth might have been adulterated and thus profaned, is evident from the signification of "lying with," as being to be perverted or adulterated; from the signification of "one of the people," as being some one of the spiritual church (n. 2928); from the signification of "woman" who here is Rebekah, as being Divine truth; and from the signification of "guilt," as being the blame of the profanation of truth; so that by "one of the people might lightly have lain with thy woman, and thou wouldst have brought guilt upon us," is signified that some one of the church might easily have adulterated Divine truth, and have brought upon himself the blame of the profanation of truth. It was said above (n. 3386) that as Abraham twice called his wife Sarah his sister, first in Egypt, and afterwards in Gerar with Abimelech; and that as Isaac in like manner called his woman Rebekah his sister, also with Abimelech; and as these three cases are recorded in the Word, there must be some very deep secret involved thereby. This very secret is seen in the internal sense, namely, that by "sister" is signified rational truth, and by "woman" Divine truth; and this was called rational truth (that is, " sister"), lest Divine truth (here called the "woman" who was Rebekah) should be adulterated, and thus profaned.

[2] In regard to the profanation of truth the case is this: Divine truth cannot possibly be profaned except by those who have first acknowledged it; for when those who have first entered into truth by acknowledgment and belief, and have thus been initiated into it, afterwards recede from it, there continually remains an impression of it stamped within, which is recalled at the same time with the falsity and evil and hence by adhering to these the truth is profaned. Therefore those with whom this is the case have continually in themselves that which condemns them thus their own hell for when the infernals approach a sphere where good and truth are, they are instantly sensible of their own hell, because they come into that which they hold in hatred, consequently into torment. Therefore those who have profaned truth dwell continually with that which torments them, and this according to the degree of the profanation. For this reason it is most especially provided by the Lord that Divine good and truth may not be profaned; and this is provided chiefly by the circumstance that the man who is such that he cannot but profane is withheld as far as possible from the acknowledgment and belief of truth and good; for as before said no one can profane except the man who has first acknowledged and believed.

[3] This was the reason why internal truths were not disclosed to Jacob‘s descendants the Israelites and Jews, who were not openly told even that there is anything internal in man, thus that there is any internal worship; and scarcely anything was said to them about the life after death, and the Lord’s heavenly kingdom; or about the Messiah whom they expected. The reason was that they were of such a character that it was foreseen that if such things had been disclosed to them they could not have helped profaning them, because they desired nothing but earthly things and because that race was of this nature and so remains, it is still permitted that they should be in utter unbelief; for if they had once acknowledged, and had afterwards gone back, they must needs have brought upon themselves the most grievous of all hells.

[4] This was also the reason why the Lord did not come into the world and reveal the internal things of the Word until there was no good whatever remaining with them, not even natural good, for they could then no longer receive any truth with internal acknowledgment (because it is good that receives truth), and therefore they could not profane it. Such was the state meant by the fullness of time," and by the consummation of the age," and also by the last day" so much treated of in the Prophets. It is for the same reason that the arcana of the internal sense of the Word are now being revealed for at this day there is scarcely any faith, because not any charity; thus because it is the consummation of the age and when this is the case, then these arcana can be revealed without danger of profanation, because they are not interiorly acknowledged.

[5] It is for this secret reason that it is related in the Word concerning Abraham and Isaac that when in Gerar with Abimelech they called their wives their sisters. Those can profane who acknowledge, but not those who do not acknowledge, still less those who do not know, (n. 593, 1008, 1010, 1059). What danger there is from a profanation of holy things and of the Word, (n. 571, 582). They who are within the church can profane holy things; but not they who are without the church, (n. 2051). It is provided by the Lord that profanation may not take place, (n. 1001, 2426). Worship becomes external in order to prevent internal worship from being profaned, (n. 1327, 1328). Men are kept in ignorance, lest the truths of faith should be profaned, (n. 301-303).

AC 3399. In the internal sense "to lie with a woman" denotes to pervert and adulterate truth (here truth Divine, because by the "woman" or Rebekah is represented Divine truth, as shown above) is evident from the fact that by "lying with," by adultery," and by harlotry," in the Word, nothing else is signified than perversions of good and falsifications of truth (n. 2466, 2729); and this for the reason that adulteries are diametrically contrary to conjugial love, insomuch that they are destructive of it; and conjugial love is from the marriage of good and truth (n. 2508, 2618, 2727-2759, 3132) and therefore those things which are contrary to good and truth, of which destroy them, are in the Word called "adulteries."

[2] Be it known however that they who are of the spiritual church cannot adulterate good so as to profane it, because they cannot receive good so as to have a perception of it, like the celestial and yet they can profane truth, because this they can acknowledge. But in the last true of the church they cannot even acknowledge truth, because there then universally reigns with them unbelief concerning the Lord, concerning the life after death, and concerning the internal man and an unbelief that universally reigns, prevents the truths of faith from penetrating interiorly. With every one that which is universal limits and hinders such things from entering deeply, both when the man is ignorant of them, and also when he supposes that he believes them.

[3] But they who are capable of profaning good are those of the celestial church, for these can receive good even to perception. This was the case with the antediluvians, who were therefore secluded from all others, and who are confined in a hell separate from the hells of others (n. 1265-1272) and that the profanation of good should not any longer take place is signified by its being said that when man was cast out of Eden, Jehovah caused to dwell at the east of the garden of Eden cherubim, and the flame of a sword that turned itself, to keep the way of the tree of lives (Gen. 3:24) (n. 308, 310).

AC 3400. That "guilt" denotes the blame or imputation of sin and of transgression against good and truth, is evident from the passages of the Word where "guilt" is mentioned and also described, as in Isaiah:--

It pleased Jehovah to bruise Him, and He hath made Him weak if thou shalt make His soul guilt, He shall see His seed, He shall prolong His days, and the will of Jehovah shall prosper through His hand (Isa. 53:10)

where the Lord is treated of; to "make His soul guilt" denotes sin imputed to Him, thus blame by those who hated Him and not that in Himself He contracted anything of sin, that He should take it away. In Ezekiel:--

Thou art become guilty through thy blood that thou hast shed, and art defiled in thine idols which thou hast made (Ezek. 22:4)

where "shedding blood" signifies offering violence to good (n. 374, 376, 1005), whence comes guilt. In David:--

They that hate the righteous shall have guilt Jehovah redeemeth the soul of His servants and none of them that trust in Him shall have guilt (Ps. 34:21, 22).

Thus "guilt" denotes all sin which remains its separation by good from the Lord is redemption," which was also represented by the expiation made by the priest when they offered the sacrifice of guilt as we read in (Lev. 6:1-26; 7:1-10; 19:20-22; Num. 5:1-8); where also the kinds of guilt are enumerated, which are as follows: hearing the voice of cursing and not declaring it; touching anything unclean swearing to do evil sinning by mistake concerning the holy things of Jehovah doing any of those things which are forbidden by the commandments; refusing to a neighbor that which was to be kept for him; finding what has been lost, and denying it and swearing to a lie; lying with a woman that is a bondmaid betrothed to a man, not redeemed, neither made free; and all sins committed against a man by committing a trespass against Jehovah.

AC 3401. And Abimelech commanded all the people, saying. That this signifies a decree, is evident from the signification of " commanding," as being to make a decree and from the representation of Abimelech, as being those who are in the doctrine of faith (n. 3392), and in the supreme sense the Lord (n. 3393) and from the signification of "people," as being those who are of the spiritual church (n. 3398) from which it is evident that " Abimelech commanded all the people" signifies a decree from the Lord in the spiritual church. The decree itself is that which follows, namely, that Divine truth and Divine good are not to be opened, and are not even to be approached in faith, from the danger of eternal damnation if They should be profaned. This is the subject next treated of.

AC 3402. He that toucheth this man and his woman, dying he shall die. That this signifies that Divine truth and Divine good are not to be opened, and are not even to be approached in faith, from the danger of eternal damnation if they should be profaned, is evident from the signification of "touching this man and his woman," as being to approach the Divine truth and Divine good which are represented by Isaac and Rebekah. Truth is here mentioned in the first place, and good in the second, because those are treated of who are in the spiritual church, who are able to adulterate and even profane truth, but not good, and for this reason it is said "man and woman" (n. 915, 2517);--and also from the signification of " dying he shall die," as being eternal damnation, which is spiritual death; here, from profanation, which is the subject treated of.

[2] It is of the Lord‘s providence that no one should be admitted into good and truth - that is, into the acknowledgment and affection thereof - any further than he can remain in them, on account of the danger of eternal damnation, (n. 3398). The case with good and truth, as before stated and shown’, is that in a man these betake themselves inward in so far as he is in evil and falsity; consequently that the angels who are with him from heaven in so far retire; and diabolical spirits from hell in so far approach. And the converse also is true. The removal of good and truth, consequently of the angels, from the man who is in evil and falsity is not apparent to him, because he is then in the persuasion that evil is good, and that falsity is truth, and this from the affection of them and the consequent delight; and when he is in this state it is impossible for him to know that good and truth have been removed from him. Good and truth, or the angels, are said to be removed from man when he is not affected by them, that is, when he is no longer delighted with them, but on the contrary is affected by the things that are of the love of self and the love of the world, that is, when these alone delight him.

[3] To know good and truth, that is, to hold them in the memory, and to talk about them, is not to possess them; but to possess them is to be affected by them from the heart; neither does anyone possess good and truth when he is affected by them for the sake of thereby gaining reputation and wealth for in this case he is not affected by good and truth, but by honor and gain, and he makes the former the means of obtaining the latter. In the other life the goods and truths that such persons have known, and have even preached, are taken away from them, and there remains the love of self and of the world, from which is their life. From this it is evident how the case is with good and truth, namely, that no one is allowed to approach them with affection and faith, unless he is of such a character that he can continue in them to the end of his life. But they who profane are those who cannot be withheld from them.

AC 3403. Verses 12-14.And Isaac sowed in that land, and found in that year a hundred measures, and Jehovah blessed him. And the man increased, and went on going and increasing until he became exceeding great. And he had acquisition of flock, and acquisition of herd, and much service; and the Philistines envied him. "And Isaac sowed in that land," signifies interior truths which are from the Lord appearing to the rational; "and found in that year a hundred measures," signifies abundance; "and Jehovah blessed him," signifies as to the good of love therein; "and the man increased, and went on going and increasing until he became exceeding great," signifies successive increase; "and he had acquisition of flock, and acquisition of herd," signifies as to interior good, and as to exterior good; "and much service," signifies the truth therefrom; "and the Philistines envied him," signifies that they who were in the mere memory-knowledge of knowledges did not apprehend.

AC 3404. And Isaac sowed in that land. That this signifies interior truths which are from the Lord appearing to the rational, is evident from the signification of " sowing," as being in the supreme sense Divine truth which is from the Lord who is the sower (n. 3038); and in the internal sense the truth and good with man thence derived (n. 3373); and from the signification of "land," as being the rational things which when enlightened by the Divine are appearances of truth (n. 3368); or what is the same, interior truths which are from the Lord appearing to the rational; which appearances, or which truths, are of a higher degree, being treated of in the internal sense as far as (verse 14). The angels are in these appearances of truth, which are such that they immeasurably transcend the understanding of man during his life in the world.

[2] In order that it may be still more evident what these appearances of truth are, take also the following example. It is known that the Divine is infinite as to being, and eternal as to manifestation, and that the finite is not capable of comprehending the infinite, nor indeed the eternal, for the eternal is the infinite as to manifestation; and as the Divine Itself is infinite and eternal, all things which are from the Divine are also in finite and eternal, and being infinite cannot possibly be comprehended by angels, because these are finite. For this reason the things which are infinite and eternal are presented before the angels in appearances which are finite; but still in such appearances as are very far above the sphere of man‘s comprehension. For example man cannot possibly have any idea of the eternal except from time; and this being the case, he cannot possibly comprehend what is from eternity, thus what the Divine was before time, or before the world was created. And so long as there is in his thought anything of an idea from time, if he thinks on the subject he must necessarily fall into errors from which he cannot be extricated. but to the angels, who are not in the idea of time, but in the idea of state, it is given to perceive this most clearly, for the eternal with them is not the eternal of time, but the eternal of state, without the idea of time.

[3] Hence it is manifest in what appearances the angels are in comparison with man, and how much their appearances are above those with man; for man cannot have the smallest thought apart from time and space; whereas the angels derive nothing from these; but in their stead from state as to being and as to manifestation. From all this we can see what is the nature of the appearances of truth here treated of, and which are of a higher degree. In what follows, the appearances of truth of a lower degree are treated of in their order, even as they are adapted to mankind.

AC 3405. And found in that year a hundred measures. That this signifies abundance, is evident from the signification of "year," as being the entire state that is treated of (n. 487, 488, 493, 893) from the signification of a "hundred," as being much and full (n. 2636) and from the signification of "measure," as being the state of a thing as to truth (n. 3104). All these things collected into a one signify the abundance of truth. In the supreme sense here, as everywhere, the subject treated of is the Lord--that He too when in the maternal human was in appearances of truth; but that as He put off this human, He put off the appearances also, and put on the infinite and eternal Divine Itself. But in the internal or relative sense the subject is appearances of a higher degree which exist with the angels, as above stated, the abundance of which is signified by the finding in that year of a hundred measures. With appearances of truth, or with truths from the Divine, the case is that such as are of a higher degree immeasurably surpass those which are in a lower degree, both in abundance and in perfection; for myriads, nay, myriads of myriads of things which are distinctively perceived by those who are in a higher degree, appear only as one thing to those who are in a lower degree for lower things are nothing but the composites of higher things, as may be inferred from the memories in man, the interior of which, because in a higher degree, so immeasurably excels the exterior one which is in a lower degree (n. 2473, 2474). From this we can see how great is the angelic wisdom in comparison with that of man; the angels of the third heaven being in the fourth degree above man; concerning which wisdom therefore nothing can be told except that it is incomprehensible, nay, ineffable.

AC 3406. And Jehovah blessed him. That this signifies in respect to the good of love therein, is evident from the signification of "being blessed," as being to be enriched with all celestial and spiritual good (n. 981, 1731, 2846); thus to be "blessed by Jehovah" is to be enriched with celestial good, which is of love, for Jehovah is the very being of love or of good (n. 1735); and therefore where good is treated of, "Jehovah" is named; but where truth is treated of, "God" is named (n. 2586, 2769).

AC 3407. And the man increased, and went on going and increasing until he became exceeding great. That this signifies successive increase, is evident from the signification of "to increase," to "go on going," and to "become exceeding great," as being the successive increasings of good and truth in their order; namely, from truth to good, and from good to truth.

AC 3408. And he had acquisition of flock, and acquisition of herd. That this signifies in respect to interior good and to exterior good (that is, to rational good and to natural good) is evident from the signification of "flock," as being interior or rational good (n. 343, 2566) and from the signification of "herd," as being exterior or natural good (n. 2566). The natural good which is signified "herd," is not that which is born with man, but is that which is procured by means of the knowledges of truth joined to the affection of good for the natural good born with men is in itself a mere animal affair, for it exists also with animals; but the natural good which is acquired, or which is given to man by the Lord, contains in it what is spiritual, so that it is spiritual good in natural. This good is real natural human good, while that which is born with men, although it appears as good, may still not be good, and may even be evil for it may receive falsities, and believe that to be good which is evil. Such natural good exists among nations of the worst life and faith.

AC 3409. And much service. That this signifies the truth thence derived, is evident from the signification of "service," as being all that which is beneath, which is subordinate, and which obeys (n. 1713, 2541, 3019, 3020), thus truth, because this is from good and ministers to good; on which subject much has been said above.

AC 3410. And the Philistines envied him. That this signifies that they who were in the mere memory-knowledge of knowledges did not apprehend, is evident from the signification of "envying," as being here not to apprehend, as is evident from what follows and from the signification of "Philistia," as being the memory-knowledge of knowledges; thus by the "Philistines" are meant those who are in this memory-knowledge (n. 1197, 1198).

AC 3411. Verses 15-17. And all the wells that his father’s servants digged in the days of Abraham his father, the Philistines stopped them up, and filled them with dust. And Abimelech said unto Isaac, Go away from us; for thou art much mightier than we. And Isaac departed thence, and encamped in the valley of Gerar, and dwelt there. "And all the wells that his fathers servants digged in the days of Abraham his father, the philistines stopped them up," signifies that they who were in the memory-knowledge of knowledges were not willing to know interior truths which are from the Divine, and thus obliterated them; "and filled them with dust," signifies by earthly things; "and Abimelech said unto Isaac," signifies the Lord‘s perception concerning this doctrine; "go away from us for thou art much mightier than we," signifies that they could not endure those truths because of the Divine in them; "and Isaac departed thence," signifies that the Lord left interior doctrinal things; "and encamped in the valley of Gerar, and dwelt there," signifies that He betook Himself to lower rational things, that is, from interior appearances to exterior ones.

AC 3412. And all the wells that his father’s servants digged in the days of Abraham his father, the Philistines stopped them up. That this signifies that they who were in the memory-knowledge of knowledges were not willing to know interior truths which are from the Divine, and thus obliterated them, is evident from the signification of "wells," as being truths (n. 2702, 3096), here, interior truths which are from the Divine, inasmuch as the wells by which truths are signified are said to have been digged by his father‘s servants in the days of Abraham his father, for by Abraham is represented the Lord’s Divine Itself (n. 2011, 2833, 2836, 3251, 3305); from the signification of "stopping up," as being not to be willing to know, and thus to obliterate; and from the representation of the Philistines, as being those who are solely in the memory-knowledges of knowledges (n. 1197, 1198).

[2] Appearances of truth of a lower degree are now treated of, in which they may be who are in the memory-knowledge of knowledges, and who are here meant by the "Philistines." With interior truths which are from the Divine, and which are obliterated by those who are called "Philistines," the case is this In the Ancient Church and afterwards, those were called "Philistines" who applied themselves little to life, but much to doctrine, and who in process of time even rejected the things which are of life, and acknowledged as the essential of the church the things which are of faith, which they separated from life; consequently who made light of the doctrinal things of charity, which in the Ancient Church were the sum and substance of doctrine, and thus obliterated them, and instead thereof vaunted much the doctrinal things of faith, and made the whole of religion to consist in these; and inasmuch as thereby they departed from the life which is of charity--that is, from the charity which is of life--they pre-eminently were called the "uncircumcised;" for by the "uncircumcised" were signified all who were not in charity, however much they might be in doctrinal things (n. 2049).

[3] Those who thus departed from charity removed themselves also from wisdom and intelligence; for no one can be wise and intelligent in regard to truth unless he is in good, that is, in charity, because all truth is from good, and looks to good; so that they who are without good cannot understand truth, and are not even willing to know it. In the other life, when such persons are far from heaven, there sometimes appears with them a snowy light; but this light is like that of winter, which being devoid of heat produces no fruit; and therefore when such persons draw near to heaven their light is turned into mere darkness, and their minds are plunged into the like, that is, into stupor. From all this it can now be seen what is meant by the statement that those who are in the mere memory-knowledge of knowledges were not willing to know interior truths which are from the Divine, and thus obliterated them.

AC 3413. And filled them with dust. That this signifies by means of earthly things, that is, by the loves of self and of gain, is evident from the signification of "dust," as being that which is of this nature (n. 249). The meaning is that those called "Philistines" (that is, those who are not in life but in doctrine) obliterate interior truths by earthly loves, which are the love of self and of gain; from these loves they were called the "uncircumcised" (n. 2039, 2044, 2056, 2632). For they who are in these loves cannot but fill the wells of Abraham with dust (that is, obliterate the interior truths of the Word by earthly things), because from these loves they cannot possibly see spiritual things (that is, the things which are of the light of truth from the Lord) for these loves induce darkness, and darkness extinguishes this light. For as before said (n. 3412), on the approach of the light of truth from the Lord, they who are in doctrine only, and not in life, are in total darkness and stupor, and even become angry, and in every way busy themselves to dissipate truths; for the love of self and of gain is of such a nature that it cannot endure the near approach of anything of truth from the Divine. Nevertheless such persons can glory and take pride in the fact that they know truths, nay, they preach them from a kind of zeal; but it is the fires of those loves that kindle and arouse them, and their zeal is merely a fervor thence derived, as is sufficiently evident from the fact that they can preach against their own veriest life with a like zeal or fervor. These are the earthly things by which the Word itself, which is the fountain of all truth, is blocked up.

AC 3414. And Abimelech said unto Isaac. That this signifies the Lord‘s perception concerning that doctrine, is evident from the signification of "saying," as being to perceive; from the representation of Abimelech, who here is the king of the Philistines, as being that doctrine (n. 3365, 3391) and from the representation of Isaac, as being the Lord in respect to the Divine rational.

AC 3415. Go away from us; for those art much mightier than we. That this signifies that they could not endure interior truths because of the Divine therein, is evident from the signification of "to go away from us," as being not to endure the presence; and from the signification of his being "much mightier," as being on account of his opulence; here, on account of the Divine that was in interior truths. They who are called "Philistines" cannot endure the presence of good, thus not the presence of the Divine, (n. 3413).

AC 3416. And Isaac departed thence. That this signifies that the Lord left interior truths, is evident from the signification of "departing thence," as being to leave; here, to leave interior truths, because these are here treated of; and from the representation of Isaac, as being the Lord as to the Divine rational. That the Lord leaves interior truths, signifies that He does not open them to persons of such a character; for there are everywhere in the Word internal truths; but such persons as are in the memory-knowledge of knowledges, and not at the same time in life, do not when reading the Word even see these truths; as is evident from the fact that they who make faith the essential of salvation do not attend to those things which the Lord so frequently spake concerning love and charity (n. 1017, 2371) and they who do attend, call such things the fruits of faith, which fruits they thus distinguish, nay, separate, from charity, of the nature of which they are ignorant. Thus the posterior things of the Word appear to them, but not the anterior things; that is, the exterior things, but not the interior; and to see what is posterior or exterior without seeing what is anterior or interior is to see nothing of the Divine. This is what is meant by the Lord’s leaving interior truths, which is signified by Isaac‘s departing thence; not that the Lord leaves them, but that they remove themselves from the Lord, because from those things which are of life.

AC 3417. And encamped in the valley of Gerar, and dwelt there. That this signifies that He betook Himself to lower rational things, that is, from interior appearances to exterior, is evident from the signification of "encamping," as being to dispose into order; and from the signification of the "valley of Gerar," as being lower rational things, or exterior appearances of truth, for a "valley" signifies lower, or what is the same, exterior things (n. 1723), and "Gerar" those which are of faith, thus which are of truth (n. 1209, 2504, 3365, 3384, 3385); and from the signification of "dwelling," as being to be and to live (n. 3384); so that by his "encamping in the valley of Gerar and dwelling there," is signified that the Lord so disposed truths that they might be adapted to the comprehension and genius of those also who are not much in life, but in the doctrinal things of faith; as may be seen from the Word, where also truths are thus adapted.

[2] For example: they who are in doctrinal things, and not so much in life, do not know otherwise than that the heavenly kingdom is similar to kingdoms on earth, in that men become great by ruling over others, this delight being the only one with which they are acquainted, and which they prefer to every other delight; and therefore the Lord spake in the Word according to this appearance, as in Matthew:--

Whosoever shall do and teach, the same shall be called great in the kingdom of the heavens (Matthew 5:19);

and in David:--

I said, Ye are gods, and all of you sons of the Most High (Psalms 82:6; John 10:34, 35).

And because even the disciples themselves had at first no other opinion respecting the heavenly kingdom than that of greatness and preeminence, as on earth--as is evident in (Matthew 18:1; Mark 9:34; Luke 9:46)--and also had an idea of sitting on the right hand and the left of a king (Matt. 20:20, 21, 24; Mark 10:37), therefore also the Lord replied according to their apprehension and their spirit, saying, when there was a contention among them as to which of them should be greatest:--

Ye shall eat and drink at My table in My kingdom; and shall sit on thrones judging the twelve tribes of Israel (Luke 22:30; Matt. 19:28);

for at that time they did not know that heavenly delight is not the delight of greatness and pre-eminence, but is the delight of humiliation and of the affection of serving others; thus of desiring to be least, and not greatest; as the Lord teaches in Luke:--

Whosoever is least among you all, the same shall be great (Luke 9:48).

[3] Thus they who are in the memory-knowledge of knowledges, and not in the life of charity, cannot know that there is any other delight than that which results from pre-eminence; and because this is the only delight that is seated in their minds, and makes all their life, therefore they are utterly ignorant of the heavenly delight that results from humiliation and the affection of serving others--that is, the delight of love to the Lord and of charity toward the neighbor--consequently of the blessedness and happiness thence derived. This is the reason why the Lord spoke in adaptation to their Infirmity, that thereby they might be aroused and introduced to good, so as to learn, and to teach, and to do it. At the same time He teaches the nature of greatness and preeminence in heaven (Matt. 19:30; 20:16, 25-28; Mark 10:31, 42-45; Luke 9:48; 13:30; 22:25-28). These and the like are the appearances of truth of a lower degree; for they do become relatively great, pre-eminent, powerful, and of authority, seeing that a single angel has greater power than myriads of infernal spirits, get not from himself, but from the Lord; and he has it from the Lord in the proportion that he believes that he has no power from himself, thus that he is the least; and this he can believe in so far as he is in humiliation and in the affection of being of service to others, that is, in so far as he is in the good of love to the Lord, and of charity toward the neighbor.

AC 3418. Verse 18. And Isaac returned, and digged again the wells of waters which they had digged in the days of Abraham his father; add the Philistines stopped them up after the death of Abraham; and he called their names after the names which his father called them. "And Isaac returned, and digged again the wells of waters which they had digged in the days of Abraham his father," signifies that the Lord opened those truths which were with the ancients; "and the Philistines stopped them up after the death of Abraham," signifies that they who were in the mere memory-knowledge of knowledges denied those truths; "and he called their names," signifies their quality; "after the names which his father called them," signifies significatives of truth.

AC 3419. And Isaac returned, and digged again the wells of waters which they had digged in the days of Abraham his father. That this signifies that the Lord opened those truths which were with the ancients, is evident from the representation of Isaac, as being the Lord as to the Divine rational, concerning which above; from the signification of "returning and digging again," as being to open again; from the signification of "wells of waters," as being the truths of knowledges. "Wells" are truths (n. 2702, 3096); and "waters" are knowledges, (n. 28, 2702, 3058); and from the signification of "the days of Abraham his father," as being a previous time and state as to truths, which truths are signified by the wells which they digged at that time, thus the truths which were with the ancients. "Days" signify time and states, (n. 23, 487, 488, 493, 893). When "days" signify states, then by Abraham the father is represented the Lord’s Divine Itself before He adjoined to it the Human (n. 2833, 2836, 3251); when they signify time, then by Abraham the father are signified the goods and truths which were from the Lord‘s Divine before He adjoined to it the Human, thus the goods and truths which were with the ancients.

[2] The truths which were with the ancients are at this day wholly obliterated, insomuch that scarcely anyone knows that they ever existed, and that they could be any other than what are taught at this day, when yet they were totally different. The ancients had Representatives and Significatives of the celestial and spiritual things of the Lord’s kingdom, thus of the Lord Himself; and they who understood such representatives and significatives were called the wise; and they were wise, for thereby they were able to speak with spirits and angels. For when angelic speech (which is incomprehensible to man because spiritual and celestial) descends to man, who is in a natural sphere, it falls into representatives and significatives such as are in the Word, and hence it is that the Word is a holy writing; for in order to a full correspondence that which is Divine cannot be presented in any other way before the natural man.

[3] And as the ancients were in representatives and significatives of the Lord‘s kingdom, in which there is nothing but celestial and spiritual love, they had also doctrinal things that treated solely of love to God and of charity toward the neighbor; and by virtue of these doctrinal things they were called the wise. From these doctrinal things they knew that the Lord would come into the world, and that Jehovah would be in Him, and that He would make the human in Himself Divine, and would thus save the human race. From these doctrinal things they also knew what charity is, namely, the affection of being of service to others without any end of recompense; and also what is the neighbor toward whom there should be charity, namely, all in the universe, but still each with discrimination. At this day these doctrinal things are utterly lost, and in place of them there are doctrinal things of faith, which the ancients accounted as relatively nothing. At the present day the doctrinal things of love to the Lord and of charity toward the neighbor are rejected, in part by those who in the Word are called "Babylonians and Chaldeans," and in part by those who are called "Philistines" and also "Egyptians;" and thus are so completely lost that there remains scarcely any trace of them. For who at the present day knows what that charity is which is devoid of all regard for self, and which is averse to everything that is for the sake of self? And who knows that the neighbor is every one, with discrimination according to the kind and amount of good in him? thus that he is good itself, consequently in the supreme sense the Lord Himself, because He is in good, and good is from Him, and the good which is not from Him is not good, however much it may appear to be so? And because it is not known what charity is, and what the neighbor, it is not known who they are that in the Word are signified by the "poor," the "miserable," the "needy," the "sick," the "hungry" and "thirsty," the "oppressed," "widows," "orphans," "captives," the "naked," "sojourners," the "blind," the "deaf," the "halt," "maimed," and other’s when yet the doctrinal things of the ancients taught who these were, and to what class of the neighbor, and thus of charity, each belonged. The whole of the Word in the sense of the letter is written in accordance with these doctrinal things, so that he who has no knowledge of them cannot possibly know any interior sense of the Word.

[4] As in Isaiah:--

Is it not to break bread to the hungry, and that thou bring the afflicted that are cast out to thy house? when thou seest the naked, that thou cover him, and that thou hide not thyself from thine own flesh? Then shall thy light break forth as the dawn, and thy healing shall spring forth speedily; and thy righteousness shall go before thee, the glory of Jehovah shall gather thee (Isa. 58:7, 8).

He who lays stress on the sense of the letter believes that if he merely gives bread to the hungry, takes into his house the poor outcasts or wanderers, and covers the naked, he will on this account come into the glory of Jehovah, or into heaven when yet these are mere outward acts, and even the wicked may do them for the sake of self-merit; but by the "hungry, the "afflicted," the "naked," are signified those who are spiritually such, thus different states of misery in which the man may be who is the neighbor, and toward whom charity is to be exercised.

[5] In David:--

He that executeth judgment for the oppressed; that giveth bread to the hungry; Jehovah looseth the prisoners; Jehovah openeth the eyes of the blind; Jehovah raiseth up them that are bowed down; Jehovah loveth the righteous; Jehovah guardeth the sojourners; He upholdeth the fatherless and widow (Ps. 146:7-9);

where by the "oppressed," the "hungry," the "prisoners," the "blind;" the "bowed down," the "sojourners," the "fatherless" and "widow," are not meant those who are commonly so called, but those who are such in respect to spiritual things, that is, in respect to their souls. Who these were, and in what state and degree they were neighbors, thus what charity was to be exercised toward them, was taught by the doctrinal things of the ancients. It is the same everywhere else in the Old Testament; for when the Divine descends into what is natural with man, it descends into such things as are works of charity, with discrimination according to genera and species.

[6] The Lord also spoke in like manner, because He spoke from the Divine Itself, as in Matthew:--

Then shall the King say unto thee on His right hand, Come ye blessed of My Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you; for I was a hungered, and ye gave Me to eat; I was thirsty, and ye gave Me to drink; I was a stranger, and ye took Me in; naked, and ye clothed Me; I was sick, and ye visited Me; I was in prison, and ye came unto Me (Matthew 25:34-36).

By the works here recounted are signified the universal genera of charity; and in what degree are the goods or the good men who are the neighbors toward whom charity is to be exercised and that in the supreme sense the Lord is the neighbor, for He says:--

Inasmuch as ye did it unto one of the least of these My brethren, ye did it unto Me (Matthew 25:40).

From these few examples it may be seen what is meant by the truths with the ancients. But that these truths are altogether obliterated by those who are in the doctrinal things of faith, and not in the life of charity, that is, by those who in the Word are called "Philistines," is signified by the Philistines stopping up the wells after the death of Abraham, which is the subject next treated of.

AC 3420. And the Philistines stopped them up after the death of Abraham. That this signifies that they who were in the mere memory-knowledge of knowledges denied those truths, is evident from the signification of "stopping up," as being not to be willing to know, and what is the same, to deity and thus to obliterate them (n. 3412); and from the representation of the Philistines, as being those who are in the mere memory-knowledge of knowledges (n. 1197, 1198, 3412, 3413). Those are in the memory-knowledge of knowledges who are in the doctrinal things of faith and are not willing to know the truths of knowledges or of doctrinal things. The truths of knowledge or of doctrinal things are those which are of life, and which have regard to charity toward the neighbor and love to the Lord. The doctrine to which these doctrinal things and knowledges pertain, merely teaches them and therefore the man who teaches what ought to be done, and does not do it, is not willing to know truths, because they are contrary to his life and that which is contrary to his life he also denies. It is from these causes that the doctrinal things of love and charity, which in the Ancient Church were the whole of doctrine, are obliterated.

AC 3421. And he called their names. That this signifies their quality, is evident from the signification of "calling names," as being the quality (n. 144, 145, 1754, 1896, 2009, 2724, 3006, 3237); and as "to call names" or "a name" signifies the quality, therefore "to call" without a name being mentioned, in the internal sense of the Word signifies to be of such a quality. As in Isaiah:--

Hear ye this O house of Jacob who are called by the name of Israel, and are come forth out of the Waters of Judah. For they call themselves of the city of holiness, and stay themselves upon the God of Israel (Isa. 48:1, 2);

where "calling themselves of the city of holiness" signifies being of such a quality. Add in Luke:--

Behold thou shalt conceive in thy womb, and shalt bring forth a son, and shalt call his name Jesus; He shall be great, and shall he called the Son of the Most High (Luke 1:31, 32);

"to be called the Son of the Most High" denotes being.

AC 3422. After the names which his father called them. That this signifies significatives of truth, is evident from the fact that the names which in ancient times were given to persons, places, and things, were all significative (n. 340, 1946, 2643); thus the names given to fountains and wells were significative of the things that were formerly understood by fountains and wells, and which had relation to truth (n. 2702, 3096) and because names were significative, by "name" also, and by "calling by name" is signified in general the quality of either a thing or a state (n. 3421); and this being so, by the names in the Word, in its internal sense, is not signified any person, or any nation, or any kingdom, or any city, but always some actual thing. That by "wells" in this passage there is signified something heavenly must be obvious to every one for unless this were so, to mention so many particulars concerning wells would not be worthy of the Divine Word, because it would be of no use to know them; as for instance that the Philistines stopped up the wells which the servants of Abraham digged that Isaac digged them again, and that he called their names after their former names and afterwards that the servants of Isaac digged a well in the valley about which the shepherds strove; and that they digged again another well about which they also strove; and afterwards another about which they did not strive; and again another; and lastly that they told Isaac about a new well (verses 15, 18-22, 25, 32, 33); but the heavenly signification of these wells is now manifest from the internal sense.

AC 3423. Verses 19-21. And the servants of Isaac digged in the valley, and found there a well of living waters. And the shepherds of Gerar strove with Isaac‘s shepherds, saying, The waters are ours; and he called the name of the well Esek, because they contended with him. And they digged another well, and they strove over that also, and he called the name of it Sitnah. "And the servants of Isaac digged in the valley, and found there a well of living waters," signifies the Word as to the literal sense in which is the internal sense; "and the shepherds of Gerar strove with Isaac’s shepherds," signifies that they who taught did not see any such thing therein, because the senses appear opposed; "saying, The waters are ours," signifies that they are in the truth; "and he called the name of the well Esek, because they contended with him," signifies denial on these accounts as well as on others, in being against the teachers, and on account of other things besides; "and they digged another well, and they strove over that also," signifies the internal sense of the Word, as to whether it has any existence; "and he called the name of it Sitnah," signifies their quality.

AC 3424. And the servants of Isaac digged in the valley, and found there a well of living waters. That this signifies the Word as to the literal sense in which is the internal sense, is evident from the signification of "digging in the valley," as being to make search lower down in respect to where truths are; for to "dig" is to search, and a "valley" denotes what is below (n. 1723, 3417); and from the signification of a well of living waters," as being the Word in which are truths Divine, thus the Word as to the literal sense in which is the internal sense. That the Word is called a "fountain," and indeed a fountain of living waters," is well known but the reason why the Word is also called a "well," is that the sense of the letter is relatively such and also because relatively to those who are spiritual the Word is not a "fountain," but a "well" (n. 2702, 3096). As a "valley" denotes that which is below, or what is the same, that which is exterior, and the fountain was found in a valley, and the literal sense is the lower or exterior sense of the Word, therefore it is the literal sense which is meant but because the internal sense, that is, the heavenly and Divine sense, is within this, therefore the waters thereof are called "living;" as were also the waters that went forth under the threshold of the new house, in Ezekiel:--

And it shall come to pass that every living creature that creepeth, to which the river there comes, shall live and there shall be a very great multitude of fish, because these waters are come thither and are healed, and everything liveth whithersoever the river cometh (Ezek. 47:9);

where the "river" is the Word; the "waters which cause everything to live" are the Divine truths contained in it; the "fish" are memory-knowledges (n. 40, 991).

[2] That the Word of the Lord is such that it gives life to him that thirsteth, that is, to him that desireth life, and that it is a "fountain whose waters are living," the Lord also teaches in John when speaking to the woman of Samaria at Jacob‘s well:--

If thou knewest the gift of God, and who it is that saith to thee, Give Me to drink, thou wouldest have asked of Him, and He would have given thee living water. Whosoever drinketh of the water that I shall give him shall never thirst; but the water that I shall give him shall become in him a fountain of water springing up unto eternal life (John 4:10, 14).

That the Word is living and therefore gives life, is because in its supreme sense the Lord is treated of, and in the inmost sense His kingdom, in which the Lord is all; and this being the case, there is in the Word life itself, which flows into the minds of those who read the Word with reverence; hence it is that in respect to the Word that is from Himself the Lord declares Himself to be a "fountain of water springing up unto eternal life" (n. 2702).

[3] That just as the Lord’s Word is called a "fountain," so is it also called a "well," is evident in Moses:--

Israel sang this song: Spring up, O well, answer ye unto it: the princes digged the well; the chiefs of the people digged it for the lawgiver with their staves (Num. 21:17, 18).

These words were spoken at the "place Beer," that is, at the "place of the well." That by "well" here is signified the Word of the Ancient Church, spoken of above (n. 2897), is evident from what is there said; "princes" are primary truths that are the source. "Princes" signify primary truths, (n. 1482, 2089). The "chiefs of the people" are lower truths, such as are those contained in the literal sense (n. 1259, 1260, 2928, 3295). The "lawgiver" is the Lord. "Staves" denote the powers which they possessed.

AC 3425. And the shepherds of Gerar strove with Isaac‘s shepherds. That this signifies that they who taught did not see any such thing therein because the senses appeared opposed, is evident from the signification of "disputing," when the internal sense of the Word is concerned, as being to deny it to be such by saying that they do not see it; and from the signification of "shepherds," as being those who teach (n. 343) and from the signification of "Gerar," as being faith (n. 1209, 2504, 3365, 3384); thus "the shepherds of the valley of Gerar" denote those who acknowledge only the literal sense of the Word. The reason why they see no such thing that is, no interior sense, is that the two appear opposite, namely, what is in the internal sense, and what is in the literal sense. But their appearing to be opposite does not prove that they are so, for they wholly correspond; and the reason they appear opposite is that they who see the Word so are in what is opposite;

[2] just as in the case of a man who is in opposition within himself, that is, whose external or natural man is in entire disagreement with his internal or spiritual man. Such a man sees that which is of the internal or spiritual man as opposed to himself, when yet in respect to the external or natural man, he himself is in that which is opposed; and if he were not in this, so that his external or natural man yielded obedience to the internal or spiritual man, the two would wholly correspond. For example: the man who is in what is opposed believes that in order to his reception of eternal life riches are to be renounced, as well as all the pleasures of the body and of the world, thus the delights of life; such things being supposed to be opposed to spiritual life, whereas in themselves they are not so, but correspond, because they are means to an end, namely, that the internal or spiritual man may enjoy them so as to be able to perform the goods of charity, and also may live content in a healthful body. The ends alone are what cause the internal man and the external either to be opposed or to correspond; they are opposed when the riches, pleasures, and delights here spoken of become the ends, for in this case the spiritual and celestial things which are of the internal man are despised and derided, nay, are rejected; but they correspond when such things are not made ends, but means to higher ends, namely, to those things which belong to the life after death, thus to the heavenly kingdom and the Lord Himself. In this case bodily and worldly things appear to the man as scarcely anything in comparison; and when he thinks about them, he values them only as means to ends.

[3] From this it is evident that the things which appear opposed are not opposed in themselves; but they appear so because men are in what is opposed. They who are not in what is opposed, act, speak, and acquire riches, and also enjoy pleasures, similarly as do those who are in what is opposed, insomuch that in the outward appearance they can scarcely be distinguished from each other. The reason is that their ends alone are what distinguish them; or what is the same, their loves; for loves are ends. But although in the outward form, or as to the body, they appear alike, yet in the inward form, or as to the spirit, they are utterly unlike. The spirit of one who is in correspondence--that is, with whom the external man corresponds to the internal is fair and beautiful, such as is heavenly love in form; but the spirit of one who is in what is opposed--that is, with whom the external man is opposed to the internal--however great may be the outward resemblance to the other, is black and ugly, such as is the love of self and of the world, that is, such as is contempt of others and hatred in form.

[4] The case is the same with a host of things in the Word; that is to say, the things in the literal sense appear opposed to those in the internal sense; when yet they are by no means opposed, but wholly correspond. For example: it is frequently said in the Word that Jehovah or the Lord is angry, is wroth, destroys, and casts into hell; when yet He is never angry, and still less does He cast anyone into hell. The former is of the sense of the letter, but the latter is of the internal sense; and these appear opposed, but this is because the man is in what is opposed. In the same way the Lord appears as a sun to the angels who are in heaven, and thence as vernal warmth, and as light at day-dawn; but to the infernals He appears as something quite opaque, and thence as wintry cold, and as midnight darkness. Consequently to the angels He appears in love and charity, but to the infernals in hatred and enmity; thus to the latter according to the sense of the letter that He is angry, is wroth, destroys, and casts into hell; but to the former according to the internal sense that He is never angry and wroth, and still less destroys and casts into hell; so that when things are being treated of in the Word that are contrary to the Divine, it is inevitable that they should be presented in accordance with the appearance. Moreover it is the Divine which the wicked change into what is diabolical that works in this way; and therefore in so far as they approach the Divine, so far they cast themselves into infernal torments.

[5] The case is the same with the Lord’s words in the prayer: "Lead us not into temptation." The sense according to the letter is that He leads into temptation; but the internal sense is that He leads no one into temptation, as is well known (n. 1875). The same is true of all other things that belong to the literal sense of the Word.

AC 3426. Saying, the waters are ours. That this signifies that they are in truth, or that they have truths, is evident from the signification of "waters," as being knowledges, and also truths (n. 28, 680, 739, 2702, 3058).

AC 3427. And he called the name of the well Esek, because they contended with him. That this signifies denial on these accounts as well as on others, in being against the teachers, and on account of other things besides, is evident from the fact that the names which were given of old were significative of the actual thing or state (n. 3422); whence they were enabled to bear in mind many things concerning these, especially in regard to their quality. In the present case, as the shepherds of Gerar disputed with the shepherds of Isaac, a name was given to the well from this circumstance. That disputing" or "contending" signifies also denying, may be seen above (n. 3425) hence comes the name "Esek," which in the original tongue means "contention" or "dispute," and is derived from a kindred word which means oppression and injury. And because by "well" here is signified the Word as to the literal sense in which is the internal sense, by "Esek," or " contention," is signified a denial of the internal sense of the Word. The causes of the denial are also contained in the same expression, and are manifestly those things treated of just above (n. 3425), namely, that the literal and spiritual senses appear opposed; and also other things besides.

[2] As regards the internal sense of the Word, the case is this: They who are in the mere memory-knowledge of knowledges and are called "Philistines," and they who are in the mere doctrinal things of faith, who are called "shepherds of the valley of Gerar," and are in no charity toward the neighbor, cannot possibly do otherwise than deny that there is an internal sense of the Word. The principal causes are that in their hearts they do not acknowledge the Lord, although they profess Him with the mouth; and also that at heart they do not love the neighbor, although they profess love toward him; and he who does not at heart acknowledge the Lord, and at heart love the neighbor, cannot possibly do otherwise than deny the internal sense of the Word for the Word in its internal sense treats of nothing else than love to the Lord and love toward the neighbor; and therefore the Lord says that on these two commandments hang the Law and the Prophets, that is, the whole Word (Matt. 22:37-40). How greatly these deny the internal sense of the Word has also been given me to see from such persons in the other life, for when the existence of an internal sense of the Word that does not appear in its literal sense, and that treats of love to the Lord and the neighbor, is merely mentioned in their presence, there is perceived not only denial by them, but also aversion, and even loathing. This is the primary cause of this denial.

[3] Another cause is that they altogether invert the Word by setting that above which is beneath, or what is the same, by setting that before which is behind; for they make faith to be the essential of the church, and the things which are of love to the Lord and love toward the neighbor to be the fruits of faith; when yet the truth is that if love to the Lord is compared to the tree of life in the paradise of Eden, charity and its works are the fruits therefrom, and faith and all things of faith are only the leaves. As therefore they so invert the Word as to derive the fruits not from the tree but from the leaves, it is not surprising that they deny the internal sense of the Word and acknowledge only its literal sense; for from the literal sense any dogma, even the most heretical, can be confirmed, as is well known.

[4] Moreover they who are in the mere doctrinal things of faith and not in the good of life, cannot but be in persuasive faith, that is, in preconceived principles, false as well as true. Consequently they must be more stupid than others, for in so far as anyone is in persuasive faith, so far he is stupid; but in so far as anyone is in the good of life (that is, in love to the Lord and charity toward the neighbor), so far he is in intelligence, that is, in faith from the Lord. Hence also it is that the former must needs be in the negative as regards the internal sense of the Word; but the latter must needs be in the affirmative for with those who are merely in doctrinal things, and not in the good of life, the interiors are closed, so that the light of truth from the Lord cannot flow in and give them to perceive that it is so; whereas with those who are in love to the Lord the interiors are Lord can flow in, affect their minds, and give a perception that it is so.

[5] A further cause is that they have no other delight in reading the Word than that they may thus acquire honors and riches, and thereby reputation, which delight is the delight of the love of self and of the world; and this to such a degree that if they do not obtain from it such advantages, they will entirely reject the Word. They who are such, in their heart not only deny the internal sense of the Word when they hear of it, but also the literal sense itself, however much they may suppose that they believe it. For he who has as his end the delight of the love of self and of the world, completely casts out of his heart everything pertaining to eternal life; and only from his natural and corporeal man makes a profession of such things, which he calls truths not for the sake of the Lord and His kingdom, but for the sake of the Lord and His kingdom, but for the sake of himself and his own. These and many other things cause those called "shepherds of the valley of Gerar," and "Philistines," to deny the internal sense of the Word.

AC 3428. And they digged another well, and they strove over that also. That this signifies the internal sense of the Word as to whether there is such a thing, is evident from the signification of "another well," and of "striving", thus from the series; for when those who deny anything, as for instance those who deny the internal sense of the Word, again strive or contend, it must needs be as to whether it has any existence. It is known that most disputes at this day go no further; but so long as men remain in debate as to whether a thing is, and whether it is so, they can never advance into anything of wisdom; for in the thing itself concerning which they debate there are innumerable things which they can never see so long as they do not acknowledge that thing, because in this case they are all the time ignorant of everything that belongs to it.

[2] The learning of the present day scarcely passes the point of debating whether a thing has any existence, and whether it is thus, or thus; the result of which is that men are shut out from the understanding of truth. For example: he who merely disputes whether there is an internal sense of the Word can never see the innumerable, nay, illimitable things which are in the internal sense and again, he who disputes whether charity is anything in the church, and whether all things of this are not of faith, cannot possibly know the innumerable, nay, illimitable things which are in charity, but remains in complete ignorance of what charity is.

[3] The like is the case with the life after death, with the resurrection of the dead, with the last judgment, with heaven and with hell--they who merely debate whether these things exist, stand meanwhile outside the doors of wisdom, and are like persons who merely knock, and cannot even look into wisdom‘s magnificent palaces. And yet strange to say such men believe themselves to be wise in comparison with others, and that they are wise in proportion to their ability to debate whether a thing be so, and specially to prove that it is not so; when yet the simple who are in good, and whom they despise, can perceive in a moment, without any dispute, much more without learned controversy, that the thing is, and what is its quality. These have a common sense of the perception of truth, whereas the former have extinguished this sense by such methods, in desiring first of all to discuss whether the thing has any existence. The Lord speaks both of the former and of the latter when He says that things are hidden from the wise and intelligent, and revealed unto babes (Matt. 11:25; Luke 10:21).

AC 3429. And he called the name of it Sitnah. That this signifies their quality, is evident from the signification of "calling a name," as denoting the quality (n. 144, 145, 1754, 1896, 2009, 2724, 3006, 3421); and from the signification of "Sitnah," as being in the original tongue "antagonism," which is a further degree of denial.

AC 3430. Verses 22, 23. And he removed from thence, and digged another well, and for this they strove not; and he called the name of it Rehoboth; and he said, For now Jehovah hath made us to be enlarged, and we shall be fruitful in the land. And he went up from thence to Beer-sheba. "And he removed from thence," signifies to things still lower; "and digged another well, and for this they strove not," signifies the literal sense of the Word; "and he called the name of it Rehoboth" signifies the consequent quality as to truth; "and he said, For now Jehovah hath made us to be enlarged," signifies the successive increase of truth therefrom; "and we shall be fruitful in the land," signifies the successive increase of good therefrom; "and he went up from thence to Beer-sheba," signifies that from this the doctrine of faith was Divine.

AC 3431. And he removed from there. That this signifies to things still lower, is evident from the signification of removing," as being to other things that follow in the series; here therefore to lower or exterior truths, because hitherto higher or interior truths have been treated of in order. Lower or exterior truths are those which appear in the literal sense of the Word, adapted to the apprehension of the natural man. These truths are now to be treated of.

AC 3432. And digged another well, and for this they strove not. That this signifies the literal sense of the Word, is evident from the signification of a "well," as being the Word (n. 2702, 3096, 3424), here, the Word as to the literal sense, for it is said that he "removed from thence, and digged another well, and for this they strove not," by which is signified that sense of the Word which is more exterior, and which they do not deny; and it is this which is called the literal sense. The literal sense of the Word is threefold; namely, historical, prophetical, and doctrinal, each of which is such that it may be apprehended even by those who are in externals.

[2] As regards the Word the case is this: In the most ancient time, when the celestial church existed, the Word was not, because the men of that church had the Word inscribed on their hearts; for the Lord taught them immediately through heaven what was good, and thence what was true, and gave them both to perceive from love and charity, and to know from revelation. To them the veriest Word was the Lord. After this church another succeeded that was not celestial but spiritual, and at first this church had no other Word than that which had been gathered from the most ancient people which Word was representative of the Lord, and significative of His kingdom thus the internal sense was to them the very Word. They had also a written Word, both historic and prophetic, which is no longer extant; and in this there was in like manner an internal sense, which had relation to the Lord, (n. 2686). Hence it was the wisdom of that time both to speak and to write by representatives and significatives; within the church concerning Divine things, and out of the church concerning other things; as is evident from the writings of those ancient people which remain with us. But in process of time this wisdom perished, to such a degree that at last they did not know that there was any internal sense even in the books of the Word. The Jewish and Israelitish nation was of the character here referred to, and accounted the prophetic Word holy from the fact that it sounded ancient, and they heard the name Jehovah in the sense of the letter; and they did not believe that anything Divine was deeply hidden within it; nor does the Christian world think any more reverently of the Word.

[3] From this we can see how in succeeding time wisdom retired from inmost things to outermost; and that man had removed himself from heaven, and had at last descended even to the dust of the earth, wherein he now places wisdom. As it has fared thus with the Word, so that its internal sense has been successively obliterated, and at this day to such a degree that it is not known that there is such a sense, when yet this sense is the veriest Word in which the Divine proximately dwells, therefore its successive states are described in this chapter.

AC 3433. And he called the name of it Rehoboth. That this signifies the consequent quality as to truth, is evident from the signification of "calling a name," as denoting the quality (n. 144, 145, 1754, 1896, 2009, 2724, 3006, 3421); and from the signification of "Rehoboth," as being truths, for in the original tongue "Rehoboth" means "breadths," and that in the internal sense of the Word "breadths" denote truths, was shown above (n. 1613).

AC 3434. And he said, For now Jehovah hath made us to be enlarged. That this signifies the successive increase of truth therefrom, is evident from the signification of "breadth," as being truth, concerning which see just above (n. 3433); hence "to be enlarged" is to receive successive increase of truth.

AC 3435. And we shall be fruitful in the land. That this signifies the successive increase of good therefrom, is evident from the signification of "being fruitful," as being successive increase of good. "To be fruitful" is predicated of good, and "to be multiplied" of truth, (n. 43, 55, 913, 983, 2846, 2847). And from the signification of "land," as being the church, and whatever is of the church (n. 662, 1066, 1067, 1262, 1733, 1850, 2928, 3355).

AC 3436. And he went up from thence to Beer-sheba. That this signifies that from this the doctrine of faith was Divine, is evident from the signification of "Beer-sheba," as being the doctrine of faith, which is Divine (n. 2723, 2858, 2859). The doctrine of faith, which is here signified by " Beer-sheba," is the very literal sense of the Word, for the Word is doctrine itself; and although the Word as to the literal sense is such that truths may be drawn from it, it is also such that things not true may be confirmed from it, as is well known from the existence of heresies. But he who reads the Word in order to be wise, that is, to do what is good and understand what is true, is instructed according to his end and affection; for unknown to him the Lord flows in and enlightens his mind, and where he is at a loss, gives understanding from other passages.

[2] moreover the man who is in simple good, and in simplicity believes the Word according to its literal sense, when instructed in the other life by angels is gifted with the faculty of perceiving truths; and in the meantime the few truths he has are vivified by charity and innocence; and when these are in the truths, the falsities which also had infused themselves in the shade of his ignorance are not hurtful, for they are not adjoined to good, but are withheld therefrom as it were in the circumference, and thus can be easily cast out. Very different however is the case with those who are not in the good of life, for with them the falsities which by a wrong interpretation they have hatched from the Word hold as it were the middle or center, and truths the surroundings or circumferences; and therefore falsities are adjoined to the evil of their life and truths are dispersed.

AC 3437. Verses 24, 25. And Jehovah appeared to him in that night, and said, I am the God of Abraham thy father; fear not, for I am with thee, and I will bless thee, and will multiply thy seed, for the sake of Abraham My servant. And he builded an altar there, and called upon the name of Jehovah, and pitched his tent there, and there the servants of Isaac digged out a well. "And Jehovah appeared to him in that night, and said," signifies the Lord’s perception concerning that obscurity; "I am the God of Abraham thy father; fear not, for I am with thee," signifies that the Divine also was there; "and I will bless thee, and will multiply thy seed," signifies that thence would be increase of good and truth; "for the sake of Abraham My servant," signifies from the Lord‘s Divine Human; "and he builded an altar there," signifies a significative and representative of the Lord; "and called upon the name of Jehovah," signifies worship thence "and pitched his tent there," signifies what is holy therein; "and there the servants of Isaac digged out a well," signifies doctrine thence derived.

AC 3438. And Jehovah appeared to him in that night, and said. This signifies the Lord’s perception concerning that obscurity, which is evident from the signification of "Jehovah appearing and saying," when predicated of the Lord, as being to perceive from the Divine. By "Jehovah appearing to him" is signified from the Divine, (n. 3367); and "saying" denotes perceiving, (n. 2862, 3395); for Jehovah was in Him; thus so long as the human was not yet glorified, the appearing of Jehovah was Divine perception, or perception from the Divine; and therefore by "Jehovah appearing to him and saying" this is signified;--and from the signification of "night," as being a state of shade or obscurity (n. 1712). By this obscurity is signified the literal sense of the Word, for relatively to the internal sense this is as shade to light.

[2] A few words shall be said in order that it may be further known how the case is with the literal sense of the Word. Relatively to the literal sense, the internal sense is like the interior or celestial and spiritual things of a man relatively to his exterior or natural and bodily things, his interiors being in the light of heaven, and his exteriors in the light of the world. What the difference is between the light of heaven and the light of the world, consequently between what is of the light of heaven and what is of the light of the world, may be seen above (n. 1521-1533, 1619-1632, 1783, 1880, 2776, 3138, 3167, 3190, 3195, 3222, 3223, 3225, 3337, 3339, 3341, 3413), namely, that it is like the difference between the light of day and the shade of night. Man, being in this shade, and not being willing to know that in truth from the Lord there is light, cannot believe otherwise than that his shade is light, and also on the other hand that the light is shade; for he is like a bird of night, which as it flies in the shade of night thinks that it is in the light but when in the light of day, that it is in the shade. For with such a person the internal eye (that is, the understanding), by which man sees interiorly, has been formed no differently than this, because he has not formed it differently; for he opens it when he looks downward, that is, to worldly and bodily things, and shuts it when he should look upward, that is, to spiritual and heavenly things. With such persons the case is the same in respect to the Word that which appears in its literal sense they believe to be of light; but that which appears in the internal sense they believe to be of shade (for the Word appears to every one in accordance with his quality) the fact being that relatively to its literal sense the internal sense of the Word is as the light of heaven to the light of the world (n. 3086, 3108); that is, as the light of day to the light of night.

[3] In the internal sense there are singulars, myriads of which together make one particular that is presented in the literal sense or what is the same, in the internal sense there are particulars, myriads of which together make in the literal sense one general; and it is this general that is seen by man, but not the particulars which are in it and which constitute it. Nevertheless the order of the particulars in the general is apparent to man, but in accordance with his quality; and this order is the holiness that affects him.

AC 3439. I am the God of Abraham thy father; fear not, for I am with thee. That this signifies that the Divine also was therein, namely, in the literal sense of the Word, is evident from the representation of Abraham, as being the Lord‘s Divine (n. 2833, 2836, 3251, 3305); hence Jehovah the "God of Abraham" signifies the Lord’s Divine which is represented by Abraham; and because the subject treated of is the Word, which also is the Lord, because all the Word is from Him and everything of the Word is concerning Him, therefore by "I am the God of Abraham thy father, fear not, for I am with thee" is signified that the Divine also is therein. As regards the Divine in the Word, the case is this: The Divine Itself is in the supreme sense of the Word, because therein is the Lord the Divine is also in the internal sense, because therein is the Lord‘s kingdom in the heavens, and hence this sense is called celestial and spiritual the Divine is also in the literal sense of the Word, because therein is the Lord’s kingdom in the earths; hence this sense is called the external, and also the natural, sense, for in it are gross appearances more remote from the Divine and yet the things therein are each and all Divine. With these three senses the case is as with the tabernacle: its inmost, or what was within the veil, where was the ark containing the testimony, was most holy, or the holy of holies; its internal, or what was immediately without the veil, where were the golden table and candlestick, was holy; and the external, where the court was, was also holy; in it the congregation assembled, and hence it was called the tent of the assembly.

AC 3440. And I will bless thee, and will multiply thy seed. This signifies that thence would be an increase of good and truth, which is evident from the signification of "blessing thee," as being an increase of good (n. 3406); and from the signification of "multiplying thy seed," as being an increase of truth (n. 43, 55, 913, 983, 2846, 2847). "Seed" denotes truth, of which "multiplying" is predicated, (n. 1025, 1447, 1610, 2848, 3038, 3373, 3380). That there is an increase of good and truth with man from the literal sense of the Word also, is that in this sense also each and all things are Divine, as just stated (n. 3439), and also because in many passages of the literal sense the internal sense is open as for instance in the Prophets of the Old Testament that the Lord would come who would be the salvation of the human race; that the whole Law and Prophets consist in loving God and the neighbor and that "to kill" is to bear hatred, because the man who hates kills every moment, this being in his will and in the delight of his life. These are of the internal sense in the literal sense, besides many other such things.

AC 3441. For the sake of Abraham My servant. That this signifies from the Lord‘s Divine Human, is evident from the representation of Abraham, as being the Lord’s Divine, and also the Divine Human (n. 2833, 2836, 3251); and from the signification of "My servant," when predicated of the Lord, as being the Divine Human; not that the Divine Human is a servant, because this also is Jehovah (n. 1736, 2156, 2329, 2921, 3023, 3035), but because the Lord by this serves the human race; for by this man is saved, inasmuch as unless the Lord had united the Human to the Divine, so that man might be enabled with his mind to look upon and adore the Human of the Lord and thus have access to the Divine, He could not possibly have been saved. The conjunction of man with the Divine Itself which is called the "Father" is through the Divine Human which is called the "Son;" thus through the Lord, by whom the spiritual man understands the Human, but the celestial man the Divine Itself. Hence it is evident why the Divine Human is called a "servant," namely, because it serves the Divine, in order that man may have access thereto, and because it serves mankind for their salvation.

[2] This then is what is signified by "Abraham My servant," as also in David:--

Remember His marvelous works that He hath done, His wonders and the judgments of His mouth, O ye seed of Abraham His servant, ye sons of Jacob, His chosen ones. He sent Moses His servant, Aaron whom He hath chosen. He remembered the word of His holiness with Abraham His servant (Ps. 105:5, 6, 26, 42);

where by "Abraham His servant" is meant the Lord as to the Divine Human. In like manner also the Lord as to the Divine Human is meant in the supreme sense by "Israel His servant," by "Jacob His servant," and by "David His servant;" by Israel His servant, in Isaiah:--

Thou Israel My servant, Jacob whom I have chosen, the seed of Abraham My friend; thou whom I have taken hold of from the ends of the earth, and called thee from the wings thereof, and said unto thee, Thou art My servant, I have chosen thee (Isa. 41:8, 9);

where "Israel My servant" in the supreme sense is the Lord in respect to the internal things of the spiritual church and "Jacob," as to the external things of this church. Again:--

He said unto me, Thou art My servant Israel, in whom I will be glorified. It is a light thing that thou shouldest be My servant to raise up the tribes of Jacob, and to bring back the preserved of Israel; and I have given thee for a light of the Gentiles, that thou mayest be My salvation unto the end of the earth (Isa. 49:3, 6);

where "Israel, in whom I will be glorified," manifestly represents the Lord‘s Divine Human. That He is called servant" from serving, is manifest, for it is said, "that thou shouldest be My servant to raise up the tribes of Jacob, and to bring back the preserved of Israel."

[3] That the Lord as to His Divine Human is meant also by "Jacob My servant," is evident in the following passage from Isaiah:--

I will give thee the treasures of darkness, and hidden riches of secret places, for Jacob My servants sake, and Israel My chosen (Isa. 45:3, 4);

where by "Jacob My servant, and Israel My chosen" is meant the Lord, ""Jacob My servant" having respect to the external things of the church, and "Israel My chosen" to the internal things of the church.

[4] The same is also signified by "David My servant" in Ezekiel:--

I will gather the sons of Israel from every side. My servant David shall be king over them; there shall be to them all one shepherd. They shall dwell upon the land which I have given unto Jacob My servant, and they shall dwell therein, they and their sons and their sons’ sons even forever; and David My servant shall be their prince forever (Ezek. 37:21, 24, 25).

"David My servant" plainly denotes the Lord‘s Divine Human (n. 1888), and this from Divine truth, which is signified by "king," and here by "David" (n. 1728, 2015, 3009). That truth itself also is relatively a servant, may be seen above (n. 3409); and because it is so, the Lord Himself calls Himself one that serveth" or ministereth," in Mark:--

Whosoever would become great among you shall be your minister; and whosoever would be first among you shall be servant of all. For the Son also came not to be ministered unto, but to minister (Mark 10:43-45; Matt. 20:26-28).

And in Luke:--

Which is the greater, he that reclineth at meat, or he that ministereth? Is not he that reclineth at meat? But I am in the midst of you as he that ministereth (Luke 22:27).

AC 3442. And he builded an altar there. That this signifies a significative and representative of the Lord, is evident from the signification of an "altar," as being the principal representative of the Lord (n. 921, 2777, 2811).

AC 3443. And called upon the name of Jehovah. That this signifies worship thence, is evident from the signification of "calling on the name of Jehovah," as being worship (n. 440, 2724); and that the "name of Jehovah" is everything in one complex whereby the Lord is worshiped (n. 2628, 2724, 3006).

AC 3444. And pitched his tent there. That this signifies what is holy therein, is evident from the signification of "tent," as being the holy of worship (n. 414, 1102, 2145, 2152, 3312).

AC 3445. And there the servants of Isaac digged out a well. That this signifies doctrine therefrom, is evident from the signification of a "well," as being the Word (n. 2702, 3424); and because the Word is doctrine itself, and thus all the doctrine which is of the church is from the Word, to "dig out a well" signifies doctrine therefrom, namely, from the literal sense of the Word, because this sense is here treated of. But doctrine itself from the literal sense of the Word is one only, namely, the doctrine of charity and love--of charity toward the neighbor and of love to the Lord; for this doctrine and life according to it is the whole Word, as the Lord teaches in (Matt. 22:37-40).

AC 3446. Verses 26, 27. And Abimelech went to him from Gerar, and Ahuzzath his companion, and Phicol the captain of his army. And Isaac said unto them, Wherefore are ye come unto me, and ye have hated me, and have sent me away from you? "And Abimelech went to him from Gerar," signifies the doctrine of faith that looks to rational things; "and Ahuzzath his companion, and Phicol the captain of his army," signifies the primaries of the doctrine of their faith; "and Isaac said unto them, Wherefore are ye come unto me, and ye have hated me, and have sent me away from you?" signifies why should they desire the Divine, seeing that they denied it, and were opposed to that which is in the internal sense of the Word.

AC 3447. And Abimelech went to him from Gerar. That this signifies the doctrine of faith that looks to rational things, is evident from the representation of Abimelech, as being the doctrine of faith that looks to rational things (n. 2504, 2509, 2510, 3391, 3393, 3397); and from the signification of "Gerar," as being faith (n. 1209, 2504, 3365, 3384, 3385); what the doctrine is that looks to rational things, may be seen above (n. 3368). In this passage, and as far as (verse 33), they are treated of who are in the literal sense of the Word and from this in the doctrinal things of faith and also the agreement of their doctrinal things with the internal sense in so far as they are from the literal sense. Abimelech and Ahuzzath his companion, and Phicol the chief captain of his army, represent these doctrinal things they are such as make faith the essential, not indeed rejecting charity, but making it secondary, and thus setting doctrine before life. Our churches at this day are almost all of this character, except that which is in Christian gentilism, where it is permitted to adore saints and their idols.

[2] As in every church of the Lord there are those who are internal men and those who are external, and the internal are those who are in the affection of good, and the external those who are in the affection of truth; so also with those who are here represented by Abimelech, his companion, and the chief captain of his army--the internal are those treated of above (Gen. 21:22-33), where it is said of Abimelech and Phicol the captain of his army that they came to Abraham and made a covenant with him in Beer-sheba (n. 2719, 2720); but the external are those here treated of.

AC 3448. And Ahuzzath his companion, and Phicol the captain of his army. That this signifies the primaries of the doctrine of their faith, is evident from the representation of Abimelech, as being the doctrine of faith that looks to rational things; hence "his companion and the captain of his army" signify these primaries, and indeed the primaries which are of doctrine; for a "captain," like a "prince," signifies the things that are primary (n. 1482, 2089); and an "army" signifies the doctrinal things themselves. That an "army" signifies the doctrinal things that are of truth, or that are lower truths, is because by "warfare" in the Word, and by "war," are signified the things that are of spiritual warfare and war (n. 1664, 1788, 2686); as also by "arms," such as spears," "shields," "bows," "arrows," "swords," and the like, as has been shown elsewhere. And because it is truths or doctrinal things by means of which spiritual combats are waged, therefore by "armies" these are signified; and also in the opposite sense things false or heretical.

[2] That both are signified in the Word by "armies," may be seen from many passages as in Daniel:--

One horn of the he-goat grew exceedingly toward the south, and toward the sunrise, and toward beauty. And it grew even to the army of the heavens, and some of the army and of the stars it cast down to the ground, and trampled upon them. Yea, it magnified itself, even to the Prince of the army. His army was given over with the continual sacrifice to transgression; and it cast down truth to the ground. I heard a holy one speaking; and another holy one said, How long shall be this vision, the continual sacrifice, and the transgression that wasteth, to give both the sanctuary and the army to be trampled down? (Daniel 8:9-13);

the "horn which grew toward the south, toward the sunrise, and toward beauty," is the power of falsity from evil (n. 2832) the "armies of the heavens" are truths; the "Prince of the army" is the Lord as to Divine truth; and because in a good sense an "army" is truth, it is said that the horn "east down of the army to the ground," and afterwards that it "cast truth to the ground."

[3] Again:--

The king of the north shall set forth a multitude greater than the former, and he shall come on at the end of the times of years, coming with a great army, and with much substance. And he shall stir up his power and his heart against the king of the south, with a great army and the king of the south shall war in battle with an exceeding great and mighty army; but he shall not stand, for they that eat of his meat shall destroy him, and his army shall overflow; and many shall fall down slain (Daniel 11:13, 25, 26).

The subject of this whole chapter is the war between the king of the north and the king of the south; and by the "king of the north" are meant falsities, as also by his "army;" and by the "king of the south" and his "army" are meant truths: it is a prophecy of the vastation of the church.

[4] In John:--

I saw heaven opened, and behold a white horse, and he that sat upon him was called faithful and true. He was clothed in a garment dipped in blood. And his armies in heaven followed him upon white horses, clothed in fine linen white and clean. And I saw the beast and the kings of the earth and their armies gathered together to make war against him that sat upon the horse, and against his army (Rev. 19:11, 13, 14, 19);

"he that sat upon the white horse" denotes the Lord’s Word, or the Lord as to the Word (n. 2760-2762); "his armies in heaven that followed him" denote the truths therefrom, consequently those in heaven who are in truths; the "beast" denotes the evils of the love of self; the "kings of the earth and their armies" denote falsities. The combats of falsity with truth are what are here described.

[5] In David:--

By the word of Jehovah were the heavens made, and all the army of them by the breath of His mouth (Ps. 33:6);

the "army of them," or of the heavens, denotes truths. Because truths are signified by an "army," the sons of the kingdom and the angels, from the truths in which they are, are called the "army of the heavens," as in Luke:--

Suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly army praising God (Luke 2:13).

In David:--

Bless Jehovah, all ye His armies, ye ministers of His that do His will (Ps. 103:21).

Again:--

Praise ye Him all His angels; praise ye Him all His army (Ps. 148:2).

In Isaiah:--

Lift up your eyes on high, and see who hath created these; He that bringeth out their army by number. He calleth them all by name; of the multitude of the powerful and of the mighty not a man is lacking (Isa. 40:26).

Again:--

I have made the earth and created man upon it; I, My hands have stretched out the heavens, and all their army have I commanded (Isa. 45:12);

where the "army of the heavens" denotes truths, thus the angels, because they are in truths, as has been shown.

[6] In the first book of Kings:--

I saw Jehovah sitting on His throne, and all the army of the heavens standing by Him on His right hand and on His left (1 Kings 22:19).

In Joel:--

Jehovah uttereth His voice before His army; for His camp is very great; for he is strong that doeth His word (Joel 2:11).

In Zechariah:--

I will encamp about My house against the army that passeth through and returneth, and no exactor shall pass through them any more. Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion; make a loud noise, O daughter of Jerusalem; behold thy King cometh unto thee (Zechariah 9:8, 9);

where the coming of the Lord is treated of; His "army" denotes truths Divine. It is from this and also because the Lord alone fights for man against the hells which are in the continual effort to assault him, that in the Word the Lord is so often called Jehovah Zebaoth," "God Zebaoth," the " Lord Zebaoth," that is, "of armies," as in Isaiah:--

The voice of a tumult of the kingdoms of the nations gathered together; Jehovah Zebaoth mustereth the army for the battle (Isa. 13:4);

"the kingdoms of the nations" denote falsities from evils; "mustering the army for the battle" denotes fighting for man.

[7] Inasmuch as the twelve tribes of Israel represented the Lord‘s heavenly kingdom, and "tribes" and likewise "twelve" signified all things of faith in one complex, that is, all truths of the kingdom (n. 577, 2089, 2129, 2130, 3272), therefore also they were called the "armies of Jehovah;" as in (Exodus 7:4; 12:17, 41, 51); and it was commanded that they should be brought out of Egypt "according to their armies" (Exod. 6:26); and should mete out the camp "according to their armies" (Num. 1:52); and should be distributed into their "armies" (Read Numbers 3).

[8] That by "armies" are signified truths, is evident also in Ezekiel:--

Persia and Lud and Put were in thine army, thy men of war; they hanged the shield and the helmet in thee, they set forth thine honor; the sons of Arvad and thine army were upon thy walls round about, and the Gammadim were in thy towers (Ezek. 27:10, 11);

speaking of Tyre, by which are signified the interior knowledges of good and truth, and thus those who are therein (n. 1201); "army" denotes the truths themselves; that "Lud and Put" are also those who are in knowledges may be seen above (n. 1163, 1164, 1166, 1195, 1231); "shield and helmet" are such things as pertain to spiritual combat or war.

[9] That in the opposite sense "armies" signify falsities, is manifest in Isaiah:--

It shall come to pass in that day that Jehovah shall visit upon the army of the height in the height, and upon the kings of the earth upon the earth (Isa. 24:21);

where the " armies of the height" denote falsities from the love of self. In Ezekiel:--

I will bring thee back, and put hooks in thy jaws, and I will bring thee forth, and all thine army, horses and horsemen, all of them completely clad, a great company with buckler and shield, all of them handling swords. Thou shalt come from thy place out of the sides to the north, thou and many peoples with thee, all of them riding on horses, a great company and a mighty army (Ezek. 38:4, 15);

speaking of Gog, by whom is signified external worship separate from internal, thus become idolatrous (n. 1151); his "army" denotes falsities.

[10] In Jeremiah:--

I will send against Babylon him that bendeth, bending his bow, and lifting up himself in his coat of mail; spare ye not her young men, give to the curse all her army (Jer. 51:2, 3);

"Babylon" denotes worship the externals of which appear holy, but the interiors are profane (n. 1182, 1283, 1295, 1304, 1306-1308, 1321, 1322, 1326); "her army" is the falsities of such profane interiors, as in like manner the "army of Babylon" in other passages (Jer. 32:2; 34:1, 21; 39:1). In Ezekiel:--

Pharaoh shall see them, and shall be comforted over all his multitude, Pharaoh and all his army, slain by the sword. For I will put the terror of Me in the land of the living (Ezek. 32:31, 32);

speaking of Egypt, by which are signified those who pervert truths by reasonings from memory-knowledges (n. 1164, 1165); "his army," or the army of Pharaoh, denotes falsities therefrom the like is also signified by the "army of Pharaoh" in other passages (Jer. 37:5, 7, 11; 46:2; Ezek. 17:17). In Luke:--

When ye see Jerusalem compassed with armies, then know that her desolation is at hand (Luke 21:20);

where the consummation of the age is treated of, or the last time of the church, when there is no longer any faith. That by "Jerusalem" is signified the church, see above (n. 2117), which is "compassed with armies" when it is beset by falsities.

[11] Hence it is evident that by the "armies of the heavens" which the Jews and idolaters adored, in the internal sense were signified falsities, concerning which in the second book of Kings:--

They forsook all the commandments of their God, and made them a molten image, even two calves, and made a grove, and bowed themselves down to all the army of the heavens (2 Kings 17:16).

This is said of the Israelites and in another place it is written concerning Manasseh that:--

He built altars for all the army of the heavens (2 Kings 21:5);

and again that:--

Josiah the king brought forth out of the temple all the vessels made for Baal, and for the grove, and for all the army of the heavens (2 Kings 23:4);

and in Jeremiah, that:--

They should bring out the bones of the princes, of the priests, and of the prophets, and should spread them before the sun and the moon, and all the army of the heavens, which they have loved, and which they have served, and after which they have walked (Jeremiah 8:1, 2).

And again:--

The houses of Jerusalem and the houses of the kings of Judah shall be unclean like Tophet, as to all the houses upon whose roofs they have burned incense unto all the army of the heavens, and have poured out drink-offerings unto other gods (Jeremiah 19:13).

And in Zephaniah:--

I will stretch out Mine hand against them that worship the army of the heavens upon the roofs (Zephaniah 1:4, 5);

for it is principally the stars that are called the "army of the heavens;" and that by the "stars" are signified truths, and in the opposite sense falsities, may be seen above (n. 1128, 1808).

AC 3449. And Isaac said unto them, Wherefore are ye come unto me, and ye have hated me, and have sent me away from you? That this signifies why should they desire the Divine seeing that they denied it and were opposed to that which is in the internal sense of the Word, is evident from what has been said above at (verses 15, 16, 19-21).

AC 3450. Verses 28, 29. And they said, Seeing we have seen that Jehovah was with thee; and we said, Now let there be an oath between us, between us and thee, and let us cut out a covenant with thee. If thou shalt do evil to us, as we have not touched thee, and as we have done unto thee nothing but good, and have sent thee away in peace; thou art now the blessed of Jehovah. "And they said, Seeing we have seen that Jehovah was with thee," signifies that they knew the Divine was therein; "and we said, Now let there be an oath between us, between us and thee, and let us cut out a covenant with thee," signifies that regarded in themselves the doctrinal things of their faith should not be denied; "if thou shalt do evil to us, as we have not touched thee, and as we have done unto thee nothing but good, and have sent thee away in peace," signifies that they have not done violence to the internal sense of the Word, and that they would not do violence to it; "thou art now the blessed of Jehovah," signifies that it was from the Divine.

AC 3451. And they said, Seeing we have seen that Jehovah was with thee. That this signifies that they knew the Divine was therein, is evident from the signification of "seeing to see," as being to observe and thus know for certain; and from the signification of "Jehovah being with thee," as being that the Divine was therein. The subject here, as before said (n. 3447), is the agreement of the literal sense of the Word with the internal sense; consequently the agreement therewith of the doctrinal things of faith, which are signified by "Abimelech, Ahuzzath, and Phicol;" in so far as they are from the literal sense of the Word; thus also the conjunction of the Lord’s kingdom on earth with His kingdom in the heavens and consequently with the Lord, by the Word. For the Word as to the supreme sense is the Lord Himself; and as to the internal sense it is the Lord‘s kingdom itself in the heavens; and as to the literal sense it is the Lord’s kingdom itself on earth, as also before said.

[2] But as regards the Lord‘s kingdom on earth, that is, His church, the case is that inasmuch as it has its doctrinal things from the literal sense of the Word, it cannot but be various and diverse in respect to these doctrinal things that is to say, one society will profess one thing to be a truth of faith, because it is so said in the Word, and another society will profess another thing, also because it is so said; and so on. Consequently, as the Lord’s church has its doctrinal things from the literal sense of the Word, it will everywhere differ, and this not only as to societies, but sometimes as to the individuals in a society. Nevertheless a difference in the doctrinal things of faith does not prevent the church from being one, provided there is unanimity as to willing well and doing well.

[3] For example if anyone should acknowledge as a matter of doctrine that charity is from faith, and at the same time lives in charity toward the neighbor, then indeed he is not in truth as to doctrine, but still he is in truth as to life; consequently there is in him the Lord‘s church or kingdom. And again if anyone should say that good works ought to be done in order that he may have recompense in heaven, according to the literal sense of the Word in (Matt. 10:41, 42; 25:34-46); and in other places and yet in doing good works never thinks of merit, he in like manner is In the Lord’s kingdom, because as to life he is in the truth; and because he is such as to life, he readily suffers himself to be instructed that no one can merit heaven, and that works wherein merit is placed are not good. And so in other cases. For the literal sense is such that in many passages it appears opposed to itself; but the reason is that in this sense there are appearances of truth accommodated to those who are in externals, consequently to those who are also in worldly and even in bodily loves.

[4] Here therefore by "Abimelech" those are treated of who are in the doctrinal things of faith, and who as before said are such as make faith that which is essential to salvation; and there is also treated of the agreement of their, doctrinal things with the internal sense; with whom also it is evident that conjunction is effected, but only with those who are in good, that is, with those who, although they make faith essential as to doctrine, still make charity essential as to life; for when with such there is confidence or trust in the Lord, which they call faith itself, then they are in the affection of love to the Lord, consequently as to life they are in good. But see what was said and shown above on this subject, namely: That what is doctrinal does not make the church, but charity (n. 809, 916, 1798, 1799, 1834, 1844): That doctrinal things are of no account unless men live according to them (n. 1515): That the church is various as to truths, but is one through charity (n. 3267): That there is a parallelism between the Lord and man as to celestial things which are of good, but not as to spiritual things which are of truth (n. 1831, 1832): That there is one only doctrine, namely, that of love to the Lord and of charity toward the neighbor (n. 3445): That the church would be one if all had charity, although they differed as to worship and doctrinal things (n. 809, 1285, 1316, 1798, 1799, 1834, 1844, 2982): That the church would be like the Lord‘s kingdom in the heavens, if all had charity (n. 2385): That in heaven there are innumerable varieties of good and truth, but that by harmony they nevertheless make a one, like the organs and members of the body (n. 684, 690, 3241).

AC 3452. And we said, Now let there be an oath between us, between us and thee, and let us cut out a covenant with thee. That this signifies that regarded in themselves the doctrinal things of their faith should not be denied, that is, in so far as they are from the literal sense of the Word, is evident from the signification of "all oath between us," as being the agreement of the doctrinal things with the literal sense of the Word; from the signification of "between us and thee," as being the agreement with the internal sense; and from the signification of "let us cut out a covenant," as being that thus there might be conjunction. A "covenant" is conjunction, (n. 665, 666, 1023, 1038, 1864, 2003, 2021). The sense hence resulting is that because this is the case, regarded in themselves the doctrinal things of their faith should not be denied; for as before said no doctrinal things whatever are denied provided they are from the Word, for they are accepted by the Lord provided that he who is in them is in the life of charity, because with this life all things of the Word can be conjoined; but the interior things of the Word are conjoined with the life which is in the interior good of charity. See what has been stated and adduced above (n. 3224).

AC 3453. If thou shalt do evil to us, as we have not touched thee, and as we have done unto thee nothing but good, and have sent thee away in peace. This signifies that they had not done violence to the internal sense of the Word, and they would not do violence to it, which may be seen from the series of things in the internal sense, and from what was said at (verses 11, 22, 23).

AC 3454. Thou art now the blessed of Jehovah. That this signifies that it was from the Divine, is evident from the signification of "the blessed of Jehovah," when said concerning the Lord - or what is the same, concerning the internal sense of the Word, for the Lord is the Word - as being Divine truth (n. 3140), thus from the Divine therefore that they had not done violence to, and would not do violence to the internal sense, because it was from the Divine. But to do violence to the internal sense is to deny those things which are the principal things of this sense, and which are the essential holy things of the Word; and these are, the Divine Human of the Lord, love to Him, and love toward the neighbor. These three are the principal things of the internal sense, and are the holy things of the Word; they are also the internal and holy things of all doctrinal things that are from the Word; and are likewise the internal and holy things of all worship; for in them is the Lord’s kingdom itself. A fourth is, that the Word, as to all things therein both in general and in particular, nay, as to the smallest point, is Divine; thus that the Lord is in the Word. This is also confessed and acknowledged by all who have doctrinal things from the Word; and yet at heart those deny it who acknowledge no other holiness in the Word than that which appears in the letter; for such can perceive nothing holy in the historicals, nor in the propheticals, except only a slight external something, from its being called holy; when yet it must be interiorly holy if it he Divine as to the smallest point.

AC 3455. Verses 30, 31. And he made them a feast, and they did eat and drink. And they rose early in the morning, and sware a man to his brother; and Isaac sent them away, and they departed from him in peace. "And he made them a feast," signifies a dwelling together; "and they did eat and drink," signifies communication; "and they rose early in the morning," signifies a state of enlightenment "and sware a man to his brother," signifies confirmation with those who are in the good of truth; "and Isaac sent them away, and they departed from him in peace," signifies that they were content.

AC 3456. And he made them a feast. That this signifies a dwelling together, is evident from the signification of a" feast," as being a dwelling together (n. 2341).

AC 3457. And they did eat and drink. That this signifies communication, is evident from the signification of "eating," as being to be communicated in respect to the things that are of good (n. 2187, 2343, 3168); and from the signification of "drinking," as being to be communicated in respect to the things that are of truth (n. 3089, 3168).

AC 3458. And they rose early in the morning. That this signifies a state of enlightenment, is evident from the signification of " morning," and of " rising early," as being a state of enlightenment for in the supreme sense the " morning and daydawn" are the Lord, and- in the internal sense the celestial of His love, thus also a state of peace (n. 2333, 2405, 2540, 2780); and in the internal sense "to rise" signifies elevation (n. 2401, 2785, 2912, 2927, 3171); from all which it is evident that their "rising early in the morning" signifies a state of enlightenment,

AC 3459. And they sware a man to his brother. That this signifies confirmation with those who are in the good of truth, is evident from the signification of "swearing," or of an "oath," as being confirmation (n. 2842, 3037, 3375); and from the signification of "a man with his brother," as being the good of truth, or what is the same, those who are in this good. "Man" signifies truth (n. 265, 749, 1007, 3134, 3309); and a "brother" signifies good, (n. 2360); also what the good of truth is, (n. 3295, 3332). Those are in this good who are here represented by Abimelech, or who are represented by the Philistines, of whom Abimelech was king, namely, those who make faith the essential of the church, and place it before charity. They who are such are in no other good than the good of truth, for they elicit and draw forth from the Word nothing but what is of faith, thus what is of truth, and scarcely see what is of good, thus what is of life, Therefore they confirm themselves in doctrinal things of faith, but not in any doctrinal things of charity. When these do good, it is from the doctrinal things of faith, and the good thence is what is called the good of truth,

[2] With those who are in this good the Lord conjoins Himself, but not so much as with those who are in the good of charity; for love and charity are spiritual conjunction, and not faith except through love and charity; and because this is so, it is not said that they "made a covenant with Isaac," but that they "sware a man to his brother;" for a "covenant" is predicated of good, which is of love and charity; but an "oath" of truth, which is of faith (n. 3375); "dwelling together," which is signified by a "feast" (n. 3456) is also predicated of those who are in the good of truth. From those of this character in the other life it has been given me to know that they are separate from those who are in the good of charity for these are more closely conjoined with the Lord than the former, whose good is so to speak hard, does not suffer itself to be bent, is not communicative, thus is not in heaven, but upon the threshold of heaven.

AC 3460. And Isaac sent them away, and they departed from him in peace. That this signifies that they were content, is evident without explication and from this also it is evident that with these there was a dwelling together, but not conjunction; concerning which just above (n. 3459).

AC 3461. Verses 32, 33. And it came to pass in that day that the servants of Isaac came and showed him concerning the well which they had digged; and they said unto him, We have found waters. And he called it Shibah; therefore the name of the city is Beer-sheba unto this day. "And it came to pass in that day," signifies that state; "that the servants of Isaac came," signifies things rational; "and showed him concerning the well which they had digged; and they said unto him, We have found waters," signifies interior truths by means of these things; "and he called it Shibah," signifies the conjunction of confirmed truth thereby; "therefore the name of the city is Beer-sheba," signifies the quality of the derivative doctrine; unto this day," signifies the perpetuity of the state.

AC 3462. And it came to pass in that day. That this signifies that state, is evident from the signification of "day,"as being state (n. 23, 487, 488, 493, 893, 2788); here, the state of the doctrine which is treated of.

AC 3463. That the servants of Isaac came. That this signifies rational things, is evident from the signification of "servants," as being rational things and memory-knowledges (n. 2567) and from the representation of Isaac, as being the Lord as to the Divine rational (n. 1893, 2066, 2072, 2083, 2630, 3012, 3194, 3210). From what goes before it is evident what of the Lord is here represented by Isaac, namely, the Word as to its internal sense; for by "Abimelech, Ahuzzath, and Phicol," are signified the doctrinal things of faith which are from the literal sense of the Word, such as are the doctrinal things of those who are called "Philistines" in a good sense, that is, those who are solely in the doctrinal things of faith, and as to life are in good, but in the good of truth, which doctrinal things have some conjunction with the internal sense, thus with the Lord,

[2] For they who are solely in the doctrinal things of faith, and in a life according to them, are in a certain conjunction, but a remote one, for the reason that they do not know from any affection what charity toward the neighbor is, and still less what love to the Lord is, but only from a certain idea of faith; thus neither are they in any perception of good, but in a species of persuasion that what their doctrinal things dictate is true and thus good, and when they are confirmed in these doctrinal things, they may be in what is false equally as in what is true for nothing but good confirms a man in regard to what is truth. Truth indeed teaches what good is, but without perception whereas good teaches what truth is from perception.

[3] Every one may know how this is, and also what is the nature and quality of the difference, merely from this common precept of charity:--

All things whatsoever ye would that men should do unto you, do ye even so to them (Matt. 7:12).

He who acts from this precept does indeed do what is good to others, but because it is so commanded, thus not from the affection of the heart; and whenever he does it, he begins from himself, and also in doing good thinks of merit; whereas he who does not act from precept, but from charity, that is, from affection, acts from the heart, and thus from freedom; and whenever he acts, he begins from really willing what is good, thus for the reason that it is delightful to him; and as he has recompense in the delight, he does not think of merit,

[4] From this then can be seen what the difference is between doing good from faith, and doing good from charity; and that those who do good from faith are more remote from good itself which is the Lord than those who do it from charity; neither can the former be easily introduced into the good of charity so far as to have a perception of it, because they are but little in truths for no one can be introduced into this good unless things not true are first eradicated, which is impossible while such things are inrooted even to persuasion.

AC 3464. And showed him concerning the well which they had digged; and they said, We have found waters. That this signifies interior truths by means of these things, is evident from the signification of a "well," as being the Word (n. 3424); and from the signification of "waters," as being truths (n. 2702), that is, truths which are from the Word; thus to " show him concerning the well which they had digged," signifies concerning the Word from which they had doctrinal things "and they said, Me have found waters," signifies that in them, that is, in the doctrinal things, there were interior truths. For as before said, there are interior truths in all the doctrinal things that are drawn from the literal sense of the Word, because the literal sense of the Word is like a well that contains water; for in each and everything of the Word there is an internal sense, which is also in the doctrinal things that are from the Word.

[2] As regards the doctrinal things that are from the literal sense of the Word, the case is this: When a man is in them, and at the same time in a life according to them, he has a correspondence in himself; for the angels who are with him are in interior truths, while he is in exterior ones, and thus through the doctrinal things he has communication with heaven, but according to the good of his life. As for example, when in the Holy Supper he thinks in simplicity of the Lord from the words then used - " This is My body, and this is "My blood" the angels with him are in the idea of love to the Lord and charity toward the neighbor; for love to the Lord corresponds to the Lord‘s body, and to bread and charity toward the neighbor corresponds to the blood, and the wine (n. 1798, 2165, 2177, 2187); and because there is such a correspondence, there flows an affection out of heaven through the angels into that holy state in which the man then is, which affection he receives in accordance with the good of his life.

[3] For the angels dwell with every one in his life’s affection, thus in the affection of the doctrinal things according to which he lives; but in no case if his life disagrees therewith; for if the life disagrees, as for instance if he is in the affection of gaining honors and riches by means of doctrinal things, then the angels retire, and infernals dwell in this affection, who either infuse into him confirmations of the doctrinal things for the sake of self and the world, thus a persuasive faith - which is such that it is regardless whether a thing is true or false provided it captivates the minds of others - or else they take away all faith, and then the doctrine of his lips is only a sound excited and modified by the fire of these loves.

AC 3465. And he called it Shibah. That this signifies the conjunction of confirmed truth by means of these things, is evident from the signification of "calling by name," as being the quality (n. 144, 145, 1754, 1896, 2009, 3421) and that "names" thus signify a thing or state, (n. 1946, 2643, 3422), here therefore the conjunction of confirmed truth by means of doctrinal things for in the original tongue " Shibah" means "an oath," which signifies confirmation (n. 2842, 3375). That is called the conjunction of confirmed truth, when interior truths conjoin themselves with exterior truth, which are doctrinal things from the literal sense of the Word. That with such persons there is conjunction by means of the truths which are of faith, and not so much by means of the goods which are of charity, was stated above (n. 3463).

AC 3466. Therefore the name of the city is Beer-sheba. That this signifies the quality of the doctrine thence derived, is evident from the signification of "name," as being the quality (n. 3465); and from the signification of "city" as being doctrine (n. 402, 2449, 2712, 2943, 3216); hence comes " Beer-sheba," which in the original tongue means "the well of the oath," thus the doctrine of confirmed truth. "Beer-sheba" is doctrine (n. 2723, 2858, 2859). In (Gen. 21:30, 31), it is said:--Because these seven ewe-lambs shalt thou take from my hand, that it may be a witness unto me that I have digged this well. Wherefore he called that place Beer-sheba, because there they sware both of them; where by "Beer-sheba" was signified the state and quality of doctrine, that it was from the Divine, and that by means of it there was conjunction; and because the interiors of that church are there treated of, it is said that "that place" was called Beer-sheba; whereas here, because the exteriors of that church are treated of, it is said that "the city" was so called; for of interior things is predicated state, which is signified by "place" (n. 2625, 2837, 3356, 3387); but of exterior things is predicated doctrine, which is signified by "city;" for all doctrine has its state and its quality from its interiors.

AC 3467. Unto this day. That this signifies the perpetuity of the state, is evident from the signification of "unto this day," as being perpetuity of state (n. 2838).

AC 3468. Verses 34, 35. And Esau was a son of forty years, and he took for a woman Judith the daughter of Beeri the Hittite, and Basemath the daughter of Elon the Hittite. And they were bitterness of spirit to Isaac and to Rebekah. "And Esau was a son of forty years," signifies a state of temptation as to the natural good of truth; "and he took for a woman Judith the daughter of Beeri the Hittite, and Basemath the daughter of Elon the Hittite," signifies the adjunction of natural truth from another source than from genuine truth itself; "and they were bitterness of spirit to Isaac and to Rebekah," signifies that from this source there at first came grief.

AC 3469. And Esau was a son of forty years. This signifies a state of temptation as to the natural good of truth, which is evident from the representation of Esau, as being the natural good of truth (n. 3300, 3302, 3322) and from the signification of " forty years," as being states of temptation. "Forty" signifies temptations, (n. 730, 862, 2272); and "years" signify states, (n. 487, 488, 493, 893). The reason why these things concerning Esau are joined to what has been related concerning Abimelech and Isaac, is that those are treated of who are in the good of truth, that is, who are in life according to things that are derived from the literal sense of the Word; for these are signified by " Abimelech, Ahuzzath, and Phicol," as before repeatedly said.

[2] They therefore who are in the good of truth, or in a life according to doctrinal things, are regenerate as to the interiors, which are their rational, but not yet as to the exteriors, which are their natural things; for man is regenerated as to the rational before he is regenerated as to the natural (n. 3286, 3288); because the natural is altogether in the world, and in the natural as in a plane there are founded man‘s thought and will. This is the reason why during regeneration man observes a combat between his rational or internal man and his natural or external man; and why his external man is regenerated much later, and likewise with much greater difficulty, than his internal man. For that which is nearer to the world and nearer to the body cannot be easily constrained to render obedience to the internal man; but only after considerable length of time and by means of many new states into which the man is introduced, which are states of self acknowledgment, and of acknowledgment of the Lord, that is, of one’s own wretchedness, and of the Lord‘s mercy; thus states of humiliation resulting from temptation combats. Because this is so, there is here next adjoined what is said of Esau and his two wives, whereby such things are signified in the internal sense.

[3] Every one knows what natural good is, namely, that it is the good into which man is born; but what the natural good of truth is, is known to few, if any. There are four kinds of natural good, that is, of the good that is born with man, namely, natural good from the love of good, natural good from the love of truth, and also natural good from the love of evil, and natural good from the love of falsity. For the good into which man is born he derives from his parents, either father or mother; for all that which parents have contracted by frequent use and habit, or have become imbued with by actual life until it has become so familiar to them that it appears as if natural, is transmitted Into their children, and becomes hereditary. If parents who have lived in the good of the love of good and in this life have perceived their delight and blessedness, conceive offspring in this state, the offspring receive therefrom an inclination to similar good; and if parents who have lived in the good of the love of truth (n. 3459, 3463) and in this life have perceived their delight, are in this state when they conceive offspring, the offspring receive therefrom an inclination to the like good.

[4] The case is similar with those who receive hereditarily the good of the love of evil and the good of the love of what is false. These latter are called goods by reason of their appearing in outward form as goods in those persons in whom they are, although they are the very reverse of goods. Very many in whom natural good appears have such good. They who are in the natural good of the love of evil are pliant and prone to evils of every kind; for they suffer themselves to be easily led astray, and from this good are compliant, especially to foul pleasures, to adulteries, and also to cruelties and they who are in the natural good of falsity are prone to falsities of every kind, and from this good learn with avidity what is persuasive, especially from hypocrites and cunning persons, who know how to captivate the mind, to insinuate themselves into the affections, and to feign innocence. At the present day most people who in the Christian world are in natural good, are born into these so-called goods of evil and falsity, because their parents have by actual life contracted the delight of evil and of falsity, and thus have implanted it in their children, and thereby in their descendants.

AC 3470. And he took for a woman Judith the daughter of Beeri the Hittite, and Basemath the daughter of Elon the Hittite. That this signifies the adjunction of natural truth from another source than from genuine truth itself, is evident from the signification of a "woman," as being truth adjoined to good, concerning which see above, where Sarah and Rebekah are treated of, (n. 1468, 1909, 2063, 2065, 2172, 2173, 2198, 2507, 2904, 3012, 3013, 3077); but the subject here treated of is natural truth adjoined to natural good - and from the representation of "Judith the daughter of Beeri the Hittite, and Basemath the daughter of Elon the Hittite," as being truth from another source than genuine truth itself. For the Hittites were among the upright Gentiles in the land of Canaan, among whom Abraham dwelt, and from whom he bought the cave of Machpelah for a sepulchre (Gen. 23); and by whom is there represented a spiritual church among the Gentiles (n. 2913, 2986); and because this church is not in truth from the Word, by the same is signified truth not from genuine truth itself. For the nation that represents a church, signifies also the truth and good such as belongs to that church; a church being a church from truth and good; so that when a church is mentioned, truth and good are understood; and when truth and good are mentioned, a church is understood.

[2] The case herein is this: Until it has been reformed, the natural good of truth is not spiritual good, that is, the good of faith and the good of charity. As just stated (n. 3469) natural good is from parents; but spiritual good is from the Lord; and therefore in order that a man may receive spiritual good, he must be regenerated; and while this is taking place there are first adjoined to him truths from another source than from genuine truth itself, which are such as do not adhere, but serve only as means for introducing - genuine truths; and when these have been introduced, the truths not genuine are separated. The case herein is as it is with children, who first learn many things, even trifling ones, such as things relating to sports and the like; not that these may make them wise, but that they may prepare the way for the reception of useful things which are of wisdom; and when these have been received, the former are separated, and indeed cast away. Or as is the case with fruits, which are first filled with sour juice before they can receive sweet juice, the sour juice which is not genuine being the means of introducing the sweet, on the entrance of which the former is dispersed.

[3] Such also is the case with man’s natural when being regenerated, for natural good is such that of itself it is not willing to obey and serve rational good as a servant serves his master, but desires to command. But in order that it may be reduced to a state of compliance and service, it is harassed by states of vastation and temptation until its concupiscences decline; and then by the influx of the good of faith and of charity through the internal man from the Lord the natural is tempered, until the good received hereditarily if by degrees extirpated, and a new good is implanted in its place, into which good the truths of faith are then insinuated, which are like new fibers inserted into the heart of man, through which fibers new juice is introduced, until a new heart has by degrees grown there.

[4] The truths which are first introduced cannot be from a genuine fountain, because evils and falsities are in the former or natural good; but they are such seeming truths, or such appearances of truths, as have a certain affinity with genuine truths, by which there is gradually given the opportunity and place for real genuine truths to insinuate themselves. Genuine good is like the blood in the arteries, or the juice in the fibers, and leads and applies truths into form. The good which is thus formed in the natural or external man is a general good, as it were woven or connected together of the particulars and singulars of spiritual good through the rational or internal man from the Lord, who alone forms and creates anew. Hence it is that in the Word the Lord is so often called the Former and Creator.

AC 3471. And they were bitterness of spirit to Isaac and to Rebekah. That this signifies that from this source there at first came grief, is evident from the signification of "bitterness of spirit," as being grief; and from the representation of Isaac and Rebekah, as being the Lord‘s Divine rational as to Divine good and Divine truth; for in the supreme sense the Lord is the subject here treated of; but in the representative sense, those who are likenesses or images of Him; that is, in the supreme sense it is shown how the Lord made the Human in Himself Divine; and in the representative sense how the Lord regenerates man, that is, makes him celestial and spiritual. That the regeneration of man is an image of the Lord’s glorification, may be seen above (n. 3043, 3138, 3212, 3296). The reason why there was grief at first, is that when truths are being inserted into natural good, they at first cause pain, for they oppress the conscience, and induce anxieties, because there are concupiscences present, against which spiritual truth combats but this first grief by degrees diminishes, and at last vanishes away. It is as with a weak and sickly body, which is to be restored to health by painful means; in this state, at first it has grief.

CONTINUATION CONCERNING CORRESPONDENCES AND REPRESENTATIONS, ESPECIALLY THOSE IN THE WORD

AC 3472. That the things in the literal sense of the Word are each and all representative of the spiritual and celestial things of the Lord‘s kingdom in the heavens, and in the supreme sense are representative of the Lord Himself, may be seen from what has been thus far shown, and from what of the Lord’s Divine mercy is still to be shown. But as man has removed himself so far from heaven, and has immersed himself in lowest nature, and even in what is earthly, it is altogether repugnant to him to hear that the Word contains deeper things than he apprehends from the letter; and this is still more the case when it is said that it contains things incomprehensible, which are adapted solely to the wisdom of angels and this is even still more so when it is said that it contains Divine things themselves, which infinitely transcend the understanding of angels. The Christian world does indeed acknowledge that the Word is Divine, yet that it is Divine in this manner it denies at heart, if not with the lips nor is this to be wondered at, inasmuch as the earthly thought in which man is at this day does not apprehend things of a sublime character; and is not willing to apprehend them.

AC 3473. That the Word in the letter stores up such things within it, is often presented to the sight of the spirits or souls who come into the other life; and it has sometimes been granted me to be present when this was done, as may be seen from the experiences adduced in the first part of this work concerning the Holy Scripture or Word, as containing things Divine which are manifest to good spirits and angels (n. 1767-1776, 1869-1879); from which experiences I may for the sake of confirmation again relate what now follows.

AC 3474. A certain spirit came to me not long after his departure from the body, as I was able to infer from the fact that he did not yet know that he was in the other life, but supposed that he was living in the world. It was perceived that he had been devoted to studies, concerning which I spoke with him. But he was suddenly taken up on high; and, surprised at this, I imagined that he was of those who have aspired to high things, for such are wont to be carried up on high; or else that he had placed heaven on high, for such likewise are often taken up on high, in order that they may know from experience that heaven is not in what is high, but in what is internal. But I soon perceived that he was carried up to the angelic spirits who are in front a little to the right at the first entrance into heaven. He then spoke with me from thence, saving that he saw things more sublime than human minds could possibly apprehend. While this was taking place I was reading the first chapter of Deuteronomy, concerning the Jewish people, in that men were sent to explore the land of land and what was in it. While I was reading this, he said that he perceived nothing of the sense of the letter, but the things in the spiritual sense and that these were wonders that he could not describe. This was in the first entrance to the heaven of angelic spirits. What wonders then would be perceived in that heaven itself! And what in the angelic heaven!

[2] Certain spirits who were with me, and who before had not believed that the Word of the Lord is of such a nature, then began to repent of their unbelief; and in this state they said that they believed because they heard that spirit say that he heard, saw, and perceived it to be so. But other spirits still persisted in their unbelief, and said that it was not so, but that these things were fancies and therefore they too were suddenly taken up, and spoke with me from thence; and they confessed that it was anything but fancy, because they really perceived it to be so, and this by a perception more exquisite than can ever be given to any sense during the life of the body.

[3] Soon others also were taken up into the same heaven, and-among them one whom I had known in the life of his body, who testified to the same effect, saying also, among other things, that he was too much amazed to be able to describe the glory of the Word in its internal sense. Then, speaking from a kind of pity, he said that it was strange that men know nothing at all of such things.

[4] on two occasions after this I saw others taken up into the second heaven among the angelic spirits, and they spoke with me thence while I was reading the third chapter of Deuteronomy from beginning to end. They said that they were only in the interior sense of the Word, at the same time asserting that there was not even a point in which there was not something spiritual that coheres most beautifully with all the rest and further that the names signify actual things. Thus they too were confirmed, for they had not believed before that each and all things in the Word have been inspired by the Lord and this they desired to confirm before other, by an oath, But it was not permitted.

AC 3475. That in the heavens there come forth continual representatives such as are in the Word, has already been several times stated and shown. These representatives are of such a nature that spirits and angels see them in a much clearer light than that of this world at noonday; and they are also of such a nature that when seen in their external form the spirits and angels perceive what they signify in their internal form and therein things still more interior. For there are three heavens: in the first heaven these representatives appear in an external form, with a perception of what they signify in the internal form in the second heaven they appear such as they are in then internal form, with a perception of what they are in a more interior form; in the third heaven they appear in this more interior form, which is their inmost form. The representatives that appear in the first heaven are the generals of those things which appear in the second and these are the generals of those which appear in the third; thus within those which appear in the first heaven are those which appear in the second; and within these are those which appear in the third. And as they are thus presented according to degrees, it may be seen how perfect and full of wisdom, and at the same time how happy, are the representatives in the inmost heaven; and that they are utterly unspeakable; for myriads of myriads of them present only one single particular of the general representative. In both general and particular these representatives involve such things as are of the Lord‘s kingdom; and these such as are of the Lord Himself. They who are in the first heaven, in their representatives see such things as come forth in the interior sphere of that kingdom and within these such things as come forth in the sphere still more interior and thus see representatives of the Lord, but remotely. They who are in the second heaven, in their representatives see such things as come forth in the inmost sphere of that kingdom, and within these see representatives of the Lord more nearly. But they who are in the third heaven see the Lord Himself.

AC 3476. From all this men may know how the case is with the Word; for the Word has been given by the Lord to man and also to the angels in order that by it they may be with Him; for the Word is the medium that unites earth heaven, and through heaven with the Lord. Its literal sense is that which unites man with the first heaven; and as within the literal there is an internal sense which treats of the Lord’s kingdom, and within this a supreme sense which treats of the Lord and as these senses are in order one within another, it is evident what is the nature of the union with the Lord that is effected by means of the Word.

AC 3477. It has been said that there are continual representatives in the heavens, and indeed such as involve the deepest arcana of wisdom. Those which are manifest to man from the literal sense of the Word are relatively as few as are the waters of a small pool as compared with those of the ocean. The nature of representatives in the heavens may be seen from what has been occasionally related above from things seen, and likewise from the following. There were represented before certain spirits, as I myself saw, a broad way and a narrow way such as are described in the Word; a broad way which led to hell, and a narrow way which led to heaven. The broad way was planted with trees, flowers, and the like that in outward form appeared beautiful and delightful, but unseen snakes and serpents of various kinds were hidden there. The narrow way did not seem to be so much adorned with trees and flowers, but appeared sad and dark; and yet there were in it angel infants most beautifully adorned, in delightful paradises and flower-gardens, which the spirits did not see. They were then asked which way they wished to go. They said, The broad way; when suddenly their eyes were opened, and in the broad way they saw the serpents, but in the narrow way the angels. They were then again asked which way they wished to go, whereupon they remained silent; and so far as their sight was opened, they said that they wished to go the narrow way; and so far as their sight was closed, that they wished to go the broad way.

AC 3478. There was also represented before certain spirits the tabernacle with the ark; for they who during their abode in the world have been greatly delighted with the Word, have such things actually presented to view. Such was the case with the tabernacle, together with all its appurtenances, its courts, its curtains round about, its veils within, the golden altar, or altar of incense, the table with the loaves upon it, the lampstand, the mercy-seat with the cherubim. At the same time it was given to the well-disposed spirits to perceive what each thing signified: that the three heavens were represented by the tabernacle, and the Lord Himself by the Testimony in the ark on which was the mercy-seat; and in proportion as their sight was opened, they saw therein things more and more heavenly and Divine, of which they had no knowledge in the life of the body; and wonderful to say there was not the smallest thing there that was not representative, even to the hooks and rings.

[2] For instance, the bread that was on the table - in this as in a representative and symbol they perceived that food by which angels live, thus celestial and spiritual love together with their joys and felicities; and in these loves and joys they perceived the Lord Himself, as the bread or manna from heaven; besides many particulars from the form, position, and number of the loaves; and from the gold encompassing the table, and from the lampstand, by which these things when illuminated exhibited still further representations of things unspeakable; and the same with everything else; from all which it might also appear that the rituals or representatives of the Jewish Church contained within them all the arcana of the Christian Church; and likewise that they to whom the representatives and significatives of the Word of the Old Testament are opened may know and perceive the arcana of the Lord‘s Church on earth while they live in the world; and the arcana of arcana which are in the Lord’s kingdom in the heavens when they come into the other life.

AC 3479. The Jews who lived before the coming of the Lord, as well as those who lived afterwards, had no other opinion concerning the rituals of their church than that Divine worship consisted solely in external things, and cared naught for what these represented and signified. For they did not know, and were not willing to know, that there was anything internal in worship and in the Word, thus that there was any life after death, nor consequently that there was any heaven, for they were altogether sensuous and corporeal; and inasmuch as they were in externals separate from things internal, relatively to these externals their worship was merely idolatrous, and therefore they were very prone to worship any gods whatsoever, provided only they were persuaded that such gods could cause them to prosper.

[2] But as that nation was of such a nature that they could be in a holy external, and thus could have holy rituals by which the heavenly things of the Lord‘s kingdom were represented, and could have a holy veneration for Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, and also for Moses and Aaron, and afterwards for David; by all of whom the Lord was represented; and especially could have a holy reverence for the Word, in which each and all things are representative and significative of Divine things, therefore in that nation a representative church was instituted. If however that nation had known internal things so far as to acknowledge them, they would have profaned them, and thereby when in a holy external would have been at the same time in a profane internal, so that there could have been through them no communication of representatives with heaven; and for this reason interior things were not disclosed to them, not even that the Lord was within, in order that He might save their souls.

[3] Inasmuch as the tribe of Judah was of this character more than the other tribes, and at this day just as of yore account the rituals holy which can be observed out of Jerusalem, and as they have a holy veneration for their fathers, especially as they regard the Word of the Old Testament as holy, and inasmuch as it was foreseen that Christians would almost reject this Word, and would likewise defile its internal things with things profane, therefore that nation has been preserved until this time, according to the words of the Lord in (Matt. 24:34). It would have been otherwise if Christians, being acquainted with internal things, had also lived as internal men; in this case that nation, like other nations, would before many generations have been cut off.

[4] But the case with that nation is that their holy external or holy of worship cannot at all affect their internals, because these are unclean from the base love of self and from the unclean love of the world; and also from the idolatry of worshiping external things separate from internal and thus because they have not anything of heaven in them, neither can they carry anything of heaven with them into the other life, except a few who live in mutual love, and thus do not despise others in comparison with themselves.

AC 3480. It was also shown how the unclean things with that nation did not prevent the interiors of the Word, or its spiritual and celestial things, from being nevertheless presented in heaven for the unclean things were removed so as not to be perceived, and evils were turned to good, so that the mere external holiness served as a plane, and thus the internal things of the Word were presented before the angels, without the interposition of any hindrances. From this it was made manifest how that people, interiorly idolatrous, could represent things holy, and even the Lord Himself; and thus how the Lord could dwell in the midst of their uncleanness (Lev. 16:16) consequently how there could be something like a church there for a church merely representative is a semblance of a church, and not a church.

[2] With Christians this cannot be the case, because they are acquainted with the interior things of worship, but do not believe them; thus they cannot be in a holy external separate from its internal. Moreover with those who are in the life of faith, communication is effected by the goods pertaining to them, evils and falsities being in the meantime removed; and it is a remarkable fact that all things of the Word, when being read by them, he open to the angels, and this even though they who read do not attend to its meaning (as has been shown me by much experience); for the internal in them, which is not so perceptible, serves as a plane.

AC 3481. I have very frequently spoken with the Jews in the other life. They appear in front, in the lower earth, beneath the plane of the left foot. I once spoke to them concerning the Word, the land of Canaan, and the Lord: concerning the word, that there are in it deepest arcana which are not manifest to men; and this they affirmed; then, that all the arcana which are therein treat of the Messiah and His kingdom which also they were willing to allow: but when I said that Messiah in the Hebrew tongue is the same as Christ in the Greek, they were not willing to hear. Again, when I said that the Messiah is most holy, and that Jehovah is in Him, and that no other is meant by the Holy One of Israel and by the God of Jacob and that because He is most holy, none can be in His kingdom but those who are holy, not in external form but internal, thus who are not in the unclean love of the world, and in the exaltation of themselves against other nations, and in hatred among themselves, this they could not hear.

[2] Afterwards when I told them that according to the prophecies the Messiah’s kingdom must be eternal, and that they who are with Him will also inherit the earth forever; and that if His kingdom were of this world, and they were to be introduced into the land of Canaan, it would only be for the few years which are of a man‘s life besides that all those who died after they were driven out of the land of Canaan would not enjoy such blessedness and that from this they might know that by the land of Canaan is represented and signified the heavenly kingdom; and especially as they now know that they are in the other life, and are to live forever, so that it is manifest that the Messiah has His kingdom there; and that if it were given them to speak with angels they might know that the universal angelic heaven is His kingdom; and moreover that by the new earth, the New Jerusalem, and the new temple in Ezekiel, nothing can be signified but such a kingdom of the Messiah - to these things they could make no reply, except merely that they who were to be introduced into the land of Canaan by the Messiah, and were to die after so few years and leave the blessedness which they were to enjoy there, would weep bitterly.

AC 3482. Although the language used in the Word to man appears simple, and in some passages unpolished, it is the angelic language itself, but in its lowest form; for when the angelic speech, which is spiritual, falls into human words, it cannot fall into any other speech than such as this; every single thing therein being representative, and every single word being significative. As the ancients had intercourse with spirits and angels, they had no other speech than this, which was full of representatives, and in every expression of which there was a spiritual sense. The books of the ancients were also written in this way for it was the study of their wisdom so to speak and so to write. From this also it is evident how far man afterwards removed himself from heaven. At this day he does not even know that there is in the Word anything else than that which appears in the letter not even that there is a spiritual sense within and whatever is said beyond the literal sense is called mystical, and is rejected merely on this account. Hence also it is that communication with heaven is at this day intercepted, insomuch that few believe there is any heaven, and wonderful to say, among the learned and erudite much fewer than among the simple.

AC 3483. Whatever is seen anywhere in the universe is representative of the Lord’s kingdom, insomuch that there is not anything in the atmospheric and starry universe, or in the earth and its three kingdoms, which is not in its own manner representative. All things in nature, in both general and particular, are ultimate images, inasmuch as from the Divine are celestial things which are of good, from celestial things spiritual things which are of truth, and from both celestial and spiritual things are natural things. From this it is evident how gross, nay, how earthly and also inverted is that human intelligence which ascribes everything to nature separate or exempt from art influx prior to itself, or from an efficient cause. Moreover they who so think and speak seem to themselves to be wiser than others that is, in attributing all things to nature when yet on the contrary angelic intelligence consists in ascribing nothing to nature, but all and everything to the Divine of the Lord, thus to life, and not to anything dead. The learned know that subsistence is a perpetual coming forth but still it is contrary to the affection of falsity and thence to a reputation for learning to say that nature continually subsists, as it originally came into existence, from the Divine of the Lord. Inasmuch therefore as each and all things subsist, that is, continually come forth, from the Divine, and as each and all things thence derived must needs be representative of those things whereby they came into existence, it follows that the visible universe is nothing else than a theater representative of the Lord‘s kingdom and that this kingdom is a theater representative of the Lord Himself.

AC 3484. From very much experience I have been instructed that there is but one only life, which is that of the Lord, and which flows in and causes man to live, nay, causes both the good and the evil to live. To this life correspond forms which are substances, and which by continual Divine influx are so vivified that they appear to themselves to live from themselves. This correspondence is that of the organs with their life; but such as are the recipient organs, such is the life which they live. Those men who are in love and charity are in correspondence, for the life itself is received by them fitly but they who are in what is contrary to love and charity are not in correspondence, because the life itself is not received fitly hence such a life comes forth as is in accordance with their quality. This may be illustrated by natural forms into which the light of the sun flows; such as are the recipient forms, such are the modifications of light in connection with them. In the spiritual world the modifications are spiritual; and therefore in that world such as are the recipient forms, such is their intelligence and such their wisdom. Hence good spirits and angels appear as the very forms of charity, while wicked spirits and infernals appear as forms of hatred.

AC 3485. The representations that come forth in the other life are appearances, but living ones, because they are from the light of life. The light of life is the Divine Wisdom, which is from the Lord alone. Hence all things that come forth from this light are real; and are not like those things that come forth from the light of the world. Wherefore they who are in the other life have sometimes said that the things they see there are real things, and the things which man sees are in comparison not real; because the former things live, and thus immediately affect their life, while the latter things do not live, thus do not immediately affect the life, except in so far and in such a manner as the things in their minds which are of this world’s light conjoin themselves fitly and correspondently with the things of the light of heaven. From all this it is now evident what representations are, and what correspondences.


Back | Next | Index | Home