HEAVENLY SECRETS
Emanuel Swedenborg

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AC GENESIS Chapter27

AC 3486. At the beginning of the preceding chapter (n. 3353-3356) were unfolded the things the Lord spake and foretold concerning the consummation of the age, or the end of the days of the church (Matt. 24:3-7). Here, of the Lord‘s Divine mercy it is permitted to unfold the things which follow on in order in the same chapter (Matt. 24:8-14) where are these words:--All these things are the beginning of sorrows. Then shall they deliver you into tribulation, and shall kill you; and ye shall be hated of all nations for my name’s sake. And then shall many be offended, and shall deliver up one another, and shall hate one mother. And many false prophets shall arise, and shall lead many astray. And because iniquity shall be multiplied, the charity of many shall wax cold. But he that endureth to the end, the same shall be saved. And this gospel of the kingdom shall be preached in the whole inhabited earth, for a testimony unto all nations and then shall the end come.

AC 3487. By the words that precede and that have been already unfolded (n. 3353-3356), there was described the first state of the perversion of the church, which was that they would begin no longer to know what is good and what is true but would dispute about it among themselves, from which falsities would originate. By the words now cited there is described the second state of the perversion of the church, truth and also which is that they would despise good and truth, and also turn away from them and thus that faith in the Lord would step by step expire, as charity would cease.

AC 3488. That the second state of the perversion of the church was described by the foregoing words of the Lord in the evangelist, is evident from their internal sense, which is as follows:--All these things are the beginning of sorrows; signifies those things which precede that is which are of the first state of the perversion of the church - which as before said is that they would begin no longer to know what is good and what is true, but would dispute about it among themselves, from which would arise falsities, and therefore heresies. That such things perverted the church before many centuries had elapsed, is evident from the fact that the church in the Christian world was divided, and this according to opinions concerning good and truth thus that the perversion of the church commenced long ago.

[2] Then shall they deliver you into tribulation, and shall kill you; signifies that good and truth would perish, first by tribulation," that is, by perversion afterwards by their killing" them, that is, by denial. To "kill," when predicated of good and truth, is not to receive, thus is to deny, (n. 3387, 3395). By "you," that is, by the apostles, are signified all things of faith in one complex, thus its good as well as its truth. These things are signified by the twelve apostles (n. 577, 2089, 2129, 2130, 3272, 3354) and here the same is clearly evident; for it is not the preaching of the apostles that is treated of, but the consummation of the age.

[3] And ye shall be hated of all nations for my name‘s sake; signifies contempt and aversion for all things which are of good and truth; "to hate" is to despise and hold in aversion, for this is of hatred; "of all nations" signifies by those who are in evil. Such are meant by " nations" (n. 1259, 1260, 1849, 1868, 2588); "for My name’s sake" is on account of the Lord, thus on account of all things which are from Him. The Lord‘s "name" is everything in one complex by which He is worshiped, thus everything which is of His church, (n. 2724, 3006).

[4] And then shall many be offended, and shall deliver up one another, and shall hate one another; signifies enmities on account of these things "many shall he offended" denotes enmity in itself; the Human itself of the Lord is that against which there is enmity; that this would be an offence and a stumbling block is here and there predicted in the Word; "they shall deliver up one another" denotes enmity among themselves from falsity against truth; "and shall hate one another" denotes enmity among themselves from evil against good.

[5] And many false prophets shall arise, and shall lead many astray; signifies preachings of falsity. "False prophets" are those who teach falsities, thus false doctrine, (n. 2534) "and shall lead many astray" denotes that there should be derivations therefrom.

[6] And because iniquity shall be multiplied, the charity of many shall wax cold; signifies the expiring of charity together with faith; "because iniquity shall be multiplied" denotes according to the falsities of faith; "the charity of many shall wax cold" denotes the expiring of charity, for they keep pace together; where faith is not, there charity is not, and where charity is not, faith is not; but charity is that which receives faith, and no charity is that which rejects faith: this is the origin of every falsity and every evil.

[7] But he that endureth to the end, the same shall be saved; signifies the salvation of those who are in charity; "he that endureth to the end" is he who does not suffer himself to be led astray, thus who does not succumb in temptations.

[8] And this gospel of the kingdom shall be preached in the whole inhabited earth, for a testimony unto all nations; signifies that this should first become known in the Christian world; "shall be preached" denotes that it should be made known; "this gospel of the kingdom" is this truth that it is so; "gospel" denotes the annunciation; "kingdom" denotes truth. "Kingdom" denotes truth (n. 1672, 2547); "in the whole inhabited earth" denotes the Christian world. "Earth" is the region where the church is, thus the Christian world, (n. 662, 1066, 1067, 1262, 1733, 1850, 2117, 2118, 2928, 3355). The church here is called "inhabited" from the life of faith, that is, from the good which is of truth; for in the internal sense "to inhabit" denotes to live; and the " inhabitants" are the goods of truth (n. 1293, 2268, 2451, 2712, 3384); "for a testimony" denotes that they may know, and not make a pretext that they have been ignorant "to all nations" denotes to evils (n. 1259, 1260, 1849, 1868, 2588); for when they are in falsity and evil, they no longer know what is true and what is good; they then believe falsity to be truth, and evil to be good, and the reverse and when the church is in this state, Then shall the end come. In what now follows and what of the Lord’s Divine mercy will be unfolded prefatory to the next chapter of Genesis, that state of the church is treated of which is called the abomination of desolation," which is the third state.

AC 3489. That the church is of such a character does not appear to those who are within the church namely, that they despise and hold in aversion all things which are of good and truth; also that they bear enmities against such things, and especially against the Lord Himself; for they frequent places of worship, hear preaching, and are in a kind of sanctity when there; they go to the Holy Supper, and at times converse with one another in a becoming manner concerning such things this is done by bad men as well as by good men - and they also live among themselves in civic charity or friendship. Consequently in the eyes of men no contempt appears, still less aversion; and less still enmity against the goods and truths of faith, and thus against the Lord. These things however are external forms by which one person misleads another; while the internal forms of the men of the church are altogether unlike, being quite contrary to the external forms. The internal forms are those which are here described, and which are as above mentioned their real quality appears to the life in the heavens, for the angels do not attend to any other than internal things, that is, to ends, or to intentions and desires, and to the derivative thoughts.

[2] How unlike these are to the externals is evident from those who come from the Christian world into the other life, concerning whom see above (n. 2121-2126) for in the other life they think and speak according to their internals alone; for externals are left behind together with the body; and there it is manifest that however peaceable such have seemed in the world, they nevertheless entertained hatred one against another, and against all things which are of faith, and especially against the Lord; for when in the other life the Lord is merely mentioned in their presence, a sphere not only of contempt but also of aversion and enmity against Him is manifestly exhaled and diffused from them, even from those who in appearance had spoken and preached piously about Him and it is the same when charity and faith are mentioned.

[3] In the internal form (which is there manifested) they are of such a character that if while they had lived in this world their externals had been loosed and removed, that is, had they not then feared for their life and had they not feared the laws, and especially had they not feared for their reputation, on account of the honors which they solicited and pursued, and on account of the wealth which they desired and eagerly sought, they would have rushed one against another with intestine hatred, in accordance with their impulses and thoughts; and would have seized the goods of others without any conscience, and likewise without any conscience would have butchered others, most especially the innocent. Such as regards their interiors are Christians at this day, (A. D. 1751), except a few who"‘ they do not know; from which it is evident what is the quality of the church.

GENESIS 27:1-46

1. And it came to pass that Isaac was old, and his eyes were dim that he could not see, and he called Esau his elder son, and said unto him, My son; and he said unto him, Behold me.

2. And he said, Behold I pray I am old, I know not the day of my death.

3. And now take I pray thy weapons, thy quiver, and thy bow, and go out to the field, and hunt me a hunting.

4. And make me dainties, such as I have loved, and bring to me, and I will eat, that my soul may bless thee before I die.

5. And Rebekah heard when Isaac spake to Esau his son; and Esau went to the field to hunt for a hunting, to bring it.

6. And Rebekah said unto Jacob her son, saying, Behold I heard thy father speak unto Esau thy brother, saying,

7. Bring me a hunting, and make me dainties, and I will eat, and will bless thee before Jehovah before my death.

8. And now my son hearken unto my voice, according to that which I command thee.

9. Go now to the flock, and take me from thence two good kids of the she-goats, and I will make them dainties for thy father, such as he loveth.

10. And thou shalt bring to thy father, and he shall eat, that he may bless thee before his death.

11. And Jacob said to Rebekah his mother, Behold Esau my brother is a hairy man, and I am a smooth man.

12. Peradventure my father will feel me, and I shall be in his eyes as a misleader; and I shall bring upon myself a curse and not a blessing.

13. And his mother said unto him, Upon me be thy curse my son; only hearken to my voice, and go, take for me.

14. And he went, and took, and brought to his mother; and his mother made dainties, such as his father loved.

15. And Rebekah took garments of desires of Esau her elder son that were with her in the house, and put them upon Jacob her younger son.

16. And the skins of the kids of the she-goats she caused to be put upon his hands, and upon the smooth of his neck.

17. And she gave the dainties, and the bread, which she had made, into the hand of Jacob her son.

18. And he came unto his father and said, My father; and he said, Behold me, who art thou my son?

19. And Jacob said unto his father, I am Esau thy firstborn I have done according as thou spakest unto me arise I pray thee, sit, and eat of my hunting, that thy soul may bless me.

20. And Isaac said unto his son, How is it that thou hast hastened to find it, my son? and he said, Because Jehovah thy God made it come to meet my face.

21. And Isaac said unto Jacob, Come near I pray, and I will feel thee my son, whether thou be my very son Esau, or not.

22. And Jacob came near to Isaac his father, and he felt him, and said, The voice is Jacob’s voice, but the hands are the hands of Esau.

23. And he recognized him not, because his hands were hairy like his brother Esau‘s hands and he blessed him.

24. And he said, Art thou my very son Esau? And he said, I am.

25. And he said, Bring it near to me, and I will eat of my sons hunting, that my soul may bless thee and he brought it near to him, and he did eat, and he brought him wine, and he drank.

26. And Isaac his father said unto him, Come near I pray, and kiss me my son.

27. And he came near, and kissed him, and he smelled the smell of his garments, and blessed him, and said, See, the smell of my son is as the smell of a field which Jehovah hath blessed.

28. And God shall give thee of the dew of heaven, and of the fat things of the earth, and a multitude of corn and new wine.

29. Peoples shall serve thee, and peoples shall bow down themselves to thee. Be thou a master to thy brethren, and let thy mother’s sons bow down themselves to thee; cursed are they that curse thee, and blessed are they that bless thee.

30. And it can to pass as Isaac made an end of blessing Jacob, and Jacob was scarcely yet gone out from the faces of Isaac his father, that Esau his brother came from his hunting.

31. And he also made dainties, and brought unto his father and he said unto his father, Let my father arise and eat of his son‘s hunting, that thy soul may bless me.

32. And Isaac his father said unto him, Who art thou? and he said, I am thy son, thy firstborn, Esau.

33. And Isaac shuddered with exceeding great shuddering, and said, Who then is he that hath hunted hunting, and brought it to me, and I have eaten of all before thou camest, and blessed him? Yea, and he shall be blessed.

34. When Esau heard the words of his father, he cried with an exceeding great and bitter cry, and said unto his father, Bless me, me also, O my father.

35. And he said, Thy brother came with fraud, and hath taken away thy blessing.

36. And he said, Is it not that his name is called Jacob? and he hath supplanted me these two times; he hath taken away my birthright, and behold now he hath taken away my blessing. And he said, Hast thou not reserved a blessing for me?

37. And Isaac answered and said unto Esau, Behold I have made him thy master, and all his brethren have I given to him for servants; and with corn and new vine have I sustained him; and what then shall I do for thee, my son?

38. And Esau said unto his father, Hast thou but this one blessing, my father? Bless me, me also, O my father. And Esau lifted up his voice, and wept.

39. And Isaac his father answered and said unto him, Behold of the fat things of the earth shall be thy dwelling, and of the dew of heaven from above.

40. And upon thy sword shalt thou live, and shalt serve thy brother, and it shall come to pass when thou shalt have the dominion that thou shalt break his yoke from upon thy neck.

41. And Esau hated Jacob because of the blessing wherewith his father blessed him; and Esau said in his heart, The days of mourning for my father draw near, and I will kill Jacob my brother.

42. And the words of Esau her elder son were told to Rebekah; and she sent and called unto Jacob her younger son, and said unto him, Behold Esau thy brother comforteth himself concerning thee to kill thee.

43. And now my son hearken unto my voice, and arise, flee thou to Laban my brother to Haran.

44. And tarry with him some days until thy brother’s wrath turn away;

45. Until thy brother‘s anger turn away from thee, and he forget that which thou hast done to him, and I will send and take thee from thence why should I be bereaved even of you both in one day?

46. And Rebekah said to Isaac, I loathe my life because of the daughters of Heth if Jacob should take a woman of the daughters of Heth, such as these, of the daughters of the land, wherefore have I lives?

THE CONTENTS

AC 3490. In the preceding chapters, where Isaac and Rebekah are treated of, the subject in the internal sense is the rational, and how the Lord made it Divine in Himself. In the present chapter, in the internal sense, the subject is the natural, and how the Lord made it Divine in Himself. "Esau" is the good thereof, and Jacob" the truth - For when the Lord was in the world He made His whole Human Divine in Himself, both the interior Human which is the rational, and the exterior Human which is the natural, and also the very corporeal, and this according to Divine order, according to which the Lord also makes new or regenerates man. And therefore in the representative sense the regeneration of man as to his natural is also here treated of, in which sense " Esau" is the good of the natural, and Jacob" the truth thereof, and yet both Divine, because all the good and truth in one who is regenerate are from the Lord.

THE INTERNAL SENSE

AC 3491. Verse 1. And it came to pass that Isaac was old, and his eyes were dim that he could not see; and he called Esau his elder son, and said unto him, My son; and he said unto him, Behold me. "And it came to pass that Isaac was old," signifies when the state was at hand; "and his eyes were dim that he could not see," signifies when the rational desired to enlighten the natural with the Divine; "and he called Esau his elder son," signifies the affection of the good of the natural, or the good of life and said unto him, My son and he said unto him, Behold me," signifies presence from being foreseen and provided.

AC 3492. And it came to pass that Isaac was old. That this signifies when the state was at hand, is evident from the signification of "growing old," as being the presence of a new state; for in the Word old age" signifies both the putting off of a former state, and the putting on of a new one; and this for the reason that old age is the last of age, when corporeal things begin to be put off, and with them the loves of the preceding age, and thus when the interiors begin to be enlightened, for these are enlightened when corporeal things are removed and also because the angels, who perceive in a spiritual manner the things that are in the Word, have no longer any idea of any old age, but instead of it an idea of new life, thus here an idea that the state was at hand, namely, that the Divine rational which is represented by Isaac desired a natural corresponding to itself, that is, one that would also be Divine.

AC 3493. And his eyes were dim that he could not see. That this signifies when the rational desired to enlighten the natural with the Divine, is evident from the signification of "eyes," as being the interior or rational sight (n. 2701); and from the signification of " seeing," as being to perceive and understand (n. 2150, 2325, 2807); hence when the eyes are said to be dim," it signifies that there is no longer any perception, here, no perception of those things which are in the natural; and this being the signification of these words, it is signified that the rational desired to enlighten the natural with the Divine. How the case herein is may be seen from what has been said and shown before concerning the rational and natural in man when he is being regenerated, namely, that the rational is regenerated before the natural, for the reason that the rational is more interior and thus nearer to the Divine; and also because it is purer, and thus fitter to receive the Divine than is the natural; and further because the natural is to be regenerated through the rational, as may be seen above (n. 3286, 3288, 3321).

[2] When therefore the rational has been regenerated and not the natural, the former appears to itself to be dim-sighted, because there is not correspondence for the rational has its sight from the light of heaven, and the natural has its sight from the light of the world; and unless there is correspondence, the rational can see nothing which is in the natural, all therein being to it as shade, or even as thick darkness. But when there is correspondence, then the things in the natural appear to the rational in light, because the things which are of the light of the world are then enlightened by those which are of the light of heaven, and thereupon become as it were translucent. But these things appear letter from what has been before said and shown concerning correspondence (n. 2987, 2989, 2991, 2996, 3002, 3138, 3167, 3222, 3223, 3225, 3337, 3485). Hence it may in some sort be apprehended that by the words, "the eyes of Isaac were dim that he could not see," is signified that the rational desired to enlighten the natural with the Divine, that is, to make it also Divine, for in the supreme sense the Lord is treated of; which may consequently be illustrated by what takes place with man when being regenerated, as before mentioned, for the regeneration of man is an image of the Lord’s glorification (n. 3043, 3138, 3212, 3296, 3490).

AC 3494. And he called Esau his elder son. That this signifies the affection of good of the natural, or the good of life, is evident from the representation of Esau, as being the Divine good of the natural (n. 3300, 3302, 3322); and because the good of the natural is that which appears in the affection and life, therefore it is the affection of good of the natural, or the good of life, that is here represented by Esau. The affection of good in the natural, and the derivative good of life, is what is called the "elder son; "but the affection of truth, and the derivative doctrine of truth, is what is called the "younger son." That the affection of good, and the derivative good of life, is the "elder son," that is, the firstborn, is evident from the fact that infants are first of all in good, for they are in a state of innocence, and in a state of love toward their parents and nurse, and in a state of mutual charity toward their infant companions; so that good is the firstborn with every man. This good, into which man is thus initiated when an infant, remains; for whatever is imbibed from infancy enters into the life; and because it remains, it becomes the good of life; for if man should be without such good as that which he has derived from infancy, he would not be a man, but would be more of a wild beast than any in the forest. This good does not indeed appear to be present, because all that is imbibed in the infantile age does not appear otherwise than as something natural-as is sufficiently manifest from walking, and from the other motions of the body; from the manners and decorums of civil life; also from speech, and various other things. From this it may be seen that good is the "elder son," that is, the firstborn, and consequently that truth is the "younger son," or is born afterwards; for truth is not learned till the infant becomes a child, a youth, and an adult.

[2] Good as well as truth in the natural or external man is a " son," that is to say, a son of the rational or internal man; for whatever comes forth in the natural or external man flows in from the rational or internal man, and from this also comes forth and is born that, which does not come forth and is not born therefrom is not a living human thing; it would be as you might say something sensuous corporeal without a soul. From this it is that both good and truth are called "sons," and indeed sons of the rational. And yet it is not the rational which produces and brings forth the natural, but it is an influx through the rational into the natural, which influx is from the Lord. Therefore all infants who are born are His sons, and afterwards when they become wise, in so far as they are still infants, that is, in the innocence of infancy, in the love of infancy toward their parent, now the Lord, and in the mutual charity of infancy toward their infant companions, now their neighbor, so far they are adopted by the Lord as sons.

AC 3495. And said unto him, My son; and he said unto him, Behold me. That this signifies presence from being foreseen and provided, is evident from the signification of "calling him and saying to him, My son," as being from what was foreseen and provided, because it is predicated of the Lord‘s Divine; add from the signification of "saying unto him, Behold me" (which is the reply) as being presence.

AC 3496. Verses 2-4. And he said, Behold I pray I am old; I know not the day of my death. And now take I pray thy weapons, thy quiver, and thy bow, and go out to the field, and hunt me a hunting. And make me dainties, such as I have loved, and bring to me, and I will eat, that my soul may bless thee before I die. before I die. "And he said, Behold I pray I am old," signifies that the state was at hand; "I know not the day of my death," signifies life in the natural; "and now take I pray thy weapons, thy quiver, and thy bow," signifies the doctrinal things of good which he had; "and go out to the field," signifies where there is good ground’ "and hunt me a hunting,"signifies the truth of good; "and make me dainties, such as I have loved," signifies pleasant things fro"‘ thence, because from good and bring to me, and I will eat," signifies" appropriation "that my soul may bless thee," signifies adjunction to his life; "before I die," signifies the first state of resuscitation in the natural

AC 3497. And he said, Behold I pray I am old. That this signifies that the state was at hand, is evident from what has been said above concerning the signification of growing old" (n. 3492).

AC 3498. I know not the day of my death. That this signifies life in the natural, is evident from the signification of "day," as being state (n. 23, 487, 488, 493, 893, 2788); and from the signification of death," as being to rise again, or to be resuscitated into life (n. 3326) thus by the day of death" is signified a state of resuscitation of life, or what is the same, life; that this is in the natural is evident, because life therein is here treated of. How the case herein is cannot be seen unless it is known how the case is with the life of the rational and with the life of the natural; or what is the same, with the life of the internal man and the life of the external. the life of the rational or internal man is distinct from the life of the natural or external man, and indeed so distinct that the life of the rational or internal man is possible apart from the life of the natural or external man; but the life of the natural or external man is not possible without the life of the rational or internal man, for the external man lives from the internal, insomuch that if the life of the internal man should cease, the life of the external would immediately become a nullity, because exterior things depend on interior ones as posterior things on prior, or as the effect on the efficient cause, for if the efficient cause should cease, the effect would immediately become a nullity. It is the same with the life of the external man relatively to the life of the internal.

[2] This may be plainly seen from man; for when man is in the world, or lives in the body, his rational is distinct from his natural, insomuch that he can be withdrawn from the external sensuous things of the body, and also in some degree from the interior sensuous things of his natural man, and can be in his rational, thus in spiritual thought. This appears better from the fact that when a man dies he altogether leaves the external sensuous things of the body, and then retains the life of his interior man; and also that although he indeed has with him the memory-knowledges of the external or natural memory, he nevertheless does not enjoy the use of them (n. 2475-2477, 2479-2486) From this it is evident that the rational or internal man is distinct from the external; but during man’s life in the body his rational does not appear to be distinct from his natural, because he is in the world, or in nature; and this being so, the life of the rational appears within the natural, insomuch that there does not appear to be any life in the rational unless it is in the natural at the same time. The rational appears to have life only in so far as the natural corresponds to it, (n. 3493). From this it may be seen that it is life corresponding in the natural which is signified by these words which Isaac spake unto Esau, "I know not the day of my death;" for the rational is represented by Isaac, and the natural by Esau, both as to the good therein.

AC 3499. And now take I pray thy weapons, thy quiver, and thy bow. That this signifies the doctrinal things of good which he had, is evident from the signification of "weapons, quiver, and bow," as being doctrinal things (n. 2686, 2709), here, the doctrinal things of good which he had, that is, which were had by the good of the natural that is represented by Esau.

AC 3500. And go out to the field. That this signifies where there is good ground, is evident from the signification of "field," as being the good of the church, also the good of doctrine (n. 2971, 3196, 3310, 3317), thus good ground.

AC 3501. And hunt me a hunting. That this signifies the truth of good, is evident from the signification of "to hunt" and a hunting," as being the truth of the natural from which is the good of life (n. 3309) here it signifies truth which is from good, because said to Esau, by whom as before said is represented the good of the natural.

AC 3502. And make me dainties, such as I have loved. That this signifies pleasant things from thence, because from good, is evident from the signification of "dainties" as being things pleasant; and because they came from Esau, by whom is represented the good of the natural, therefore they signify things pleasant because from good. In the original language "dainties" signify things that are delightful and pleasing to the taste; and in the internal sense they signify that which is delightful of good, and that which is pleasing of truth, because like the other bodily senses, the taste corresponds to celestial and spiritual things concerning which correspondence, of the Lord‘s Divine mercy hereafter. It cannot be seen how the case herein is unless it is known in what manner the natural is made new, or receives life from the rational, that is, from the Lord through the rational.

[2] The natural does not become new, or receive life corresponding to the rational, that is, is not regenerated, except by means of doctrinal things, or the knowledges of good and truth the celestial man by the knowledges of good first, but the spiritual man by the knowledges of truth first. Doctrinal things, or the knowledges of good and truth, cannot be communicated to the natural man, thus cannot be conjoined and appropriated, except by means of delights and pleasantnesses accommodated to it, for they are insinuated by an external or sensuous way; and whatever does not enter by some delight or pleasantness does not inhere, thus does not continue. This is what is meant by the truth of good and the pleasantness thereof, and this is what is treated of in what follows.

AC 3503. And bring to me, and I will eat. That this signifies appropriation, is evident from the signification of "eating," as being appropriation (n. 2187, 2343, 3168):

AC 3504. That my soul may bless thee. That this signifies adjunction to his life, and consequently life corresponding to the rational, is evident from the signification of " being blessed," as being to be gifted with celestial and spiritual good (n. 981, 1731, 2846, 3017, 3406); for the good of infancy and of life thence, which is the same as the good of the natural, and which is represented by Esau, is not spiritual good - the good of infancy being devoid of knowledge and intelligence, and thus of wisdom. The good of infancy becomes spiritual good through the implanting of truth, thus through regeneration (n. 1616, 1802, 2280, 2290, 2291, 2299, 2304, 2306, 2307, 3494); hence comes the correspondence between rational and natural things, consequently the adjunction of the natural man to the life of the rational; this adjunction to its life being what is meant by "my soul blessing thee."

AC 3505. Before I die. That this signifies the first state of resuscitation in the natural, is evident from the signification of "dying," as being to rise again, or to be resuscitated into life (n. 3326, 3498). That this is the first state is evident from the fact that the good of infancy and the derivative good of life is the first of regeneration - which state has thus far been represented by Esau. The subsequent states are what are treated of in series in this chapter.

AC 3506. Verses 5-7. And Rebekah heard when Isaac spake to Esau his son; and Esau went to the field to hunt for a hunting, to bring it. And Rebekah said unto Jacob her son, saying Behold I heard thy father speak unto Esau thy brother, saying, Bring me a hunting, and make me dainties, and I will eat, and will bless thee before Jehovah before my death. " And Rebekah heard when Isaac spake to Esau his son," signifies the affection of truth and life from it; "and Esau went to the field to hunt for a hunting, to bring it," - signifies the endeavor of the affection of good to procure truth which might be adjoined to the Divine rational; "and Rebekah said unto Jacob her son, saying," signifies the perception of the Lord from Divine truth concerning natural truth; "behold I heard thy father speak unto Esau thy brother, saying," signifies that the Divine good of the Divine rational desired the affection of good; " bring me a hunting," signifies the truth of good and make me dainties," signifies the desire and delight from the pleasantness thence "and I will eat," signifies appropriation thus "and will bless thee before Jehovah," signifies conjunction thereby "before my death," signifies thus life in the natural.

AC 3507. And Rebekah heard when Isaac spake to Esau his son. That this signifies the affection of truth and life therefrom, is evident from the representation of Rebekah, as being the Lord’s Divine rational as to Divine truth conjoined with the Divine good therein, thus the very affection of truth and from the signification of "hearing Isaac speak," as being life from it; for in the internal sense "to hear speak" denotes influx, because in the representative sense "to hear" denotes to obey (n. 2542) and to speak" denotes to will and flow in (n. 2626, 2951, 3037) thus in the supreme sense "to hear speak‘ denotes life therefrom, namely, the life of Divine truth from Divine good to his son," in the internal sense denotes concerning the good of the natural, and thence the truth of the natural. That this is the sense of these words does not so plainly appear, because it is widely removed from the sense of the letter, which is historical; nevertheless such is the case, for angelic ideas are altogether unlike human ideas. angelic ideas are spiritual, and when they penetrate inwardly they are celestial; but human ideas are natural, and when derived from historicals, are sensuous. And yet the Lord effects through the Word such a correspondence between spiritual things which are of heaven and natural things which are of the world, that natural ideas may be changed into spiritual, and this in a moment. From this comes the conjunction of heaven with the world through man, and indeed through the Word, consequently through the church in which is the Word. That there is a correspondence between natural and spiritual things in each and all of those things which can possibly be apprehended and perceived by the mind, will of the Lord’s Divine mercy become evident from what is related from experience concerning the Grand Man, at the end of the following chapters.

AC 3508. And Esau went to the field to hunt for a hunting, to bring it. That this signifies the endeavor of the affection of good to procure truth which might be conjoined with the Divine rational, is evident from the representation of Esau, as being the good of the natural; hence comes the affection of good of the rational in the natural, for the good which is in the natural is not of the natural, but is of the rational in the natural (n. 3498) and from the signification of going to the field to limit for a hunting, to bring it," as being the endeavor to procure truth for itself; for a "field" is where there is good ground (n. 3500); a "hunting" is truth which is from good (n. 3501); and "to bring it," is to procure it, thus to adjoin it to the Divine rational. As before said, in the supreme sense the glorification of the Lord‘s natural is here treated of; and in the representative sense the regeneration of the natural in man (n. 3490). It is according to order that this should be accomplished through truth, that is, through the knowledges of good and truth, for without these the natural cannot be enlightened by the rational, or through the rational thus it cannot be regenerated, knowledges being the vessels recipient of the good and truth flowing in from the rational; and according to the quality and quantity which the vessels receive, such is the enlightenment. The vessels which receive good and truth from the rational are the very truths of the natural, which are nothing else than memory-knowledges, knowledges, and doctrinal things. Goods come from the order of the things which flow in, and from the order among themselves of the things which are there; hence comes the good of the natural.

AC 3509. And Rebekah said unto Jacob her son. That this signifies the Lord’s perception from Divine truth concerning natural truth, is evident from the representation of Rebekah, as being the Divine truth of the Lord‘s Divine rational (n. 3012, 3013, 3077); from the signification of "saying," as being to perceive (n. 1791, 1815, 1819, 1822, 1898, 1919, 2080, 2506, 2515, 2552, 2619); and from the representation of Jacob, as being the Lord’s natural as to truth (n. 3305); from all which it is manifest that by "Rebekah said unto Jacob her son," is signified the Lord‘s perception from Divine truth concerning natural truth. That the Lord from the Divine good of the Divine rational which is represented by Isaac, willed to procure truth for Himself through the good of the natural which is represented by Esau, whereby He might glorify or make Divine His natural; but that the Lord from the Divine truth of the Divine rational which is represented by Rebekah willed to procure for Himself through the truth of the natural which is represented by Jacob the truth by means of which the rational might be glorified or made Divine, cannot be apprehended unless it is illustrated by the things that come to pass in man while being regenerated or made new by the Lord; nor indeed even by this unless it is know" how the case is with the rational as to the good and as to the truth therein-which must therefore be briefly stated -

[2] The rational mind is distinguished into two faculties, one faculty being called the will, and the other the understanding. During man’s regeneration, that which proceeds from the will is called good, and that which proceeds from the understanding is called truth. Before man has been regenerated the will does not act as one with the understanding; but the former wills good, while the latter wills truth; insomuch that an effort of the will is perceived as being quite distinct from one of the understanding. This however is perceived only in those who reflect, and who know what the will is and the things that belong thereto, and what the understanding is and the things that belong thereto; but it is not perceived by those who do not know these things and therefore who do not reflect, for the reason that the natural mind is regenerated through the rational mind (n. 3493), and this according to an order such that the good of the rational does not flow immediately into the good of the natural and regenerate it, but through the truth which is of the understanding, thus in appearance from the truth of the rational. These are the things treated of in this chapter in the internal sense; for "Isaac" is the rational mind as to the good which is of the will, "Rebekah" being the same with respect to the truth which is of the understanding; "Esau" is the good of the natural that comes forth from the good of the rational; and "Jacob" is the truth of the natural that comes forth from the good of the rational through the truth therein.

[3] From these things it may be seen what arcana are contained in the internal sense of the Word but still there are very few which can be described to human apprehension; while those which transcend it, and cannot be described, are without limit; for in proportion as the Word penetrates more deeply, that is, more interiorly, into heaven, the more innumerable and ineffable the arcana become, not only to man, but also to the angels of the lower heaven; and when it reaches the inmost heaven, the angels there perceive that the arcana are infinite, and are altogether incomprehensible to them, because they are Divine. Such is the Word.

AC 3510. Behold I heard thy father speak unto Esau thy brother, saying. That this signifies that the Divine good of the Divine rational desired the affection of good, is evident from the representation of Isaac, who is here the "father," as being the Divine good of the Divine rational; from the signification of "speaking," as being to desire (n. 2626, 2951, 3037); and from the representation of Esau, as being the affection of good in the natural (n. 3508).

AC 3511. Bring me a hunting. That this signifies the truth of good, is evident from the signification of a "hunting," as being the truth of good (n. 3501).

AC 3512. And make me dainties. That this signifies the desire and delight from the pleasantness thence, is evident from the signification of "dainties," as being what is pleasing (n. 3502), thus desire and delight from the pleasantness thereof, that is, from truth; for as before said in the number cited, truths are introduced into the natural of man by what is pleasing and in agreement therewith and those which are not so introduced do not inhere, and thus are not conjoined with the rational by correspondence. Moreover, like all other memory-knowledges, truths are allotted their place in the memory that belongs to the natural man in accordance with the pleasant and delightful things that introduced them; as is evident from the fact that when these pleasant and delightful things return, the things that were introduced by them also return; and also on the other hand that when these things are recalled, there are at the same time excited the delightful and pleasant things to which they had been adjoined.

AC 3513. And I will eat. That this signifies appropriation thus, is evident from the signification of "eating," as being to appropriate (n. 2187, 2343, 3168, 3503). Appropriation is effected when truths, or the knowledges of good and truth, are insinuated into the natural by means of things that are pleasant and delightful; and when these truths are adjoined to good there, there is then effected a communication with the truth and good of the rational, thus with the rational; and this communication is what is called appropriation, inasmuch as the truth and good are of the rational in the natural; for the things in the rational relatively to those in the natural are as particulars relatively to generals. It is known that from particulars there comes forth what is general, and that without particulars no general could come into existence. The general of the particulars of the rational is that which is exhibited in the natural and because it is a general, it appears under another form, and this according to the order of the particulars which compose it, thus according to the form thence derived. If the singulars and derivative particulars of celestial good and spiritual truth are what form the general in the natural, there then comes forth a celestial and spiritual form, and in a certain image there is represented something of heaven in every single thing of the general; but if the singulars and particulars are not those of good and truth, but of evil and falsity, which form the generals in the natural, there is then represented in an image something of hell in every single thing of the general.

[2] Such are the things which are signified by the eating and drinking in the Holy Supper, where also by "eating and drinking" is signified appropriation namely, by "eating" the appropriation of good, and by drinking" the appropriation of truth. If good, that is, love to the Lord and charity toward the neighbor, form the internal or rational man, and through this the external or natural man corresponding to it, then the man becomes in particular and in general an image of heaven, consequently an image of the Lord; but if contempt for the Lord and for the good and truth of faith, and hatred toward the neighbor, form the internal man, then the man becomes in particular and in general an image of hell; and especially when at the same time this is done in what is holy, for thence comes profanation. Thus it is that to those who eat and drink worthily, eternal life is appropriated; while they who eat and drink unworthily, appropriate death unto themselves.

AC 3514. And will bless thee before Jehovah. That this signifies conjunction thereby, is evident from the signification of "blessing thee," as being adjunction to his life (n. 3504) and whereas it is here said, " I will bless thee before Jehovah," it signifies conjunction. Adjunction is predicated of the communication of the truth of the natural with the good of the rational; but conjunction, of the communication of the good of the natural with the good of the rational; for there is a parallelism between the Lord and man as to the celestial things which are of good, but not as to the spiritual things which are of truth (n. 1832).

AC 3515. Before my death. That this signifies thus life in the natural, is evident from the signification of "death," as being resuscitation to life (n. 3498, 3505).

AC 3516. Verses 8-10. And now my son hearken unto my voice, according to that which I command thee. Go now to the flock, and take me from thence two good kids of the goats, and I will make them dainties for they father, such as he loveth. And thou shalt bring to they father, and he shall eat, that he may bless thee before his death. "And now my son hearken unto my voice, according to that which I command the," signifies desire and delight perceived from the Divine truth in the Divine rational toward natural truth; "go now to the flock," signifies to natural domestic good not conjoined with the Divine rational; "and take me from thence two good kids of the goats," signifies the truths of this good; "and I will make them dainties for they father, such as he loveth," signifies that he should make deliciousnesses therefrom; "and thou shalt bring to they father, and he shall eat," signifies to the Divine good of the Divine rational, and appropriation; "that he may bless thee," signifies conjunction thereby; "before his death," signifies resuscitation in the natural.

AC 3517. And now my son hearken unto my voice, according to that which I command thee. That this signifies desire and delight perceived from the Divine truth in the Divine rational toward natural truth, is evident from the representation of Rebekah who speaks these things, as being the Divine truth of the Divine rational, concerning which above and from the representation of Jacob to whom these things are said, as being natural truth, concerning which also above. That it is desire and delight, is manifest without explication.

AC 3518. Go now to the flock. That this signifies to natural domestic good not conjoined with the Divine rational, is evident from the signification of "flock," as being good (n. 343, 415, 1565), here, natural good because it is said to Jacob, and indeed domestic good, because it was at home, whereas the field whence Esau, by whom is signified the good of the natural, (n. 3500, 3508) took his hunting, was good not domestic. Elsewhere in the Word "flock" is predicated of the good of the rational; but in this case "herd" is predicated of the good of the natural (n. 2566). Natural domestic good is that good which a man derives from his parents, or into which he is born, quite distinct from the good of the natural which flows in from the Lord. The nature and quality of natural good may be seen in (n. 3470, 3471); and therefore for the sake of distinction the one good is called the Good of the Natural, and the other Natural Good. Moreover every man receives domestic good from his father and from his mother, which goods are in themselves distinct that which he receives from the father being interior, and that from the mother exterior. In the Lord these goods were most distinct, for the good which He had from the Father was Divine, but that which He had from the mother was contaminated with hereditary evil; that good in the natural which the Lord had from the Father was His own, because it was His very life, and is that which is represented by Esau; whereas the natural good which the Lord derived from the mother, being contaminated with hereditary evil, was in itself evil, and this is what is meant by "domestic good." Although of such a character, this good was yet of service for the reformation of the natural; but when it had answered this purpose it was rejected.

[2] The case is similar with every man who is being regenerated: the good which he receives from the Lord as from a new father is interior, but the good which he derives from his parents is exterior; the former good, which he receives from the Lord, is called spiritual; but the latter, which he derives from his parents, is called natural good. The good that a man derives from his parents is serviceable first of all for his reformation, for by means of it are introduced as by what is pleasurable and delightful, first, memory-knowledges, and afterwards the knowledges of truth; but when it has served as a means for this use it is separated from these; and then spiritual good comes forth and manifests itself. This must be evident from much experience, as from the single instance that when a child is first instructed he is affected with the desire of knowing, not at first for any end that is manifest to himself, but from a certain pleasure and delight that is born with him and is also derived from other sources; but afterwards, as he grows up, he is affected with the desire of knowing for the sake of some end, as that he may excel others, or his rivals and next for some end in the world but when he is to be regenerated, he is affected from the delight and pleasantness of truth; and when he is being regenerated, which takes place in adult age, from the love of truth, and afterwards from the love of good and then the ends which had preceded, together with their delights, are separated little by little, and to them succeeds interior good from the Lord, which manifests itself in his affection. From this it is evident that the former delights, which had appeared in the outward form as good, had served as means. Such successions of means are continual.

[3] The case herein may be compared to that of a tree, which in its first age, or at the beginning of spring, adorns its branches with leaves, and afterwards as its age or the spring advances, decorates them with flowers; and next in summer puts forth the first germs of fruits, which afterwards become fruit and lastly puts seeds therein, which contain in them new trees of a like kind, and indeed whole orchards in potency; and if the seeds are sown, in act. Such analogues are there in nature, which also are representative for universal nature is a theater representative of the Lord‘s kingdom in the heavens, thus of His kingdom on earth, that is, in the church, and hence of His kingdom in every regenerate man. From this it is plain how natural or domestic good, although a merely outward delight and indeed a worldly one, may serve as a means for producing the good of the natural, which may conjoin itself with the good of the rational, and thus become regenerate or spiritual good, that is, good which is from the Lord. These are the things which are represented and signified by "Esau and Jacob" in this chapter.

AC 3519. And take me from thence tow good kids of the she-goats. That this signifies the truths of this good, is evident from the signification of "kids of the she-goats," as being the truths of good, concerning which in what follows. The reason there were two, is that as in the rational, so in the natural, there are things which are of the will and things which are of the understanding. The things in the natural that have relation to the will are delights, and those which have relation to the understanding are memory-knowledges, and in order to be something these two must be conjoined together.

[2] That "kids of the she-goats" signify the truths of good, may be seen from those passages of the Word where "kids" and " she-goats" are mentioned. Be it known that in the genuine sense all the tame and useful beasts mentioned in the Word signify the celestial things of good and the spiritual things of truth (n. 45, 46, 142, 143, 246, 714, 715, 2180, 2781, 3218); and because there are various kinds of celestial things or goods, and consequently various kinds of spiritual things or truths, one kind is signified by one beast, and another by another; thus one kind is signified by a "lamb," another by a "kid," another by a "sheep," by a "she-goat," a" ram," a "he-goat," a "bullock," an "ox;" another also by a "horse" and by a "camel;" another likewise by birds; and also another by the beasts of the sea, as by "whales"’ and "fishes." There are more genera of celestial and spiritual things than can be enumerated, consequently of goods and truths, although when the celestial or good is mentioned, and also the spiritual or truth, it appears as if it were not manifold, but only one. But how manifold they both are, or how innumerable their genera are, may be seen from what has been said concerning heaven (n. 3241), namely, that it is distinguished into innumerable societies, and this according to the genera of celestial and spiritual things, or of the goods of love and thence of the truths of faith; and moreover every single genus of good, and every single genus of truth, has innumerable species into which the societies of each genus are distinguished, and every species in like manner.

[3] The most universal genera of good and truth are what were represented by the animals that were offered in the burnt-offerings and sacrifices; and because the genera are most distinct from one another it was expressly enjoined that such and no other should be offered--in some cases, for instance, male and female lambs, also male and female kids; in some cases rams and sheep, and also he-goats; but in others, calves, bullocks, and oxen also pigeons and turtle-doves (n. 922, 1823, 2180, 2805, 2807, 2830, 3218). What was signified by "kids" and she-goats" may be seen both from the sacrifices in which they were offered, and also from other passages in the Word; whence it is evident that male and female "lambs" signified the innocence of the internal or rational man, and that‘ "kids" and she-goats" signified the innocence of the external or natural man, thus the truth and good thereof.

[4] That the truth and good of the innocence of the external or natural man is signified by "kids" and " she-goats," is evident from the following passages in the Word. In Isaiah:--

The wolf shall abide with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid and the calf, and the young lion, and the sheep together and a little child shall lead them (Isa. 11:6);

where the Lord’s kingdom is treated of, and a state of no fear from evil, or of no dread on account of hell, because one of presence with the Lord. The "lamb" and the "kid" denote those who are in innocence, and because these are the safest of all, they are mentioned first.

[5] When all the firstborn of Egypt were smitten, it was commanded that they should slay perfect and male young of the flock, of lambs or of kids, and should put some of the blood on the door-posts and on the lintel of the houses, and thus there should not be a plague on them from the destroyer (Exod. 12:5, 7, 13). The "firstborn of Egypt" denotes the good of love and charity extinct (n. 3325); lambs" and "kids" am states of innocence; and those who are in these states are safe from evil, for all in heaven are protected by the Lord through states of innocence; and this protection was represented by the slaying of a lamb or kid, and by the blood upon the door-posts and lintel of the houses.

[6] When Jehovah appeared to anyone through an angel, a kid of the goats was sacrificed, lest the man should die-as when he appeared to Gideon (Judges 6:19), and to Manoah (Judges 13:15, 16, 19). The reason was that Jehovah or the Lord cannot appear to anyone, not even to an angel, unless he to whom He appears is in a state of innocence; and therefore as soon as the Lord is present with anyone he is let into a state of innocence for the Lord enters through innocence, even with the angels in heaven. On this account no one can come into heaven unless he has somewhat of innocence, according to the words of the Lord in (Matthew 18:3; Mark 10:15; Luke 18:17). Men believed they should die when Jehovah appeared, unless they offered such a burnt-offering, (Judges 13:22, 23).

[7] Inasmuch as genuine conjugial love is innocence (n. 2736), it was customary in the representative church to enter in unto a wife by a present of a kid of the she-goats as we read of Samson (Judges 15:1); likewise of Judah when he went in unto Tamar (Gen. 38:17, 20, 23). That a "kid" and a "she-goat" signified innocence, is also evident from the sacrifices of guilt, which they were to offer when anyone had sinned through error (Lev. 1:10; 4:28; 5:6); sin through error is a sin of ignorance in which is innocence. The same is evident from the following Divine command in Moses:--The first of the first-fruits of thy ground thou shalt bring into the house of Jehovah thy God. Thou shalt not seethe a kid in its mother‘s milk (Exod. 23:19; 34:26); where by the "first-fruits of the ground, which they were to bring into the house of Jehovah," is signified the state of innocence which is in infancy; and by "not seething a kid in its mother’s milk," that they should not destroy the innocence of infancy. Because these things are signified, in both passages the one command follows the other without a break; and yet in the literal sense they appear to be altogether different but in the internal sense they cohere together.

[8] Because as before said "kids" and "she-goats" signified innocence, it was also commanded that the curtain of the tent over the tabernacle should be made of the wool of she-goats (Exod. 25:4; 26:7; 35:5, 6, 23, 26; 36:14), for a sign that all the holy things therein represented derived their essence from innocence. By the "wool of she-goats" is signified the ultimate or outermost of the innocence that is in ignorance, such as exists with the Gentiles and who in the internal sense are the "curtains" of the tabernacle. From all this it is evident what and of what quality are the truths of good that are signified by the "two good kids of the she-goats" concerning which Rebekah his mother spoke unto Jacob her son, namely, that they are those of innocence or of infancy, being in fact those which Esau was to bring to his father Isaac; concerning which above (n. 3501, 3508) and which indeed were not these truths of good, but at first appeared as if they were and it is for this reason that by means of these Jacob simulated Esau.

AC 3520. And I will make the dainties for thy father, such as he loveth. That this signifies that he should make deliciousnesses therefrom, is evident from the signification of "dainties," as being pleasant things from good (n. 3502). They are here called "deliciousnesses," because they are truths not from genuine good, but from domestic good (n. 3518).

AC 3521. And thou shalt bring to thy father, and he shall eat. That this signifies to the Divine good of the Divine rational, and appropriation, is evident from the representation of Isaac, here the "father", as being the Divine good of the Divine rational; and from the signification of "eating," as being appropriation (n. 3513) but that truth from domestic good is not appropriated, will appear from what follows.

AC 3522. That he may bless thee. That this signifies conjunction thereby, is evident from the signification of "blessing," as being conjunction (n. 3504, 3514).

AC 3523. Before his death. That this signifies resuscitation in the natural, is evident from the signification of "death," as being resuscitation (n. 3498, 3505); that it is in the natural is evident.

AC 3524. Verses 11-13. And Jacob said to Rebekah his mother, Behold Esau my brother is a hairy man, and I am a smooth man. Peradventure my father will feel me, and I shall be in his eyes as a misleader; and I shall bring upon myself a curse and not a blessing. And his mother said unto him, Upon me be thy curse, my son; only hearken to my voice, and go, take for me. "And Jacob said to Rebekah his mother," signifies the Lord‘s perception from Divine truth concerning natural truth "behold Esau my brother is a hairy man," signifies the quality of natural good relatively; "and I am a smooth man," signifies the quality of natural truth relatively "peradventure my father will feel me," signifies the inmost degree of perception; "and I shall be in his eyes as a misleader," signifies rejection, because apparently contrary to order; "and I shall bring upon myself a curse, and not a blessing," signifies disjunction; "and his mother said unto him," signifies perception from Divine truth; "upon me be thy curse, my son," signifies that there would be no disjunction; "only hearken unto my voice, and go, take for me," signifies from the effect.

AC 3525. And Jacob said to Rebekah his mother. That this signifies the Lord’s perception from Divine truth concerning natural truth, is evident from the signification of "saying," in the historicals of the Word, as being to perceive (n. 3509); from the representation of Jacob, as being natural truth (n. 3305); and from the representation of Rebekah, as being the Divine truth of the Lord‘s Divine rational (n. 3012, 3013, 3077). That perception from Divine truth concerning natural truth is signified, and not perception from natural truth concerning Divine truth, according to the appearance from the sense of the letter, is because all the observation the natural exercises is from the rational; here therefore, because predicated of the Lord, the signification is "from the Divine truth of the Divine rational."

AC 3526. Behold Esau my brother is a hairy man. That this signifies the quality of natural good relatively, is evident from the signification of "Esau," as being the good of the natural (n. 3494, 3504); and from the signification of "a hairy man," as being the quality of this good. That "hairy" signifies the natural in especial as to truth, may be seen above (n. 3301), and from what now follows.

AC 3527. And I am a smooth man. That this signifies the quality of natural truth relatively, is evident from the representation of Jacob who is here speaking, as being the natural as to truth (n. 3305) and from the signification of a "smooth man," as being its quality, concerning which something shall now be said. Before it can be known what these things signify, it must be known what is meant by "hairy," and what by "smooth." The interiors in man present themselves in a kind of image in his exteriors, especially in his face and its expression; at the present day his inmosts are not seen there, but his interiors are in some measure seen there, unless from infancy he has learned to dissemble, for in this case he assumes to himself as it were another lower mind, and consequently induces on himself another countenance; for it is the lower mind that appears in the face. More than others, hypocrites have acquired this from actual life, thus from habit; and this the more in proportion as they are deceitful. With those who are not hypocrites, rational good appears in the face from a certain fire of life and rational truth from the light of this fire. Man knows these things from a certain connate knowledge, without study; for it is the life of his spirit as to good and as to truth which thus manifests itself; and because man is a spirit clothed with a body, he has such knowledge from the perception of his spirit, thus from himself; and this is the reason why a man is sometimes affected with the countenance of another although this is not from the countenance, but from the mind which thus shines forth. But the natural appears in the face in a more obscure fire of life, and a more obscure light of life; and the corporeal hardly appears at all except in the warmth and fairness of the complexion, and in the change of their states according to the affections.

[2] Because the interiors thus manifest themselves in especial in the face, as in an image, the most ancient people who were celestial men and utterly ignorant of dissimulation, much more of hypocrisy and deceit, were able to see the minds of one another conspicuous in the face as in a form; and therefore by the "face" were signified the things of the will and of the understanding; that is, interior rational things as to good and truth (n. 358, 1999, 2434) and in fact interior things as to good by the blood and its redness and interior things as to truths by the resultant form and its fairness; but interior natural things by the outgrowths thence, such as the hairs and the scales of the skin, namely, the things from the natural as to good by the hairs, and the things from the natural as to truth by the scales. Consequently they who were in natural good were called "hairy men," but they who were in natural truth, "smooth men." From these considerations it may be seen what is signified in the internal sense by the words, "Esau my brother is a hairy man, and I am a smooth man," namely, the quality relatively to one another of natural good and natural truth. From all this it is evident what Esau represents, namely, the good of the natural, for he was called "Esau" from being hairy (Gen. 25:25), and "Edom" from being ruddy (Gen. 25:30). Mount Seir, where he dwelt, has the same meaning, namely, what is hairy; and because it had this meaning there was a mountain by which they went up to Seir that was called the bare or smooth mountain (Josh. 11:17; 12:7); which was also representative of truth ascending to good.

[3] That "hairy" is predicated of good, and thence of truth, and also in the opposite sense of evil, and thence of falsity, was shown above (n. 3301); but that "smooth" is predicated of truth, and in the opposite sense of falsity, is evident also from the following passages in the Word. In Isaiah:--

Ye that inflame yourselves with gods under every green tree in the smooth things of the valley is thy portion (Isa. 57:5, 6);

where "inflaming" is predicated of evil; and the "smooth things of the valley," of falsity. Again:--

The workman strengthens the smelter, him that smooths with the hammer along with the beating on the anvil, saying to the joint, It is good (Isa. 41:7);

where the "workman strengthening the smelter" is predicated of evil; and "smoothing with the hammer," of falsity. In David:--

They make thy mouth smooth as butter; when his heart approacheth his words are softer than oil (Psalms 55:21);

where a "smooth or flattering mouth" is predicated of falsity; and the "heart and its soft things," of evil. Again:--

Their throat is an open sepulchre, they speak smooth things with their tongue (Ps. 5:9);

"the throat an open sepulchre" is predicated of evil; "the tongue speaking smooth things," of falsity. In Luke:--

Every valley shall be filled up and every mountain and hill shall be brought low; and the crooked shall become straight, and the rough places level ways (Luke 3:5);

where "valley" denotes what is lowly (n. 1723, 3417); "mountain and hill," what is lifted up (n. 1691); "the crooked become straight," the evil of ignorance turned into good, for "length" and what belongs thereto are predicated of good (n. 1613); the "rough places made level ways," the falsities of ignorance turned into truths. "Way" is predicated of truth, (n. 627, 2333).

AC 3528. Peradventure my father will feel me. That this signifies the inmost degree of perception, is evident from the signification of "feeling," and thus of being sensible, as being the inmost and the all of perception and from the signification of "father," as being good, here, Divine good, because the Lord is treated of. That "to feel at" signifies the inmost and the all of perception is because all sensation has relation to the sense of touch, and this is derived and comes forth from what is perceptive for sensation is nothing else than external perception, and perception is nothing else than internal sensation. What perception is, may be seen above (n. 104, 371, 495, 503, 521, 536, 1383-1398, 1616, 1919, 2145, 2171, 2831). Moreover all sensation and all perception, which appear so various, are referable to one common and universal sense, namely, the sense of touch; the varieties, such as taste, smell, hearing, and sight, which are external sensations, being nothing but different kinds of touch that originate from internal sensation, that is, from perception. This can be confirmed by much experience, and will of the Lord’s Divine mercy be shown in its own place. From this it is evident that in the internal sense "to feel at" signifies the inmost and the all of perception. Moreover all perception, which is internal sensation, comes forth from good, but not from truth, except from good through truth; for the Lord‘s Divine life flows into good, and through good into truth, and thus produces perception. From this it can be seen what is signified by "peradventure my father will feel me," namely, the inmost and the all of perception from good, thus from the Lord’s Divine.

AC 3529. And I shall be in his eyes as a misleader. That this signifies rejection because apparently contrary to order, is evident from the signification of "being in his eyes," as being to be observed as to quality; for by the "eye" is signified the observation of the internal sight (n. 212, 2701, 2789, 2829, 3198, 3202); and from the signification of "misleading" or of "a misleader," as being contrary to order; here, apparently (all misleading is nothing else) and from this there would be rejection. But what is signified by "apparently contrary to order," will appear from what follows.

AC 3530. And I shall bring upon me a curse and not a blessing. That this signifies disjunction, is evident from the signification of a "curse," as being disjunction, or a turning away from good (n. 245, 379, 1423); and from the signification of a "blessing," as being conjunction with good (n. 3504, 3514).

AC 3531. And his mother said unto him. That this signifies perception from Divine truth, is evident from the signification of "saying," as being to perceive, concerning which often above; and from the representation of Rebekah, here the "mother," as being the Divine truth of the Lord‘s Divine rational (n. 3012, 3013).

AC 3532. Upon me be thy curse, my son. That this signifies that there would he no disjunction, is evident from the signification of a "curse," as being disjunction (n. 3530) and because the perception was from the Divine (n. 3531), it signifies that there should be no disjunction.

AC 3533. Only hearken to my voice, and go, take for me. That this signifies from the effect, is evident from the signification of "hearkening to a voice," as being to obey; and from the signification of "going and taking for me," as being to do; and because this was said to the natural as to truth (represented by Jacob) by the rational as to truth, here the Divine rational (represented by Rebekah), therefore nothing else is signified than from the effect;" for the natural sees from the effect, but the rational sees from the cause.

AC 3534. Verses 14-17. And he went, and took, and brought to his mother; and his mother made dainties, such as his father loved. And Rebekah took garments of desires of Esau her elder son that were with her in the house, and put them upon Jacob her younger son. And the skins of the kids of the she-goats she caused to be put upon his hands, and upon the smooth of his neck. And she gave the dainties, and the bread, which she had made, into the hand of Jacob her son. "And he went, and took, and brought to his mother," signifies a state of obedience of the truth of the natural; "and his mother made dainties, such as his father loved," signifies things that are delectable, but not desirable; "and Rebekah took garments of desires of Esau her elder son," signifies the genuine truths of good; "that were with her in the house," signifies that were from the Divine good through the Divine truth of the Divine rational; "and put them upon Jacob her younger son," signifies the affection of truth, or the life of good from truth; " and the skins of the kids of the she-goats," signifies the external truths of domestic good; "she caused to be put upon his hands," signifies according to the faculty of receiving; "and upon the smooth of his neck," signifies that disjoining truth should not appear; "and she gave the dainties," signifies delectable things thence derived; "and the bread," signifies the good thence derived; "which she had made," signifies which were from Divine truth; " into the hand of Jacob her son," signifies that such was the affection of natural truth.

AC 3535. And he went, and took, and brought to his mother. That this signifies a state of obedience of the truth of the natural, may be seen from what was said above (n. 3533); thus without further explication.

AC 3536. And his mother made dainties, such as his father loved. That this signifies things that are delectable, but not desirable, is evident from the representation of Rebekah, who is here the "mother," as being the Divine rational as to truth; and from the signification of "dainties," as being the pleasant things which are of truth, concerning which above (n. 3502). The reason why the delectable things here referred to are not desirable, is that they are not from the hunting of Esau, that is, from the truth of genuine good (n. 3501), but from the kids of the goats which are of the flock, that is, from the truth of domestic good (n. 3518, 3519). How these things are circumstanced is evident from what was said above (n. 3502, 3512, 3518, 3519).

AC 3537. And Rebekah took garments of desires of Esau her elder son. That this signifies the genuine truths of good, is evident from the signification of "garments of desires," as being genuine truths. "Garments" signify truths relatively lower, (n. 2576); "of desires" denotes genuine, because of the genuine good of the natural, which is represented by Esau the elder son (n. 3300, 3302, 3322, 3494, 3504, 3527).

AC 3538. That were with her in the house. That this signifies that were from the Divine good through the Divine truth of the Divine rational, is evident from the representation of Rebekah, who is here meant by "her," as being the Divine truth of the Divine rational; and from the signification of "house," as being here the Divine good, because it is predicated of the Lord. "House" is good, (n. 710, 2233, 2234, 2559, 3128). That these things are signified by the words "that were with her in the house," is because by "house" is signified the rational both as to good and as to truth; or what is the same, both as to the will part, which is of good, and as to the intellectual part, which is of truth. When the rational acts from the will part or good, through the intellectual part or truth, then the rational mind is called one house." From this also heaven itself is called the "house of God," because therein is nothing else than good and truth, and the good acts through truth united or conjoined with itself. This is also represented in marriages between a husband and wife who constitute one house, by reason that conjugial love comes forth from the Divine marriage of good and truth (n. 2728, 2729, 3132); and both the husband and the wife have a will from good, but with a difference such as is that of good in respect to its own truth and therefore good is signified by the husband, and truth by the wife; for when there is one house, then good is the all therein, and truth, being of good, is also good. The reason why it is said, "with her in the house," not "with him" or "with them," is that the subject now is the state of the conjunction of truth and good, that is, the state before they were fully united or conjoined, which state is now to be described.

AC 3539. And put them upon Jacob her younger son. That this signifies the affection of truth, or the life of good from truth, is evident from the representation of Rebekah, as being the Divine truth of the Divine rational; from the representation of Jacob, as being the Divine truth of the Divine natural; and from the signification of "putting upon,"’as being here to communicate and to imbue, namely, the truths of good which are signified by the "garments of Esau" (n. 3537), thus the affection of truth of the natural, which is here the same as the life of good from truth. How these things are to be understood may be known from what was said above (n. 3518) but because they are such things as are at this day utterly unknown, it is permitted to unfold them somewhat further to the apprehension. In this chapter the Lord is treated of, and how He made His very natural Divine; and in the representative sense there is treated of the regeneration of man as to his natural (n. 3490).

[2] The case herein with man is this: The end of regeneration is that man may be made new as to his internal man, thus as to his soul or spirit; but man cannot be made new or regenerated as to his internal man unless he is regenerated as to his external man also; for although after death man becomes a spirit, he nevertheless has with him in the other life the things which are of his external man, namely, natural affections, and also doctrinal things, and even memory-knowledges; in a word, all things of the exterior or natural memory (n. 2475-2483); for these are the planes in which his interiors are terminated; and therefore according to the disposition that has been made of these things is the character of interior things when they flow into them, because they are modified in them. This shows that man must be regenerated or made new not only as to his internal or rational man, but also as to his external or natural man; and unless this were the case there would not be any correspondence. There is a correspondence between the internal man and its spiritual things, and the external man and its natural things, (n. 2971, 2987, 2989, 2990, 3002, 3493).

[3] The state of the regeneration of man is described in a representative sense in this chapter by "Esau" and "Jacob;" here, the quality of man‘s first state while he is being regenerated, or before he has been regenerated; for this state is entirely inverted in respect to that in which man is when he has been regenerated. For in the former state, during regeneration, or before he has been regenerated, intellectual things which are of truth apparently act the first part; but when he has been regenerated, the things of the will, which are of good, act the first part. That intellectual things which are of truth apparently act the first part in the first state, was represented by Jacob, in that he claimed the birthright of Esau for himself (n. 3325, 3336) and also in that he claimed the blessing, which is here treated of; and that the state has been completely inverted, is represented by Jacob’s art to be Esau, in clothing himself with the garments of Esau and the skins of the kids of the she-goats for in this state rational truth not yet thus conjoined with rational good, or what is the same, the understanding not thus conjoined with the will, in this manner inflows and acts into the natural, and disposes inversely the things which are there.

[4] This can also be seen from much experience, especially from the fact that a man is able to observe in the understanding, and thereby his natural can know, many things which are good and true, and yet the will cannot as yet act in accordance with them; as for instance that love and charity are the essential in man: this the intellectual faculty of man can see and confirm, but until he has been regenerated the will faculty cannot acknowledge it: there are even those who are in no love to the Lord whatever, and in no charity toward the neighbor, who well apprehend this. In like manner that love is the very life of man, and that such as the love is, such is the life; and likewise that everything delightful and everything pleasant is from love, consequently all joy and all happiness and therefore also such as the love is, such is the joy and such the happiness. A man is also able to apprehend in his understanding, even should his will dissent or go contrary thereto, that the happiest life is from love to the Lord and from charity toward the neighbor, because the very Divine flows into it; and on the other hand that the most miserable life is from the love of self and the love of the world, because hell flows into it; and from this it may be perceptible to the understanding, yet not to the will, that love to the Lord is the life of heaven, and that mutual love is the soul from this life; and therefore in so far as a man does not think from the life of his will, nor reflect upon his life derived therefrom, so far he perceives this in his understanding; but in so far as he thinks from the life of his will, so far he does not perceive, nay, denies it.

[5] Also to the understanding it may clearly appear that it is into the humiliation with a man that the Divine can inflow; for the reason that in this state the loves of self and of the world, and consequently the infernal things which oppose, are removed; but yet so long as the will is not new and the understanding has not been united to it, the man cannot be in humiliation of heart; nay, in so far as the man is in a life of evil, that is, in so far as his will is toward evil, so far this state is not possible; and what is more, so far the matter is obscure to him, and so far he even denies it. Hence also a man can perceive in his understanding that the humiliation of man is not for the sake of the Lord‘s love of glory, but for the sake of His Divine love, and in order that He can thereby inflow with good and truth and make the man blessed and happy; nevertheless so far as the will is consulted, so far this is obscured. The same is true in very many other cases.

[6] This faculty of man of being able to understand what is good and true although he does not will it, has been given to man in order that he may have the capacity of being reformed and regenerated; on which account this faculty exists with the evil as well as with the good; nay, with the evil it is sometimes more acute, but with this difference, that with the evil there is no affection of truth for the sake of life, that is, for the sake of the good of life from truth, and therefore they cannot be reformed; but with the good there is the affection of truth for the sake of life, that is, for the sake of the good of life, and therefore they can be reformed. But the first state of the reformation of these is that the truth of doctrine appears to them to be in the first place, and the good of life in the second, because they do what is good from truth; and their second state is that the good of life is in the first place, and the truth of doctrine in the second, for then they do what is good from good, that is, from the will of good; and when this is the case, because the will has been conjoined with the understanding as in a marriage, the man has been regenerated. In the internal sense these two states are treated of in the things said concerning Esau and Jacob.

AC 3540. And the skins of the kids of the she-goats she caused to be put. That this signifies the external truths of domestic good, is evident from the signification of "skins," as being external things and from the signification of the kids of the she-goats," because from a home flock, as being the truths of domestic good (n. 3518, 3519), where also it appears what domestic good is, and what the truths thence derived. Every good has its own truths, and every truth has its own good, which must be conjoined together in order for them to be anything. That "skins" signify things external is because skins are the outermosts of the animal in which its interiors are terminated, in like manner as is the case with the skin or cuticles in man. This signification is derived from the representation in the other life, there being those there who belong to the province of the skin, concerning whom of the Lord’s Divine mercy something will be said when we speak concerning the Grand Man at the end of the following chapters. They are such as are only in external good and its truths. Hence the "skin" of man, and also of beasts, signifies what is external; which is also manifest from the Word, as in Jeremiah:--

For the multitude of thine iniquity are thy skirts uncovered, and thy heels suffer violence. Can the Ethiopian change his skin, and the leopard his spots? then can ye also do good that are taught to do evil (Jer. 13:22, 23);

where "skirts" are external truths; "heels," outermost goods. The "heel," and "shoes," are the lowest natural things, (n. 259, 1748); and because these truths and goods are from evil, as here said, they are compared to an "Ethiopian," or a black, and his "skin," and also to a "leopard" and his "spots."

[2] In Moses:--

If in pledging thou shalt have pledged thy neighbor‘s garment, thou shalt restore it unto him before the sun goes down; for that is his only covering it is his garment for his skin wherein he shall lie down (Exod. 22:26, 27).

As all the laws in the Word, even those which are civic and forensic, have a correspondence with the laws of good and truth in heaven, and were thence enacted, such is the case with this law also; otherwise it would be impossible to discover why a pledged garment should be restored before the sun went down; and why it is said that his garment is for his skin wherein he shall lie down, But from the internal sense the correspondence is manifest, being that our companions are not to be defrauded of external truths, which are the doctrinal things according to which they live, and rituals. A "garment" signifies such truths, (n. 297, 1073, 2576); but the "sun" is the good of love or of life which is therefrom (n. 1529, 1530, 2441, 2495); that this should not perish, is signified by the garment being restored before the sun went down; and because these external truths are the externals of the interior things, or their termination, it is said that "his garment is for his skin wherein he shall lie down."

[3] As "skins" signified external things, it was commanded that the covering of the Tent should be of the skins of red rams, and over these the skins of badgers (Exod. 26:14); for the Tent was representative of the three heavens, thus of the celestial and spiritual things of the Lord’s kingdom. The curtains which were round about represented natural things that are external (n. 3478), which are the "skins of rams and of badgers," and as external things are those which cover internal ones, or in other words natural things are those which cover spiritual and celestial ones, just as the body covers its soul, therefore this was commanded; and in like manner that when the camp set forward Aaron and his sons should cover the ark of the testimony with the veil of covering, and should put over this covering the skin of a badger; and that upon the table and the things which were upon it they should spread a cloth of scarlet double-dyed, and should cover it with badger‘s skin as a covering; likewise that they should put the lampstand and all its vessels under a covering of badger’s skin; and should put all the vessels wherewith they ministered under a cloth of blue, and should cover them with a covering of badger‘s skin (Num. 4:5-12). Whoever thinks of the Word holily may know that Divine things are represented by all these things: by the ark, the table, the lampstand, and the vessels wherewith they ministered; also by the coverings of scarlet double-dyed and blue; and also by the coverings of badgers’ skins and that by all these things are represented the Divine things that are within the external ones.

[4] Inasmuch as the prophets represented those who teach, and hence the teaching of good and truth from the Word (n. 2534), and Elijah the Word itself (n. 2762), in like manner John, who for this reason is called the Elias that was to come (Matt. 17:10-13); therefore in order that they might represent the Word as it is in its external form, that is, in the letter, Elijah was girded with a girdle of skin about his loins (2 Kings 1:8) and John had his raiment of camel‘s hair, and a girdle of skin about his loins (Matt. 3:4). And inasmuch as the skin of man and beast signified external things, which are natural things in their relation to spiritual and celestial ones; and as in the Ancient Church it was customary to speak and write by significatives, therefore also in Job, which is a book of the Ancient Church, "skin" has the same signification, as may be seen from several passages in that book, and also from this:--

I know my Redeemer, He liveth, and at the last He will arise above the dust, and afterward these shall be encompassed with my skin, and from my flesh I shall see God (Job 19:25, 26).

To be "encompassed with skin" denotes by the natural, such as man has with him after death (n. 3539); "from the flesh to see God" is to do so from what is our own, vivified. This is "flesh" may be seen above, (n. 148, 149, 780). That the book of Job is a book of the Ancient Church is evident as before said from its representative and significative style; but it is not of those books which are called the Law and the Prophets, because it has not an internal sense which treats solely of the Lord and of His kingdom for this is the one thing that makes a book of the genuine Word.

AC 3541. Upon his hands. That this signifies according to the faculty of receiving, is evident from the signification of "hand," as being poor (n. 878, 3091); thus the faculty of receiving.

AC 3542. And upon the smooth of his neck. That this signifies that disjoining truth should not appear, is evident from the predication of "smooth," or of "smoothness," as being concerning truth (n. 3527); and from the signification of the "neck," as being that which conjoins; here, therefore, because the appearance was upon the smooth of his neck, the signification is that disjoining truth should not appear. How the case herein is can be seen from what was said and shown above (n. 3539), namely, that that good and those truths which flow forth from the understanding, and not at the same time from the will, are not good and not truths, however much they may so appear in the outward form; and if the will is of evil, the good and the truths disjoin instead of conjoining; but if anything of the will is of good, then they do not disjoin, but conjoin, although they are disposed in an inverted order, for by their means the man is being regenerated; and because when thus disposed they serve at first for the regeneration of man, it is said that thus disjoining truth should not appear; but more concerning these things below.

[2] The reason why the "neck" signifies that which conjoins, is that the higher things in man, which are of the head, communicate through the intervening neck with the lower things which are of his body hence it is that both influx and communication, and consequently conjunction, are signified by this intermediate part; as may be seen still more conclusively from the correspondences of the Grand Man with the things of the human body, treated of at the ends of the chapters. From this comes a like signification of the "neck" in the Word, as in Isaiah:--

His breath as an overflowing stream will divide even unto the neck (Isa. 30:28);

where an "overflowing stream" denotes falsity thus overflowing; "dividing even unto the neck" denotes falsity closing up and thus intercepting the communication and thus the conjunction of higher things with lower ones which conjunction is precluded and intercepted when spiritual good and truth are not received.

[3] In Habakkuk:--

Thou hast smitten the head out of the house of the wicked, laying bare the foundation even unto the neck (Habakkuk 3:13);

where "smiting the head out of the house of the wicked" denotes destroying the principles of falsity "laying bare the foundation even unto the neck" denotes intercepting the conjunction thereby. In Jeremiah:--

Transgressions knit together are come up upon my neck he hath over-thrown my forces God hath given me into their hands, I am not able to rise up (Lam. 1:14);

"transgressions knit together ascending upon my neck" denote falsities ascending toward interior or rational things.

[4] Inasmuch as by the "neck" was signified this communication and conjunction, therefore by the bonds of the neck was signified interception, consequently the desolation of truth which comes forth when the spiritual things that continually flow in from the Lord are no longer admitted into the rational of man, and consequently not into his natural. This interception, or desolation, is what is represented in Jeremiah by the command that he should make unto himself bonds and yokes, and should put them upon his neck, and send them to the peoples, and should say that they were to serve Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon; and that they who did not yield their necks under his yoke should be visited by the sword, the famine, and the pestilence; but that those who bowed down their necks should be left upon the land (Jer. 27:2, 3, 8, 11). To put the neck under the yoke of the king of Babylon and serve him," signifies to be desolated as to truth, and to be vastated as to good. It is "Babel" which vastates, (n. 1327); and they are vastated lest holy things should be profaned, (n. 301-303, 1327, 1328, 2426, 3398, 3399, 3402); and because when the influx of good and truth is intercepted, what is evil and false is served, therefore also to "put the neck under the yoke" signifies to serve.

[5] Again in the same Prophet:--

Thus saith Jehovah, Even so will I break the yoke of Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon within two years of days from off the neck of all the nations (Jer. 28:11);

signifying that they should be delivered from vastation. In Isaiah:--

Shake thyself from the dust arise, sit thee down O Jerusalem open the bonds of thy neck, O captive daughter of Zion (Isa. 52:2);

where "to open the bonds of the neck" signifies to admit and receive good and truth. In Micah:--

Behold against this family do I devise an evil from which ye shall not draw forth your necks, and ye shall not walk erect, for it is an evil time (Micah 2:3).

"Not to draw forth the neck from evil" is not to admit truth; "not to walk erect" is thereby not to look to higher things, that is, to those which are of heaven (n. 248).

AC 3543. And she gave the dainties. That this signifies the delectable things thence derived, is evident from the signification of "dainties," as being things pleasant and also delectable (n. 3502, 3536).

AC 3544. And the bread. That this signifies the good thence derived, is evident from the signification of "bread," as being good (n. 276, 680, 1798, 2165, 2177, 3464, 3478).

AC 3545. That she had made. That this signifies which were from Divine truth, is evident from the representation of Rebekah, as being the Divine truth of the Lord’s Divine rational and because it is said of Rebekah that she had "made them," it signifies that they were from Divine truth.

AC 3546. Into the hand of Jacob her son. That this signifies that such as the affection of natural truth, is evident from its being a closing period of that precedes and at this time such was Jacob, by whom is represented natural truth (n. 3305, 3509, 3525), in that he was clothed as to his hands and neck with the skins of kids of goats, and had in his hands dainties that he was to carry to his father Isaac.

AC 3547. Verses 18-20. And he came unto his father and said, My father; and he said, Behold me, who art thou my son? And Jacob said unto his father, I am Esau thy firstborn; I have done according as thou spakest unto me; arise I pray thee, sit, and eat of my hunting, that thy soul may bless me. And Isaac said unto his son, How is it that thou hast hastened to find it, my son? and he said, Because Jehovah thy God made it come to meet my face. "And he came unto his father and said, my father; and he said, Behold me, who art thou my son?" signifies a state of perception from the presence of that truth; "and Jacob said unto his father," signifies the observation of natural truth "I am Esau thy firstborn," signifies that it believed that it was natural good itself; "I have done according as thou spakest unto me," signifies obedience; " arise I pray thee,. sit, and eat of my hunting," signifies the truth of the affection of such good; "that thy soul may bless me," signifies conjunction; "and Isaac said unto his son," signifies perception‘ "how is it that thou hast hastened to find it, my son?" signifies production so speedy "and he said, Because Jehovah thy God made it come to meet my face," signifies providence.

AC 3548. And he came unto his father and said, My father; and he said, Behold me, who art thou my son? That this signifies a state of perception from the presence of that truth, is evident from the representation of Isaac, who is here the "father;" and from the representation of Jacob, who is here the "son," concerning which several times before; also from the signification of "saying," as being to perceive, concerning which likewise above. From these and from the rest of the expressions it is evident that the signification herein is a state of perception from the presence of that truth which is represented by Jacob; but what is the quality of this truth which is now represented by Jacob is manifest from the internal sense of what goes before and of what follows, namely, that in outward form it appears like the good and the truth of good which are represented by Esau and are signified by his hunting, but that it is not such in its internal form. The natural as to truth in the man who is being regenerated, that is, before he has been regenerated, appears of this character, not indeed in the sight of man, for he knows nothing about the good and truth with him during regeneration; but in the sight of the angels, who see such things in the light of heaven, Man does not even know what the good and truth of the natural are; and because he does not know this, he cannot perceive it; and because he does not perceive it in general, neither can he perceive it in particular; thus he cannot perceive the differences, and still less the changes of their state; and this being so, he can with difficulty comprehend from any description how the case is with this good and its truth. But as these matters are what are treated of in this chapter, therefore in what follows the subject is to be unfolded in so far as it can be apprehended.

AC 3549. And Jacob said unto his father. That this signifies the observation of natural truth, is evident from the signification of "saying," as being to perceive, concerning which above; here, to observe, because from the natural; and from the representation of Jacob, as being natural truth, concerning which also above.

AC 3550. I am Esau thy firstborn. That this signifies that it believed it was natural good itself, is evident from the representation of Esau, and from the signification of "firstborn," as being good, and indeed the natural good which is represented by Esau; for such is the case with the truth appertaining to man before he is regenerated that it is believed to be good itself: they who have perception know that it is not good, but that it is truth under the form of good; but they who have not perception know no otherwise than that it is good. This also will better appear from what follows.

AC 3551. I have done according as thou spakest unto me. That this signifies obedience, is evident without explication.

AC 3552. Arise I pray thee, sit, and eat of my hunting. That this signifies the truth of the affection of such good, is evident from the signification of "arising," as involving somewhat of elevation (n. 2401, 2785, 2912, 2927, 3171) and from the signification of "sitting," as involving somewhat of tranquillity from the signification of eating," as being appropriation (n. 2187, 3168); and from the signification of "hunting," as being the truth which is from good (n. 3501), hence in the present case the affection of that good from which is truth, for the things signified by "arising," "sitting," and "eating," in the internal sense belong to affection, and therefore only affection is mentioned to denote them.

AC 3553. That thy soul may bless me. That this signifies conjunction, is evident from the signification of " to be blessed," as being conjunction (n. 3504, 3514, 3530).

AC 3554. And Isaac said unto his son. That this signifies the perception of the rational represented by Isaac concerning the natural which is represented by Jacob; and that "to say" denotes to perceive, has often been shown before.

AC 3555. How is it that thou hast hastened to find it, my son? That this signifies production so speedy, is evident without explication.

AC 3556. And he said, Because Jehovah thy God made it come to meet my face. That this signifies providence, is also evident without explication. The providence here treated of is that during regeneration good and the derivative truth are thus disposed in order with man, that is, that they appear outwardly, or are there presented, with a face like that of genuine good and its derivative genuine truths when nevertheless they are not such, but as before said are domestic good and the derivative truths that are of service merely for the regenerating of man, thus for introducing goods and truths of a grosser nature, because such are conducive to the end.

AC 3557. Verses 21-23. And Isaac said unto Jacob, Come near I pray, and I will feel thee my son, whether thou be my very son Esau, or not. And Jacob came near to Isaac his father; and he felt him, and said, The voice is Jacob’s voice, but the hands are the hands of Esau. And he recognized him not, because his hands were hairy like his brother Esau‘s hands; and he blessed him. "And Isaac said unto Jacob," signifies perception concerning this natural; come near I pray, and I will feel thee my son," signifies inmost perception from presence; "whether thou be my very son Esau, or not," signifies that it was not natural good; "and Jacob came near to Isaac his father,"signifies a state of presence; "and he felt him," signifies thence all perception; "and said, The voice is Jacob’s voice, but the hands are the hands of Esau," signifies that in this case the intellectual part is of truth which is within, but the will part is of good which is without, thus they are of inverted order; "and he recognized him not, because his hands were hairy as his brother Esau‘s hands," signifies that from the will part that was without it was perceived that it was natural good; " and he blessed him," signifies the consequent conjunction.

AC 3558. And Isaac said unto Jacob. That this signifies perception concerning this natural, is evident from the signification of "saying," as being to perceive, concerning which above and from the representation of Jacob as being the natural as to truth, here only the natural, because he also represented apparently, or in an external form simulated, Esau; thus also the natural as to good, which is Esau, and likewise his hunting, which is the truth that is of that good (n. 3501). The reason why "he said" is so often repeated, is also because what is new thus begins, or a new perception (n. 2061, 2238, 2260).

AC 3559. Come near I pray, and I will feel thee my son. That this signifies inmost perception from presence, is evident from the signification of "coming near," as being presence and from the signification of "feeling," as being an inmost and complete perception (n. 3528).

AC 3560. Whether thou be my very son Esau, or not. That this signifies that it was not natural good, is evident from the doubt expressed in these words and in those which presently follow; and as it is the rational which perceives what and of what quality the natural is, there is signified a perception that it was not natural good, or Esau.

AC 3561. And Jacob came near to Isaac his father. That this signifies a state of presence, is evident from what goes before.

AC 3562. And he felt him. That this signifies all perception, is evident from the signification of "feeling," as being an inmost and complete perception (n. 3528, 3559), here, all perception, because the perception of all things is from that which is inmost, that is, they who are in inmost perception are in the perception of all things which are beneath; for the things which are beneath are nothing but derivations and compositions therefrom, inasmuch as the inmost is the all in all of the things beneath it; for unless whatever is beneath is from things interior or what is the same, from things superior, as an effect from its efficient cause, it does not come into existence. And this shows why the end makes a man happy or unhappy in the other life; for the end is the inmost of every cause, insomuch that unless the end is in the cause, nay, unless it is the all thereof, the cause is not; and in like manner the end is the inmost of every effect, for the effect is from such cause; and because this is so, whatever pertains to man derives its being from the end which is in him, and hence in the other life his state is such as is his end (n. 1317, 1568, 1571, 1645, 1909, 3425). From this it may be seen that as feeling signifies inmost perception, it therefore signifies all perception.

AC 3563. And said, The voice is Jacob’s voice, but the hands are the hands of Esau. That this signifies that in this case the intellectual part is of truth which is within, but that the will part is of good which is without, thus that they are of inverted order, is evident from the predication of "voice" as being of truth, and from the predication of "hand" as being of good. "Voice" is predicated of truth, (n. 219, 220); and from its being said, "the voice is Jacob‘s voice," by whom is represented natural truth. And the reason why "hand" is predicated of good is that by "hand" is signified power and faculty (n. 878, 3541), which is derived from no other source than good, all the power and faculty of truth being therefrom, although it appears to be from truth; the same is evident also from its being said, "the hands are the hands of Esau," by whom good is represented, as also has been shown above. That these things are of inverted order is evident from the fact that it is according to order for good which is of the will to be within, and for truth which is of the understanding to be without. However, as before said, these things are such that they cannot be so well set forth to the apprehension, because few are in any knowledge concerning such things for even if they should be most clearly set forth, yet when knowledge is wanting they are not apprehended and yet it is necessary to state how the case is, because this is the subject here treated of.

[2] The good of the natural comes forth from no other source in man than interior good, that is, from the good of the rational; that the natural has good from no other source, is evident; but the influx causes the good in the natural to be such as the natural is; and as this is the only source of the good of the natural, the truth of the natural is from the same source; for where good is, there is truth, both being necessary in order that there may be anything; but the influx causes the truth therein to be such as is that into which it flows. The influx takes place in this way: The good of the rational flows into the natural in two ways through the shortest way, into the good itself of the natural, thus immediately and through the good of the natural into the truth there; this good and this truth are what is represented by Esau and his hunting. The good of the rational also flows into the natural by a way less short, namely, through the truth of the rational, and by this influx forms something like good, but it is truth.

[3] It is according to order that the good of the rational should inflow into the good of the natural and at the same time into its truth, immediately; and also through the truth, of the rational into the good of the natural, thus mediately; and in like manner into the truth of the natural both immediately and mediately; and when this is the ease, then the influx is according to order. Such influx exists with those who have been regenerated but as before said there is another influx before they have been regenerated, namely, that the good of the rational does not flow immediately into the good of the natural, hut mediately through the truth of the rational, and thus presents something like good in the natural, but which is not genuine good, and consequently not genuine truth; yet it is such that inmostly it really has good from the influx through the truth of the rational; but no further. Therefore also good comes forth there under another form, namely, outwardly like the good which is represented by Esau, but inwardly like the truth which is represented by Jacob; and as this is not according to order, it is said to be of inverted order; but yet in respect to the fact that man can be regenerated in no other way, it is according to order.

[4] I am aware that these things, even though clearly stated, and consequently possible of clear perception on the part of those who are in the knowledge of such things, are yet obscure to those who do not know what influx is; and still more so to those who do not know that the rational is distinct from the natural; and still more so to those who have not any distinct idea about good and truth. But what the quality of natural good is, and of natural truth, in the state previous to regeneration, can appear solely from the affections at that time. When man is affected with truth, not for the sake of ends of life, but for the sake of other ends, such as that he may become learned, and this from a certain affection of emulation, or from a certain affection of childish envy, and also from a certain affection of glory; then are the good of the natural and the truth of the natural in such an order as is here represented by Jacob, consequently relatively to each other they are in inverted order; that is, the will part which is of good is without, and the intellectual part which is of truth is within.

[5] But in the state after regeneration it is otherwise; for then man is not only affected with truth for the sake of ends of life, but still more is he affected with the good itself of life and the former affections, namely those of emulation, of childish envy, and of glory, separate themselves, and this until it appears as if they were dissipated; for then the good which is of the will is within, and the truth which is of the understanding is without; yet still in such a manner that truth acts as a one with good, because from good. This order is genuine and the former order tends to the forming of this order, inasmuch as the will part, which is then without, admits many things that are serviceable to regeneration, and is like a sponge that absorbs both clear and muddy waters thus also it admits things that would otherwise be rejected, which yet serve as means, and also for forming ideas about goods and truths, and for other uses.

AC 3564. And he recognized him not, because his hands were hairy like his brother Esau’s hands. That this signifies that from the will part which was without it was perceived that it was natural good, is evident from the fact that he did not recognize Jacob to be Jacob, that is, the truth which Jacob represents but he perceived Esau, that is, the natural good which was without and this because of the influx spoken of above (n. 3563), for between interior good and exterior good there is communication because there is parallelism (n. 1831, 1832, 3514) but not between good and truth, unless the influx of good into truth is such as has been described just above.

AC 3565. And he blessed him. That this signifies the consequent conjunction, is evident from the signification of being blessed," as being conjunction (n. 3504, 3514, 3530); but in this state the conjunction was no other than that which was described above (n. 3563). With the truth represented by Jacob there was inmost conjunction, but not mediate conjunction; thus through the end which is the inmost good, and which was that thus and no otherwise it could be effected. When there is this end, then for the first time there is a conjunction of the inmost things with the outermost; mediate conjunction comes successively, and is produced by the end; for in the end lies concealed all the progression, inasmuch as the Lord acts through the ends, and through then successively disposes the intermediate things into order; from which comes the conjunction which is signified by Isaac blessing Jacob.

AC 3566. Verses 24, 25. And he said, Art thou my very son Esau? And he said, I am. And he said, Bring it near to me, and I will eat of my son‘s hunting, that my soul may bless thee; and he brought it near to him, and he did eat, and he brought him wine, and he drank. "And he said, Art thou my very son Esau? And he said, I am," signifies the state of the affection of natural truth, that from the external form it then believed itself to be natural good; "and he said, Bring it near to me, and I will eat of my son’s hunting" signifies a longing to conjoin with itself natural truth through good; "that my soul may bless thee," signifies conjunction; "and he brought it near to him, and he did eat," signifies the conjunction of good first; "and he brought him wine, and he drank," signifies the conjunction of truth afterwards.

AC 3567. And he said, Art thou my very son Esau? And he said, I am. That this signifies the state of natural truth, that from the external form it then believed itself to be natural good, is evident from Isaac‘s inquiry, "Art thou my very son Esau?" by which in the internal sense nothing can be signified than the influx of the rational from good into the natural truth represented by Jacob and from the reply, "and he said, I am," as signifying that it then believed itself to be good. (n. 3550).

AC 3568. And he said, Bring it near to me, and I will eat of my son’s hunting. That this signifies a longing to conjoin with itself natural truth through good, is evident from the signification of "eating," as being to conjoin and appropriate (n. 2187, 2343, 3168, 3513); and from the signification of "my son‘s hunting," as being the truth of good (n. 3309, 3501, 3508). That a longing is signified, is evident.

AC 3569. That my soul may bless thee. That this signifies conjunction, is evident from the signification of "being blessed," as being conjunction (n. 3504, 3514, 3530, 3565).

AC 3570. And he brought it near to him, and he did eat. That this signifies the conjunction of good first and that he brought him wine and he drank signifies the conjunction of truth afterwards, is evident from the signification of "eating," as being to be conjoined and appropriated in respect to good (n. 3568); and from the signification of "wine," as being the truth which is from good (n. 1071, 1798); and from the signification of "drinking," as being to be conjoined and appropriated in respect to truth (n. 3168). In regard to the circumstance that the good of the rational, represented by Isaac, conjoins with itself good first, and truth afterwards, and this through the natural, which is Jacob, the case is this: When the natural is in the state in which it is outwardly good and inwardly truth (n. 3539, 3548, 3556, 3563), it then admits many things which are not good, but which nevertheless are useful, being means to good in their order. But the good of the rational does not conjoin and appropriate to itself from this source anything but that which is in agreement with its own good;, for good receives nothing else, and whatever disagrees, it rejects. The rest of the things in the natural it leaves, in order that they may serve as means for admitting and introducing more things that are in agreement with itself.

[2] The rational is in the internal man, and what is there being transacted is unknown to the natural, for it is above the sphere of its observation and for this reason the man who lives a merely natural life cannot know anything of what is taking place with him in his internal man, that is, in his rational; for the Lord disposes all such things entirely without the man’s knowledge. Hence it is that man knows nothing of how he is being regenerated, and scarcely that he is being regenerated. But if he is desirous to know this, let him merely attend to the ends which he proposes to himself, and which he rarely discloses to anyone. If the ends are toward good, that is to say, if he cares more for his neighbor and the Lord than for himself, then he is in a state of regeneration but if the ends are toward evil, that is to say, if he cares more for himself than for his neighbor and the Lord, let him know that in this case he is in no state of regeneration.

[3] Through his ends of life a man is in the other life; through ends of good in heaven with the angels; but through ends of evil in hell with devils. The ends in a man are nothing else than his loves for that which a man loves he has for an end; and inasmuch as his ends are his loves, they are his inmost life (n. 1317, 1568, 1571, 1645, 1909, 3425, 3562, 3565). The ends of good in a man are in his rational, and these are what are called the rational as to good, or the good of the rational. Through the ends of good, or through the good therein, the Lord disposes all things that are in the natural for the end is as the soul, and the natural is as the body of this soul; and such as the soul is, such is the body with which it is encompassed; thus such as the rational is as to good, such is the natural with which it is invested.

[4] It is known that the soul of man commences in the ovum of the mother, and is afterwards perfected in her womb, and is there encompassed with a tender body, and this of such a nature that through it the soul may be able to act in a manner suited to the world into which it is born. The case is the same when man is born again, that is, when he is being regenerated. The new soul which he then receives is the end of good, which commences in the rational, at first as in an ovum there, and afterwards is there perfected as in a womb; the tender body with which this soul is encompassed is the natural and the good therein, which becomes such as to act obediently in accordance with the ends of the soul the truths therein are like the fibers in the body, for truths are formed from good (n. 3470). Hence it is evident that an image of the reformation of man is presented in his formation in the womb; and if you will believe it, it is also the celestial good and spiritual truth which are from the Lord that form him and then impart the power to receive each of them successively, and this in quality and quantity precisely as like a man he looks to the ends of heaven, and not like a brute animal to the ends of the world.

[5] That the rational as to good through the natural conjoins with itself good first, and truth afterwards, which is signified by Jacob‘s bringing dainties and bread to Isaac and his eating, and bringing him wine and his drinking, may also be illustrated by the offices which the body performs for its soul. It is the soul which gives to the body to have appetite for food, and also to enjoy the taste of it, the foods being introduced by means of the delight of appetite and the delight of taste, thus by means of external good; but the foods which are introduced do not all enter the life, for some serve as menstruums for digesting; some for tempering; some for opening some for introducing into the vessels; but the good foods selected are introduced into the blood, and become blood, out of which the soul conjoins with itself such things as are of use.

[6] The case is the same with the rational and the natural: to appetite and taste correspond the desire and the affection of knowing truth; and knowledges correspond to foods (n. 1480); and because they correspond, they are circumstanced in like manner; the soul (which is the good of the rational) gives to long for and to be affected with the things which are of memory-knowledge and of doctrine, and introduces them through the delight of the longing and the good of the affection. But the things which it introduces are not all such as to become the good of life; for some serve as means for a kind of digesting and tempering; some for opening and introducing; but the goods which are of life it applies to itself, and thus conjoins them with itself, and from them forms for itself truths. From this it is evident how the rational disposes the natural, in order that it may serve it as the soul or what is the same, may serve the end, which is the soul, to perfect itself, that it may be of use in the Lord’s kingdom.

AC 3571. Verses 26-29. And Isaac his father said unto him, Come near I pray, and kiss me my son. And he came near, and kissed him; and he smelled the smell of his garments, and blessed him, and said, See, the smell of my son is as the smell of a field which Jehovah hath blessed. And God shall give thee of the dew of heaven, and of the fat things of the earth, and a multitude of corn and new wine. Peoples shall serve thee, and peoples shall bow down themselves to thee. Be thou a master to thy brethren, and let thy mother‘s sons bow down themselves to thee; cursed are they that curse thee, and blessed are they that bless thee. "And Isaac his father said unto him, Come near I pray," signifies a degree of perception still more interior "and kiss me my son," signifies whether it can be united; "and he came near, and kissed him," signifies presence and unition; "and he smelled the smell of his garments," signifies that which was grateful from the truth of good which he perceived; "and blessed him," signifies conjunction thus; "and said, See, the smell of my son," signifies that which was grateful from the truth of good; "is as the smell of a field," signifies as from good ground out of which is truth; "which Jehovah hath blessed," signifies that it is multiplied and made fruitful from the Divine; "and God shall give thee of the dew of heaven," signifies from Divine truth; "and of the fat things of the earth," signifies from Divine good "and a multitude of corn," signifies the derivative natural good; "and new wine," signifies the derivative natural truth; "peoples shall serve thee," signifies the truths of the church, or spiritual churches; "and peoples shall bow down themselves to thee," signifies the truths of good; "Be thou a master to thy brethren," signifies the dominion at first appearing to be that of the affection of natural truth over the affections of natural good; "and let thy mother’s sons bow down themselves to thee," signifies over all other affections of truth; "cursed are they that curse thee," signifies that he who disjoins himself shall be disjoined "and blessed are they that bless thee," signifies that he who conjoins himself shall be conjoined.

AC 3572. And Isaac his father said unto him, Come near pray. That this signifies a degree of perception still more interior, is evident from the signification of "saying that he should come near," as being a degree of more interior perception from presence; "to come near" has no other signification.

AC 3573. And kiss me my son. That this signifies whether it can be united, is evident from the signification of "kissing;" as being unition and conjunction from affection. "Kissing," which is an outward thing, signifies nothing else than the affection of conjunction which is an inward thing; they also correspond. As is evident from what has been said above, the subject here treated of in the supreme sense is the glorification of the natural in the Lord, that is, how the Lord made the natural in Himself Divine; but in the representative sense the subject is the regeneration of the natural in man, thus the conjunction of the natural with the rational; for the natural is not regenerated until it has been conjoined with the rational. This conjunction is effected by the immediate and mediate influx of the rational into the good and truth of the natural; that is to say, from the good of the rational immediately into the good of the natural, and through this into the truth of the natural; and mediately through the truth of the rational into the truth of the natural, and thence into the good of the natural-which conjunctions are here treated of.

[2] These conjunctions are impossible except by means provided by the Divine, and indeed by such as are utterly unknown to man, and of which he can scarcely have any idea by means of the things of the world‘s light, that is, which are of the natural lumen with him; but only by means of the things which are of the light of heaven, that is, which are of rational light. Nevertheless all these means have been disclosed in the internal sense of the Word, and are manifest before those who are in that sense, thus before the angels, who see and perceive innumerable things on this subject, of which scarcely one can be unfolded and explained in a manner suited to the apprehension of man.

[3] But from effects and the signs thereof it is in some measure manifest to man how the case is with this conjunction for the rational mind (that is, man’s interior will and understanding) ought to represent itself in the natural mind just as this mind represents itself in the face and its expressions, insomuch that as the face is the countenance of the natural man, so the natural mind should be the countenance of the rational mind. When the conjunction has been effected, as is the case with those who have been regenerated, then whatever man interiorly wills and thinks in his rational presents itself conspicuously in his natural, and this latter presents itself conspicuously in his face. Such a face have the angels; and such a face had the most ancient people who were celestial men, for they were not at all afraid that others should know their ends and intentions, inasmuch as they willed nothing but good; for he who suffers himself to be led by the Lord never intends or thinks anything else. When the state is of this character, then the rational as to good conjoins itself immediately with the good of the natural, and through this with its truths; and also mediately through the truth that is conjoined with itself in the rational with the truth of the natural, and through this with the good therein; and in this way the conjunction becomes indissoluble.

[4] But how far man is at this day removed from this state, thus from the heavenly state, may be seen from the fact that it is believed to be of civil prudence to speak, to act, and also to express by the countenance, something else than what one thinks and intends, and even to dispose the natural mind in such a manner that together with its face it may act contrary to the things which it interiorly thinks and wills from an end of evil. To the most ancient people this was an enormous wickedness, and such persons were cast out from their society as devils. From these things, as from effects and their signs, it is evident in what consists the conjunction of the rational or internal of man as to good and truth with his natural or external man; and thus what is the quality of a man-angel, and what the quality of a man-devil.

AC 3574. And he came near, and kissed him. That this signifies presence and unition, is evident from the signification of "coming near," as being presence; and from the signification of "kissing," as being unition or conjunction from affection (n. 3573). That kissing" has this signification is evident also from the following passages in the Word. In David:

Serve Jehovah with fear. Kiss the Son, lest He be angry, and ye perish in the way, for His anger will soon be kindled. Blessed are all they that put their trust in Him (Ps. 2:11, 12);

where the Lord is treated of, whose Divine Human is the " Son;" to "kiss Him" is to be conjoined with Him through the faith of love. Again:--

Mercy and truth are met together righteousness and peace have kissed each other (Ps. 85:10);

"righteousness and peace have kissed each other" denotes their conjunction together. In Hosea:--

Ephraim spake horror, and became guilty in Baal and now they sin more and more and have made them a molten image of their silver, even idols in their own intelligence, all of them the work of the craftsmen they say to them, Let the sacrificers of men kiss the calves (Hosea 13:1, 2);

"Ephraim" denotes intelligence, here, man‘s own intelligence, that is, those who believe themselves to be wise, and who desire to be wise, not from the Lord; the "molten image of their silver" denotes good falsified; "all of them the work of the craftsmen" denotes self-intelligence. They who are such are said to "kiss the calves," that is, to embrace magic and to adjoin themselves thereto. In the first book of Kings:--

Jehovah said to Elijah, I have caused to be left seven thousand in Israel, all the knees that have not bowed unto Baal, and every mouth that hath not kissed him (1 Kings 19:18);

where "to kiss" denotes to join one’s self from affection, thus to worship.

AC 3575. And he smelled the smell of his garments. That this signifies that which was grateful from the truth of good which he perceived, is evident from the signification of the "smell," as being that which is grateful (n. 925), and of "smelling," as being to perceive that which is grateful; and from the signification of "garments," as being truth (n. 297, 1073, 2576); and because they were Esau‘s, who is here meant by "his," and by Esau is represented the good of the natural, therefore it is the truth of good which is signified. The truth of good is that which is produced in the natural by means of the immediate and mediate influx of the rational (n. 3573); this truth was that which was desired; but because it could not be produced by immediate influx from the good of the rational, unless at the same time by mediate influx (that is, through the truth of the rational); and as this could not be produced except by means of a number of means, which are what are here described by "Esau’ and Jacob" in the internal sense, therefore by "smelling the smell of his garments" is signified the truth of good which was perceived.

AC 3576. And he blessed him. That this signifies conjunction thus, is evident from the signification of "being blessed," as being conjunction (n. 3504, 3514, 3530, 3565). From these particulars which are related concerning Esau and Jacob it is evident that the good of the rational conjoined itself inmostly with the good of the natural, and through the good therein with truth; for Isaac represents the rational as to good; Rebekah, the rational as to truth; Esau, the good of the natural; and Jacob, the truth of it. That the rational as to good, signified by "Isaac," conjoined itself inmostly with the good of the natural; signified by "Esau," and not with the truth of the natural, signified by "Jacob," except mediately, is evident from the fact that Isaac had Esau in mind when he pronounced the blessing on Jacob; nor did he then think of Jacob, but of Esau. He who pronounces a blessing, blesses him of whom he is thinking, and not then him of whom he is not thinking. All the blessing that is uttered with the mouth goes forth from within, and has life in it from the will and thought of him who blesses, and therefore it essentially belongs to him for whom he wills, and of whom he thinks. He who takes it away and thus makes it his own is like one who steals something which should be restored to another. That when Isaac blessed he thought of Esau and not of Jacob, is evident from all that goes before, as from (verses 18 and 19), where Isaac says to Jacob, "Who art thou my son?" and Jacob said unto his father, "I am Esau thy firstborn;" and from (verses 21, 22, and 23), where Isaac said to Jacob, "Come near I pray, and I will feel thee my son, whether thou be my very son Esau, or not;" and after he had felt him, he said, "The voice is Jacob‘s voice, but the hands are the hands of Esau, and he recognized him not;" also from (verse 24), "And he said, Art thou my very son Esau? And he said, I am;" and at last when he kissed him, he smelled the smell of his garments," namely, Esau’s and when he then blessed him, he said, "See, the smell of my son;" from all which it is evident that by the son whom he blessed no other was meant than Esau; and therefore also when he heard from Esau that it was Jacob, Isaac shuddered with exceeding great shuddering" (verse 33), "and said, Thy brother came with fraud" (verse 35); but the reason why Jacob retained the blessing, according to what is said in (verses 33 and 37), is that the truth represented by Jacob was apparently to have the dominion for a time, as has been shown several times above.

[2] But after the time of reformation and regeneration has been completed, then the good itself which had lain inmostly concealed, and from within had disposed each and all things that had appeared to be of truth, or that truth had attributed to itself, comes forth and openly has the dominion. This is signified by what Isaac said to Esau: "By thy sword shalt thou live, and shalt serve thy brother, and it shall come to pass when thou shalt have the dominion, that thou shalt break his yoke from upon thy neck" (verse 40), the internal sense of which words is that so long as truth is being conjoined with good, good is apparently made to take a lower place; but that it will be in the prior place, and then there will be a conjunction of the rational with the good of the natural, and thereby with the truth; and thus truth will come to be of good; consequently Esau will then represent the good itself of the natural, and Jacob the truth itself thereof, both conjoined with the rational; thus in the supreme sense the Lord‘s Divine natural; Esau, as to the Divine good, and Jacob as to the Divine truth, therein.

AC 3577. As the smell of a field. That this signifies as from good ground out of which comes truth, is evident from the signification of the "smell of a field," as being the perception of truth from good, like the exhalation from the harvest in a field. "Field" denotes good ground, (n. 3500). The reason why "smell" signifies perception, is that the delights of good and the pleasant things of truth which are perceived in the other life, manifest themselves there by corresponding odors (n. 1514, 1517-1519); and from this and also from the correspondences it is evident that smell is nothing else than the perceptive, but the natural perceptive that corresponds to the spiritual perceptive.

AC 3578. Which Jehovah hath blessed. That this signifies that it is multiplied and made fruitful from the Divine, is evident from the signification of "Jehovah blessing," as being to be multiplied as to truth and to be made fruitful as to good (n. 2846, 3406).

AC 3579. And God shall give thee of the dew of heaven. That this signifies from Divine truth, and that of the fat things of the earth signifies from Divine good, is evident from the signification of the "dew of heaven," as being truth; and from the signification of "fat things," as being good (n. 353), both Divine in the supreme sense, in which they are predicated of the Lord. With the multiplication of truth and fructification of good the case is this: When the rational flows into the natural, it there presents its good in a general form; through this good it produces truths therein, almost as the life in man builds up fibers, and disposes them into forms according to uses. This good, through these truths disposed into heavenly order, produces further good; and through this good further truths, which are derivations. Such a natural idea may be had of the formation of truth from good, and further of good through truth, whereby again truth is formed; but a spiritual idea cannot be had except by those who are in the other life, for there ideas are formed from the light of heaven, in which is intelligence.

[2] That "dew" signifies truth, is evident also from the Word elsewhere, as in Zechariah:--

The seed of peace, the vine shall give her fruit and the earth shall give her produce, and the heavens shall give their dew (Zech. 8:12);

speaking of a new church, where the "vine giving its fruit" denotes the spiritual of the church or the truth of faith, giving good; and the "earth giving its produce," the celestial of the church or the good of charity, giving truth; these are the "dew which the heavens shall give." In Haggai:

Because of Mine house that lieth waste over you the heavens are closed from dew, and the earth is closed from her produce (Haggai 1:9, 10);

where the "dew of the heavens and the produce of the earth," which were restrained, have a like signification.

[3] In David:--

From the womb of the dawning, thou hast the dew of thy birth (Ps. 110:3);

concerning the Lord the "dew of birth" denoting the celestial of love. In Moses:--

Blessed of Jehovah be his land, for the precious things of heaven, for the dew, and for the deep lying beneath (Deut. 33:13);

concerning Joseph; the " precious things of heaven" are spiritual things (n. 3166), which are signified by dew;" the deep lying beneath" signifies natural things. Again:--

Israel dwelt securely, alone at the fountain of Jacob, in a land of corn and new wine, yea his heavens dropped down dew (Deut. 33:28);

where also the "dew which the heavens dropped" denotes the spiritual things which are of truth.

[4] In the genuine sense "dew" is the truth of good which is from a state of innocence and peace; for by "morning" or "day-dawn," when the dew descends, are signified these states (n. 2333, 2405, 2540, 2780); hence also the manna which was from heaven was with the dew that descended in the morning, as may be seen from Moses:--

In the morning the dew was laid round about the camp and when the laying of the dew withdrew, behold on the faces of the wilderness a small round thing, small as the hoar frost on the ground (Exod. 16:13, 14).

When the dew fell upon the camp in the night, the manna fell upon it (Num. 11:9).

As the manna was heavenly bread, in the supreme sense it signified the Lord as to the Divine good; hence with men the celestial of love, for this is from the Divine of the Lord (n. 276, 680, 1798, 2165, 2177, 3464, 3478); the "dew" in which and with which the manna descended, in the supreme sense denotes the Divine truth; and in the relative sense, the spiritual truth with men; "morning" is the state of peace in which these goods are (n. 92, 93, 1726, 2780, 3170).

[5] Inasmuch as "dew" signifies the truth which is from good, or what is the same, the spiritual which is from the celestial, therefore also in the Word spiritual truth is compared to "dew;" for things which signify serve also for comparison with the same thing, as in Isaiah:--

Thus hath Jehovah said unto me, I will be still, and I will behold in My dwelling-place; like serene heat upon light; like a cloud of dew in the heat of harvest (Isa. 18:4).

In Hosea:--

O Ephraim, what shall I do unto thee? O Judah, what shall I do unto thee? for your holiness is as a cloud of the dawn, and as the dew that falleth in the morning (Hosea 6:4; 13:3).

Again:--

I will be as the dew unto Israel, he shall blossom as the lily, and shall fix his roots as Lebanon (Hosea 14:5).

In Micah:--

The remnant of Jacob shall be in the midst of many peoples as dew from Jehovah, as drops upon the herb (Micah 5:7).

In David:--

Like the goodly oil upon the head that came down upon the border of Aaron’s garments; like the dew of Hermon that cometh down upon the mountains of Zion for there Jehovah commanded the blessing of life for evermore (Ps. 133:2, 3).

And in Moses:--

My doctrine shall drop as the rain, My word shall distil as the dew; as the small rain upon the grass; and as drops upon the herb (Deut. 32:2);

where "dew" denotes the multiplication of truth from good, and the fructification of good through truth; and as the dew is that which every morning renders the field and vineyard fruitful, good itself and truth are signified by "corn and new wine," concerning which in what follows.

AC 3580. And a multitude of corn. That this signifies the derivative natural good, and that new wine signifies the derivative natural truth, is evident from the signification of "corn," as being good; and from the signification of "new wine," as being truth; which when predicated of the natural signify natural good and truth, and then "bread and wine" are predicated of the rational. That "bread" is celestial good, see above, (n. 276, 680, 1798, 2165, 2177, 3464, 3478); and that "wine" is what is spiritual, thus truth from good, (n. 1071, 1798).

[2] That "corn and new wine" have this signification, may be seen also from the following passages in the Word. In Haggai:--

The heavens are closed from dew, and the earth is closed from her produce. And I called for a drought upon the land, and upon the mountains, and upon the corn, and upon the new wine; and upon that which the ground bringeth forth (Haggai 1:10, 11);

where "drought" denotes a lack of dew and of rain, thus a lack of truth derived from any good; "drought upon the corn" is a lack of good and "drought upon the new wine" is a lack of truth. In Moses:--

Israel shall dwell securely, alone at the fountain of Jacob in a land of corn and new wine; yea, his heavens shall drop down dew (Deut. 33:28);

"alone" denotes those who are not infested by evils and falsities (n. 139, 471); a "land of corn and new wine" denotes the good and truth of the church.

[3] In Hosea:--

I will be as the dew unto Israel; he shall bud forth as the lily, and shall fix his roots as Lebanon; his branches shall go forth, and his honor shall be as the olive tree, and his smell as Lebanon; they that dwell under his shadow shall return; they shall vivify the corn, and blossom as the vine; his memory shall be as the wine of Lebanon (Hosea 14:5-7);

where corn" denotes spiritual good and wine," spiritual truth. In Isaiah:--

The curse shall devour the earth. The new wine shall mourn, the vine shall languish, all the glad of heart shall sigh (Isa. 24:6, 7);

where the vastation of the spiritual church is treated of; the "new wine mourning" denotes that truth shall cease.

[4] In Jeremiah:--

Jehovah hath redeemed Jacob. And they shall come and sing in the height of Zion, and shall flow together unto the goodness of Jehovah, to the corn and to the new wine, and to the oil, and to the sons of the flock and of the herd (Jer. 31:11, 12);

the "corn and new wine" denote good and the derivative truth " oil," the good from which they come, and which is from them; "the sons of the flock and of the herd," the truth which thus comes therefrom; and as these things have such a signification, they are called the goodness of Jehovah."

[5] In Hosea:--

She did not know that I gave her the corn, and the new wine, and the oil, and multiplied unto her silver and gold which they made for Baal. Therefore will I return and take away My corn and My new wine in their appointed season, and I will pluck away My wool and My flax (Hosea 2:8, 9);

where the church perverted is treated of; and it is manifest that by "corn" is not meant corn; nor by "new wine," new wine; neither by "oil," "silver," "gold," "wool," and "flax," are such things meant, but those which are spiritual; that is, those of good and truth.

[6] In like manner where a new church is treated of, in the same Prophet:--

I will betroth thee unto Me in faithfulness and thou shalt know Jehovah. And it shall come to pass in that day that I will hearken to the heavens; and these shall hearken to the earth; and the earth shall hearken to the corn, and the new wine, and the oil; and these shall hearken to Jezreel (Hosea 2:20-22);

where "Jezreel" denotes a new church. In Joel:--

Awake ye drunkards and weep, and howl all ye drinkers of wine, because of the new wine, for it is cut off from your mouth. The field is wasted, the land mourneth for the corn is wasted, the new wine is dried up, the oil languisheth (Joel 1:5, 10).

[7] Again:--

Rejoice ye sons of Zion, and be glad in Jehovah your God; for He hath given you the early rain for righteousness; and He will cause to come down for you the rain, the early rain and the latter rain in the first. And the floors shall be filled with pure corn, and the vats shall overflow with new wine and oil (Joel 2:23, 24).

Again in the same Prophet:--

And it shall come to pass in that day that the mountains shall drop down sweet wine, and the hills shall flow with milk, and all the brooks of Judah shall flow with waters, and a fountain shall go forth out of the house of Jehovah (Joel 3:18);

where the Lord‘s kingdom is treated of; and by " sweet wine " by "milk," and by "waters," are signified spiritual things whose abundance is thus described.

[8] In Zechariah:--

Jehovah their God shall save them in that day as the flock of His people. For how great is His goodness! and how great is His beauty! corn shall make the young men to flourish, and new wine the virgins (Zech. 9:16, 17).

In David:--

Thou dost visit the earth, and delightest in it; Thou greatly enrichest it; the stream of God is full of waters; Thou preparest them corn; the meadows are clothed with flocks;the valleys also are covered over with corn; they shout for joy, they also sing (Ps. 65:9, 13).

From all this we can see what is signified by "corn and new wine."

AC 3581. Peoples shall serve thee. That this signifies the truths of the church, and that peoples shall bow down themselves to thee, signifies the truths of good, is evident from the mention of serving," as being concerning truths (n. 2567, 3409); and from the signification of "peoples," as being truths (n. 1259, 1260, 2928, 3295). By the "peoples" first mentioned are signified the truths of the church, which are called spiritual truths; and by the "peoples" mentioned the second time are signified the truths of good, which are spiritual goods, and are called truths relatively, the goods of charity being such truths. Because there is this distinction, the "peoples" mentioned in the first place and in the second are not expressed in the Hebrew tongue by the same word, but yet by a word somewhat akin.

AC 3582. Be thou a master to thy brethren. That this signifies the dominion at first appearing to be of that of the affection of natural truth over the affections of natural good, is evident from the signification of being "a master," as being dominion and from the signification of "brethren," as being the affections of good, here, of natural good (n. 367, 2360, 3303). Concerning the apparent dominion at first of truth over good, see (n. 3324, 3325, 3330, 3332, 3336, 3470, 3539, 3548, 3556, 3563, 3570).

AC 3583. And let thy mother’s sons bow down themselves to thee. That this signifies over all other affections of truth, is evident from the signification of "sons," as also being truths (n. 489, 491, 533, 1147, 2623, 3373); and from the signification of mother," as being the affection of spiritual truth, and thence the church; because the church is and is so called from truth and the affection thereof (n. 289, 2691, 2717).

AC 3584. Cursed are they that curse thee. That this signifies that he who disjoins himself shall be disjoined; and that blessed are they that bless thee signifies that he who conjoins himself shall be conjoined, is evident from the signification of "being cursed,‘ as being to be disjoined and of "being blessed," as being to be conjoined (n. 3504, 3514, 3530, 3565). These things are predicated of truths, and by "those who curse" are signified falsities which separate themselves from truths and by "those who bless" are signified truths which adjoin themselves to other truths; for with truths and goods the case is that they form a society together, at last making as it were one city; and in such a manner they also consociate. This originates from the form of heaven, in which the angels are ranged in order according to the relationships and affinities of good and truth, and thus together constitute one kingdom or one city, from which truths and goods flow in with man, and are disposed in him into a similar form, and this by the Lord alone. But how the case herein is, will be more plainly evident from the correspondence of the Grand Man, which is heaven, with each and everything that is in man; which correspondence will of the Lord’s Divine mercy be described at the close of the chapters. From all this it is now evident what is involved in the blessing of Isaac pronounced to Jacob, but meant with respect to Esau; namely, the fructification of good through the multiplication of truth, and again the fructification of truth.

AC 3585. Verses 30-33. And it came to pass as Isaac made an. end of blessing Jacob, and Jacob was scarcely yet gone out from the faces of Isaac his father, that Esau his brother came from his hunting. And he also made dainties, and brought unto his father; and he said unto his father, Let my father arise and eat of his son‘s hunting, that thy soul may bless me. And Isaac his father said unto him, Who art thou? and he said, I am thy son, thy firstborn, Esau. And Isaac shuddered with exceeding great shuddering, and said, Who then is he that hath hunted hunting, and brought it to me, and I have eaten of all before thou camest and blessed him? Yea, and he shall be blessed. "And it came to pass as Isaac made an end of blessing Jacob," signifies when the first conjunction had been thus effected; "and Jacob was scarcely yet gone out from the faces of Isaac his father," signifies progression and change of state; "that Esau his brother came from his hunting," signifies the truth of good and its arrival; "and he also made dainties, and brought unto his father," signifies things desirable and delightful to the Divine rational; and he said unto his father, Let my father arise, and eat of his son’s hunting," signifies that it should appropriate to itself the truth of natural good "that thy soul may bless me," signifies that there might be conjunction and Isaac his father said unto him, Who art thou? and he said, I am thy son, thy firstborn, Esau," signifies a state of perception concerning natural good and the derivative truth; "and Isaac shuddered with exceeding great shuddering," signifies a great alteration in respect to the inversion of the state; "and said, Who then is he that hath hunted hunting, and brought it to me," signifies an inquisition concerning that truth; and I have eaten of all before thou camest," signifies that it was appropriated; "and blessed him; yea, and he shall be blessed," signifies that it had been conjoined.

AC 3586. And Jacob came to pass as Isaac made an end of blessing Jacob. That this signifies when the first conjunction had been thus effected, is evident from the signification of "blessing," as being conjunction (n. 3504, 3514, 3530, 3565, 3584); thus "as Isaac made an end of blessing" signifies when conjunction had been effected; that the first conjunction was with truth, represented by Jacob, is evident from what has been already said.

AC 3587. And Jacob was yet scarcely gone out from the faces of Isaac his father. That this signifies progression and change of state, is evident from the signification of "going out from the faces," as being when those things ceased which were represented by Jacob, thus when the state was changed; for the subject is now Esau, and in the internal sense the good of the natural, how as before said this comes forth from the inmost and manifests itself; and when reformation has been accomplished by the ministry of truth, has the dominion.

AC 3588. That Esau his brother came from his hunting. That this signifies the truth of good and its arrival is evident from the representation of Esau, as being the good of the natural from the signification of "coming," as being arrival; and from the signification of "hunting," as being the truth which is from good (n. 3501).

AC 3589. And he also made dainties, and brought unto his father. That this signifies things desirable and delightful to the Divine rational, is evident from the signification of dainties," as being the delightful things which are of good and the pleasant things which are of truth (n. 3502, 3536), the delightful things which are of good are the desirable things, and the pleasant things which are of truth are the delightful things for the affection of good is that which desires, and then the affection of truth is that which delights.

AC 3590. And he said unto his father, Let my father arise, and eat of his son‘s hunting. That this signifies that the Divine rational should appropriate to itself the truth of natural good, is evident from the representation of Isaac, who here is the "father," as being the good of the rational from the signification of "eating," as being to appropriate (n. 2187, 2343, 3168, 3513); and from the signification of "hunting," as being the truth of natural good (n. 3588).

AC 3591. That thy soul may bless me. That this signifies that there might be conjunction, is evident from the signification of "being blessed," as being conjunction (n. 3504, 3514, 3530, 3565, 3584).

AC 3592. And Isaiah his father said unto him, Who art thou? and he said, I am thy son, thy firstborn, Esau. That this signifies a state of perception concerning natural good and the derivative truth, is evident from what was said above (n. 3548-3550), at (verses 18 and 19), where similar words occur.

AC 3593. And Isaac shuddered with exceeding great shuddering. That this signifies a great alteration in respect to the inversion of the state, is evident from the signification of" shuddering," as being an alteration; that it is in respect to the inversion of the state, is evident from what has been said above concerning the two states of the man who is being regenerated-the state before he has been regenerated, and the state after he has been regenerated-namely, that in the state before he has been regenerated, truths apparently have the dominion; while in the state after he has been regenerated, truths give place, and good receives the dominion, on which subject see what has been frequently shown above, (n. 1904, 2063, 2189, 2967, 2979, 3286, 3288, 3310, 3325, 3330, 3332, 3336, 3470, 3509, 3539, 3548, 3556, 3563, 3570, 3576, 3579).

AC 3594. And said, Who then is he that hath hunted hunting, and brought it to me. That this signifies an inquisition concerning that truth, is evident from the representation of Jacob, in reference to whom it is here said, "Who is he," as being the natural as to truth; and from the signification of "hunting," as being truth from good (n. 3501); here, an inquisition concerning that truth, as to whether it was from good.

AC 3595. And I have eaten of all before thou camest. That this signifies that it had been appropriated, is evident from the signification of "eating," as being to be appropriated (n. 2187, 2343, 3168, 3513).

AC 3596. And blessed him; yea, and he shall be blessed. That this signifies that it has been conjoined, is evident from the signification of "being blessed," as being to be conjoined (n. 3504, 3514, 3530, 3565, 3584). How the case is with the appropriation and conjunction of the truth represented by Jacob may be seen from what has been said above. But as these subjects are of such a nature as to transcend the apprehension of the natural man, and cannot be seen except in the light in which is the rational or internal man, in which light at the present day there are but few, because few are being regenerated, therefore it is better to illustrate them no further, for the illustration of things unknown and transcending the apprehension does not bring them into light, but into more shade. Moreover such things are to be built upon ideas of natural truths, through which they are to be apprehended, and at the present day these also are wanting. This is the reason why the words just preceding have been explained so briefly, and merely as to the internal sense of the expressions.

[2] From what has been said it may be seen what is involved in the statement that Isaac asked hunting of his son, that he might eat of it before he blessed him, and that he did not bless him till after he had eaten, and thus that after eating followed the blessing of him who prepared and brought the dainties-as is also evident from Isaac’s words (here concerning Jacob), "he brought to me, and I have eaten of all before thou camest, and blessed him; yea, and he shall be blessed." The reason referred to appears from the internal meaning of the rituals of the Ancient Church; for with them eating signified appropriation and conjunction-conjunction that is to say with him with whom or of whose bread they had eaten. Food in general signified what is of love and charity, that is, the same as celestial and spiritual food-bread what is of love to the Lord, and wine what is of charity toward the neighbor. When these had been appropriated, the persons were conjoined thus they spake to each other from affection, and were consociated together. Feasts with the ancients were nothing else, nor was anything else represented in the Jewish Church by their eating together of the holy things, nor was anything else represented in the primitive Christian Church by their dinners and suppers.

AC 3597. Verses 34-40. When Esau heard the words of his father, he cried with an exceeding great and bitter cry, and said unto his father, Bless me, me also, O my father. And he said, Thy brother came with fraud, and hath taken away thy blessing. And he said, Is it not that his name is called Jacob? and he hath supplanted me these two times; he hath taken away my birthright, and behold now he hath taken away my blessing. And he said, Hast thou not reserved a blessing for me? And Isaac answered and said unto Esau, Behold I have made him thy master, and all his brethren have I given to him for servants; and with corn and new wine have I sustained him; and what then shall I do for thee, my son? And Esau said unto his father, Hast thou but this one blessing, my father? Bless me, me also, O my father. And Esau lifted up his voice, and wept. And Isaac his father answered and said unto him, Behold of the fat things of the earth shall be thy dwelling, and of the dew of heaven from above. And upon thy sword shalt thou live, and shalt serve thy brother; and it shall come to pass when thou shalt have the dominion that thou shalt break his yoke from upon thy neck.

[2] "When Esau heard the words of his father," signifies the observation of natural good from Divine good; "he cried with an exceeding great and bitter cry," signifies its great alteration in respect to the inversion of the state "and said unto his father, bless me, me also, O my father," signifies that it longed for conjunction, even although by what had gone before truth had been conjoined; "and he said, Thy brother came with fraud," signifies what is inverted of order; and hath taken away thy blessing," signifies conjunction in that manner;

[3] "and he said, Is it not that his name is called Jacob," signifies its quality "and he hath supplanted me these two times," signifies that it had inverted order "he hath taken away my birthright, signifies the loss of the priority; "and behold now he hath taken away my blessing," signifies the loss of the conjunction; "and he sad, Hast thou not reserved a blessing for me," signifies whether there was for it anything in respect to conjunction in that former state;

[4] "and Isaac answered and said unto Esau," signifies instruction; "behold I have made him thy master," signifies that in that state it should have the dominion; "and all his brethren have I given to him for servants," signifies that to the affection of truth at that time there had apparently been subordinated the affections of good; "and with corn and new wine have I sustained him," signifies, as before, its good and truth; and what then shall I do for thee, my son," signifies that in that state there is nothing else for good;

[5] "and Esau said unto his father," signifies the observation of natural good; "hast thou but this one blessing, my father," signifies whether in that case anything else could be adjoined from natural good " bless me, me also, O my father," signifies that it longed for conjunction even although thereby truth had been conjoined and Esau lifted up his voice, and wept," signifies a further state of alteration

[6] "and Isaac his father answered and said unto him,-" signifies perception concerning natural good, that it would be made Divine "behold, of the fat things of the earth shall be thy dwelling," signifies that life is from the Divine good; "and of the dew of heaven from above," signifies that it is from the Divine truth;

[7] "and upon thy sword shalt thou live, and thou shalt serve thy brother," signifies that so long as truth is being conjoined with good, good will in appearance be in a lower place; "and it shall come to pass when thou shalt have the dominion," signifies that it shall be in the prior place; "that thou shalt break his yoke from upon thy neck," signifies that the conjunction would then be through good, and that truth would be of good.

AC 3598. Inasmuch as the things contained in (verses 34 to 38) are such as have been already unfolded, and what they involve may be seen from what has been already said, it is therefore needless any further to unfold them in respect to the internal sense, except that merely the things contained in (verses 39 and 40), relating to the blessing of Esau by Isaac his father, shall be illustrated.

AC 3599. And Isaac his father answered and said unto him. That this signifies perception concerning natural good, that it would be made Divine, is evident from the signification of Isaac, as being the Lord‘s Divine rational as to the Divine good therein (n. 3012, 3194, 3210); and from the signification in the historicals of the Word of "saying," as being to perceive, which has already been frequently treated of; and from the representation of Esau, to whom he spoke, as being natural good, concerning which also much has been already said. That it should be made Divine, is evident from the blessing, now to be considered. It was said above that Esau represents the Lord’s Divine natural as to Divine good, and Jacob His Divine natural as to Divine truth; but here, that Esau represents the natural good which was to be made Divine; and in what goes before, that Jacob represented the natural truth which also was to be made Divine. How the case herein is may be seen from what was said above (n. 3494, 3576); but that it may become still clearer, a few words shall be added.

[2] The natural good which Esau first represents is the natural good of the Lord‘s infancy, which was Divine from the Father, but human from the mother; and in so far as it was from the mother it was imbued with hereditary evil; and being such, it could not be at once in an order capable of receiving the Divine that was inmostly within it; but had first to be reduced into order by the Lord. The case is the same with the truth represented by Jacob; for where there is good there must be truth in order for there to be anything; all that which is of thought, even with infants, is of truth, adjoined to the will part which is of good. Wherefore after the Lord had reduced the natural as to good and as to truth in Himself into order, so that it might receive the Divine, and that thus He Himself might inflow from His Divine, and after by successive steps He had expelled all the human that was from the mother; then Esau represents the Lords Divine natural as to good, and Jacob His Divine natural as to truth.

[3] But Esau and Jacob represent the Divine good and Divine truth of the Lord’s Divine natural as conjoined with each other like brothers, which Divine good and Divine truth considered in themselves are nothing else than one simultaneous power for the formation and reception of actual good and truth. This actual good and truth are treated of later. From all this it is evident what great arcana are contained in the internal sense of the Word, which arcana are such that not even their most general points fall into the understanding of man; as possibly may be the case with the things just stated; and how then can the innumerable particulars relating thereto do so? Yet are they well adapted to the understanding and apprehension of the angels, who concerning these and the like things receive from the Lord heavenly ideas illustrated by representatives of ineffable loveliness and bliss; from which some conception may be formed of the nature of angelic wisdom, yet remotely, because such things are in the shade of the human understanding.

AC 3600. Behold of the fat things of the earth shall be thy dwelling. That this signifies that life is from Divine good; and that of the dew of heaven from above signifies that it is from Divine truth, is evident from the signification of "fatness," as being good (n. 353), here, Divine good, because it is spoken of the Lord; and from the signification of "dwelling," as being life (n. 1293, 3384), and that "dwelling" is predicated of good (n. 2268, 2451, 2712); and from the signification of the "dew of heaven," as being truth derived from the good of a state of peace and innocence (n. 3579), here, Divine truth, because it is spoken of the Lord. Similar words were spoken to Jacob, namely, "God shall give thee of the dew of heaven and of the fat things of the earth" (verse 28) but there "dew" (thus truth) is spoken of in the first place; and the "fat things of the earth" (thus good) in the second and also that"God should give" of them; whereas here in relation to Esau, the "fat things of the earth" (thus good) are spoken of in the first place; and in the second place the "dew of heaven" (thus truth) and it is not said that "God would give," but that "his dwelling should be of them;" which also shows that Jacob represents truth, and Esau good;-also that truth as apparently in the former place is first but that this is the inverse of order, according to what has already been frequently shown.

AC 3601. And upon thy sword shalt thou live, and shalt serve thy brother. That this signifies that so long as truth is being conjoined with good, good will in appearance be in a lower place, is evident from the signification of a sword," as being truth combating (n. 2799); hence to "live upon the sword" denotes while truth is being conjoined with good, for the conjunction is effected by means of combats, that is, temptations, because without these truth is not conjoined; and from the signification of "serving thy brother," as being to be in a lower place. That nevertheless good is not in a lower place, but only apparently so, is evident from what has so frequently been said above (n. 3582).

AC 3602. And it shall come to pass when thou shalt have the dominion. That this signifies that it shall be in a prior place, is evident from the signification of "having the dominion," as being to be in a prior place; on this subject see what now follows.

AC 3603. That thou shalt break his yoke from upon thy neck. That this signifies that the conjunction would then be through good, and that truth would be of good, is evident from the signification of "breaking a yoke from upon the neck," as being liberation. By the "neck" is signified influx and communication, and the consequent conjunction; and by a "yoke upon the neck" is signified restraint and interception, (n. 3542); thus "breaking the yoke from upon the neck" denotes liberation from restraint, and interception and therefore it denotes conjunction through good and also that truth becomes of good; for where there is no longer any restraint and interception, good flows in and conjoins itself with truth.

[2] How the case herein is may be seen from what has been already said and shown but few comprehend in what consists the apparent priority of truth and in the meanwhile the inferiority of good, and this principally because few reflect on such things, and do not even reflect upon good, in that it is distinct from truth. moreover all those are ignorant of what good is who live a life of the love of self and of the world, for they do not believe that there can be any good except that which is from this source and because they are ignorant of what good is, they are also ignorant of what truth is, for truth is of good. They do indeed know from revelation that it is good to love God and the neighbor, and that truth consists of doctrinal things derived from the Word, but inasmuch as they do not live according to these things, they have no perception of such good and truth, but merely have knowledges separated from these. Nay, even those who are being regenerated do not know what good is until they have been regenerated; for before this they supposed that truth was good, and that to do according to truth was good, when yet that which they then do is not good, but truth. When man is in this state, he is in the state which is described by "Jacob" and in the "blessing" given to him; but when he comes into a state of doing good from the affection of good-that is, when he is regenerate-he then comes into the state which is described in the blessing given to Esau.

[3] This may be illustrated by those things which appear with man in his first and second ages, and afterwards in his third and fourth. In his first age man knows only by memory the things contained in the Word, and in like manner what is in the doctrinal matters of faith; and he believes himself to be good when he is acquainted with many things therefrom, and can apply some of them, not to his own life, but to the life of others. In his second age, when he is more grown up, he is not content to know only by memory the things contained in the Word and in doctrine, but begins to reflect upon them from his own thought, and in so far as he adds thereto from his own thought, in so far he is pleased; and thereupon he is in the affection of truth from a kind of worldly love, which love is also the means of his learning many things that without it would be left unlearned. In his third age, if he is one of those who can be regenerated, he begins to think about use, and to reflect on what he reads in the Word and imbibes from doctrinal matters for the sake of use; and when he is in this state the order is inverted, so that truth is no longer so much put in the first place. But in his fourth age, when comes the age of his regeneration, because then the state is full (n. 2636), he loves the Lord and the doctrinal things that are from the Word-- that is, truth-for the sake of the good of life, consequently from the good of life. Thus good comes to be in the prior place, which until this time was apparently in the posterior place.

[4] The reason why good was apparently in the posterior place, is that it lay inmostly concealed in all his affection; nor could it manifest itself, inasmuch as outside of it there were such things as it could not agree with, namely, vain and empty things such as are those of self-glory and the glory of the world but after the man has been regenerated these things recede; and the good, which had lain inmostly concealed, comes forth as it were from its place of confinement, and flows into those things which are outside, and makes truths its own, that is, truths of good, and thus manifests itself.

[5] In the meantime, like that involuntary which is in his voluntary, the good in the man is in everything he thinks, and thence in everything he does. Man knows not that he has this involuntary, because he perceives nothing else in himself except that which is his own; that is, the voluntary. This involuntary is two-fold, the one being his heredity that he his from his father and mother, while the other flows in through heaven from the Lord. As a man grows up, if he is such as not to suffer himself to be regenerated, that which he has hereditarily from his parents manifests itself more and more for he takes evils from it, and makes them his own, or proper to himself. But with those who are being regenerated the involuntary which is from the Lord through heaven manifests itself in adult age; and in the meantime it has disposed and governed each and all things of their thought and also of their will, although it has not been visible.

AC 3604. Verses 41-45. And Esau hated Jacob because of the blessing wherewith his father blessed him; and Esau said in his heart, The days of mourning for my father draw near, and I will kill Jacob my brother. And the words of Esau her elder son were told to Rebekah; and she sent and called unto Jacob her younger son, and said unto him, Behold Esau thy brother comforteth himself concerning thee to kill thee. And now my son hearken unto my voice, and arise, flee thou to Laban my brother to Haran. And tarry with him some days until thy brother‘s wrath turn away, until thy brother’s anger turn away from thee, and he forget that which thou hast done to him, and I will send and take thee from thence; why should I be bereaved even of you both in one day? "And Esau hated Jacob because of the blessing wherewith his father blessed him," signifies that natural good was averse to the inverted conjunction of truth "and Esau said in his heart," signifies thought; "the days of mourning for my father draw near, and I will kill Jacob my brother," signifies the inversion and privation of the self-derived life of truth "and the words of Esau her elder son were told to Rebekah," signifies the Lord‘s perception from Divine truth concerning the animus or purpose of natural good at that time "and she sent and called unto Jacob her younger son, and said unto him," signifies the state of observation of the affection of truth from influx through Divine truth; "behold Esau thy brother comforteth himself concerning thee to kill thee," signifies the purpose to invert the state and deprive truth of self-derived life; "and now my son hearken unto my voice, and arise," signifies delay as yet; "flee thou to Laban my brother to Haran," signifies to the affection of external or corporeal good; "and tarry with him some days," signifies what is successive; "until thy brother’s wrath turn away," signifies until the state turns thereto "until thy brother‘s anger turn away from thee," signifies what is successive of the state with natural good; "and he forget that which thou hast done to him," signifies habit acquired from the delay; "and I will send and take thee from thence," signifies then the end; "why should I be bereaved even of you both in one day," signifies that otherwise there would be no conjunction.

AC 3605. And Esau hated Jacob because of the blessing wherewith his father blessed him. That this signifies that natural good was averse to the inverted conjunction of truth, is evident from the signification of "hating," as here in the internal sense being to be averse to, which is the subject treated of in what follows and from the representation of Esau, as being natural good; and of Jacob as being natural truth; and from the signification of a "blessing," as being conjunction (n. 3504, 3514, 3530, 3565, 3584); that here it is an inverted conjunction of truth which is represented by Jacob, is evident from what was said and shown above (n. 3539, 3548, 3556, 3563, 3570, 3576, 3603).

[2] That in the internal sense " to hate’ denotes to be averse to, is because it is predicated of good, which is represented by Esau, and good does not even know what hatred is, being the direct opposite thereof, and opposites are never possible in the same subject; but instead of hatred, good, or they who are in good, feel a kind of aversion; hence it is that "hatred" here in the internal sense denotes to be averse to; for the internal sense is principally for those who are in heaven, wherefore when it descends thence, and is derived into the literal sense, then, the historicals being of this nature, the affection of aversion falls into the expression "hatred," but yet in such a way that with those who are in heaven there is no idea of hatred. This case is like that which was related from experience (n. 1875), concerning the words in the Lord‘s prayer, " Lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil;" in that temptation and evil are rejected until what is purely angelic, that is, good, remains without any idea of temptation and of evil, and this with the adjunction of a species of indignation and aversion, in regard to evil being thought of when the Lord is thought of.

[3] The case is the same when we read in the Word concerning Jehovah or the Lord "hating." As in Zechariah:--

Let none of you think evil in your heart of his neighbor and love no lying oath for all these are things that I hate, saith Jehovah (Zech. 8:17).

In Moses:--

Thou shalt not set thee up a pillar, which Jehovah thy God hateth (Deut. 16:22).

In Jeremiah:--

Mine heritage is become unto Me as a lion in the forest she hath uttered her voice against Me, therefore I have hated her (Jer. 12:8).

In Hosea:--

In Gilgal I hated them; because of the wickedness of their works I will drive them out of Mine house I will love them no more (Hosea 9:15).

In these passages "hatred," predicated of Jehovah or the Lord, in the internal sense is not hatred, but mercy, for the Divine is mercy but when this flows in with a man who is in evil, and he runs into the penalty of evil, it then appears as hatred and because it so appears, in the sense of the letter it is likewise so called.

[4] It is in the same way that anger," "wrath," and "fury" are in the Word predicated of Jehovah or the Lord (n. 245, 592, 696, 1093, 1683, 1874, 2395, 2447, 3235). Above all other peoples the Jewish and Israelitish people were such that as soon as they observed anything unfriendly, even in their associates, they believed it lawful to treat them cruelly, and not only to kill them, but also to expose them to wild beasts and birds; and therefore because the inflowing mercy of the Lord was turned with them into such hatred, not only against their enemies, but also against their companions, they could not believe otherwise than that Jehovah also entertained hatred, was angry, wrathful, and furious, and for this reason it is so expressed in the Word according to the appearance; for such as is a man’s quality, such the Lord appears to him (n. 1838, 1861, 2706). but what the quality of hatred is with those who are in love and charity, that is, who are in good, is evident from the words of the Lord in Matthew:--

Ye have heard that it has been said, Thou shalt love thy neighbor, and hate thine enemy but I say unto you, Love your enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you, and pray for them that injure and persecute you, that ye may be the sons of your Father who is in the heavens (Matthew 5:43-45).

AC 3606. And Esau said in his heart. That this signifies thought, is evident from the signification of "saying in the heart," as being thought.

AC 3607. The days of mourning for my father draw near, and I will kill Jacob my brother. That this signifies the inversion and privation of the self-derived life of truth, is evident from the signification of "days of mourning," as being the inversion of the state; and from the signification of "killing Jacob his brother," as being to deprive truth of self-derived life. The case herein is similar to what was just now said concerning the signification of "hatred" in the internal sense, namely, that it is not hatred and the same may be seen from what is continually taking place in the other life, where all the good that flows down from heaven to those who are in evil is turned into evil, and with the infernals into the opposite; in like manner truth into falsity (n. 2123); and therefore on the other hand the evil and falsity that is with such spirits is in heaven good and truth and in order that it may become good there are spirits in the way who reject the ideas of evil and falsity, so that the idea of good and truth may be presented (n. 1393, 1875). And moreover when that which is evil and false approaches those who are in good and truth, it does not appear as evil and falsity, but under another form in accordance with the nature and state of their goodness.

[2] From this it is evident that in the internal sense to "kill Jacob the brother" is not to kill, but is a privation of that life which is not compatible with truth for truth has no life of itself, but from good, inasmuch as truth is only a vessel recipient of good (n. 1496, 1832, 1900, 2063, 2261, 2269, 2697, 3049, 3068, 3128, 3146, 3318, 3387); and that in good there is life, but not in truth, except that which is from good (n. 1589). Wherefore the privation of the self-derived life of truth is not the extinction of truth, but its vivification for when truth appears to itself to have life from itself, then it has no life, except such life as in itself is not life; but when it is deprived of this, it is then gifted with real life, namely, through good from the Lord, who is life itself.

[3] This plainly appears from those who are in the other life. With such as are in truth alone, the ideas appear closed, so that those things which are of heaven cannot flow in, except only in a manner so general that the influx is scarcely known to be from heaven; whereas with such as are at the same time in good, their ideas appear open, so that the things which are of heaven flow in as into a heaven in miniature, or as into an image of themselves; for they flow in by means of the good that is in them through truths (n. 1869, 2425). That truth is deprived of self-derived life when good begins to be in the prior place, or to have the dominion, may be seen from what has been said and shown above concerning the apparent priority of truth at first, and concerning the subsequent priority of good; this privation of the self-derived life of truth is what is here signified. The reason why these things are called the "mourning for a father," is that days of mourning signify inversion of state, which inversion of state was signified above by the exceeding great shuddering with which Isaac shuddered (verse 33), (n. 3593), and by the great and exceeding bitter cry with which Esau cried out (verse 34), (n. 3597).

AC 3608. And the words of Esau her elder son were told to Rebekah. That this signifies the Lord‘s perception from Divine truth concerning the animus or purpose of natural good at that time, is evident from the signification of "being told," as being to think and reflect (n. 9862), thus to perceive and from the representation of Rebekah, as being the Divine truth of the Lord’s Divine rational; and from the representation of Esau, as being natural good. From this it is evident that its "being told Rebekah concerning the words of Esau her elder son," signifies the Lords perception from Divine truth concerning the animus or purpose of natural good.

AC 3609. And she called unto Jacob her younger son, and said unto him. That this signifies the state of observation of the affection of truth from influx through Divine truth, is evident from the representation of Rebekah, who "called and said," as being the Divine truth of the Lords Divine rational conjoined with the Divine good therein; from the representation of Jacob, as being natural truth, or the affection of truth therein; and from the signification of calling him and saying to him," as being a state of perception; here a state of observation, because the natural is the subject treated of.

AC 3610. Behold Esau thy brother comforteth himself concerning thee to kill thee. That this signifies the purpose to invert the state and deprive truth of self-derived life, is evident from the signification of "comforting one‘s self" for anyone, as being to appease unrest of mind with hope concerning anyone, or concerning anything,- "concerning thee" implying the inversion of the state of truth-and from the signification of "to kill thee," that is, Jacob, as being to deprive truth of self-derived life (n. 3607), where it was shown that depriving truth of life is not extinguishing it, but vivifying it. For the case with respect to the life of truth is this: When they who are in truth, or in the affection of truth, do not live according to the truth which they know and with which they are affected, there is then somewhat of pleasure and delight derived from the love of self or the love of the world, which has adjoined itself to the affection of truth, and which appears as good, when yet it is not good, except as regards the use, in that truths may thus be introduced and learned which afterwards may be serviceable to real good and its life. When truth is in this state, that is, they who are in the affection of truth, then truth is said to have self-derived life, which is not life, as is evident from the fact that in the love of self and the love of the world, or in their pleasure and delight, there is not life; but in celestial and spiritual love, and in their delight and pleasure. Therefore when truth, that is, they who are in such an affection of truth, are deprived of that life, they then for the first time receive life, or are then for the first time vivified.

[2] These things cannot possibly be apprehended by those who are in the affection of self and of the world, for they believe that no other life is possible; consequently that if they should be deprived of that life, they would altogether cease to live; for they who are in that life can in no wise know what spiritual and heavenly life is. then yet the fact is that when they are deprived of that life of the affection of self and of the world, then life flows in from the Lord such as is the angelic and heavenly life, together with ineffable wisdom and happiness and when the former life is viewed from this life, it appears as no life, or as the unclean life of brute animals, inasmuch as there is nothing of the Divine therein, except that they can think and speak, and thus appear in external form like others.

[3] In respect to the circumstance that good had the purpose to invert the state and deprive truth of self-derived life, which is signified by Esau comforting himself for Jacob to kill him, the case is this With a man who is being regenerated, the good in him is continually in the purpose to invert the state, and to reduce it into such order that truth may not be in the prior place, but in the posterior; as is consonant with the state of heaven. but this purpose lies deeply concealed, nor is it observed until the purpose has been effected. The case herein is as it is with conjugial love, which does not appear during infancy and childhood, but still lies hidden within nor does it come forth until each and all things have been so disposed that it can manifest itself; meanwhile it produces all means that are suited to itself; that is, they are produced. The case is the same in the vegetable kingdom: in every tree and in every plant there lies inmostly concealed an endeavor to produce fruits or seeds; but this endeavor cannot manifest itself until it has first produced all the means, namely, branches, leaves, and flowers, which being produced the endeavor comes forth into act.

[4] So also is it with those who are born anew: the conjugial principle of good and truth long lies hidden within; but still it is present as an endeavor in the efficient cause and thence in the effect; yet it does not appear until all things have been disposed into order; and when they have been so disposed, it for the first time comes forth and manifests itself. It is this endeavor which is meant by the purpose to invert the state and deprive truth of self-derived life. Hence it is manifest that the internal sense is altogether different from that which is expressed in the sense of the letter, namely, that it treats of the reduction of truth into order, and its vivification, and not of the destruction and privation of its life.

AC 3611. And now my son hearken unto my voice, and arise. That this signifies delay as yet, is evident from the signification of "hearkening to a voice," as being to obey; namely, that he should tarry yet in that inverted state, which is the subject treated of in what follows.

AC 3612. Flee thou to Laban my brother to Haran. That this signifies to the affection of external or corporeal good, is evident from the representation of Laban, as being the affection of good in the natural man (n. 3129, 3130, 3160); and from the signification of "Haran," as being what is external and thence relatively obscure (n. 1430) but what is here properly signified by Laban" and "Haran" may be seen from what follows, where mention is made of Laban and Haran, namely, that it is the collateral good of a common stock; for goods and truths have a conjunction among themselves like that of parents, brethren, kinsmen, and relations, in families (n. 685, 917, 2508, 2524, 2556, 2739). But these things are altogether hidden from the man who is not in the life of good, and who does not even know what good is, and thus not what truth is; if he first knew these, that is, if he did so from doctrine conjoined with life, or from life conjoined with doctrine, he would then know and perceive innumerable things concerning good and truth, and this successively more and more distinctly, and afterwards their mutual and correlative conjunctions with each other, and at last their proximities in their series, and in each proximity again things innumerable; thus lastly heaven in its form, that is, in its beauty and happiness.

AC 3613. And tarry with him some days. That this signifies what is successive, is evident from the signification of "to tarry," as being the like as "to dwell," thus as "to live" (n. 1293, 2268, 2451, 2712, 3384), but "to tarry" is predicated of the life of truth with good, and "to dwell," of the life of good with truth; and from the signification of "days," as being times and states (n. 23, 487, 488, 493, 2788, 3462); thus it is the life of subsequent times and states, consequently what is successive, that is here signified by "tarrying with him some days." This successive condition-that is, the tarrying of Jacob with Laban-is treated of in the chapters which follow.

AC 3614. Until thy brother’s wrath turn away. That this signifies until the state turns thereto; and that until thy brother‘s anger turn away from thee signifies what is successive of the state with natural good, is evident from the signification of "wrath" and "anger," as being states which are repugnant, as will be shown in what follows. When these states become such that they are no longer repugnant, but begin to conjoin themselves, it is then said that "wrath turns away," and that "anger turns away;" hence it is that "until thy brother’s wrath turns away" signifies until the state turns thereto; and that "until thy brother‘s anger turn away" signifies what is successive of the state with natural good. That "wrath" involves one thing, and anger" another, may be seen from the words being in other respects alike, and that otherwise there would be an idle repetition, namely, "until thy brother’s wrath turn away" and "until thy brother‘s anger turn away.’ That is implied in each expression is manifest from the general explication, and also from the predication of wrath and the predication of anger for wrath is predicated of truth, here of the truth of good, which is represented by Esau; whereas "anger" is predicated of this good itself.

[2] "wrath" and "anger" are frequently mentioned in the Word, but in the internal sense they do not signify wrath and anger, but repugnance, and this for the reason that whatever is repugnant to any affection produces wrath or anger, so that in the internal sense they are only repugnances; but the repugnance of truth is called "wrath," and the repugnance of good is called "anger;" and in the opposite sense "wrath" is the repugnance of falsity or its affection, that is, of the principles of falsity; and "anger" is the repugnance of evil or its cupidity, that is, of the love of self and the love of the world. In this sense "wrath" is properly wrath, and "anger" is anger; but when they are predicted of good and truth, "wrath" and "anger" are zeal; which zeal, because in external form it appears like wrath and anger, therefore in the sense of the letter" is also so called.

[3] That in the internal sense "wrath" and "anger" are merely repugnances, may be seen from the following passages in the Word. In Isaiah:--

Jehovah hath heat against all the nations, and wrath against all their army (Isa. 34:2).

The "heat of Jehovah against the nations" denotes repugnance against evil. "Nations" are evils, (n. 1259, 1260, 1849, 1868, 2588); "wrath against all their army" denotes repugnance against the derivative falsities. The "stars," which are called the "army of the heavens," are knowledges, and thus truths and in the opposite sense falsities, (n. 1128, 1808, 2120, 2495, 2849). Again:--

Who gave Jacob for a prey, and Israel to the spoilers? did not Jehovah? He against whom we have sinned? Therefore he poured upon him the wrath of His anger (Isa. 42:24, 25).

The "wrath of anger" denotes repugnance against the falsity of evil; "Jacob," those who are in evil; and Israel," those who are in falsity.

[4] Again:--

I have trodden the wine-press alone and of the peoples there was no man with Me; and I have trodden them in Mine anger, and destroyed them in My wrath and I trampled the peoples in Mine anger, and made them drunk in My wrath (Isa. 63:3, 6);

where the Lord is treated of and His victories in temptations to "tread and trample in anger" denotes victories over evils; and to "destroy and make drunk in wrath," victories over falsities to "trample upon," in the Word, is predicated of evil; and to "make drunken," of falsity. In Jeremiah:--

Thus saith the Lord Jehovih, Behold, Mine anger and My wrath shall be poured out upon this place, upon man, and upon beast, and upon the tree of the field, and upon the fruit of the ground and it shall burn and shall not be quenched (Jer. 7:20);

where mention is made of both "anger" and "wrath," because both evil and falsity are treated of.

[5] It is usual with the Prophets in speaking of evil to speak also of falsity, as in speaking of good to speak also of truth, and this because of the heavenly marriage, which is the marriage of good and truth, in everything of the Word (n. 683, 793, 801, 2173, 2516, 2712); hence also both "anger" and "wrath" are mentioned; otherwise one term would have been sufficient. In the same Prophet:--

I Myself will fight with you with an outstretched hand and with a strong arm, even in anger, and in wrath, and in great heat; and I will smite the inhabitants of this city, both man and beast (Jer. 21:5, 6).

Here in like manner "anger" is predicated of the punishment of evil, and " wrath," of the punishment of falsity, and "heat," of the punishment of both; "anger" and " wrath," because they denote repugnance, also denote punishment; for things which are repugnant come into collision, and then evil and falsity are punished; for in evil there is repugnance to good, and in falsity there is repugnance to truth; and because there is repugnance, there is also collision; that from this comes punishment may be seen above (n. 696, 967).

[6] In Ezekiel:--

Thus shall Mine anger be consummated, and I will make My wrath to rest upon them, and I will comfort Myself, and they shall know that I Jehovah have spoken in My zeal when I have consummated My wrath upon them, when I shall do judgments in thee in anger and in wrath and in the reproofs of wrath (Ezek. 5:13, 15);

where also "anger" denotes the punishment of evil; "wrath," the punishment of falsity, from its repugnance and consequent attack. In Moses:--

It shall not please Jehovah to pardon him, because then the anger of Jehovah and His zeal shall smoke against that man. And Jehovah shall separate him unto evil out of all the tribes of Israel. The whole land thereof shall be brimstone and salt, and a burning; it shall not be sown, and shall not bud, neither shall therein any herb come up like the overthrow of Sodom and Gomorrah, Admah and Zeboim, which Jehovah overthrew in His anger and in His wrath; and all the nations shall say, Wherefore hath Jehovah done thus unto this land? what meaneth the heat of this great anger? (Deut. 29:20-24).

Inasmuch as " Sodom" denotes evil, and "Gomorrah" the derivative falsity (n. 2220, 2246, 2322), and the nation of which Moses here speaks is compared thereto in respect to evil and falsity, therefore "anger" is spoken of in respect to evil, and "wrath" in respect to falsity, and "heat of anger" in respect to both. That such things are attributed to Jehovah or the Lord is according to the appearance, because it so appears to man when he runs into evil and the evil punishes him (n. 245, 592, 696, 1093, 1683, 1874, 2395, 2447, 3235, 3605).

AC 3615. And he forget that which thou hast done to him. That this signifies habit acquired from the delay, is evident from the signification here of forgetting," as being the successive abolition of repugnance; and as this is effected by means of delay add the consequent habit, therefore this is signified by "and he forget that which thou hast done unto him."

AC 3616. And I will send and take thee from thence. That this signifies then the end, is evident from what goes before and from what follows; for the end, which is here signified by "sending and taking thee from thence," is when truth is in agreement with good, and thus truth serves in subordination to good; this end, after the tarrying of Jacob with Laban was ended, is represented by Esau when he ran to meet Jacob, and embraced him, and fell upon his neck, and kissed him, and they wept (Gen. 33:4) for when the end is, that is, the conjunction, then the good of the rational flows immediately into the good of the natural, and through the good into its truth, and also mediately through the truth of the rational into the truth of the natural, and through this into the good therein (n. 3573). From this it is evident why it was said by Rebekah, by whom is represented the truth of the rational, to Jacob, by whom is represented the truth of the natural, I will send and take thee from thence."

AC 3617. Why should I be bereaved even of you both in one day? That this signifies that otherwise there would be no conjunction, is evident from the fact that if those things were not done which in the internal sense are represented in what follows by Jacob sojourning with Laban, truth could not have been conjoined with good, thus good could not have been united to the truth in the natural, consequently the rational would be deprived of both; for without the conjunction in the natural of truth with good, and the unition of good with truth, there is no regeneration, which in the relative sense is the subject treated of in this chapter. This also is the conclusion of that which goes before.

AC 3618. Verse 46. And Rebekah said to Isaac, I loathe my life because of the daughters of Heth; if Jacob should take a woman of the daughters of Heth, such as these, of the daughters of the land, wherefore have I lives? "And Rebekah said to Isaac," signifies the Lord‘s perception from Divine truth; "I loathe my life because of the daughters of Heth," signifies the adjunction of natural truth from another source; "if Jacob should take a woman of the daughters of Heth," signifies that natural truth should not be associated therewith; "such as these, of the daughters of the land," signifies because not from that ground; "wherefore have I lives?" signifies that thus there would not be conjunction.

AC 3619. And Rebekah said to Isaac. That this signifies the Lord’s perception from Divine truth, is evident from the signification of "saying," as being to perceive; from the representation of Rebekah as being the Divine truth of the Lord‘s Divine rational; and from the representation of Isaac as being the Divine good therein; and whereas Divine good is being itself, and Divine truth is the derivative life, on which account the Lord is the Lord principally from Divine good, therefore it is said "the Lord’s perception from Divine truth." Perception from the Divine truth of the rational is from the intellectual part, whereas perception from Divine good is from the will part; but perception from the intellectual part is not of this part, but is of the inflowing will part; for the intellectual part is nothing but the will part in form. Such is the intellectual part when conjoined with the will part; but before it is so conjoined the intellectual part appears to be by itself, and the will part by itself, although this is nothing but that the external separates itself from the internal; for when the intellectual part inwardly wills and thinks anything, there is an end from the will part which makes its life, and directs the thinking there. The reason why the intellectual part has life from the end, is that the end with man is his life (n. 1909, 3570); hence it may in some measure be evident what in the representative sense is anyone‘s perception from truth, and what in the supreme sense is the Lord’s perception from Divine truth.

AC 3620. I loathe my life because of the daughters of Heth. That this signifies the adjunction of natural truth from another source, is evident from the signification of " loathing one‘s life," as being no adjunction, namely, of natural truth to the truth of the rational, for when there is not adjunction, then to the rational its life appears as if it were no life, as may be seen from what was said above (n. 3493); and from the signification of the "daughters of Heth," as being the affections of truth from what is not genuine; here, the affections of natural truth, because spoken of Jacob, by whom natural truth is represented, as before show". "Daughters" are affections, (n. 2362); and Heth" or " Hittite," is truth from what is not genuine, (n. 3470). Hence it is evident that by "I loathe my life because of the daughters of Heth," is signified that there could be no adjunction of the natural through truth which is not from what is genuine; thus that there must be the adjunction of natural truth from another source. The adjunction of natural truth is treated of in what follows, where mention is made of Jacob’s stay with Laban, namely, that truths from a common stock were adjoined thereto; and by the truths which the daughters of Heth represent, because they were not from that stock, no adjunction could be effected, since there was disparity and discordance for by the sons of Heth is represented the spiritual church among the Gentiles (n. 2913, 2986), in which, as they have not the Word, the truths are not from that origin.

AC 3621. If Jacob should take a woman of the daughters of Heth. That this signifies that natural truth should not be associated thereto, is evident from the signification of "taking a woman," as being to be associated; and from the signification of the "daughters of Heth," as being the affections of truth from what is not genuine (n. 3620); or what is the same, truth for truth without affection is not conjoined (n. 3066, 3336). How the case is with these things is evident from what was said above concerning the daughters of Heth.

AC 3622. Such as these, of the daughters of the land. That this signifies because not from that ground, that is, from truths of the genuine church, is evident from the signification of "daughters," as being churches for "daughters" signify the affections of good and truth (n. 2362); and "land" signifies the region where the church is, thus the church (n. 662, 1066, 1067, 1262, 1733, 1850, 2117, 2118, 2928, 3355) thus the "daughters of the land" are the goods and truths of the church.

AC 3623. Wherefore have I lives? That this signifies that thus there would not be conjunction, is evident from the signification of "lives," as being conjunction through truths and goods; for when no truth from a common stock or genuine source could be adjoined to natural truth, then neither would there be the adjunction of the natural to the truth of the rational; thus to the rational its life would appear as no life (n. 3493, 3620); hence by the words, "wherefore have I lives?" is signified that thus there would not be conjunction. The reason why here and in other passages lives are spoken of in the plural, is that there are two faculties of life in man; one of which is called the understanding, and is of truth; and the other of which is called the will, and is of good; these two lives or faculties of life make a one when the understanding is of the will, or what is the same, when truth is of good. This is the reason why in the Hebrew tongue frequent mention is made of "life," and also of "lives." That mention is made of "lives," is evident from the following passages in Genesis:--

And Jehovah God formed man dust from the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of lives, and man became a living soul (Gen. 2:7).

And out of the ground made Jehovah God to grow every tree that is desirable to the sight, and good for food and the tree of lives in the midst of the garden (Gen. 2:9).

Behold I do bring the flood of waters upon the earth, to destroy all flesh wherein is the breath of lives (Gen. 6:17).

And they went in unto Noah into the ark, two, two, of all flesh wherein is the breath of lives (Gen. 7:15, n. 780).

All in whose nostrils was the breathing of the breath of lives died (Gen. 6:22).

And in David:--

I believe to see the goodness of Jehovih in the land of lives (Ps. 27:13).

Again:--

What man is he that desireth lives, and loveth days that he may see good (Ps. 34:12).

Again:--

With Thee is the fountain of lives; in Thy light shall we see light (Ps. 36:9).

In Malachi:--

My covenant was with Levi of lives and peace (Mal. 2:5).

In Jeremiah:--

Thus saith Jehovah, Behold I set before you the way of lives, and the way of death (Jer. 21:8).

In Moses:--

To love Jehovah thy God, and to obey His voice, and to cleave unto Him for He is thy lives, and the length of thy days that thou mayest dwell in the land (Deut. 30:20).

And again:--

It is not a vain word from you, because it is your lives, and through this word ye shall prolong your days upon the land (Deut. 32:47)

and in other places. "Lives" are spoken of in the plural because they are two, as was said, and yet a one; as also in the Hebrew tongue are "heavens," which are many, and yet a one; in like manner "waters," those above and those beneath (Gen. 1:6, 7, 9), which are spiritual things pertaining to the rational and the natural, and which also are to be a one through conjunction. In respect to "lives," they signify in the plural both what is of the will and what is of the understanding, consequently what is of good and what is of truth; for the life of man is nothing else than good and truth wherein is life from the Lord, inasmuch as man, without good and truth, and life therein, is no man; for man without these would not be able to will anything or think anything, all his faculty of willing being from what is good or what is not good, and his faculty of thinking from what is true or what is not true; hence man has lives, which are one life when his thinking is from his willing, that is, when the truth which is of faith is from the good which is of love.

CONCERNING THE CORRESPONDENCE OF ALL MAN‘S ORGANS AND MEMBERS, BOTH INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR, WITH THE GRAND MAN, WHICH IS HEAVEN

AC 3624. It is now permitted to relate and describe wonderful things which, so far as I know, have not as yet been known to anyone, nor have even entered into the mind of anyone, namely, that the universal heaven is so formed as to correspond to the Lord, to His Divine Human; and that man is so formed as to correspond to heaven in regard to each and all things in him, and through heaven to the Lord. This is a great mystery which is now to be revealed, and which shall be treated of here and at the close of the subsequent chapters.

AC 3625. It is from this ground that it has been occasionally said above, in speaking of heaven and the angelic societies, that they belong to some province of the body; as to that of the head, or that of the breast, or of the abdomen, or of some member or organ therein; and this because of the correspondence here spoken of.

AC 3626. That there is such a correspondence is perfectly well known in the other life, not only to angels, but also to spirits, and even to the wicked. Angels know from it the most hidden things in man and the most hidden things in the world and in its universal nature, as has very often been made manifest to me from the fact that when I spoke of any part of man, they, from their mental view into the heavenly order which they followed, to which the order of that part corresponded, not only knew all the structure of that part, its manner of acting and use, but likewise innumerable things besides, more than man is ever capable of exploring or even understanding, and this in their order and in their series. Thus being in first principles, they thence know the things which are from these.

AC 3627. It is a general rule that nothing can exist and subsist from itself, but from something else, that is, through something else, and that nothing can be kept in form except from, that is, through it, as is evident from each and everything in nature. That on the outside the human body is kept in form by the atmospheres, is known; and unless it were also kept in form within by some acting or living force, it would fall to pieces in a moment; for everything unconnected with what is prior to itself, and through things prior with the First, instantly perishes. That the Grand Man, or influx therefrom, is that prior by which man as to each and all things in him is connected with the First, that is, with the Lord, will appear from what follows.

AC 3628. On this subject I have been instructed by much experience, and indeed that not only the things pertaining to the human mind, namely to its thought and affection, correspond to things spiritual and celestial which are of heaven from the Lord, but also the whole man in general, and in particular whatever is in man; insomuch that there is not the smallest part, nor even the smallest constituent of a part, which does not correspond; also that man exists and continually subsists therefrom; and further, that unless there were such a correspondence of man with heaven, and through heaven with the Lord, thus with what is prior to himself, and through prior things with the First, he would not subsist even a moment, but would dissolve into nothing.

[2] There are always two forces which, as before said, keep everything in its connection and in its form, namely, a force acting from without, and a force acting from within, in the midst of which forces is that which is kept in connection and form; thus is it with man as to every part of him, even the most minute. That the atmospheres are that which from without keep the whole body in connection, by their continual pressure or incumbence and the consequent acting force, is known; and also that the aerial atmosphere by its inflow keeps the lungs in their connection and form, and likewise its organ which is the ear, with its forms constructed therein according to the modifications of the air. It is also known that the ethereal atmosphere in like manner maintains the interior connections; for this atmosphere flows in freely through all the pores, and keeps the interior viscera of the whole body inseparable in their forms, by nearly the same pressure or incumbence, and the consequent acting force; also that the same atmosphere keeps in connection and form its organ which is the eye, with its forms therein constructed to the modifications of the ether. Unless there were internal forces correspondent to these which should react against the external forces and thus keep the intermediate forms in connection and equilibrium, they would not subsist a moment.

[3] From this it is evident that in order that anything may exist and subsist there must needs be two forces. The forces which flow in and act from within are from heaven and through heaven from the Lord, and have in themselves life. This is very clearly manifest from the organ of hearing: unless there were interior modifications, which are of life, and to which correspond the exterior modifications which are of the air, there would be no hearing. The same is also evident from the organ of sight: unless there were interior light which is of life, and to which corresponds the exterior light which is of the sun, no vision would be possible. The case is the same with all the other organs and members in the human body: there are forces acting from without, which are natural and in themselves not living, and there are forces acting from within, in themselves living, which keep every organ in its connection, and cause it to live, and this according to the form such as has been given them for use.

AC 3629. That the case is thus, few can believe, because men do not know what the spiritual is, and what the natural, and still less how these are distinguished from each other; also what correspondence is, and what influx and that the spiritual, when it flows into the organic forms of the body, presents living operations such as appear; and that without such influx and correspondence not even the most minute particle of the body can have life and be moved. As to these things I have been informed by living experience that not only heaven in general flows in, hut also the societies in particular; likewise what the societies are and of what quality which flow into this and that organ of the body, and into this and that member; and further, that there is not one society only which flows into each organ or member, but very many, and that in each society also there are very many for the more there are, so much the better and stronger is the correspondence, inasmuch as perfection and strength are from the unanimous multitude of many who act as a one in a heavenly form hence results a more perfect and stronger endeavor into particulars according to the numbers.

AC 3630. From this it may be seen that the viscera and members, or organs of motion and sensation, correspond each and all to societies in heaven, thus as it were to so many distinct heavens; and that from those societies, that is, through them, celestial and spiritual things flow in with man, and this into adequate and suitable forms, and in this manner present the effects which are apparent to man. These effects however do not appear to man otherwise than as natural, thus altogether under another form and under another appearance, so that they cannot be known to be from heaven.

AC 3631. It was also once shown me to the life what societies they are, and of what quality, and how they flow in and act, which constitute the province of the face, and flow into the muscles of the forehead, of the cheeks, of the chin, and of the neck, and what communication there is between them. In order that this might be presented to the life, it was allowed them by means of influx and in various ways to present the appearance of a face. In like manner it was shown what societies, and of what quality, flow into the lips, into the tongue, into the eyes, and into the ears and it was also given to speak with them, and thus to be fully instructed. In this way it was made evident that all who come into heaven are organs or members of the Grand Man; and also that heaven is never shut, but that the greater its numbers the stronger is the endeavor, the stronger the force, and the stronger the action; and further, that the heaven of the Lord is immeasurable, so immeasurable as to exceed all belief; the inhabitants of this earth being very few in comparison, and almost as a pool compared with the ocean.

AC 3632. Divine order, and the heavenly order thence derived, are not terminated except in man, in what is of his body, namely, in his gestures, actions, looks, speech, external sensations, and their delights. These are the extremes of order, and the extremes of influx, which are then terminated; but the interior things which flow in are not such as they appear in externals, but have altogether a different appearance, a different countenance, a different sensation, and a different pleasure. Correspondences teach of what sort these are, and also representations, which have been described. That there is such a difference may be seen from the actions which flow from the will, and from the speech which flows from the thought-the actions of the body are not such in the will, nor are the expressions of speech such in the thought. Hence also it is manifest that natural acts flow from spiritual, for that which is of the will and of the thought is spiritual; and that these spiritual are effigied in those natural acts correspondently, but still differently.

AC 3633. All spirits and angels appear to themselves as men; of such a face and such a body, with organs and members; and this for the reason that their inmost conspires to such a form; just as the primitive of man, which is from the soul of the parent, endeavors toward the formation of the whole man in the ovum and the womb, although this primitive is not in the form of the body, but in another most perfect form known to the Lord alone; and inasmuch as the inmost with every one in like manner conspires and endeavors toward such a form, therefore all there appear as men. Moreover the universal heaven is such that every one is as it were the center of all, for he is the center of influxes from all through the heavenly form; and hence an image of heaven results in every one, and makes him like unto itself, thus a man; for such as the general is, such is a part of the general, inasmuch as the parts must be like their general, in order that they may be of it.

AC 3634. A man who is in correspondence, that is, who is in love to the Lord and in charity toward the neighbor, and thence in faith, is as to his spirit in heaven, and as to his body in the world; and because he thus acts as one with the angels, he is also an image of heaven and as there is an influx of all, or a general influx into the particulars or parts, as before said, he is also a little heaven under a human form; for man has from good and truth that he is man and is distinguished from brute animals.

AC 3635. There are in the human body two things which are the fountains of all its motion, and also of all external or mere bodily action and sensation, namely, the heart and the lungs. These two correspond in such a manner to the Grand Man or heaven of the Lord that the celestial angels therein constitute one kingdom, and the spiritual another kingdom, for the kingdom of the Lord is celestial and spiritual. The celestial kingdom consists of those who are in love to the Lord; the spiritual kingdom of those who are in charity toward the neighbor (n. 2088, 2669, 2715, 2718, 3235, 3246). The heart and its kingdom in man correspond to the celestial angels; the lungs and their kingdom correspond to the spiritual. The angels also flow into the things which are of the heart and lungs, so that these things exist and subsist by influx from them. But the correspondence of the heart and lungs with the Grand Man will of the Lord’s Divine mercy be treated of specifically.

AC 3636. This is a most universal truth: That the Lord is the Sun of heaven, and that from this Sun is all the light in the other life; and that to angels and spirits, or those who are in the other life, nothing at all of the light of the world appears; and also that the light of the world, which is from its sun, is only thick darkness to angels. From the Sun of heaven, or from the Lord, there is not only light, but also heat but it is spiritual light and spiritual heat. To the angels‘ eyes this light appears as light, but has within it intelligence and wisdom, because this is its source; and by their senses this heat is perceived as heat, but there is within it love, because this is its source. For this reason love is also called spiritual heat, and likewise constitutes the heat of man’s life; and intelligence is called spiritual light, and likewise constitutes the light of man‘s life. From this universal correspondence all other correspondences are derived; for all things both in general and in particular the relation to the good which is of love, and to the truth which is of intelligence.

AC 3637. Relatively to man, the Grand Man is the Lord’s universal heaven; but in the supreme sense the Grand Man is the Lord alone, for heaven is from Him, and all things therein correspond to Him. Inasmuch as by a life of evil and the consequent persuasions of falsity, the human race had become altogether perverted, and as the lower things with man then began to dominate over the higher, or his natural things over the spiritual, so that Jehovah or the Lord could no longer flow in through the Grand Man, that is heaven, and reduce them into order, there was a consequent necessity for the coming of the Lord into the world, that thereby He might put on the human, and make it Divine, and by it restore order, so that the universal heaven might have relation to Him as the Only Man, and might correspond to Him alone; those who were in evil and thence in falsity being rejected beneath the feet, thus out of the Grand Man. Hence they who are in the heavens are said to be in the Lord, even in His Body; for the Lord is the all of heaven, in whom all and each are assigned their provinces and offices.

AC 3638. From this it is that in the other life all societies, how many soever they may be, keep their situation constant in respect to the Lord, who appears like a sun to the universal heaven; and what is wonderful, and can scarcely be credited by anyone, because not apprehended, the societies there keep the same situation in respect to each individual, wherever he may be, and however he may turn himself and move about- as for instance, the societies which appear on the right are continually at his right, and those which appear on the left are continually at his left, however he changes his position as to face and body. This also it has been given me frequently to observe in turning the body. Thus it is manifest that the form of heaven is such as to bear a constant relation to a Grand Man relatively to the Lord; and that all the angels are not only with the Lord, but in the Lord; or what is the same, that the Lord is with them, and in them; otherwise this condition would not exist.

AC 3639. Hence all situations in heaven are determined with respect to the human body, according to their points of direction from it; that is, on the right, on the left, forward, and backward, in whatever position; as also according to planes, as in the plane of the head and of its parts, as of the forehead, the temples, the eyes, and the ears; in the plane of the body, the plane of the shoulders, of the breast, the abdomen, the loins, the knees, the feet, and the soles of the feet; likewise above the head, and beneath the soles of the feet, at every degree of obliquity; at the back also, from the hinder part of the head downward. It is known from the very situation what the societies are, and to what provinces of man‘s organs and members they belong, and this in all cases infallibly; but more is known from their genius and disposition as to affections.

AC 3640. The hells, which are very numerous, have also a constant situation, so that from their mere situation it may be known what they are, and of what quality. With their situation the case is similar-all the hells beneath man are in planes in every direction under the soles of the feet. Some spirits from them appear also above the head, and elsewhere scatteredly; but it is not that they have their situation there, for the same is a persuasive phantasy which deceives and counterfeits in respect to their situation.

AC 3641. All, both they who are in heaven and they who are in hell, appear erect, with the head upward and the feet downward; when nevertheless in themselves, and according to angelic vision, they are in a different position. That is to say, they who are in heaven have their heads toward the Lord, who is the Sun there, and thus is the common center from whom is all position and situation; whereas in the sight of the angels the infernals have their heads downward and their feet upward, thus in a position opposite, and also oblique; for to the infernals that is beneath which to the celestials is above, and that is above which to the celestials is beneath. From this it is in some degree manifest how heaven may as it were make a one with hell; or how they may together present a one in situation and position.

AC 3642. One morning I was in company with angelic spirits, who according to custom acted in unity of thought and speech. This penetrated also toward hell, into which it was continued, insomuch that they appeared as it were to act as a one with the infernals but the reason was that the good and truth with the angels was by a wonderful turning changed with the infernals into evil and falsity, and this by degrees as it flowed down, where hell acted as a one by persuasions of falsity and by cupidities of evil. Notwithstanding that the hells are out of the Grand Man, they are nevertheless in this manner reduced as it were into a one, and thereby are kept in order, according to which are their consociations; thus the Lord from His Divine directs the hells also.

AC 3643. It was observed that they who are in the heavens are in a serene aura of light, like the light of morning and of noon, also verging to evening; and in like manner that they are in heat as of spring, of summer, and of autumn; whereas they who are in hell are in an atmosphere gross, cloudy, and dark, and are also in cold. It was observed that between these in general there is an equilibrium; also that in proportion as the angels are in love, charity, and the derivative faith, in the same proportion they are in an aura of light and of vernal heat; and in proportion as the infernals are in hatred, and thence in falsity, in the same proportion they are in thick darkness and in cold. As before said in the other life the light has intelligence within it, the heat has within it love, the thick darkness insanity, and the cold hatred.

AC 3644. As to their souls, or what is the same, as to the spirit which is to live after the body’s decease, all men in the universal world have a situation either in the Grand Man (that is, in heaven), or outside of it in hell. During his life in this world man is not aware of this; but still he is there, and is thereby directed. All are in heaven in accordance with their good of love and the derivative truth of faith; and in hell in accordance with their evil of hatred and the derivative falsity.

AC 3645. The universal kingdom of the Lord is a kingdom of ends and uses. It has been given me manifestly to perceive this Divine sphere of ends and uses, and certain things at the same time which are inexpressible. Each and all things flow forth from this sphere, and are directed by it. In so far as the affections, thoughts, and actions have within them the end to do good from the heart, so far the man, spirit, or angel is in the Grand Man, that is, in heaven; but in so far as a man or spirit has the end to do evil from the heart, so far he is out of the Grand Man, that is, is in hell.

AC 3646. With brute animals the case is similar to what it is with men in respect to influxes and correspondences, namely, that with them there is an influx from the spiritual world and an afflux from the natural world by which they are held together and live; but the very operation exhibits itself in different ways in accordance with the forms of their souls and thence of their bodies. The case is as with the light of the world, which flows into various objects of the earth in a like degree and manner, and nevertheless acts diversely in different forms, producing beautiful colors in some, and colors not beautiful in others. So when spiritual light flows into the souls of brutes, it is received altogether differently, and thus actuates them differently from what it does when it flows into the souls of men.

[2] For the latter are in a higher degree, and in a more perfect state, and are such that they can look upward, thus to heaven and to the Lord, and therefore the Lord can adjoin them to Himself, and give them eternal life; but the souls of brutes are such that they cannot do otherwise than look downward, thus to earthly things alone, and therefore can be adjoined solely to such things wherefore also they perish together with the body. The ends are what show the quality of the life which man has and the quality of the life which beasts have. Man is able to have spiritual and heavenly ends; he may see them, acknowledge them, believe them, and be affected with them; whereas beasts can have no other than natural ends. Thus man is able to be in the Divine sphere of ends and uses which is in heaven and which constitutes heaven; but beasts cannot be in any other sphere than that of earthly ends and uses. Ends are nothing but loves, for that which is loved is regarded as the end.

[3] The reason why very many men do not know how to distinguish between their life and the life of beasts, is that they in like manner are in external things, and at heart are solely concerned about earthly, bodily, and worldly objects; and much persons believe themselves to be like the beasts in respect to life also, and suppose that after death they will be dissipated like them; for as to what spiritual and celestial things are they know not, because they care not. Hence comes the insanity of our age, in that men compare themselves to brute beasts and do not see the internal distinction; but he who believes in celestial and spiritual things, or suffers spiritual light to flow in and act, sees altogether differently, and likewise how far he is above brute animals. But the life of brute animals will of the Lord‘s Divine mercy be treated of separately.

AC 3647. How the case is with these things has also been shown. It was given me to see and perceive certain ones as they entered into the other life who in the life of the body had regarded only earthly things and had nothing else as their end; nor had they been initiated by means of any knowledges into good and truth. They had belonged to the common crowd of sailors and of peasants. They appeared (as was also perceived) to have so little life that I thought it impossible for them to receive eternal life like other spirits, being like machines, little animated but the angels had tender care for them, and through the faculty which they possessed as men insinuated into them the life of good and truth, whereby they were more and more led on from a life like that of animals to human life.

AC 3648. There is an influx from the Lord through heaven into the subjects also of the vegetable kingdom; as into trees of every kind, and into their fructifications and into plants of various kinds, and their multiplications. Unless a spiritual principle from the Lord within continually acted into their primitive forms, which are in the seeds, they would never vegetate and grow in so wonderful a manner and succession; but the forms therein are such that they do not receive anything of life. It is from this influx that they have within them an image of the eternal and infinite, as is evident from the fact that they are in the continual endeavor to propagate their kind and their species, and thus to live as it were forever, and also to fill the universe; this endeavor being in every seed. But man attributes all these marvelous things to mere nature, nor believes in any influx from the spiritual world, because at heart he denies it; although he might know that nothing can subsist except through that from which it has come forth; that is, that subsistence is a perpetual coming forth; or what is the same, production is continual creation. That hence universal nature is a theater representative of the Lord’s kingdom, may be seen above (n. 3483). But on this subject also, and on the correspondence of the vegetable kingdom with the Grand Man, of the Lord‘s Divine mercy something shall be said elsewhere.

AC 3649. The subject of the Grand Man and correspondence therewith will he continued at the close of the subsequent chapters.


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