HEAVENLY SECRETS
Emanuel Swedenborg

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AC GENESIS Chapter43

GENESIS 43:1-34

1. And the famine became grievous in the land,

2. And it came to pass when they had finished the eating of the produce which they had brought from Egypt, and their father said unto them, Go back, buy us a little food.

3. And Judah spake unto him, saying, Protesting the man did protest unto us, saying, Ye shall not see my faces except your brother be with you.

4. If thou wilt send our brother with us, we will go down and buy thee food,

5. And if thou wilt not send, we will not go down; for the man said unto us, Ye shall not see my faces except your brother be with you.

6. And Israel said, Wherefore dealt ye ill with me, to tell the man whether ye had yet a brother?

7. And they said, Asking the man asked unto us, and unto our birth, saying, Is your father yet alive? have ye a brother? and we told him according to the mouth of these words.  Knowing could we know that he would say, Bring your brother down?

8. And Judah said unto Israel his father, Send the boy with me, and we will arise and go; and we will live, and not die, both we and thou, and also our little ones.

9. I will be surety for him; of my hand shalt thou require him; if I bring him not unto thee, and set him before thee, then I shall sin to thee all the days.

10. For except we had lingered, surely we had now returned these two times.

11. And their father Israel said unto them, If therefore this be so, do this: take of the song of the land in your vessels, and carry down the man a present, a little resin and a little honey, wax and stacte, terebinth nuts and almonds.

12. And take double silver in your hands, and the silver that was returned in the mouth of your bags carry back in your hand; peradventure it was an error.

13. And take your brother, and arise, and return unto the man.

14. And God Shaddai give you mercies before the man, and send you your other brother and Benjamin. And I, as I have been bereaved, I shall be bereaved.

15. And the men took this present, and they took double silver in their hand, and Benjamin; and rose up, and went down to Egypt, and stood before Joseph.

16. And Joseph saw Benjamin with them, and he said to him that was over his house, Bring the men to the house, and slaying slay, and make ready; for the men shall eat with me at noon.

17. And the man did as Joseph said; and the man brought the men to Joseph‘s house.

18. And the men were afraid because they were brought to Joseph’s house; and they said, Over the word of the silver that was returned in our bags in the beginning are we brought; to roll down upon us, and to cast himself upon us, and to take us for servants, and our asses.

19. And they came near to the man that was over Joseph‘s house, and they spake unto him at the door of the house,

20. And said, In me, my lord, in coming down we came down in the beginning to buy food;

21. And it came to pass, when we came to the inn and we opened our bags, and behold everyone’s silver in the mouth of his bag, our silver in its weight; and we have brought it back in our hand.

22. And the other silver have we brought down in our hand to buy food; we know not who put our silver in our bags.

23. And he said, Peace be to you, fear not; your God and the God of your father gave you a hidden gift in your bags; your silver came to me.  And he brought Simeon out unto them.

24. And the man brought the men to Joseph‘s house, and gave water, and they washed their feet; and he gave their asses provender.

25. And they made ready the present against Joseph came at noon; for they heard that they should eat bread there.

26. And Joseph came to the house, and they brought him the present which was in their hand to the house, and bowed down themselves to him to the earth.

27. And he asked them to peace, and said, Is there peace to your father, the old man of whom ye spake?  Is he yet alive?

28. And they said, There is peace to thy servant our father; he is yet alive.  And they bent themselves, and bowed themselves down.

29. And he lifted up his eyes, and saw Benjamin his brother, his mother’s son, and said, Is this your youngest brother, of whom ye spake unto me?  And be said, God be gracious unto thee, my son.

30. And Joseph made haste, for his compassions were moved toward his brother; and he sought to weep, and he came to the bed-chamber, and wept there.

31. And he washed his faces, and went out, and he restrained himself, and said, Set on bread.

32. And they set on for him alone, and for them alone, and for the Egyptians who did eat with him, alone; because the Egyptians cannot eat bread with the Hebrews; because this is an abomination to the Egyptians.

33. And they sat before him, the firstborn according to his birthright, and the youngest according to his youth; and the men were amazed, everyone at his companion.

34. And he brought out portions from his faces unto them and he multiplied Benjamin‘s portion above the portions of them all, five measures.  And they drank and drank largely with him.

THE CONTENTS

AC 5574. The subject is continued of the conjunction in the natural of the truths of the church, which are the ”ten sons of Jacob,“ with the celestial of the spiritual, or truth from the Divine, which is ”Joseph,“ through the intermediate which is ”Benjamin;“ but in this chapter, in the internal sense, only the general influx which precedes conjunction is treated of.

THE INTERNAL SENSE

AC 5575. Verses 1-5. And the famine became grievous in the land.  And it came to pass when they had finished the eating of the produce which they had brought from Egypt, and their father said unto them, Go back, buy us a little food.  And Judah spake unto him, saying, Protesting the man did protest unto us, saying, Ye shall not see my faces except your brother be with you.  If thou wilt send out brother with us, we will go down and buy thee food.  And if thou wilt not send, we will not go down; for the man said unto us, Ye shall not see my faces except your brother be with you.  ”And the famine became grievous,“ signifies desolation from want of spiritual things; ”in the land,“ signifies about the things that were of the church; ”and it came to pass,“ signifies what is new; ”when they had finished the eating of the produce,“ signifies when truths failed; ”which they had brought from Egypt,“ signifies which were from memory-knowledges; ”and their father said unto them,“ signifies perception from the things of the church; ”Go back, buy us a little food,“ signifies that in order to live they must procure for themselves the good of spiritual truth; ”and Judah spake unto him,“ signifies the good of the church; ”saying, Protesting the man did protest unto us,“ signifies that the spiritual derived from the internal was averse to them; ” saying, Ye shall not see my faces,“ signifies that there will be no compassion; ”except your brother be with you,“ signifies unless there is an intermediate for you; ”if thou wilt send our brother with us,“ signifies that if it is so done by the church that adjunction shall take place, there must be an intermediate; ”we will go down and buy thee food,“ signifies that then the good of truth will be procured there; ”and if thou wilt not send him,“ signifies if not; ”we will not go down,“ signifies that it cannot be procured; ”for the man said unto us,“ signifies perception concerning the spiritual; ”Ye shall not see my faces,“ signifies that there will be no compassion; ”except your brother be with you,“ signifies unless there is an intermediate for you.

AC 5576. And the famine became grievous.  That this signifies desolation from the want of spiritual things, is evident from the signification of ”famine,“ as being a lack of the knowledges of good and truth (n. 3364, 5277, 5279, 5281, 5300), and hence desolation (n. 5360, 5376, 5415); and because desolation comes from a scarcity and consequent want of spiritual things, this also is signified by ”famine.“

[2] Hunger in the spiritual world or in heaven is not hunger for food, because the angels do not feed upon material food, which is for the body that man carries about in the world; but it is hunger for such food as nourishes their minds.  This food, which is called spiritual food, is to understand truth and be wise in good; and wonderful to say the angels are nourished by this food; which has been made evident to me from the fact that after little children who die have been instructed in heaven in the truths of intelligence and the goods of wisdom, they no longer appear as little children, but as adults, and this according to their increase in good and truth; and also from the fact that the angels continually long for the things of intelligence and wisdom, and that when they are in the evening, that is, in a state in which these things fail, they are so far in what is relatively not happiness, and they then hunger and long for nothing more than that the morning may dawn for them afresh, and that they may return into their life of happiness, which is of intelligence and wisdom.

[3] That to understand truth and to will good is spiritual food, may also appear to everyone who reflects that when anyone is enjoying material food for the nourishment of the body, his food is more nourishing if he is at the same time in cheerful spirits and conversing on agreeable topics, which is a sign that there is a correspondence between spiritual food for the soul and material food for the body.  And the same is further evident from the fact that when one who longs to imbue his mind with the things of knowledge, intelligence, and wisdom, is kept from them, he begins to be saddened and distressed, and like one who is famished longs to return to his spiritual food, and thereby to the nourishment of his soul.

[4] That there is spiritual food which nourishes the soul as material food nourishes the body, may also be seen from the Word, as in Moses:--

Man doth not live by bread only; but by every utterance of the mouth of Jehovah doth man live (Deut. 8:3; Matt.  4:4).

The ”utterance of the mouth of Jehovah,“ is in general the Divine truth which proceeds from the Lord, thus all truth of wisdom, specifically the Word, in which and from which are the things of wisdom.  And in John:--

Labor not for the meat which perisheth, but for that meat which endureth unto everlasting life, which the Son of man shall give unto you (John 6:27);

that this meat is the truth of wisdom which proceeds from the Lord is evident.

[5] From this too it may be known what is meant by these words of the Lord in the same chapter:--

My flesh is meat indeed, and My blood is drink indeed (John 6:55);

namely, that the Lord’s ”flesh“ is Divine good (n. 3813), and His ”blood“ Divine truth (n. 4735); for when the Lord made His whole Human Divine, then His flesh was nothing else than Divine good, and His blood Divine truth.  It is evident that in the Divine nothing material is to be understood; and therefore ”food“ in the supreme sense, that is, when predicated of the Lord, is the good of the Divine love for saving the human race.  This food is what is meant by the Lord‘s words in John:--

Jesus said to the disciples, I have meat to eat that ye know not of. My meat is to do the will of Him that sent Me, and to perfect His work (John 4:32, 34);

”to do the will of Him that sent Him, and to perfect His work“ is to save the human race; the Divine from which this is done is the Divine love.  From all this it is now plain what is meant in the spiritual sense by ”famine.“

AC 5577. In the land.  That this signifies about the things that were of the church, is evident from the signification of ”land“ in the Word, as being the church, here therefore the things that are of the church, because anything that signifies the church, signifies also the things that are of the church; for these produce it.  That in the Word ”land“ signifies the church is because the land of Canaan was the place where the church had been from most ancient times.  So when ”land“ or ”earth“ is mentioned in the Word, the land of Canaan is meant; and when this is meant, the church is meant; for when a land is mentioned they who are in the spiritual world do not stay in the idea of the land, but in that of the nation which is there, nor in the idea of the nation, but in that of the quality of that nation; thus in the idea of the church when ”land“ is spoken of and the land of Canaan is meant.  From this it is plain how deluded are they who believe that at the day of the last judgment a new earth and new heaven will come into existence, according to the prophecies in the Old Testament, and in John in the New (where however by the ”new earth“ nothing else is meant than a new external church, and by the ”new heaven“ a new internal church), and also they who believe that anything but the church is meant where the ”whole earth“ is mentioned in the Word.  Hence it is plain how little they apprehend the Word who think there is no holier sense in it than that which shines forth from the letter alone.  That the church was in the land of Canaan from the most ancient times may be seen above (n. 3686, 4447, 4454, 4516, 4517, 5136); that by ”land“ in the Word is signified the church (n. 662, 1066, 1068, 1262, 1413, 1607, 2928, 4447); and that by the ”new heaven and new earth“ is signified a new church internal and external (n. 1733, 1850, 2117, 2118, 3355, 4535).

AC 5578. And it came to pass. That this signifies what is new, is evident from the signification of ”it was,“ or ”it came to pass,“ as involving a new state (n. 4979, 4987, 4999, 5074, 5466). In the original tongue the meaning was not at first distinguished by punctuation, but the text was continuous, in imitation of heavenly speech; and instead of punctuation marks, ”and“ was used, and also ”it was,“ or ”it came to pass.“ This is the reason why these words occur so often, and why ” it was,“ or ”it came to pass,“ signifies something new.

AC 5579. When they had finished the eating of the produce. That this signifies when truths failed, is evident from the signification of ”produce,“ as being truth (n. 5276, 5280, 5292, 5402); that truth failed is signified by their ”finishing the eating of it.“ Those who are in the spiritual world are sated with things true and good, for these are their food (n. 5576); but when these have served their purpose, they come again into want. This is as with the nourishment of man by material food when this has fulfilled its use, hunger comes on again.  The hunger that is a need of spiritual things, in the spiritual world is evening or the twilight of their day; but after it comes daybreak and morning.  Thus there are alternations there, They come into that evening or into spiritual hunger, in order that they may feel hungry and long for truths and goods, which yield them more nourishment when they are hungry, just as does material food to one who is famishing.  From all this it is evident what is meant by the need of spiritual things when truths failed.

AC 5580. Which they had brought from Egypt. That this signifies which were from memory-knowledges, is evident from the signification of ”Egypt,“ as being memory-knowledges (n. 1164, 1165, 1186, 1462); that they were ”from these,“ is signified by their ”bringing it thence.“ By ”Egypt“ in a good sense are signified the memory-knowledges of the church, namely, those which are of service for the form of the church (n. 4749, 4964, 4966).  By means of such knowledges man is introduced into the truths of the church as through a court into a house; for these knowledges are what first strike the senses, and thereby open a way to interior things; for it is known that the outward things of sense are first opened in man, and then the inner things of sense, and at last the things of the understanding; and that when these last have been opened, they are represented in the former so as to be comprehended. The reason is that things of the understanding arise from those of sense by a sort of extraction, for things of the understanding are conclusions, which when formed are separated, and rise to a higher plane.  This is brought about by the influx of spiritual things through heaven from the Lord.  From all this it is plain how it is that truths are from memory-knowledges.

AC 5581. And their father said unto them.  That this signifies perception from the things of the church, is evident from the signification of ”saying“ in the historicals of the Word, as being perception; and from the representation of Israel, who here is the ”father,“ as being the church. ”Israel“ is the internal spiritual church, and ”Jacob“ the external, (n. 4286, 4292, 4570). He is called ”father“ because by ”father“ in the Word is also signified the church, and likewise by ”mother;“ but by ”mother“ the church as to truth, and by ”father“ the church as to good.  The reason of this is that the church is a spiritual marriage, which is from good as the father, and from truth as a mother.

AC 5582. Go back, buy us a little food.  That this signifies that in order to live they must procure for themselves the good of spiritual truth, is evident from the signification of ”buying,“ as being to procure for one’s self and to appropriate (n. 4397, 5374, 5406, 5410, 5426); and from the signification of ”food,“ as being the good of truth (n. 5340, 5342), here the good of spiritual truth, for it is this good that is treated of in what follows.  That it means in order to live, follows,

AC 5583. And Judah shake unto him.  That this signifies the good of the church, is evident from the representation of Judah, as being the good of the church (n. 3654).  Judah‘s now speaking about Benjamin, and Reuben’s speaking about him before (Gen. 42:36, 37), is a secret which cannot be unfolded except from the internal sense. And so when Reuben spoke about Benjamin, Jacob was called ”Jacob“ (Gen. 42:36); while here when Judah speaks about him, Jacob is called ”Israel“ (verses 6, 8, 11).  That there is something involved in this no one can deny; but what it is cannot be known from the historical sense of the letter, So too in other places where Jacob is now called ”Jacob“ and now ”Israel“ (n. 4286).  The secret involved will of the Lord‘s Divine mercy he told in the following pages.  That Judah now speaks is because the subject treated of is the good of spiritual truth, that it is to be procured (n. 5582); and therefore Judah, who is the good of the church, speaks with Israel, who is the good of spiritual truth, and makes himself answerable for Benjamin, who is the intermediate; for the intermediate must be conjoined by means of good.

AC 5584. Saying, Protesting the man did protest unto us. That this signifies that the spiritual from the internal was averse to them, is evident from the signification of ”protesting to protest,“ as being to be averse; for he protested that they should not see his faces unless their brother were with them; such protesting is of aversion, for by not seeing his faces is signified that there will be no compassion; and from the representation of Joseph, as being the Divine spiritual, or what is the same, truth from the Divine (n. 3969), who here, being called ”the man,“ is the spiritual, or truth flowing in from the internal.

AC 5585. Saying, Ye shall not see my faces.  That this signifies that there will be no compassion, is evident from the signification of” faces“ when predicated of man, as being his interiors, that is, his affections and derivative thoughts (n. 358, 1999, 2434, 3527, 3573, 4066, 4796, 4797, 5102); but when predicated of the Lord, they denote mercy or compassion.  Therefore ”not to see his faces“ means that there will be no mercy, or no compassion; for in the supreme sense the Lord is here represented by Joseph. Not that the Lord has no compassion, for He is mercy itself; but when there is no intermediate that conjoins, it appears to the man as if there were no compassion in the Lord.  The reason is that if there is not a conjoining intermediate, there is no reception of good, and when there is no reception of good; there is evil in its stead.  If the man then cries to the Lord, and because he cries from evil and thus for himself against all others, is not heard, it appears to him as if there were no compassion. That the ”faces“ of Jehovah or the Lord denote mercy, is evident from the Word; for the ”face“ of Jehovah or the Lord in the proper sense denotes the Divine love itself; and because it denotes the Divine love, it denotes what is of mercy, for this from love is shown toward the human race steeped in miseries so great.

[2] That the ”face“ of Jehovah or the Lord is the Divine love, is evident from the face of the Lord when He was transfigured before Peter, James, and John, that is, when He showed them His Divine; for then  His face did shine as the sun (Matt. 17:2); that the ”sun“ is the Divine love may be seen shown above (n. 3038, 1521, 1529-1531, 2441, 2495, 3636, 3643, 4060, 4321, 4696).  The Lord’s Divine Itself never appeared in any face, but His Divine Human, and through this as in it the Divine love, or relatively to the human race, the Divine mercy. This Divine mercy in the Divine Human is called the ”angel of faces,“ in Isaiah:--

I will make mention of the mercies of Jehovah. He will recompense them according to His mercies, and according to the multitude of His mercies, and He became for them a Saviour. And the angel of His faces saved them, for the sake of His love, and for the sake of His pity (Isaiah 63:7-9);

it is called an ”angel“ because ”angels“ in the internal sense of the Word signify something of the Lord (n. 1925, 2821, 4085), here His mercy and therefore it is said ”the angel of His faces.“

[3] That the ”face“ of Jehovah or the Lord is mercy, and also peace and good, because these are of mercy, may likewise be seen from the following passages.  In the benediction:--

Jehovah make His faces to shine upon thee, and be merciful unto thee. Jehovah lift up His faces unto thee, and give thee peace (Num. 6:25, 26);

it is very evident that ”to make the faces to shine“ is to be merciful, and ”to lift up the faces“ is to give peace.  In David:--

God be merciful unto us, and bless us, and cause His faces to shine upon us (Ps. 67:2);

the ”faces“ here again denote mercy.  In the same:--

Bring us back O God, and cause Thy faces to shine, that we may be saved (Ps. 80:3, 7, 19);

with a similar meaning.  Again:--

Deliver me from the hands of mine enemies, and from them that persecute me. Make Thy faces to shine upon Thy servant (Ps. 31:15, 16; Ps. 119:134, 135).

In Daniel:--

Hear, O our God, the praying of Thy servant, and his prayers, and cause Thy faces to shine upon Thy sanctuary that Is desolate (Daniel 9:17);

”causing the faces to shine“ denoting to be merciful.

[4] In David:--

There are many that say, Who will make us see good? Lift up the light of Thy faces upon us (Ps. 4:6, 7);

”lifting up the light of the faces“ denotes to give good from mercy.  In Hosea:--

Let them seek My faces when distress is theirs; in the morning let them seek Me (Hosea 5:15).

Again in David:--

Seek ye My faces; thy faces Jehovah will I seek (Ps. 27:8, 9).

Again:--

Seek Jehovah and His strength; seek His faces continually (Ps. 105:4);

”to seek the faces of Jehovah“ denotes to seek His mercy.  Again:--

I shall see Thy faces in righteousness (Ps. 17:15);

and in Matthew:--

See that ye despise not one of these little ones; for I say unto you that their angels in the heavens do always behold the face of My Father who is in the heavens (Matthew 18:10);

”to behold the face of God“ denotes to enjoy peace and good from mercy.

[5] But the opposite is ”to conceal,“ or ” hide,“ and also ”to turn away the faces“ which signifies not to be merciful; as in Isaiah:--

In the overflowing of My anger I hid My faces from thee for a moment; but with mercy of eternity will I have mercy on thee (Isa. 54:8);

where the ”overflowing of anger“ denotes temptation, and because the Lord appears not to be merciful therein, it is said ”I hid My faces from thee for a moment.“ In Ezekiel:--

I will turn away My faces from them (Ezek. 7:22).

In David:--

How long wilt Thou forget me, O Jehovah? to eternity? How long wilt Thou hide Thy faces from me? (Ps. 13:1),

In the same:--

Hide not Thy faces from me; put not Thy servant away in anger (Ps. 27:9).

Again:--

Wherefore Jehovah dost Thou forsake my soul? why hidest Thou Thy faces from me? (Ps. 88:14),

And again:--

Make haste, answer me, O Jehovah; my spirit is consumed.  Hide not Thy faces from me, lest I become like them that go down into the pit. Cause me to hear Thy mercy in the morning (Ps. 143:7, 8).

And in Moses:--

My anger shall wax not against this people in that day, so that I will forsake them; and I will hide My faces from them, whence it will be for consuming; I will surely hide My faces in that day for all the evil which they have done (Deut. 31:17, 18);

[6] ”the anger waxing hot“ denotes a turning away (n. 5034); and ”hiding the faces“ denotes not being merciful.  These things are predicated of Jehovah or the Lord, although He is never angry, and never turns away or hides His faces; but it is so said from the appearance with the man who is in evil; for the man who is in evil turns himself away, and hides from himself the Lord‘s faces, that is, removes His mercy from himself.  That it is the evils in man that do this, may also be seen from the Word, as in Micah:--

Jehovah will hide His faces from them at that time, according as they have rendered their works evil (Micah 3:4).

In Ezekiel:--

Because they trespassed against Me, therefore I hid My faces from them. According to their uncleanness and according to their transgressions did I with them; and I hid My faces from them (Ezek. 39:23, 24).

And especially in Isaiah:--

It is your iniquities that separate between you and your God, and your sins do hide His faces from you (Isa. 59:2).

From these and many other passages the internal sense is plain, which here and there stands forth, and is found by him who seeks it.

AC 5586. Except your brother be with you.  That this signifies unless there is an intermediate for you, is evident from the representation of Benjamin, as being an intermediate (n. 5411, 5413, 5443).  The intermediate which Benjamin represents is the intermediate between the internal and the external, or between the spiritual and the natural man, and is the truth of good which proceeds from the truth from the Divine which is represented by Joseph.  This truth of good is called the spiritual of the celestial, and that this is ”Benjamin“ may be seen above (n. 3969, 4592).  Man’s internal and external are most distinct from each other, for his internal is in the light of heaven, and his external in the light of the world; and because they are most distinct, they cannot be conjoined except by means of an intermediate that partakes of both.

AC 5587. If thou wilt send our brother with us.  That this signifies that if it is so done by the church that adjunction shall take place, there must be an intermediate, is evident from the representation of Israel, who was to send, as being the church (n. 4286), and hence ”if thou wilt send“ denotes if it is so done by the church; and from the representation of Benjamin, who here is their ”brother,“ as being an intermediate (n. 5586).  From this it is plain that by ”if thou wilt send our brother with us“ is signified that if it is so done by the church that its external be adjoined to its internal, there must be an intermediate.

AC 5588. We will go down and buy thee food. That this signifies that then the good of truth will be procured, is evident from the signification of ”buying,“ as being to procure and appropriate, and from the signification of ”food,“ as being the good of truth (n. 5582).

AC 5589. But if thou wilt not send him. That this signifies if not, that is, if it be not of the church that adjunction shall take place, is plain from what was said just above (n. 5587).

AC 5590. We will not go down. That this signifies that it cannot be procured, is evident from what was said just above (n. 5588).

AC 5591. For the man said unto us.  That this signifies perception concerning the spiritual, is evident from the signification of the ”man,“ as being the spiritual from the internal (n. 5584); and from the signification of ”saying“ in the historicals of the Word, as being perception.

AC 5592. Ye shall not see my faces. That this signifies that there will be no compassion, is evident from what was unfolded above (n. 5585), where the same words occur.

AC 5593. Except your brother be with you. That this signifies unless there is an intermediate for you, is evident from what was said above in regard to Benjamin, who is here the ”brother,“ that he is an intermediate (n. 5586, 5587).

AC 5594. Verses 6-10.  And Israel said, Wherefore dealt ye ill with me, to tell the man whether ye had yet a brother? And they said, Asking the man asked unto us, and unto our birth, saying, Is your father yet alive? have ye a brother? and we told him according to the mouth of these words.  Knowing could we know that he would say, Bring your brother down? And Judah said unto Israel his father, Send the boy with me, and we will arise and go; and we will live, and not die, both we and thou, and also our little ones. I will be surety for him; of my hand shalt thou require him; if I bring him not unto thee, and set him before thee, and I shall sin to thee all the days; for except we had lingered, surely we had now returned these two times. ”And Israel said,“ signifies perception from spiritual good; ”Wherefore dealt ye ill with me to tell the man whether ye had yet a brother?“ signifies that they separated from them the truth of good, to conjoin it with the spiritual from the internal; ”and they said, Asking the man asked unto us,“ signifies that it clearly perceived the things in the natural; ”and unto our birth,“ signifies concerning the truths of faith there; ”saying, Is your father yet alive?“ signifies and concerning the spiritual good from which they were; ”have ye a brother?“ signifies concerning interior truth; ”and we told him according to the mouth of these words,“ signifies that he perceived them conformably; ”knowing could we know that he would say, Bring your brother down?“ signifies that we did not believe that he wished the truth of good to be conjoined with him; ”and Judah said unto Israel his father,“ signifies perception from the good of the church concerning those things; ”Send the boy with me,“ signifies that he should be adjoined to him; ”and we will arise and go; and we will live, and not die,“ signifies spiritual life according to degrees; ”both we,“ signifies the external of the church; ”and thou,“ signifies its internal; ”and also our little ones,“ signifies the things which are still more interior; ”I will be surety for him,“ signifies that in the meantime it will be adjoined to itself; ”of my hand shalt thou require him,“ signifies that it shall not he torn away in so far as lies in its power; ”if I bring him not unto thee, and set him be. fore thee,“ signifies unless he is quite restored to the church; ”and I shall sin to thee all the days,“ signifies that the good of the church will no longer he; ”for except we had lingered,“ signifies tarrying in a state of doubt; ”surely we had now returned these two times,“ signifies that there would have been spiritual life both exterior and interior.

AC 5595. And Israel said.  That this signifies perception from spiritual good, is evident from the signification of ”saying,“ as being to perceive; and from the representation of Israel, as being spiritual good (n. 3654, 4598); and because Israel is spiritual good, he is also the internal spiritual church (n. 3305, 4286), for this church is a church from spiritual good.  Spiritual good is truth that has become good; for truth becomes good when the man lives according to it, for it then passes into the will, and from the will into act, and becomes of the life; and when it becomes of the life it is no longer called truth but good.  But the will which transforms truth into good is the new will in the intellectual part; it is this good that is called spiritual good.  Spiritual good is distinguished from celestial good in that celestial good is implanted in man‘s will part itself; but this subject has often been treated of before.

[2] That Jacob is not now called ”Jacob,“ as in the previous chapter (Gen. 42:36), but ”Israel,“ is because good is the subject treated of in this chapter, and truth in the preceding; wherefore in that chapter Reuben was the one to speak, by whom is represented the truth of doctrine of the church (n. 3861, 3866, 4731, 4734, 4761, 5542), while in this chapter it is Judah who speaks, by whom is represented the good of the church (n. 3654, 5583).  That good is now treated of is because this time the conjunction between the internal, which is Joseph, and the external, which is the ten sons of Jacob, is effected by means of the intermediate which is Benjamin; and the conjunction of the internal with the external is effected by means of good.

AC 5596. Wherefore dealt ye ill with me, to tell the man whether ye had yet a brother?  That this signifies that they separated from them the truth of good, to conjoin it with the spiritual from the internal, is evident from the signification of ”dealing ill,“ as being to separate, for it is their separating Benjamin from him that he calls ”dealing ill;“ and from the signification of ”telling,“ as being to give something for another to think and reflect upon (n. 2862, 5508), consequently to communicate (n. 4856), thus also to conjoin; for when anything passes into the will of another, conjunction is effected by what is communicated, as when Joseph heard that Benjamin was still living and with his father, he wanted him to come to him, and then to be alone with him, conjoined with him, as is plain from the historicals that follow; and from the representation of Joseph, as being the Divine spiritual, and as being, when called ”the man,“ the spiritual from the internal (n. 5584); and from the representation of Benjamin, who is here their brother of whom they told, as being the truth of good (n. 5586).  From all this it is plain that by ”Wherefore dealt ye ill with me to tell the man whether ye had yet a brother?“ is signified that they separated from them the truth of good, to conjoin it with the spiritual from the internal.

AC 5597. And they said, Asking the man asked unto us.  That this signifies that it clearly perceived the things in the natural, is evident from the signification of ”asking,“ as being to perceive another’s thought; and from the representation of the ten sons of Jacob, who are here meant by ”us,“ as being the things of the church which are in the natural (n. 5403, 5419, 5427, 5458, 5512). That by ”asking“ is meant perceiving another‘s thought, is because in heaven there is a communication of all thoughts, so that no one has need to ask another what he is thinking.  Hence it is that ”asking“ signifies perceiving another’s thought; for in the internal sense the quality of a thing on earth is its quality in heaven.

AC 5598. And unto our birth.  That this signifies concerning the truths of faith there, is evident from the signification of ”birth,“ as being the birth of truth from good, or of faith from charity (n. 1145, 1255, 4070, 4668).  That ”birth“ in the internal sense denotes this is because in heaven no other birth is understood than that which is called regeneration, which is effected by means of the truth of faith and the good of charity.  By this birth, from being sons of man men become sons of the Lord; these are they who are said to be ”born of God“ (John 1:13).  According to the varieties of good from truth and of truth from good in this birth are the brotherhoods or relationships by blood and by marriage in heaven; for in heaven there are perpetual varieties, but the varieties are so disposed by the Lord as to represent families in which are brothers, sisters, sons-in-law, daughters-in-law, grandsons, granddaughters, and so on. In general however all are disposed in such a form that together they make a one, as is the case with the varieties in the human body, where no member is exactly like another, nor indeed any part in one member the same as another part, and yet all the various parts are disposed in such a form that they act as a one, and each concurs intimately or remotely with the action of every other. Such being the form in man, it may be inferred what the form in heaven must be, with which all the things in man have correspondence that it must be most perfect.

AC 5599. Saying, Is your father yet alive? That this signifies and concerning the spiritual good from which they were, is evident from the representation of Israel, who is the ”father“ here, as being spiritual good (n. 3654, 4598, 5595). It is said ”from which they were“ because from this good, as from a father, the truths of faith come down (n. 5598).

AC 5600. Have ye a brother? That this signifies concerning interior truth, is evident from the representation of Benjamin, as being the spiritual of the celestial, or what is the same, the truth of good, or interior truth. ”Benjamin“ is truth in which is good, or the spiritual of the celestial, (n. 3969, 4592). This interior truth is the intermediate between truth from the Divine and truth in the natural.

AC 5601. And we told him according to the month of these words.  That this signifies that he perceived them conformably, is evident from the signification of ”telling,“ as being to perceive (n. 3608), for in the spiritual world or in heaven they have no need to tell what they think, there being a communication of all thoughts (n. 5597), and therefore in the spiritual sense ”telling“ signifies perceiving; and from the signification of ”according to these words,“ as being conformably; for they are the things he desired to perceive.

AC 5602. Knowing could we know that he would say, Bring your brother down?  That this signifies that we did not believe that he desired the truth of good to be conjoined with himself, is evident from the signification of ”knowing could we know that he would say,“ as being not to believe; and from the representation of Benjamin, who is here the ”brother,“ as being the truth of good (n. 5600). That this was to be conjoined with him is signified by their ”bringing him down,“ as is plain from what was said above (n. 5596).

AC 5603. And Judah said unto Israel his father.  That this signifies perception from the good of the church concerning these things, is evident from the signification of ”saying“ in the historicals of the Word, as being to perceive; from the representation of Judah, as being the good of the church (n. 5583); and from the representation of Israel, as being the internal spiritual church (n. 3305, 4286). From this it is plain that by ”Judah‘s saying to Israel his father“ is signified the perception of the church from its good.

AC 5604. Send the boy with me.  That this signifies that he should be adjoined to him, namely, to the good of the church which is represented by Judah, is evident from the signification of ”sending with him,“ as being to be adjoined to him, and not to the others; for it is said in what follows ”I will be surety for him, of my hand shalt thou require him;“ and from the representation of Benjamin, who is here the ”boy,“ as being interior truth (n. 5600).  This is called the ”boy,“ because that which is interior is in the Word called relatively a ”boy,“ for the reason that there is more innocence in the interior than in the exterior, and innocence is signified by an ”infant,“ and also by a ”boy“ (n. 5236).

AC 5605. And we will arise and go, and we will live, and not die.  That this signifies spiritual life according to degrees, is evident from the signification of ”arising,“ as being elevation to higher or interior things, consequently to the things of spiritual life (n. 2401, 2785, 2912, 2927, 3171, 4103, 4881); from the signification of ”going,“ as being to live (n. 3335, 3690, 4882, 5493), and as the words follow ”and we will live,“ ”going“ signifies the first spiritual life; from the signification of ”living,“ as being spiritual life, for no other life is meant in the internal sense of the Word; and from the signification of ”not dying,“ as being no longer to be damned, that is, to be out of a state of damnation, for in the internal sense of the Word no other than spiritual death is meant, which is damnation.  From this it is plain that by ”we will arise and go, and we will live and not die“ is signified life according to degrees; namely, introduction into life by ”arising,“ the first of life by ”going,“ life itself by ”living,“ and being led out from the things of no life by ”not dying.“

[2] That ”to go“ in the internal sense is to live, seems strange to him who knows nothing about spiritual life; but it is like ”journeying,“ which denotes the order of life and what is successive of life (n. 1293, 4375, 4554, 4585), and like ”sojourning,“ which denotes to be instructed and to live accordingly (n. 1463, 2025, 3672). The reason why ”going,“ ”journeying,“ and ”sojourning“ have these significations might indeed be told, but the reason is of such a nature as could scarcely be accepted by those who are ignorant of the nature of movements in the other life. Moments and progressions there are nothing else because from no other source than changes of the state of life.  These changes appear in externals exactly like progressions from place to place. That this is so can be confirmed by much experience in the other life; for I have walked there in spirit with them and among them, through many of their abode., and this though in body I remained in the same place. I have also talked with them as to how this could be, and have been informed that it is the changes of the state of life that make progressions in the spiritual world.

[3] This was also confirmed by the fact that by means of changes induced on their states, spirits can appear on high, and then in a moment beneath, or now far to the west, and in a moment to the east, and so on.  But as before said this cannot but seem strange to him who knows nothing about life in the spiritual world; for there are no spaces or times there, but states of life instead.  These states produce in externals a most living appearance of progressions and motions.  The appearance is as living and real as that life itself is in us and therefore our own; when yet life flows in from the Lord, who is the fountain of all life (n. 2021, 2658, 2706, 2886-2888, 3001, 3318, 3337, 3338, 3484, 3619, 3741-3743, 4151, 4249, 4318-4320, 4417, 4523, 4524, 4882).  As ”going“ and ”moving“ signify living, it was therefore said by the ancients, that ”in God we move, live, and have our being“ (Acts 17:28); and by ”moving“ they meant the external of life, by ”living“ its internal, and by ”being“ its inmost.

AC 5606. Both we.  That this signifies the external of the church, is manifest from the representation of the ten sons of Jacob, who here are ”we,“ as being the external of the church (n. 5469).

AC 5607. And thou.  That this signifies its internal, is evident from the representation of Israel, who here is ”thou,“ as being the internal of the church (n. 4286, 4292, 4570).

AC 5608. And also our little ones.  That this signifies the things still more interior, is evident from the signification of ”little ones,“ as being the things which are interior (n. 5604).  That more interior things are signified by ”little children’ and by “boys,” is because innocence is signified by both, and innocence is what is inmost.  In the heavens the inmost or third heaven consists of those who are in innocence, for they are in love to the Lord; and because the Lord is innocence itself, therefore they who are there, being in love to Him, are in innocence.  These, although they are the wisest of all in the heavens, yet appear to others like little children. It is for this reason, and also because little children are in innocence, that by “little children” in the Word is signified innocence.

[2] As the inmost of the heavens is innocence, therefore that which is interior with all in the heavens must be innocence.  This is like successive things in relation to those which exist together, or like the things which are distinct from one another by degrees in relation to those which exist from them; for all that which exists simultaneously, springs from that which is successive. When the former exists from the latter, the parts place themselves in the same order as that in which they had before been distinguished by degrees; as, by way of illustration, end, cause, and effect are in succession and distinct from one another; and when they exist together they place themselves in the same order, the end as inmost, the cause next, and the effect last.  The effect is coexisting, and is such that unless there is in it a cause, and in the cause an end, there is no effect, because if from the effect you remove the cause you destroy the effect, and still more if from the cause you remove the end; for from the end the cause has what makes it a cause, and from the cause the effect has what makes it an effect.

[3] So also it is in the spiritual world: just as the end, cause, and effect are distinct from one another, so in the spiritual world are love to the Lord, charity toward the neighbor, and the works of charity.  When these three become one or exist together, the first must be in the second, and the second in the third. And also as in the works of charity: unless charity from affection or the heart is within them, they are not works of charity; and unless love to God is within charity, it is not charity.  Therefore if you take away that which is interior, the exterior falls; for the exterior comes into existence and subsists from its interiors in order. So is it with innocence.  This makes one with love to the Lord, and unless it is within charity it is not charity; consequently unless charity in which there is innocence is within the works of charity they are not works of charity.  Hence it is that innocence must be within all who are in the heavens.

[4] That this is so, and that innocence is signified by “little children,” is evident in Mark:--

Jesus said to the disciples, Suffer the little children to come unto me, and forbid them not; for of such is the kingdom of God. Verily I say unto you, whosoever shall not receive the kingdom of God as a little child, he shall not enter therein. And taking them up in His arms, he put His hand upon them, and blessed them (Mark 10:14-16; Luke 18:15-17; Matt. 18:3).

It is evident that by “little children” is here signified innocence, because with little children there is innocence, and because those who are innocent appear in heaven as little children.

[5] No one can enter heaven unless he has some what of innocence (n. 4797); and moreover little children suffer themselves to be governed by angels who are forms of innocence, and not as yet by what is their own, as is the case with and who govern themselves by their own judgment and will.  That little children suffer themselves to be governed by angels is evident from the Lord‘s words in Matthew,

See that ye despise not one of these little ones; for I say to you, that their angels in the heavens do always behold the face of My Father (Matthew 18:10);

no one can “see the face” of God except from innocence.

[6] In the following passages also innocence is signified by “infants” or “little children.” In Matthew:--

Out of the mouth of babes and suckling, Thou hast perfected praise (Matthew 21:16; Ps. 8:2).

Again

Thou hast hid these things from the wise and the intelligent, and hast revealed them unto babes (Matthew 11:25; Luke 10:21);

for innocence, which is signified by “babes,” is wisdom itself, because genuine innocence dwells in wisdom (n. 2305, 2306, 4797). For this reason it is said, “out of the mouth of babes and sucklings Thou hast perfected praise,” and also that such things have been “revealed unto babes.”

[7]. In Isaiah:--

The cow and the bear shall feed, their young ones shall lie down together, and the suckling shall play on the hole of the viper (Isa. 11:7, 8);

speaking of the Lord’s kingdom, and specifically of the state of peace or innocence therein.  A “suckling” denotes innocence; that nothing of evil can befall those who are in innocence is signified by a “suckling playing on the hole of a viper;” “vipers” are they who are most crafty.  This chapter plainly relates to the Lord.  In Joel:--

Sound the trumpet in Lion, gather the people, sanctify the congregation, assemble the elders, gather the babes and those that suck the breasts (Joel 2:15, 16);

“elders” denotes the wise; “babes and those that such the breasts,” the innocent.

[8] In the following passages also by “infants” is meant innocence, but in these that it was destroyed.  In Jeremiah:--

Wherefore commit ye great evil against your souls, to cut off from you man and woman, infant and suckling, out of the midst of Judah, so that I shall leave you no remains? (Jer. 44:7).

Again:--

Lift up thy hands to Him upon the soul of thy little children, that faint for hunger in the head of all the streets (Lam. 2:10).

In Ezekiel:--

Pass through Jerusalem, and smite, let not your eye spare, neither have ye pity, the old man, the young man, and the maiden, and the little child (Ezek. 9:5, 6).

In Micah:--

The women of My people ye drive out of everyone‘s house of delights, from the babes thereof they take away Mine honor forever (Micah 2:9).

[9] As regards the innocence of little children however, it is only external and not internal; and because it is not internal it cannot be conjoined with any wisdom.  But the innocence of the angels, especially those of the third heaven, is internal innocence, and thus conjoined with wisdom (n. 2305, 2306, 3494, 4563, 4797). Man is so created that when he grows old and becomes like a little child, the innocence of wisdom conjoins itself with the innocence of ignorance which he had in infancy, and so he passes into the other life as a true infant.

AC 5609. And I wilt be surety for him.  That this signifies that in the meantime it will be adjoined to itself, is evident from the signification of “being surety for” anyone, as being to be instead of him, as is plain from what now follows, especially from what Judah said to Joseph about his being surety (Gen. 44:32, 33); and as to be surety for anyone denotes to be instead of him, it also denotes that while in the way it is adjoined to itself.

AC 5610. Of my hand shalt thou require him.  That this signifies that it shall not be torn away in so far as lies in its power, is evident from the signification of the “hand,” as being power (n. 878, 3387, 4931-4937, 5327, 5328, 5544), and that it denotes in so far as lies in its power, is because surety or guarantee goes no further (the internal sense here sets forth the truth and the nature of it); and from the signification of “requiring him from him,” as being not to be torn away; for one who is required of another must be adjoined to him and not be torn from him.

AC 5611. If I bring him not unto thee, and set him before thee. That this signifies unless he is quite restored to the church, is evident from the signification of “bringing to him and setting before him,” as being to completely restore; and from the representation of Israel, to whom he was to be restored, as being the church (n. 3305, 4286, 5595).

AC 5612. And I shall sin to thee all the days.  That this signifies that the good of the church will no longer be, is evident from the representation of Judah, who says this of himself, as being the good of the church (n. 5583, 5603); and from the signification of “sinning,” as being disjunction (n. 5229, 5474), thus that it will not be, for anything that is disjoined from another is not with it any longer; and from the signification of “all the days,” as being forever, thus no longer. These things are said because the good of the church is impossible without the intermediate between the internal and the external which is represented by Benjamin; for both the good and the truth of the church flow from the internal through the intermediate into the external, and consequently in the degree that it is important to have the good of the church, in the same degree it is important to have the intermediate.  It is for this reason that Judah makes himself surety for Benjamin.  That the good of the church is not possible without the intermediate, is signified by these words of Judah, and that the truth of the church is not possible, by Reuben’s words (n. 5542).

AC 5613. For except we had lingered.  That this signifies tarrying in a state of doubt, is evident from the signification of “lingering,” as being a state of doubt; for as “going,” “advancing,” “journeying,” and “sojourning” signify states of life (n. 5605), so “lingering” signifies a state of doubt, because when the state of life is in a state of doubt, then the external is in a state of lingering. Moreover this is to be seen in man himself; for when his mind hangs in any doubt, he halts and deliberates.  The reason is that doubt makes the state of life hesitating and wavering, and consequently the outward progression, which is the effect.  Hence it is plain that tarrying in a state of doubt is signified by “except we had lingered.”

AC 5614. Surely we had now returned these two times.  That this signifies that there would have been spiritual life both exterior and interior, is evident from the signification of “going,” as being to live (n. 5605); and therefore “returning” is living therefrom, for they went thither to procure corn, and by “corn” is signified the good of truth from which is spiritual life; and from the signification of “these two times,” which, as it relates to life, denotes life exterior and interior, for by the “produce” they got the first time was signified life that is exterior or in the natural, for the reason that they were without an intermediate (as explained in the preceding chapter); while by the “corn” they get this time is signified interior life, because they were now with Benjamin, who is the intermediate, as explained in this and in the following chapter. Hence it is that by “surely we had now returned these two times,” is signified spiritual life both exterior and interior.

[2] That this is the signification cannot but seem strange, especially to one who knows nothing about what is spiritual; for it seems as if “returning these two times” has nothing in common with the spiritual life that is signified; but still this is the internal sense of the words.  If you will believe it, the interior thought itself of the man who is in good apprehends this, because this thought is in the internal sense, although while in the body the man is deeply ignorant of it; for unknown to him the internal sense, that is, the spiritual sense, which is of the interior thought, falls into material and sensuous ideas that partake of time and space and of such things as are in the world, and therefore it does not appear that his interior thought is of such a nature; for his interior thought is like that of the angels, his spirit being in company with them.

[3] That the thought of the man who is in good is according to the internal sense, may be seen from the fact that when after death he comes into heaven, he at once without any information is in the internal sense, and this could not be unless as to his interior thought he had been in this sense while in the world.  The reason of his being in this internal sense is that there is a correspondence between spiritual and natural things so complete that there is not the smallest thing that has not its correspondence; and therefore because the interior or rational mind of the man who is in good is in the spiritual world, and his exterior or natural mind in the natural world, it must needs be that both minds think (the interior mind spiritually, and the exterior naturally), and that the spiritual falls into the natural, and they act as a one by correspondence.

[4] That man‘s interior mind, the ideas of thought of which are called intellectual and are said to be immaterial, does not think from the words of any language, nor consequently from natural forms, can be seen by him who is able to reflect on these things, for he can think in a moment what he can scarcely utter in an hour, and he does so by universals which comprise in them very many particulars. These ideas of thought are spiritual, and when the Word is being read are no other than as the internal sense is; although the man does not know this, because as before said these spiritual ideas, by influx into what is natural, present natural ideas, so that the spiritual ideas do not appear; insomuch that unless he has been instructed the man believes that there is no spiritual unless it is like the natural, and even that he does not think otherwise in spirit than as he speaks in the body.  In such a manner does the natural cast a shade over the spiritual.

AC 5615. Verses 11-14.  And their father Israel said unto them, If therefore this be so, do this; take of the song of the land in your vessels, and carry down the man a present, a little resin and a little honey, wax and stacte, terebinth nuts and almonds; and take double silver in your hand; and the silver that was returned in the mouth of your bags carry back in your hand; peradventure it was an error; and take your brother, and arise, and return into the man; and God Shaddai give you mercies before the man, and send you your other brother and Benjamin.  And I, as I have been bereaved I shall be bereaved.  “And their father Israel said unto them,” signifies perception from spiritual good; “If therefore this be so, do this,” signifies if it cannot be done otherwise, so let it be done; “take of the song of the land in your vessels,” signifies the choice things of the church in the truths of faith; “and carry down the man a present,” signifies to obtain favor; “a little resin and a little honey,” signifies the truths of good of the exterior natural, and its delight; “wax and stacte,” signifies the truths of good of the interior natural; “terebinth nuts and almonds,” signifies goods of life corresponding to these truths; “and take double silver in your hands,” signifies truth received in the abilities; “and the silver that was returned in the mouth of your bags carry back in your hand,” signifies that by truth gratuitously given in the exterior natural they were to submit themselves as far as possible; “peradventure it was an error,” signifies lest he be adverse; “and take your brother,” signifies that thus they would have the good of faith; “and arise, and return unto the man,” signifies life from spiritual truth; “and God Shaddai,” signifies consolation after hardships; “give you mercies before the man,” signifies may spiritual truth receive you graciously; “and send you your other brother,” signifies may it give the good of faith; “and Benjamin,” signifies and also interior truth; “and I, as I have been bereaved I shall be bereaved,” signifies that the church, before these things are done, will be as if deprived of its truths.

AC 5616. And their father Israel said unto thee.  That this signifies perception from spiritual good, is evident from the signification of “saying” in the historicals of the Word, as being perception; and from the representation of Israel, as being spiritual good (n. 5595). He is called “father” because the truths that his sons represent are from this good as from a father.

AC 5617. If therefore this be so, do this.  That this signifies that if it cannot be done otherwise so let it be done, is evident without explication.

AC 5618. Take of the song of the land in your vessels. That this signifies the choice things of the church in the truths of faith, is evident from the signification of the “song,” as being the choice things; and from the signification of the “land,” as being the church (n. 5577); and from the signification of “vessels,” as being the truths of faith (n. 3068, 309, 3316, 3318).  The word “song” is used because this word in the original tongue is derived from singing; hence the “song of the land” signifies productions hailed with songs and praises, consequently in the internal sense choice things.

AC 5619. And carry down the man a present.  That this signifies obtaining favor, is evident from the signification of “offering a present to the man,” here to Joseph, who is called the “lord of the land,” as being to obtain favor. It was customary in the Ancient representative Church, and thence in the Jewish, to give some present to judges, and at a later period to kings and priests, when they were approached, moreover this was commanded.  The reason was that the presents they gave them represented such things in man as ought to be offered to the Lord when He is approached, which are things that are from freedom, consequently from the man himself; for his freedom is what is from the heart, and what is from the heart is from the will, and what is from the will is from the affection which is of the love, and what is from the affection which is of the love is free, thus of the man himself (n. 1947, 2870-2893, 3158).  From this it is that a present should be given by man to the Lord on approaching Him. It was this present that was represented; for kings represented the Lord as to Divine truth (n. 1672, 2015, 2069, 3009, 3670, 4581, 4966, 5044), and priests as to Divine good (n. 1728, 2015, 3670). That these presents were initiations, (n. 4262); and initiations are for obtaining favor.

AC 5620. A little resin and a little honey.  That this signifies the truths of good of the exterior natural and its delight, is evident from the signification of “resin,” as being the truth of good or truth from good (n. 4748).  The reason why “resin” has this signification is that it ranks among unguents, and also among aromatics.  “Aromatics” signify such things as are of truth from good, especially if they are of an unctuous nature, and so partake of oil; for “oil” signifies good (n. 886, 3728, 4582).  That this resin was aromatic, may be seen in (Gen. 37:25); and for this reason also the same word in the original means balsam.  That it was like an ointment, or thick oil, is evident.  This then is the reason why by “resin” is signified the truth of good which is in the natural, here in the exterior, because resin“ is put first and joined with ”honey,“ which is the delight therein.  That ”honey“ denotes delight is because it is sweet, and everything sweet in the natural world corresponds to what is delightful and pleasant in the spiritual world.  The reason why it is called its delight, that is, the delight of truth from good in the exterior natural, is that every truth and especially every truth of good has its own delight; but a delight from the affection of these, and from the derivative use.

[2] That ”honey“ is delight is evident also from other passages in the Word, as in Isaiah:--

A virgin shall conceive and bear a son, and shall call His name Immanuel (God with us). Butter and honey shall He eat, that He may know to refuse the evil and choose the good (Isa 7:14, 15);

speaking of the Lord; ”butter“ denotes the celestial; ”honey,“ +hat which is from the celestial.

[3] In the same:--

It shall come to pass for the multitude of milk that they shall yield, he shall eat butter; and butter and honey shall everyone eat that is left in the midst of the land (Isa. 7:22);

speaking of the Lord’s kingdom; ”milk“ denotes spiritual good; ”butter,“ celestial good; and ”honey,“ that which is from them, thus what is happy, pleasant, and delightful.

[4] In Ezekiel:--

Thus wast thou adorned with gold and silver; and thy garments were of fine linen and silk and broidered work.  Thou didst eat fine flour and honey and oil; so thou becamest beautiful very exceedingly, and thou didst prosper even unto a kingdom.  With fine flour and oil and honey I fed thee; but thou didst set it before them for an odor of rest (Ezek. 16:13, 19);

speaking of Jerusalem, by which is meant the spiritual church, the quality of which is described as it was With the ancients, and as it afterward became.  Her being ”adorned with gold and silver“ denotes with celestial and spiritual good and truth; her ”garments of fine linen, silk, and broidered work“ denotes truths in the rational and in each natural; ”fine flour“ denotes the spiritual; ”honey,“ its pleasantness; and ”oil,‘ its good. That such things as belong to heaven are signified by these particulars can be seen by anyone.

[5] In the same:--

Judah and the land of Israel were thy traders, in wheat of Minnith, and pannag, and honey, and oil, and balm (Ezek. 27:17);

speaking of Tyre, by which is signified the spiritual church such as it was in the beginning and such as it afterward became, but in respect to the knowledges of good and truth (n. 1201). “Honey” here also denotes the pleasantness and delight from the affections of knowing and learning celestial and spiritual goods and truths.

[6] In Moses:--

Thou makest him ride on the high places of the earth, and he eats the produce of the fields.  He maketh him suck honey out of the rock, and oil out of the flint of the rock (Deut. 32:13);

here also treating of the Ancient spiritual Church; “to suck honey out of the rock” denotes delight from truths of memory-knowledge.

[7] In David:--

I feed them with the fat of wheat, and with honey out of the rock I sate them (Ps. 81:16);

“to sate with honey out of the rock” denotes to fill with delight from the truths of faith.

[8] In Deuteronomy:--

Jehovah bringeth me unto a good land, a land of rivers of water, of fountains and of deeps that go out from the valley, and from the mountain; a land of wheat and barley, and of vine and of fig and of pomegranate; a land of oil olive and of honey (Deut. 8:7, 8);

speaking of the land of Canaan; in the internal sense, of the Lord’s kingdom in the heavens.  A “land of oil olive and of honey” denotes spiritual good and its pleasantness.

[9] Hence also the land of Canaan was called  A land flowing with milk and honey (Num. 13:27; 14:8; Deut. 26:9, 15; 27:3; Jer. 11:5; 32:22; Ezek. 20:6). In the internal sense of these passages by the “land of Canaan” is meant, as before said, the Lord‘s kingdom; “flowing with milk” denotes an abundance of celestial spiritual things; and “with honey,” an abundance of derivative happiness and delights.

[10] In David:--

The judgments of Jehovah are truth, righteous are they together; more to be desired are they than gold and much fine gold, sweeter also than honey and the dropping of the honeycombs (Ps. 19:9, 10);

the “judgments of Jehovah” denote truth Divine; “sweeter than honey and the dropping of the honeycombs” denotes delights from good and pleasantnesses from truth. Again:--

Sweet are Thy words to my palate, sweeter than honey to my mouth (Ps. 119:103);

where the meaning is similar.

[11] The manna that Jacob’s posterity had for bread in the wilderness is thus described in Moses:--

The manna was like coriander seed, white; and the taste of it was like a cake kneaded with honey (Exod. 16:31);

as the manna signified the truth Divine that descends through heaven from the Lord, it consequently signified the Lord Himself as to the Divine Human, as He Himself teaches in (John 6:51, 58); for it is the Lord‘s Divine Human from which all truth Divine comes, yea, of which all truth Divine treats; and this being so, the manna is described in respect to delight and pleasantness by the taste, that it was “like a cake kneaded with honey.” The taste denotes the delight of good and the pleasantness of truth, (n. 3502),

[12] As John the Baptist represented the Lord as to the Word, which is the Divine truth on earth, in like manner as Elijah (n. 2762, 5247), he was therefore the “Elijah who was to come” before the Lord (Mal. 4:5; Matt.  17:10-12; Mark 9:11-13; Luke 1:17); wherefore his clothing and food were significative, of which we read in Matthew:--

John had his clothing of camel’s hair, and a leathern girdle about his loin; and his meat was locusts and wild honey (Matthew 3:4; Mark 1:6).

The “clothing of camel‘s hair” signified that the Word, such as is its literal sense as to truth (which sense is a clothing for the internal sense), is natural; for what is natural is signified by “hair,” and also by “camels;” and the “meat being of locusts and wild honey” signified the Word such as is its literal sense as to good; the delight of this is signified by “wild honey.”

[13] The delight of truth Divine in respect to the external sense is also described by “honey” in Ezekiel:--

He said unto me, Son of man, feed thy belly and fill thy bowels with this roll that I give thee.  And when I ate it, it was in my mouth as honey for sweetness (Ezek. 3:3).

And in John:--

The angel said unto me, Take the little book and eat it up; and it shall make thy belly bitter, but it shall be in thy mouth sweet as honey. So I took the little book out of the angel’s hand and ate it up; and it was in my mouth sweet as honey; but when I had eaten it my belly was made bitter.  Then he said unto me, Thou must prophesy again over many peoples and nations and tongues and kings (Rev. 10:9-11).

The “roll” in Ezekiel, and the “little book” in John, denote truth Divine.  That in the external form this appears delightful, is signified by the flavor being “sweet as honey;” for truth Divine, like the Word, is delightful in the external form or in the literal sense because this admits of being unfolded by interpretations in everyone‘s favor.  But not so the internal sense, which is therefore signified by the “bitter” taste; for this sense discloses man’s interiors.  The reason why the external sense is delightful, is as before said that the things in it can be unfolded favorably; for they are only general truths, and general truths are susceptible of this before they are qualified by particulars, and these by singulars.  It is delightful also because it is natural, and what is spiritual conceals itself within. Moreover it must be delightful in order that man may receive it, that is, be introduced into it, and not be deterred at the very threshold.

[14] The “honeycomb and broiled fish” that the Lord ate with the disciples after His resurrection, also signified the external sense of the Word (the “fish” as to its truth and the “honeycomb” as to its pleasantness), in regard to which we read in Luke:--

Jesus said, Have ye here anything to eat? They gave Him a piece of a broiled fish, and of a honeycomb, and He took them and did eat before them (Luke 24:41-43).

And because these things are signified, the Lord therefore said to them:--

These are the words which I spake unto you while I was yet with you, that all things must be fulfilled which are written in the law of Moses, and in the prophets, and in the Psalms, concerning Me (Luke 24:44).

It appears as if such things were not signified, because their having a piece of broiled fish and a honeycomb seems as if fortuitous; nevertheless it was of providence, and not only this, but also all other, even the least, of the things that occur in the Word.  As such things were signified, therefore the Lord said of the Word that in it were written the things concerning Himself. Yet the things written of the Lord in the literal sense of the Old Testament are few; but those in its internal sense are all so written, for from this is the holiness of the Word.  This is what is meant by His saying that “all things must be fulfilled which are written in the Law of Moses, and in the Prophets, and in the Psalms, concerning Him.”

[15] From all this it may now be seen that by “honey” is signified the delight that is from good and truth, or from the affection of them, and that there is specifically signified external delight, thus the delight of the exterior natural. As this delight is of such a nature as to be from the world through the things of the senses, and thereby contains within it many things from the love of the world, the use of honey in the meat-offerings was therefore forbidden, as in Leviticus:--

No meat-offering which ye shall bring unto Jehovah shall be made with leaven; for there shall be no leaven, nor any honey, from what ye burn with fire to Jehovah (Lev. 2:11);

where “honey” denotes such external delight, which, because it contains in it what partakes of the love of the world, was also like leaven, and was on this account forbidden. What “leaven” or “leavened” means, see (n. 2342),

AC 5621. Wax and stacte.  That this signifies the truths of good of the interior natural, is evident from the signification of “wax,” here aromatic wax, as being the truth of good; and from the signification of “stacte,” as also being truth from good (n. 4748).  Their being of the interior natural is because these spices are purer than resin and honey, and are therefore mentioned in the second place; for such particulars are enumerated in the Word in accordance with the order. By “wax” here is not meant common, but aromatic wax, such as storax.  This wax is signified by the term used in the original language, and spice also by the same. Hence it is plain why this aromatic wax signifies the truth of good; for all spices, being sweet-scented, in the internal sense signify the truths which are from good. This may be seen from the fact that truths from good are perceived in heaven pleasantly, like sweet-scented things in the world; and therefore when the perceptions of the angels are turned into odors, as of the Lord‘s good pleasure often happens, they are then smelt as fragrances from spices and from flowers.  This is the reason why frankincense and incense were compounded of materials of grateful odor, and were employed for a holy use; and also why aromatics were mixed with the anointing oil. One who does not know that such things derive their cause from things perceived in heaven, may be of the opinion that they were commanded merely to render outward worship grateful; but in that case there would be in them nothing of heaven, or nothing holy, and consequently such matters of worship would not have anything Divine in them. Frankincense and incense, and also the fragrant substances used in the anointing oil, were representative of spiritual and celestial things, (n. 4748); and the spheres of faith and love are turned into grateful odors, and therefore grateful and sweet-scented and also spicy odors signify truths of faith which are from the good of love, (n. 1514, 1517-1519, 4628),

AC 5622. Terebinth nuts and almonds.  That this signifies goods of life corresponding to these truths, is evident from the signification of “terebinth nuts,” as being goods of life corresponding to the truths of good of the exterior natural which are signified by “resin”; and from the signification of “almonds,” as being goods of life corresponding to the truths of good of the interior natural which are signified by “aromatic wax and stacte.” That these “nuts” have this signification is because they are fruits, and “fruits” in the Word signify works; the fruits of useful trees good works, or what is the same, goods of the life, for in respect to use the goods of life and good works.  That “terebinth nuts” signify goods of life corresponding to truths of good of the exterior natural, is because they are of a less noble tree; and things that are exterior are signified by such objects as are less noble.  The reason is, that in themselves exterior things are grosser than interior; for they are generals composed of very many interior things.

[2] That “almonds” signify goods of life corresponding to the truths of good of the interior natural, is because the almond is a nobler tree.  This tree itself signifies in the spiritual sense a perception of interior truth which is from good, its “blossom” interior truth which is from good, and its “fruit” good of life thence derived. In this sense the “almond tree” is spoken of in Jeremiah:--

The word of Jehovah came to pass, saying, Jeremiah what seest thou? And I said, I see a rod of an almond tree. Then said Jehovah unto me, Thou hast well seen; for I wake over My word to do it (Jer. 1:11, 12);

a “rod” denotes power; “almond tree,” the perception of interior truth; here, being predicated of Jehovah, it denotes waking over it; “word” denotes truth.

[3] By the “almonds which budded from the rod of Aaron for the tribe of Levi,” are also signified goods of charity or goods of life, of which we read in Moses:--

It came to pass on the morrow, when Moses entered into the tent of meeting, behold the rod of Aaron for the tribe of Levi had blossomed and brought forth blossom, so that the flower flowered, and bare almonds (Num. 17:8).

This was a sign that this tribe was chosen for the priesthood; for by the “the tribe of Levi” was signified charity (n. 3875, 3877, 4497, 4502, 4503), which is the essential of the spiritual church.

AC 5623. And take double silver in your hands.  That this signifies truth received in the abilities, is evident from the signification of “silver,” as being truth (n. 1551, 2954) and from the signification of “double,” as being again in succession (n. 1335), namely truth which was gratuitously bestowed on them, and which was to be bestowed on them again; and from the signification of “hands,” as being abilities (n. 878, 3387, 4931-4937, 5327, 5328).  Truth in the abilities means in the capacities for receiving it, thus according to the capacities.  But the capacities or abilities for receiving truth are wholly according to good, because the Lord adjoins them to good; for when the Lord flows in with good He also flows in with capacity.  Hence truth received in the abilities means according to goods.  That the capacities for receiving truth are according to good is evident from much experience in the other life.  They who are in good there have the capacity not only for perceiving truth, but also for receiving it, yet according to the amount and quality of the good in which they are. But they who are in evil have on the other hand no capacity for receiving truth.  This comes from pleasure and consequent desire.  They who are in good have pleasure in perfecting good by means of truth, because good takes its quality from truths; and therefore they desire truths.  But they who are in evil have pleasure in evil, and in confirming it by falsities, and therefore they desire falsities; and because they desire falsities they are averse to truths. For this reason they have no capacity for receiving truths, for they reject or stifle or pervert them as soon as they reach the ear or occur to the thought. Besides, every man who is of sound mind has a capacity for receiving truths; but they extinguish this capacity who turn to evil, and they exalt it who turn to good.

AC 5624. And the silver that was returned in the mouth of your bags carry back in your hand.  That this signifies that by means of the truth given gratuitously in the exterior natural they were to submit themselves as far as possible, is evident from the signification of the “silver returned,” as being truth given gratuitously (n. 5530); from the signification of “in the mouth of their bags,” as being in the threshold of the exterior natural (n. 5497); and from the signification of “in the hand,” as being in the ability (n. 5623), thus as far as possible.  Their submitting themselves by means of this truth is signified by their “carrying it back;” for in the spiritual world to carry back truth to the Lord, from whom it has been received gratuitously, is to submit one’s self by means of it. But the manner in which they submitted themselves by its means is plain from the conversation with the man who was over Joseph‘s house (verses 18-24).

AC 5625. Peradventure it was an error.  That this signifies lest he be adverse, is evident from the signification of an “error,” as being what is adverse, for the error here meant is as if they had forgotten to pay the silver and so were taking it back, everyone in his own sack; for which reason he might possibly be adverse to them, as they also believed; for they were afraid because they were brought to Joseph’s house, and said, “Upon the word of the silver that was returned in our bags in the beginning are we brought, to roll down upon us, and to throw himself upon us, and to take us for servants, and our asses” (verse 18). Moreover “sin” signifies disjunction and aversion (n. 5229, 5474); and so does “error” if there is sin in it, but in a less degree; wherefore it is said “lest he be adverse.”

AC 5626. And take your brother.  That this signifies that in this way they would have the good of faith, is evident from the representation of Simeon, who is here the “brother” whom they were to take, as being faith in the will (n. 3869-3872, 4497, 4502, 4503, 5482), thus the good of faith, because when the truth of faith passes into the will it becomes the good of faith; for the truth then passes into the man‘s life, and when it is there it is regarded not as something to be known, but as something to be done; consequently it changes its essence and becomes actual.  Hence it is no longer called truth, but good.

AC 5627. And arise, return unto the man.  That this signifies life from spiritual truth, is evident from the signification of “arising,” as being elevation to things interior, consequently to spiritual things (n. 2401, 2785, 2912, 2927, 3171, 4103, 4881); from the signification of “returning,” as being the consequent life (n. 5614); and from the representation of Joseph, when called “the man,” as being spiritual truth (n. 5584).

AC 5628. And God Shaddai.  That this signifies consolation after hardships, is evident from the signification of “Shaddai,” as being temptation and consolation after it (n. 1992, 4572); here therefore consolation after the hardships they had suffered in Egypt. That it is consolation after hardships is plain also from the words that follow in continuance-“ give you mercies before the man.” That “Shaddai” signifies temptation and consolation after it, is because the ancients designated the One Only God by various names, according to the various things that were from Him; and as they believed that temptations were from Him, they then called God “Shaddai,” and by this name they did not mean another God, but the Only One in respect to temptations.  But when the Ancient Church declined, they began to worship as many gods as there were names for the One Only God, and also of themselves added to them many more.  This practice at last became so prevalent that every family had its own god, and they wholly distinguished him from the rest who were worshiped by other families.

[2] Terah’s family, of which was Abraham, worshiped Shaddai for its god (n. 1356, 1992, 2559, 3667); and hence not only Abraham, but Jacob also, acknowledged Shaddai as his god, even in the land of Canaan; and this was permitted them lest they should be forced from their own religiosity; for no one is forced from what he regards as holy.  But as the ancients understood by “Shaddai” Jehovah Himself, or the Lord, who was so styled when they underwent temptations, therefore Jehovah or the Lord regained this name with Abraham, as is plain from (Gen.  17:1), and also with Jacob, (Gen. 35:11). The reason why not merely temptation, but consolation also, is signified by “ Shaddai,” is that consolation follows all spiritual temptations.  This has been given me to know by experience in the other life; for when anyone there suffers hard things from evil spirits, through infestations, incitements to evils, and persuasions to falsities, after the evil spirits have been removed, he is received by angels, and is brought into a state of comfort by means of a delight conformable to his genius.

AC 5629. Give you mercies before the man.  That this signifies, may spiritual truth receive you graciously, is evident from the signification of “giving mercies,” as being to receive graciously; and from the representation of Joseph, as being when called “the man,” spiritual truth (n. 5627).

AC 5630. And send you your other brother.  That this signifies, may it give the good of faith, is evident from the representation of Simeon, who is here the “other brother,” as being the good of faith (n. 5626). That “sending” denotes to give is because “sending” is used in reference to the person, and “giving” in reference to the thing signified by the person.

AC 5631. And Benjamin.  That this signifies, and also interior truth, is evident from the representation of Benjamin, as being interior truth (n. 5600).

AC 5632. And I, as I had been bereaved, I shall be bereaved. That this signifies that before these things are done the church will be deprived of its truths, is evident from the representation of Israel, who says this of himself, as being the church (n. 3305, 4286); and from the signification of being bereaved,“ as being to be deprived of the truths of the church (n. 5536).  That this is so before these things are done is plain, for if there is no good of faith which is represented by Simeon (n. 5630), and no interior truth, which is the intermediate represented by Benjamin, the church has not any truth, except such as is on the lips merely, and not in the heart.

AC 5633. Verses 15-17. And the men took this present, and they took double silver in their hand, and Benjamin; and rose up, and went down to Egypt, and stood before Joseph. And Joseph saw Benjamin with them, and he said to him that was over his house, Bring the men to the house, and slaying slay, and make ready; for the men shall eat with me at noon.  And the man did as Joseph said; and the man brought the men to Joseph‘s house.  ”And the men took this present,“ signifies that truths had with them the means for obtaining favor; ”and they took double silver in their hand,“ signifies also truth received in the ability; ”and Benjamin,“ signifies and the intermediate also; ”and rose up and went down to Egypt,“ signifies elevation to life to be gained by them from the interior things of memory-knowledges; ”and stood before Joseph,“ signifies the presence of the celestial of the spiritual there; ”and Joseph saw Benjamin with them,“ signifies the perception by the celestial of the spiritual of a spiritual intermediate with truths; ”and he said to him that was over his house,“ signifies to that which is of the external church; ”Bring the men to the house,“ signifies that the truths in the natural were to be introduced thither; ”and slaying slay and make ready,“ signifies through the goods of the exterior natural; ”for the men shall eat with me at noon,“ signifies that they will be conjoined when with the intermediate; ”and the man did as Joseph said,“ signifies bringing it about; ”and the man brought the men to Joseph’s house,“ signifies first introduction into the good which is from the celestial of the spiritual.

AC 5634. And the men took this present.  That this signifies that truths had with them the means for obtaining favor, is evident from the signification of ”men,“ as being truths (n. 3134); and from the signification of a ”present,“ which was given on approaching kings and priests, as being something to obtain favor (n. 5619).

AC 5635. And they took double silver in their hand.  That this signifies also truth received in the ability, is evident from what was said above (n. 5623), where the same words occur. It may also be seen there what is meant by truth received in the ability.

AC 5636. And Benjamin.  That this signifies and the intermediate also, is evident from the representation of Benjamin, as being the intermediate (n. 5411, 5413, 5443).

AC 5637. And rose up, and went down to Egypt.  That this signifies elevation to life to be gained by them from the interior things of memory-knowledges, is evident from the signification of ”rising up,“ as being elevation to the things of spiritual life (n. 2401, 2785, 2912, 2927, 3171, 4103, 4881); and from the signification of ”going down,“ as being to life to be gained by them, for ”going down“ here involves the same as was meant before by the words, ”Send the boy with me, and we will arise and go, and we will live, and not die“ (verse 8), by which is signified spiritual life according to degrees (n. 5605); and from the signification of ”Egypt,“ as being memory-knowledges (n. 1164, 1165, 1186, 1462, 4749, 4964, 4966), here the interior things of memory-knowledges, because the celestial of the spiritual which is represented by Joseph was there; wherefore it is presently said that they ”stood before Joseph.“ The interior things of memory-knowledges are spiritual things in the natural mind, and spiritual things are there when the memory-knowledges there are enlightened by the light of heaven, and they are so enlightened when the man has faith in the doctrinal things that are from the Word, and he has this faith when he is in the good of charity; for then truths and thereby memory-knowledges are enlightened by the good of charity as by a flame. From this they have their spiritual light.  Hence it may be seen what is meant by the interior things of memory-knowledges.

AC 5638. And stood before Joseph.  That this signifies the presence of the celestial of the spiritual there, is evident from the signification of ”standing before“ anyone, as being presence; and from the representation of Joseph, as being the celestial of the spiritual.  That the celestial of the spiritual was present in both naturals was represented by Joseph‘s being made lord over all Egypt. This is what is meant by the presence of the celestial of the spiritual in the interior things of memory-knowledges; for these knowledges are in the natural (n. 5316, 5324, 5326-5328, 5333, 5337, 5373). The truths represented by Jacob’s ten sons are truths in the natural.

AC 5639. And Joseph saw Benjamin with them. That this signifies the perception by the celestial of the spiritual of a spiritual intermediate with truths, is evident from the signification of ”seeing,“ as being to understand and perceive (n. 2150, 2807, 3764, 4567, 4723, 5400); and from the representation of Jacob‘s ten sons (who are meant by ”with them,“ that is, with whom Joseph saw Benjamin), as being truths in the natural (n. 5403, 5419, 5427, 5458, 5512); and from the representation of Benjamin, as being the intermediate (n. 5411, 5413, 5443). That this is here called a spiritual intermediate is because the truths represented by Jacob’s ten sons were now to be conjoined with the truth from the Divine which is ”Joseph,“ and this conjunction is not effected without an intermediate which is spiritual; and therefore when this intermediate was perceived, it immediately follows that ”Joseph said to him that was over his house, Bring the men to the house, and slaying slay, and make ready; for the men shall eat with me at noon, by which is signified that they would be introduced and conjoined because with the intermediate.

[2] What the spiritual is relatively to the natural must be further told in a few words, because most of those who are in the Christian world are so ignorant of what the spiritual is that when they hear the term they hesitate, and say to themselves that no one knows what it is.  In its essence with man the spiritual is the very affection of good and truth for the sake of good and truth, and not for the sake of self, and also the affection of what is just and fair for the sake of what is just and fair, and not for the sake of self.  When a man feels in himself delight and pleasantness, and still more if he feels happiness and blessedness, from these affections, this is the spiritual in him, which comes not from the natural, but from the spiritual world or from heaven, that is, through heaven from the Lord.  This then is the spiritual, which when it reigns in a man, affects and as it were tinges all that he thinks, wills, and does, and causes the thoughts and the acts of his will to partake of the spiritual, until at last these also become spiritual in him, as when he passes out of the natural into the spiritual world.  In a word, the affection of charity and faith, that is, of good and truth, and the delight and pleasantness, and still more the happiness and blessedness thence derived, which are felt inwardly in man and make him a man truly Christian, are the spiritual.

[3] That most men in the Christian world are ignorant of what the spiritual is, is because they make faith and not charity the essential of the church.  Consequently as those few who are concerned about faith think little if at all about charity or know what it is, therefore as there is no knowledge, there is no perception of the affection which is of charity; and he who is not in the affection of charity cannot possibly know what the spiritual is. Especially is this true at the present day, when scarcely anyone has any charity, because it is the last time of the church But be it known that in a general sense the “spiritual” means the affection both of good and of truth, and therefore heaven is called the spiritual world, and the internal sense of the Word the spiritual sense; but specifically that which is of the affection of good is called the celestial, and that which is of the affection of truth is called the spiritual.

AC 5640. And he said to him that was over his house.  That this signifies to that which is of the external church, is evident from the representation of him that was over the house, as being the external church, when he who is in the house is the internal church (n. 1795).  And as in the internal sense the thing, and not the person, is regarded (n. 5225, 5287, 5434), therefore by “him that was over the house” is signified that which is of the external church.

AC 5641. Bring the men to the house.  That this signifies that the truths in the natural mind were to be introduced thither, is evident from the signification of “Jacob‘s sons,” as being the truths of the church in the natural (n. 5403, 5419, 5427, 5458, 5512).  Their being introduced there is signified by “bringing the men to the house.”

AC 5642. And slaying slay and make ready.  That this signifies through the goods of the exterior natural, is evident from the signification of “slaying,” as involving that which is slain - an ox, a bullock, a he-goat, or other cattle as being the goods of the natural. An “ox” and a “bullock” are the goods of the natural, (n. 2180, 2566, 2781, 2830); here the goods of the exterior natural, because through these they were now first introduced to conjunction; for his “bringing the men to Joseph’s house” signifies the first introduction into the good which is from the celestial of the spiritual (n. 5645). As the “bullock” and “ox” signified the goods of the natural, everything done in regard to them also signified this good, for the one involved the other.

AC 5643. For the men shall eat with me at noon.  That this signifies that they will be conjoined when with the intermediate, is evident from the signification of “eating with,” as being to be communicated, conjoined and appropriated (n. 2187, 2343, 3168, 3513, 3596, 3832).  And because they were with the spiritual intermediate, which is “Benjamin” (n. 5639), it is said “at noon;” for “noon” signifies a state of light, thus the spiritual state which comes through the intermediate (n. 1458, 3708).

AC 5644. And the man did as Joseph said.  That this signifies bringing it about, is evident without explication.

AC 5645. And the man brought the men to Joseph‘s house.  That this signifies the first introduction into the good which is from the celestial of the spiritual, is evident from the signification of “bringing,” as being introduction (n. 5641); from the signification of “Jacob’s sons,” as being the truths of the church in the natural (n. 5403, 5419, 5427, 5428, 5512); from the signification of a “house,” as being good (n. 3652, 3720, 4982), and hence also the church (n. 3720), for the church is the church from good; and from the representation of Joseph, as being the celestial of the spiritual.  From this it is plain that by “the man‘s bringing the men to Joseph’s house” is signified that the truths in the natural were to be introduced into the good which is from the celestial of the spiritual.  That the first introduction is what is signified, is because they now only ate with Joseph, and did not know him. By this is signified a general conjunction, which is the first introduction; for truth from the Divine then flows in generally, and is not discerned.  But when the truth which flows in is observed, there is then a second conjunction, which is signified by Joseph‘s manifesting himself to his brethren related in chapter 45.

AC 5646. Verses 18-23.  And the men were afraid because they were brought to Joseph’s house; and they said, Over the word of the silver that was returned in our bags in the beginning are we brought; to roll down upon us, and to cast himself upon us, and to take us for servants, and our asses. And they came near to the man that was over Joseph‘s house, and they spake unto him at the door of the house, and said, In me, my lord, in coming down we came down in the beginning to buy food; and it came to pass when we came to the inn and we opened our bags, and behold everyone’s silver in the mouth of his bag, our silver in its weight; and we have brought it back in our hand.  And other silver have we brought down in our hand to buy food; we know not who put our silver in our bags.  And he said, Peace be to you, fear not; your God, and the God of your father, gave you a hidden gift in your bags; your silver came to me. And he brought Simeon out unto them.  “And the men were afraid,” signifies a drawing back; “because they were brought to Joseph‘s house,” signifies because the truths that belonged to the natural were to be adjoined and subjected to the internal; “and they said, Over the word of the silver that was returned in our bags in the beginning are we brought,” signifies because truth in the exterior natural appears to be given gratuitously, they were therefore to be in subjection; “to roll down upon us and to cast himself upon us,” signifies that on this account they were to be reduced under absolute power; “and to take us for servants and our asses,” signifies until whatever is in either natural be as nothing; “and they came near to the man that was over Joseph’s house,” signifies the doctrinals of the church; “and they spake unto him at the door of the house,” signifies taking counsel of them about introduction; “and said, In me, my lord,” signifies a testifying; “in coming down we came down in the beginning to buy food,” signifies a disposition to procure good for truths; “and it came to pass when we came to the inn and we opened our bags,” signifies introspection into the exterior natural; “and behold everyone‘s silver in the mouth of his bag,” signifies that it was clearly seen that truths had been given as it were gratuitously; “our silver in its weight,” signifies truths according to each one’s state; “and we have brought it back in our hand,” signifies that what had been given gratuitously would be in submission as far as possible; “and other silver have we brought down in our hand to buy food,” signifies that there is a disposition to procure good by means of truth from another source; “we know not who put our silver in our bags,” signifies non-belief, from ignorance of the source of truth in the exterior natural; “and he said, Peace be to you, fear not,” signifies that it is well, let them not despair; “your God, and the God of your father,” signifies the Lord‘s Divine Human; “gave you a hidden gift in your bags,” signifies that it was from Him without any prudence of theirs; “your silver came to me,” signifies that it will seem as truth procured by them; “and he brought Simeon out unto them,” signifies that he adjoined will to truths.

AC 5647. And the men were afraid.  That this signifies a drawing back, is evident from the signification of “being afraid,” as here being a drawing back, namely, from conjunction with the internal.  Fear arises from various causes, as from danger of loss of life, of gain, honor, and reputation, also of being brought into some servitude and thus losing freedom and with it the life’s delight.  This is the subject treated of in what now follows; for they were afraid lest they should be adjoined to the internal, and thereby lose their own, and with it their freedom, and with freedom the life‘s delight, because this depends on freedom. This is the reason why by “the men were afraid” is signified a drawing back lest they should be adjoined.  Here in few words it must be told in advance how the case is with this conjunction, that is, the conjunction of the external or natural man with the internal or spiritual.  The external or natural man reigns from life’s earliest age, and knows not that there is an internal or spiritual man.  When therefore the man is being reformed and from being natural or external is beginning to become spiritual or internal, the natural at first rebels, for it is taught that the natural man is to be subjugated, that is, that all its concupiscences together with the things that confirm them are to be rooted out. Hence when the natural man is left to itself, it thinks that in this way it would utterly perish; for it knows no otherwise than that the natural is everything, and it is wholly ignorant that in the spiritual there are things immeasurable and unutterable; and when the natural man so thinks, it draws back and is not willing to be subjected to the spiritual. This is what is here meant by their “fear.”

AC 5648. Because they were brought to Joseph‘s house.  That this signifies because the truths that belong to the natural were to be adjoined and subjected to the internal, is evident from the signification of “being brought to Joseph’s house,” as being to be conjoined and subjected to the internal; for by Joseph is represented the internal, because he represents truth from the Divine, or the celestial of the spiritual (n. 5307, 5331, 5332, 5417, 5469); and by a “house” is signified man‘s internal as well as his external (n. 3128, 3538, 4973, 5023), here the internal, as it is called “Joseph’s house;” and by “being brought” (namely, to the internal) is signified to be adjoined, and therefore to be subjected.  The reason is that when the natural is adjoined to the internal, it is then subjected to it; for the command which had before belonged to the natural man, then becomes the spiritual man‘s; of which command, of the Lord’s Divine mercy more will be said in the following pages.

[2] A few words must here be added in regard to the internal sense.  The internal sense of the Word is especially for those who are in the other life.  When those who are there are with a man who is reading the Word, they perceive it according to the internal sense, and not according to the external; for they understand no human words, but only the sense of the words, and this not according to the man‘s natural thoughts, but according to their thoughts which are spiritual. Into this spiritual sense the natural sense that is with the man is at once transmuted, just as one turns the language of another into his own which is different, doing it in an instant.  So is the sense of natural human thought turned into spiritual, for spiritual language or speech is proper to the angels, and natural language or speech to men.  That there is so sudden a change of as it were one language into the other, is because there is a correspondence of each and all things in the natural world with those in the spiritual world.

[3] Now as the internal sense of the Word is chiefly for those who are in the spiritual world, therefore such things are here mentioned in the internal sense as are for them, and as are pleasant and delightful to them.  Yet the more interior such things are, the more remote are they from the apprehension of men to whom only those things which are of the world and the body are pleasant and delightful; and when this is the case, they hold in contempt the spiritual things that belong to the internal sense, and also loathe them.  Let everyone explore within himself whether the things contained in the internal sense of the verses that now follow are worthless and distasteful to him, when yet they are what the angelic societies take the greatest delight in.  From this it may be plain to one who reflects what a difference there is between the delights of men and the delights of angels, and also in what things the angels vest wisdom, and in what men vest it - that the angels vest wisdom in such things as man thinks worthless and holds in aversion, and that man vests wisdom in such things as the angels care nothing about, and many in such things as the angels reject and shun.

AC 5649. And they said, Over the word of the silver that was returned in our bags in the beginning are we brought.  That this signifies that because truth in the exterior natural appears to be given gratuitously, they were therefore to be in subjection, is evident from the signification of the “silver being returned,” as being truth bestowed gratuitously, (n. 5530, 5624); from the signification of a “” as being the threshold of the exterior natural (n. 5497); and from the signification of “being brought,” as being to be adjoined or subjected (n. 5648).

[2] The case herein is this.  As it was perceived that the truths of memory-knowledge in the exterior natural were given gratuitously, and would therefore be enticed to conjoin themselves with the internal, and thereby be in subjection to it, they would as just said be deprived of their freedom, and thereby of all the delight of life.  That this is the case, namely, that it is perceived that truths of memory-knowledge are bestowed gratuitously, and this in the natural mind whether exterior or interior, is quite unknown to man.  The reason is that he is in no such perception; for he does not at all know what is bestowed on him gratuitously, still less what is stored up in the exterior natural, and what in the interior.  The reason why he has not this perception is usually because worldly and earthly things are dear to him, and not celestial and spiritual things; and therefore he does not believe in any influx through heaven from the Lord, thus not at all that anything is given him; when yet all the truth that he rationally infers from memory-knowledges, and supposes to be of his own ability, is such as is given him.  Still less can man perceive whether it is placed in the exterior natural or in the interior, because he is ignorant that the natural is twofold, namely the outer which draws near to the external senses, and the inner which draws back from them and turns to the rational.

[3] As man knows nothing about either the one or the other, he can therefore have no perception about such things; for the knowledge of a thing must come first in order that there may be a perception of it. Yet the angelic societies know and perceive these things well and clearly, not only what is bestowed on them gratuitously, but also where it is, as may be seen from the following experience.  When any spirit who is in good, and hence in ability, comes into an angelic society, he comes at the same time into all the memory-knowledge and intelligence the society has, and in which he had not been before; and he then knows no otherwise than that he had known and understood it so before, and from himself.  But when he reflects, he perceives that it is gratuitously bestowed on him through that angelic society by the Lord; and he also knows from the angelic society where it is, whether in the exterior or in the interior natural.  For there are angelic societies that are in the exterior natural, and there are others that are in the interior natural. Yet the natural which belongs to them is not such a natural as man has; but it is a spiritual natural, which has become spiritual by having been conjoined and subjected to the spiritual.

[4] From all this it is evident that the things here related in the internal sense take place actually so in the other life, namely, that they perceive what is given them gratuitously, as well as where it is stored up, although man at this day knows nothing of such things.  But in ancient times they who were of the church knew such things, being taught them by their memory-knowledges and by their doctrinals.  They were interior men; but since those times men have become successively more external, insomuch that at this day they are in the body, thus in the outermost.  A sign of this is that they do not even know what the spiritual and the internal are, nor believe in their existence.  Nay, to such an outermost in the body have they gone away from interior things, that they do not even believe that there is a life after death, nor that there is a heaven or a hell.  Nay, by receding from interior things they have gone to such an outermost, and have become so stupid in spiritual things, as to believe that man’s life is like that of beasts, and therefore that man will die in like manner; and strange to say the learned believe so more than the simple, and anyone who believes differently is accounted by them a simpleton.

AC 5650. To roll down upon us and to cast himself upon us. That this signifies that on this account they were to be reduced under absolute power, is evident from the signification of “rolling down upon” anyone, as being to present him as culpable; and from the signification of “casting one‘s self upon” anyone, as being to reduce him under power, here absolute power, for it follows “and to take us for servants, and our asses.” The case herein is that before the natural man is conjoined with the spiritual, or the external with the internal, he is left to think whether he desires to get rid of the concupiscences arising from the love of self and of the world, together with the things by which he has defended them, and to yield the command to the spiritual or internal man. He is left to think this in order that he may be free to choose what he will. When the natural man apart from the spiritual thinks about this, he rejects it; for he loves his concupiscences because he loves himself and the world. Hence he becomes anxious, and supposes that if these were got rid of he would have no life left, for he vests everything in the natural or external man; or supposes that afterward he could do nothing of himself, and all that he would think, will, and do, would flow in through heaven, thus that he would not be his own master any longer. When the natural man on being left to himself is in this state, he draws back and resists. But when some light flows into his natural through heaven from the Lord, he begins to thinks differently, namely, that it is better for the spiritual man to have the supremacy, because thereby he can think and will what is good, and so can come into heaven, but not if the natural man were to rule.  And when he reflects that all the angels in the universal heaven are of this character, and that they are consequently in unspeakable joy, he then fights with the natural man, and at last desires it to be subordinated to the spiritual man.  In this state is the man placed who is to be regenerated, in order that he may be in freedom to turn whither he will; and so far as he turns to this in freedom, so far he is being regenerated. All this is treated of here in the internal sense.

AC 5651. And take us for servants, and our asses.  That this signifies until whatever is in both naturals be as nothing, is evident from the representation of Jacob’s ten sons, who say this of themselves, as being truths in the natural (n. 5403, 5419, 5427, 5458, 5512); and from the signification of “servants,” as being things of slight importance (n. 2541), here of none at all; and from the signification of “asses,” as being things in the natural which are memory-knowledges (n. 5492), here in the exterior natural, because the truths signified by “Jacob‘s sons” are in the interior natural.

[2] In regard to whatever is in both naturals being as nothing the case is this.  In order that a man may become spiritual, his natural must become as nothing, that is, be able to do nothing whatever of itself, because in so far as the natural is able of itself, so far the spiritual is not able; for the natural has imbibed from infancy nothing else than the things of the cupidities of self and of the world, thus those which are contrary to charity.  These evils prevent the influx of good through the internal man from the Lord, for whatever flows in is turned in the natural into evil, the natural being the plane in which the influx terminates. And therefore unless the natural (that is, the evil and falsity which have formed it) becomes as nothing, good cannot possibly flow in through heaven from the Lord.  It has no abiding place, but is dissipated; for it cannot stay in evil and falsity.  It is for this reason that the internal is closed so long as the natural does not become as nothing. This also is known in the church from the doctrine that the old man must be put off in order that the new may be put on.

[3] Regeneration is nothing else than that the natural be subjugated, and the spiritual obtain the dominion; and the natural is subjugated when it is reduced to correspondence. When the natural has been reduced to correspondence, it does not react any more, but acts as it is commanded, and obeys the spiritual, almost as the acts of the body obey the behest of the will, and as the speech, together with the expression of the face, conforms to the influx of the thought.  From this it is plain that for a man to become spiritual the natural must needs become as nothing whatever in respect to willing.

[4] But be it known that it is the old natural that must become as nothing, because this has been formed from evils and falsities; and when it has become as nothing the man is then gifted with a new natural, which is called the spiritual natural-spiritual from the fact that the spiritual is what acts through it, and manifests itself through it, as the cause through the effect.  It is known that the cause is everything of the effect.  Hence the new natural in its thinking, willing, and producing effect, is nothing else than the representative of the spiritual.  When this comes to pass the man receives good from the Lord; and when he receives good he is gifted with truths; and when he is gifted with truths he is perfected in intelligence and wisdom; and when he is perfected in intelligence and wisdom he is blessed with happiness to eternity.

AC 5652. And they came near to the man that was over Joseph’s house.  That this signifies the doctrinals of the church, is evident from the signification of the “man over Joseph‘s house,” as being that which is of the external church (n. 5640), thus doctrine, for this is of the church. Moreover by “man” is signified truth, and thus doctrine (n. 3134), and by a “house,” the church (n. 1795) and as “Joseph” is the internal (n. 5469), “Joseph’s house” is the internal church.  Doctrine from the Word is what is over this house, in being of service and in ministering.

AC 5653. And they spake unto him at the door of the house. That this signifies taking counsel of them about introduction, is evident from the signification of “speaking to the man over Joseph‘s house,” as being to take counsel of them, namely, of doctrinals; and from the signification of the “door of the house,” as being introduction (n. 2356, 2385), here from the natural or external man to the spiritual or internal, which is the subject treated of.  As this is signified, it is not said in the original “at the door of the house,” but “the door of the house.”

AC 5654. And said, In me, my lord.  That this signifies a testifying, is evident from this very form of speech, as being one of testifying, namely, that they will tell the truth about the silver that was found in the mouth of everyone’s bag.

AC 5655. In coming down we came down in the beginning to buy food.  That this signifies a disposition to procure good for truths, is evident from the signification of “coming down,” as being a disposition or an intention; for he who comes down or betakes himself anywhere, does so from a disposition, here to procure good for truths, signified by “to buy food;” for by “buying” is signified procuring and appropriating (n. 5374, 5397, 5406, 5414, 5426), and by “food,” the good of truth (n. 5340, 5342), here good for the truths represented by Jacob‘s sons, who say this of themselves.

AC 5656. And it came to pass when we came to the inn and we opened our bags.  That this signifies introspection into the exterior natural, is evident from the signification of an “inn,” as being the exterior natural in general (n. 5495); and from the signification of “opening,” as being introspection, for he who opens does so for the sake of looking in; and from the signification of a “bag,” as being specifically the exterior natural (n. 5497).)

AC 5657. And behold everyones silver in the mouth of his bag. That this signifies that it was clearly seen that truths had been given as it were gratuitously, is evident from the signification of “everyone’s silver in his bag,” as being truths given gratuitously (n. 5530, 5624).  It is similar with “everyone‘s silver in the mouth of his bag,” with the difference that by this are signified the truths that had been given gratuitously, and that had been stored up in the threshold of the exterior natural; for by the “mouth of the bag” is signified the threshold of the exterior natural (n. 5497). As it were given gratuitously is here signified because they are in a state of doubt as to whether they would be willing to be conjoined with the internal and become as nothing; and when anyone is in a state of doubt, he feels doubtful also about the truths which confirm.

AC 5658. Our silver in its weight.  That this signifies truths according to each one’s state, is evident from the signification of “silver,” as being truth (n. 1551, 2954); and from the signification of “weight,” as being the state of a thing as to good (n. 3104); thus “truths according to each one‘s state” is according to the good they are capable of receiving.  Weights and measures are mentioned in many passages of the Word yet in the internal sense they do not signify weights and measures; but weights signify the states of a thing as to good, and measures the states of a thing as to truth.  So also do heaviness and extension; heaviness in the natural world corresponds to good in the spiritual world, and extension to truth. The reason is that in heaven, which is the source of correspondences, there is no heaviness and no extension, because there is no space.  Things indeed appear heavy and extended among spirits; but these are appearances arising from states of good and truth in a higher heaven.

[2] That “silver” signifies truth was very well known in ancient times.  Hence the ancients distinguished the several ages of the world from the first to the last into the golden, the silver, the copper, and the iron ages, to which they added an age of clay.  They called those times the golden ages when there was innocence and wholeness, and when everyone did what was good from good, and what was just from justice. They called those times the silver ages when there was no longer innocence, but still a kind of wholeness that consisted not in doing good from good, but in doing truth from truth; and they gave the name of copper and iron to the ages which are yet lower.

[3] That they so designated these periods was not from comparison, but from correspondence; for the ancients knew that silver corresponds to truth, and gold to good, and this by communication with spirits and angels. For when good is spoken about in a higher heaven, there is an appearance of gold below among those who are beneath them in the first or lowest heaven; and when truth is spoken of, there is an appearance of silver; sometimes so that not only the walls of the rooms where they dwell sparkle with gold and silver, but also the very atmosphere. Tables of gold also, golden lampstands, and many other things, appear with the angels of the first or ultimate heaven who are in good from good; while to those who are in truth from truth, such objects appear of silver.  Yet who at the present day knows that it was from their correspondence that the ancients called these the gold and silver ages? Indeed who at this day knows anything about correspondence?  And he who does not know this, and still more he who makes pleasure and wisdom consist in disputing whether it is or is not so, cannot know the least of the countless things that belong to correspondence.

AC 5659. And we have brought it back in our hand.  That this signifies that what had been given gratuitously would be in submission as far as possible, is evident from the signification of “bringing back,” as here being to submit; and from the signification of “in our hand,” as being as far as possible (n. 5624). Its having been given gratuitously is signified by the “silver in the mouth of the bag which they had brought back” (n. 5657).

AC 5660. And other silver have we brought down in our hand to buy food.  That this signifies that there is a disposition to procure good by means of truth from another source, is evident from the signification of “silver,” as being truth (n. 5657); and as by “silver” is signified truth, by the “other silver” is signified other truth, consequently truth from another source (as there is no genuine truth but that which is from the Lord, who bestows it gratuitously, so truth itself is from no other source); and from the signification of “bringing down,” as being a disposition for procuring, namely, the good of truth which is signified by the corn they were to buy.  The historical sense of the letter implies that the other silver also came to Joseph to buy food from him, and therefore did not come from any other source.  But the internal sense does not abide in the historical sense of the letter, for which it does not care, but abides in the subject that is being treated of; and the subject is, that if they were to be subjected as servants because some truths in the exterior natural had been bestowed gratuitously, they would procure good by means of truth from some other source.  Such also is the series in the internal sense, for it is presently said, “We know not who put our silver in our bags,” by which is signified that they would not believe, because they did not know what was the source of the truth in the exterior natural.

[2] Something similar takes place in the other life with spirits who are being initiated into good by means of truths, and especially into this one - that all good and truth flow in from the Lord. When they perceive that everything they think and will flows into them, thus that they have no power to think and to will from themselves, they resist as much as they can, believing that if this were so they would have no life of their own, and thereby that all delight would perish, for they vest this in what is their own. Besides, if they cannot do good or believe truth of themselves, they suppose they should let go their hands, doing and thinking nothing from themselves, and should wait for influx. They are permitted to think so, even to the extent of almost coming to the conclusion that they do not desire to receive good and truth from this source, but from some other by which there would not be such a loss of what is their own; and sometimes it is given their to inquire where they may find it.  Yet afterward when they find it nowhere, those who are being regenerated come back, and in freedom choose to be led by the Lord in their willing and thinking.  They are then informed that they bill receive an own that is heavenly, such as angels have, and with this own, also blessedness and happiness to eternity.

[3] As regards the own that is heavenly, this comes forth from the new will that is given by the Lord, and differs from the man’s own in the fact that they who have it no longer regard themselves in each and all things they do, and in each and all things they learn or teach; but they then have regard to the neighbor, the public, the church, the Lord‘s kingdom, and thereby to the Lord Himself.  It is the ends of life that are changed.  The ends that look to lower things, that is, to self and the world, are removed, and ends that look to higher things are substituted in their place.  The ends of life are nothing else than the man’s life itself, for they are his very will and loves, because what a man loves he wills and has for his end.  He who is gifted with an own that is heavenly is also in quietude and in peace; for he trusts in the Lord, and believes that nothing of evil will reach him, and knows that concupiscences will not infest him. And besides, they who are in the heavenly own are in freedom itself; for to be led by the Lord is freedom, because they are led in good, by good, to good. From this it is evident that they are in blessedness and happiness, for there is nothing that disturbs them, nothing of the love of self, consequently nothing of enmity, hatred, and revenge; nor is there anything of the love of the world, consequently nothing of fraud, of fear, of unrest.

AC 5661. We know not who put our silver in our bags.  That this signifies non-belief, from ignorance of the source of truth in the exterior natural, is evident from the signification of “not knowing,” as being in the spiritual sense not believing or non-belief; from the signification of “who put,” as being ignorance from what source; from the signification of “silver,” as being truth (n. 5658); and from the signification of a “bag,” as being the exterior natural (n. 5497).

AC 5662. And he said, Peace be to you, fear not.  That this signifies that it is well, let them not despair, is evident from the signification of “peace,” as being to be well; and from the signification of “fear not,” as being let them not despair.  For the internal sense treats of a change of state, in that they no longer procure truths and through them good by their own power; but are presented with them from the Lord.  And because they supposed that they would thus lose their own, thus freedom, and consequently all the delight of life, they were in despair, as is plain from what has gone before.  Hence it is that “fear not” here signifies let them not despair; for fear arises from various causes (n. 5647), and therefore also signifies various things.

[2] That “peace” denotes it is well, is because it is the inmost, and hence the universally reigning thing, in each and all things in heaven; for peace in heaven is like spring on earth, or like the dawn, which does not affect us by sensible changes, but by a universal pleasantness that flows into everything that is perceived, and fills with this pleasantness not only the perception itself but also the several objects.  At the present day scarcely anyone knows the meaning of “peace” where mentioned in the Word, as in the benediction, “Jehovah lift up His faces upon thee, and give thee peace” (Num. 6:26); and in other places.  Almost everyone believes peace to be security from enemies, and also tranquillity at home and among companions.  Such peace is not meant in this passage, but a peace which immeasurably transcends it - the heavenly peace just now spoken of.  This peace can be bestowed on no one unless he is led by the Lord and is in the Lord, that is, in heaven where the Lord is all in all; for heavenly peace flows in when the cupidities arising from the love of self and the love of the world are taken away.  These are what take peace away, for they infest man‘s interiors, and at last cause him to make rest consist in unrest, and peace in annoyances, because his delight is in evils.  So long as man is in these he cannot possibly know what peace is, nay, he so long believes that such peace is nothing; and if anyone says that it becomes perceptible when the delights from the love of self and the world are taken away, he laughs, because he makes peace consist in the delight of evil, which is the opposite of peace.

[3] Because such is the nature of peace, namely, the inmost of all happinesses and blessednesses, and hence the universal that reigns in them all, therefore the ancients used as a common form of speech the words, “Peace be unto you,” when they meant that it be well; and asked whether people “had peace” when they meant “is it well?” See what has been said and shown above in regard to peace, namely: That peace in heaven is like spring and the dawn on earth (n. 1726, 2780): That peace in the supreme sense is the Lord, in the representative sense His kingdom, and that it is the Lord’s Divine affecting with good from the inmost (n. 3780, 4681): That all unrest is from evil and falsity, but peace from good and truth (n. 3170).

AC 5663. Your God, and the God of your father.  That this signifies the Lord‘s Divine Human, may be seen from the fact that where “God” or “Jehovah” is mentioned in the Word, the Lord and no one else is meant (n. 1343, 1736, 2921, 3035); and when it is said “your God and the God of your father,” that is, the God of Israel and of Jacob and his sons, it means the Lord’s Divine Human, and indeed as to the Divine natural (n. 3305, 4286, 4570); for Israel represented the Lord as to the interior natural, Jacob as to the exterior, and his sons as to the truths in this natural.

[2] That the Lord was meant in the Word by “God” and “Jehovah,” the Jewish Church did not know, nor does the Christian Church know it at this day. That the Christian Church has not known it, is because it has distinguished the Divinity into three persons.  But the Ancient Church which was after the flood, and above all the Most Ancient Church which was before the flood, understood by “Jehovah” and “God” no other than the Lord, and Him indeed as to His Divine Human.  They also knew about the Divine Itself which is in the Lord, and which He calls His “Father,‘ yet they were not able to think about that Divine Itself which is in the Lord, but about the Divine Human, and consequently could not be conjoined with any other Divine; for conjunction is effected through thought which is of the understanding and affection which is of the will, thus through faith and through love.  For if we think of the Divine Itself, the thought falls as it were into a boundless universe, and thus is dissipated, whence there is no conjunction.  It is otherwise when the Divine Itself is thought of as the Divine Human. And the ancients knew that they could not be saved unless they were conjoined with the Divine.

[3] Therefore it was the Divine Human that the Ancient Churches worshiped; and Jehovah also manifested Himself to them in the Divine Human. The Divine Human was the Divine Itself in heaven; for heaven constitutes one man, which is called the Grand Man, as his been heretofore shown at the end of the chapters. This Divine in heaven is none other than the Divine Itself, but in heaven it is as a Divine Man.  This Man is what the Lord took on and made Divine in Him, and united it to the Divine Itself as it had been united from eternity; for from eternity there was a one.  He did this because mankind could not otherwise have been saved; for it was no longer sufficient for the Divine Itself to be able, through heaven and thus through the Divine Human itself there, to flow into human minds; wherefore the Divine Itself willed to unite the Divine Human to itself actually by the Human taken on in the world.  The one and the other is the Lord.

AC 5664. Gave you a hidden gift in your bags.  That this signifies that it was from Him without any prudence of theirs, is evident from the signification of a ”hidden gift,“ as being the truth and good that are given by the Lord without the man’s knowing it; and from the signification of ”silver brought back in the sacks or bags,“ as being without any ability of theirs (n. 5488, 5496, 5499). From this it is plain that by ”gave you a hidden gift in your bags“ is signified that from Him, namely from the Lord‘s Divine Human, is truth and good in the natural without any ability of theirs; and because it is without their ability, it is without their prudence.  The word ”prudence“ is used, because prudence corresponds to providence, and that which is of the Divine providence is not of man’s prudence.

AC 5664a. Your silver came to me.  That this signifies that it will seem as truth procured by them, is evident from the signification of ”silver,“ as being truth (n. 1551, 2954). Their ”silver coming to him“ means that they bought, and thus that they themselves procured; for ”to buy“ is to procure (n. 5655). Thus by ”your silver came to me“ is signified truth procured by them; but as the truth which is of faith is never procured by any man, but is insinuated and given by the Lord, and yet seems as if acquired by man, it is said that it will seem as truth procured by them.

[2] It is known in the church that truth is insinuated and given by the Lord; for it is taught that faith is not from man but from God; thus not only confidence, but also the truths of faith are from Him.  Still it appears as if the truths of faith were procured by the man, for he is profoundly ignorant that they flow in, because he does not perceive it. The reason why he does not perceive it is that his interiors are closed, so that he cannot have perceptible communication with spirits and angels; and when the interiors are closed the man can know nothing whatever about influx.

[3] Be it known however that it is one thing to know the truths of faith, and quite another to believe them.  They who merely know the truths of faith, charge their memory with them just as they do with the facts of any other branch of knowledge. These truths man can procure for himself without such an influx, but they have no life, as is plain from the fact that an evil man, even the worst, can know the truths of faith just as much as an upright and pious man.  But as before said with the evil these truths have no life; for when an evil man brings them forth he regards in everyone of them either self-glory or gain; so that it is the love of self and of the world that inflates them and makes a sort of life but it is such life as there is in hell, which is called spiritual death.  Hence it is that when he brings them forth, he brings them forth from the memory, and not from the heart; whereas he who believes the truths of faith brings them forth from the heart at the same time as from the lips; for with him the truths of faith are so deeply rooted in as to have their root in the outer memory, and to grow from there toward what is interior or higher, like fruit-bearing trees; and like trees they deck themselves with leaves, and at last with blossoms, for the sake of the end of bearing fruit.  So it is with such a man.

[4] He also aims at nothing else through the truths of faith than uses, which are the practices of charity, which to him are the fruits.  These are the truths which man cannot procure for himself, even in the smallest degree; but they are gratuitously bestowed on him by the Lord, and this in every moment of his life, nay, if he will believe it, without number in every moment.  But as man is of such a nature as to have no perception of their flowing in, for as before said if he had the perception he would resist, because he would believe that he would then lose his own, and with his own his freedom, and with his freedom his delight, and would thus become a thing of nought, it is therefore brought about that man does not know but that he procures truths of himself.  This then is what is meant by saying that it will seem as truth procured by them.  Moreover in order that a heavenly own and heavenly freedom may be bestowed on man, he must needs do good as of himself and think what is true as of himself; but when he reflects he should acknowledge that these are from the Lord (n. 2882, 2883, 2891).

AC 5665. And he brought Simeon out unto them.  That this signifies that he adjoined will to truths, is evident from the representation of Simeon, as being faith in the will, or the will to do the truth which is of faith (n. 3869-3872, 4497, 4502, 4503, 5482); and from the representation of the sons of Jacob, who are they unto whom he brought out Simeon, as being the truths of the church in the natural (n. 5403, 5419, 5427, 5458, 5512). From this it is plain that his ”bringing Simeon out unto them“ signifies that he adjoined will to truths.

AC 5666. Verses 24-28. And the man brought the men to Joseph‘s house, and gave waters, and they washed their feet; and he gave their asses provender.  And they made ready the present against Joseph came at noon; for they heard that they should eat bread there.  And Joseph came to the house, and they brought him the present which was in their hand to the house, and bowed down themselves to him to the earth.  And he asked them to peace, and said, Is there peace to your father, the old man of whom ye spake? Is he yet alive? And they said, There is peace to thy servant our father; he is yet alive. And they bent themselves and bowed themselves down.  ”And the man brought the men to Joseph’s house,“ signifies initiation to conjunction with the internal; ”and gave waters,“ signifies a general influx of truth from the internal; ”and they washed their feet,“ signifies a consequent purifying of the natural; ”and he gave their asses provender,“ signifies instruction concerning good; ”and they made ready the present,“ signifies insinuation; ”against Joseph came at noon,“ signifies until the internal should be present with light; ”for they heard that they should eat bread there,“ signifies a noticing that good would be adjoined to truths; ”and Joseph came to the house,“ signifies the presence of the internal; ”and they brought him the present which was in their hand to the house,“ signifies insinuation as far as possible; ”and bowed down themselves to him to the earth,“ signifies humiliation; ”and he asked them to peace,“ signifies perception that it is well; ”and said, Is there peace to your father, the old man of whom ye spake,“ signifies also with spiritual good; ”is he yet alive,“ signifies that it has life; ”and they said, There is peace to thy servant our father,“ signifies a noticing therefrom of the natural that it is well with the good from which it comes; ”he is yet alive,“ signifies and that it has life; ”and they bent themselves and bowed themselves down,“ signifies outward and inward humiliation.

AC 5667. And the man brought the men to Joseph‘s house.  That this signifies initiation to conjunction with the internal, is evident from the signification of ”bringing the men to Joseph’s house,“ as being to adjoin to the internal the truths belonging to the natural (n. 5648).  That initiation to conjunction is signified, is clear from what follows--that they ate there, and that Joseph did not then manifest himself to them; by which is signified a general influx, which is now described, and which also is initiation.

AC 5668. And gave waters.  That this signifies a general influx of truth from the internal, is evident from the signification of ”waters,“ as being truth (n. 2702, 3058, 3424, 4976), and indeed truth in general.  Hence ”giving waters“ signifies a general influx of truth. That it is from the internal, is because it was in Joseph‘s house (n. 5667). A general influx of truth is the enlightenment which gives the capacity of apprehending and understanding truth. This enlightenment is from the light of heaven that is from the Lord, which light is nothing else than the Divine truth (n. 2776, 3138, 3167, 3195, 3223, 3339, 3485, 3636, 3643, 3993, 4302, 4413, 4415, 5400).

AC 5669. And they washed their feet.  That this signifies a consequent purifying of the natural, is evident from the signification of ”washing the feet,“ as being the purifying of the natural (n. 3147).

AC 5670. And he face their asses provender.  That this signifies instruction concerning good, is evident from the signification of ”giving provender,“ as being to instruct in good; for by ”provender“ is signified the good of the truths of memory-knowledges (n. 3114); and by ”giving provender,“ which is ”feeding,“ is signified to instruct in this good. ”Feeding“ is instructing, (n. 5201); and by ”asses“ are signified memory-knowledges, (n. 5492). From this it is plain that by ”giving asses provender“ is signified instruction about the good of memory-knowledges.  The good of memory-knowledges is the delight from the truths of these knowledges.  The truths of memory-knowledges are most general truths, which appear in the natural light which is from the light of the world; but in order that they may appear (that is, as being truths), there must be a general influx from the internal (n. 5668). This is the enlightenment from the light of heaven.

AC 5671. And they made ready the present.  That this signifies insinuation, is evident from the signification of a ”present,“ as being to obtain favor (n. 5619); thus ”to make ready the present“ is insinuation.

AC 5672. Against Joseph came at noon.  That this signifies until the internal should be present with light, is evident from the signification of” against he came,“ as being when it should be present; from the representation of Joseph, as being the internal (n. 5648); and from the signification of ”noon,“ as being a state of light (n. 1458, 3195, 3708).  That ”noon“ denotes a state of light is because the times of day, as morning, noon, and evening, correspond to the enlightenments in the other life, and the enlightenments there are those of intelligence and wisdom, for in the light of heaven there is intelligence and wisdom.  There are alternations of enlightenment there, like morning, noon, and evening on earth. The states of shade, like those of evening, do not arise from the sun there, that is, the Lord, who is always giving light, but from the angels’ own, for in so far as they are let into their own they come into a state of shade or evening, and in so far as they are lifted out of their own into a heavenly own, they come into a state of light.  From this it is plain why noon corresponds to a state of light.

AC 5673. For they heard that they should eat bread there. That this signifies a noticing that good would be adjoined to truths, is evident from the signification of ”hearing,“ as being a noticing (n. 5017); from the signification of ”eating,“ as being to be appropriated and conjoined (n. 2187, 3168, 3513, 3596, 3832, 5643); and from the signification of ”bread,“ as being the good of love (n. 2165, 2177, 2187, 3464, 3478, 3735, 3813, 4211, 4217, 4735, 4976).

AC 5674. And Joseph came to the house.  That this signifies the presence of the internal, is evident from the signification of ”coming to the house,“ as being to be at hand, or presence (n. 5672); and from the representation of Joseph, as being the internal (n. 5648).

AC 5675. And they brought him the present which was in their hand to the house.  That this signifies insinuation as far as possible, is evident from the signification of the ”present“ that was given to kings and priests, as being to obtain favor; thus also insinuation (n. 5671); and from the signification of being ”in their hands,“ as being as far as possible (n. 5624, 5659).

AC 5676. And bowed down themselves to him to the earth.  That this signifies humiliation, is evident from the signification of ”bowing down to the earth,“ as being to humble one‘s self (n. 2153, 5682).

AC 5677. And he asked them to peace.  That this signifies perception that it is well, is evident from the signification of ”asking,“ as being to perceive another’s thought (n. 5597); and from the signification of ”peace,“ as being to be well (n. 5662).

AC 5678. And said, Is there peace to your father, the old man of whom ye spake?  That this signifies also with spiritual good, is evident from the signification of ”peace,“ as being to be well (n. 5677); and from the representation of Israel, who is the ”father“ here, as being spiritual good (n. 3654, 4286, 4598).

AC 5679. Is he yet alive?  That this signifies that it has life, is evident from the signification of ”living,“ as being spiritual life (n. 5407).

AC 5680. And they said, There is peace to thy servant our father.  That this signifies a noticing therefrom of the natural that it is well with the good from which it comes, is evident from the signification of ”saying,“ as being to perceive (n. 1898, 1919, 2080, 2619, 2862, 3395, 3509); from the signification of ”peace,“ as being to be well (n. 5662, 5677); and from the representation of Israel, as being spiritual good (n. 5678).  This good is called ”father,“ because from it as from a father are the truths and goods in the natural which are represented by his ten sons; and because the truths and goods in the natural are represented by them, the natural also is signified by them; for the natural is the containant, and the truths and goods therein are the contents, which make a one.  From this it is plain that by their saying ”there is peace to thy servant our father,“ is signified a noticing therefrom of the natural that it is well with the good from which it comes.  It is called a noticing therefrom, namely, from the internal, which is represented by Joseph (n. 5648), because all the perception of the natural comes from the spiritual, and because from the spiritual, it comes from the internal, that is, through the internal from the Lord.  The natural never has any perception, nor even any life of thought and affection, except what comes from the spiritual; for in the natural all things are of themselves dead, but they are vivified by influx from the spiritual world, that is, through the spiritual world from the Lord.  In the spiritual world all things live from the light which is from the Lord; for in this light is wisdom and intelligence.  That here there is signified a noticing therefrom, or from the internal in the natural, follows also from what has been said above (n. 5677).

AC 5681. He is yet alive.  That this signifies, and that it has life, is evident from what was adduced just above (n. 5679, 5407).

AC 5682. And they bent themselves and bowed themselves down. That this signifies outward and inward humiliation, is evident from the signification of ”bending themselves,“ as being outward humiliation; and from the signification of ”bowing themselves down,“ as being inward humiliation; for bending is a less degree of bowing down, and therefore it denotes outward humiliation; and bowing down is a greater degree, and therefore it denotes inward humiliation.  Moreover, ”bending“ denotes the humiliation of truth, that is, of those who are in truth, thus of the spiritual; and ”bowing down“ denotes the humiliation of good, that is, of those who are in good, thus of the celestial.  In this case also ”bending“ is outward humiliation, and ”bowing down“ inward; for they who are in good are more interior men than those who are in truth.  These things are what are contained in the internal sense of this period. Most of them have been unfolded simply as to the significations of the words, for the reason that they are such as have been previously unfolded.

AC 5683. Verses 29-34.  And he lifted up his eyes, and saw Benjamin his brother, his mother‘s son, and said, Is this your youngest brother, of whom ye spake unto me?  And he said, God be gracious unto thee, my son.  And Joseph made haste, for his compassions were moved toward his brother; and he sought to weep, and he came to the bed-chamber, and wept there.  And he washed his faces, and went out, and he restrained himself and said, Set on bread.  And they set on for him alone, and for them alone, and for the Egyptians, who did eat with him, alone; because the Egyptian cannot eat bread with the Hebrews; because this is an abomination to the Egyptians.  And they sat before him, the firstborn according to his birthright, and the youngest according to his youth; and the men were amazed, everyone at his companion. And he brought out portions from his faces unto them; and he multiplied Benjamin’s portion above the portions of them all, five measures. And they drank and drank largely with him. ”And be lifted up his eyes,“ signifies reflection; ”and saw Benjamin,“ signifies a noticing of the intermediate ”his brother, his mother‘s son,“ signifies the internal from the natural, as from a mother; ”and said,“ signifies perception; ”Is this your youngest brother, of whom ye spake unto me?“ signifies the one born after all, as was also known to them; ”and he said, God be gracious unto thee, my son,“ signifies that the Divine is also with the spiritual of the celestial, which is the intermediate, because it proceeds from the celestial of the spiritual, which is truth from the Divine; ”and Joseph made haste,“ signifies from the inmost; ”for his compassions were moved,“ signifies mercy from love; ”toward his brother,“ signifies toward the internal from itself; ”and he sought to weep,“ signifies the effect of mercy from love; ”and he came to the bed-chamber, and wept there,“ signifies in itself, not apparently; ”and he washed his faces,“ signifies that it is so arranged; ”and went out,“ signifies by removal; ”and he restrained himself,“ signifies by concealment; ”and said, Set on bread,“ signifies perception of conjunction through the intermediate with truths in the natural; ”and they set on for him alone, and for them alone,“ signifies outward appearance that the internal was as if separated from them; ”and for the Egyptians, who did eat with him, alone,“ signifies separation of the memory-knowledges that are in inverted order; ”because the Egyptians cannot eat bread with the Hebrews,“ signifies that they could not possibly be conjoined with the truth and good of the church; ”because this is an abomination to the Egyptians,“ signifies that they are in opposition; ”and they sat before him,“ signifies that they were set in order by his presence ”the firstborn according to his birthright, and the youngest according to his youth,“ signifies according to the order of truths under good; ”and the men were amazed, everyone at his companion,“ signifies a change of state of each one among them; ”and he brought out portions from his faces unto them,“ signifies goods applied to each one from mercy; ”and he multiplied Benjamin’s portion above the portions of them all,“ signifies good for the intermediate above the goods for the truths in the natural; ”five measures,“ signifies much increased; ”and they drank,“ signifies the application of truths under good; ”and drank largely with him,“ signifies abundantly.

AC 5684. And he lifted up his eyes.  That this signifies reflection, is evident from the signification of ”lifting up the eyes,“ as being thought and attention (n. 2789, 2829, 4339), and also observation (n. 4086).  Thus it denotes reflection; for to reflect is to concentrate the intellectual sight, and to observe whether a thing is so, and then that it is so.

AC 5685. And saw Benjamin.  That this signifies a noticing of the intermediate, is evident from the signification of ”seeing,“ as being to understand and notice (n. 2150, 2325, 3764, 3863, 4403-4421, 4567, 4723, 5400); and from the representation of Benjamin, as being the intermediate (n. 5411, 5413, 5443, 5639).

AC 5686. His brother, his mother‘s son.  That this signifies the internal from the natural as from a mother, is evident from the representation of Benjamin, who is here the ”brother“ and ”mother’s son,“ as being the internal (n. 5469); and as he is the intermediate he therefore comes forth from the celestial of the spiritual, which is ”Joseph,“ as from a father, and from the natural as from a mother; for he must partake of both in order to serve as an intermediate. This then is what is meant by the internal from the natural as from a mother.  And because the celestial of the spiritual, which is ”Joseph,“ in like manner came forth from the natural as a mother, but from the Divine as a father, Benjamin is therefore called his ”brother, the son of his mother,“ as indeed he was by birth.  And presently he is called also his ”son.“ The Lord, who is meant here by ”Joseph“ in the supreme sense, calls everyone a ”brother“ who has anything of the good of charity from the Lord.  He is also called the ”son of His mother,“ but then by ”mother“ is meant the church.

AC 5687. And said.  That this signifies perception, is evident from the signification of ”saying“ in the historicals of the Word, as being perception.  That ”saying“ is perceiving, is because in heaven the very thoughts from which the speech comes are perceived, otherwise than is the case in the world.  Hence it is that ”perceiving“ in the spiritual sense is ”speaking“ or ”saying“ in the literal, or what is the same, the natural sense.

AC 5688. Is this your youngest brother, of whom ye spake unto me?  That this signifies the one born after all, as was also known to them, is evident from the signification of the ”youngest brother,“ as being the one born after all; and from the signification of the words ”of whom ye spake unto me,“as being what was perceived by them. ”To speak“ denotes what is perceived, thus what is known, (n. 5687). That Benjamin is here called, as he was, their ”youngest brother,“ that is, the one born after all or the youngest in birth, is because it is similar in the spiritual sense with the intermediate which Benjamin represents for the intermediate is born in man last of all, because when a man is born spiritually, that is, when he is reborn, his rational, which is the internal human, is first regenerated by the Lord, and afterward his natural (n. 3286, 3288, 3321, 3493, 4612); and as the intermediate partakes of both (of the rational made spiritual, or made new, and also of the natural), and as it cannot take anything from the natural unless this also is made new, therefore the intermediate cannot be born till afterward, and indeed according to the degree in which the natural is being regenerated.

[2] All things that are related in the Word of Jacob‘s sons had so come to pass of Providence, in order that the Word might be written about them and their descendants, and might contain within it heavenly things, and in the supreme sense Divine things, which they would represent in actual life.  So also was it with Benjamin, who being born last, would therefore represent the intermediate between the internal and the external, or between the celestial of the spiritual which the Lord had in the world, and the natural which the Lord also had and was to make Divine.

[3] All that is related of Joseph and his brethren represents in the supreme sense the glorifying of the Lord’s Human, that is, how the Lord made the Human in Him Divine.  The reason for this being represented in the inmost sense is that the Word might be most holy in its inmost sense, and also that it might contain in every part of it what would enter into the wisdom of the angels; for it is known that angelic wisdom so far surpasses human intelligence that scarcely any. thing of it can be apprehended by man.  It is also the happiness itself of the angels that every detail of the Word has reference to the Lord; for they are in the Lord. Furthermore, the glorifying of the Lord‘s Human is the pattern of man’s regeneration, and hence man‘s regeneration also is presented in the internal sense of the Word at the same time with the glorification of the Lord.  Man’s regeneration together with its innumerable mysteries also enters into the angels‘ wisdom, and affords them happiness according as they apply it to its uses, which are for man’s reformation.

AC 5689. And he said, God be gracious unto thee, my son.  That this signifies that the Divine was also with the spiritual of the celestial, which is the intermediate, because it proceeds from the celestial of the spiritual, which is truth from the Divine, is evident from the signification of ”God be gracious,“ when it is said by the celestial of the spiritual which is ”Joseph,“ to the spiritual of the celestial which is ”Benjamin,“ and when the latter is also called his ”son,“ which means that the Divine is also with the spiritual of the celestial, which is an intermediate because it proceeds from the celestial of the spiritual which is truth from the Divine. ”Benjamin“ is the spiritual of the celestial, (n. 3969, 4592); and also this is an intermediate, (n. 5411, 5413, 5443, 5639),

[2] As in the supreme sense, as before said, the Lord‘s internal human was the celestial of the spiritual, and this was truth from the Divine, or the first clothing of the Divine Itself in the Lord, and as the spiritual of the celestial, which is the intermediate, proceeded therefrom, it follows that the Divine was also with this.  That which proceeds from anything derives its essence from that from which it proceeds; but it is clothed with such things as serve for communication, thus for use in a lower sphere.  The things with which it is clothed are taken from such as are in the lower sphere, to the end that the internal from which it proceeds may act in the lower sphere by such means as are there.

[3] That which gives the essence is as the father, for the essence is the soul; and that which gives the clothing is the mother, for the clothing is the body of this soul.  This is the reason why it was said above that the intermediate must draw from both in order to be an intermediate; what it has from the internal being as its father, and what it has from the external being as its mother.

AC 5690. And Joseph made haste.  That this signifies from the inmost, is evident from the signification of ”making haste,“ as here being what bursts forth from the inmost; because there follows, ”for his compassions were moved,“ by which is signified mercy from love. When this bursts forth, it bursts forth from the inmost, and this at the first glance of the eye or at the first instant of thought; wherefore by ”making haste“ here nothing else is signified than from the inmost.

AC 5691. For his compassions were moved.  That this signifies mercy from love, is evident from the signification of the ”compassions being moved,“ as being mercy from love; it is said ”mercy,“ because he was not yet acknowledged by him, and ”from love,“ because as an intermediate he had proceeded from him. In the original language ”compassions“ is expressed by a word which signifies the inmost and tenderest love.

AC 5692. Toward his brother.  That this signifies toward the internal from itself, is evident from the representation of Benjamin, who is here the ”brother,“ as being the intermediate, thus also the internal (n. 5649); and as both the intermediate and the internal proceed from the celestial of the spiritual, which is ”Joseph,“ it is therefore called the internal from itself.  Whoever receives anything of the Divine from the Lord, who here is ”Joseph“ in the supreme sense, as he who receives any of the good of charity, is called by the Lord a ”brother,“ and also a ”son.“

AC 5693. And he sought to weep.  That this signifies the emotion of mercy from love, is evident from the signification of ”weeping,“ as being the effect of mercy from love (n. 3801, 5480).

AC 5694. And he came to the bed-chamber, and wept there.  That this signifies in itself, not apparently, is evident from the signification of ”coming to the bed-chamber,“ as being in one’s self, so as not to appear. It was customary with the ancients to speak of ”entering into the chamber,“ and also of then ”shutting the door,“ when they meant the doing of anything that was not to appear.  This form of speaking was derived from the significatives in the Ancient Church; for by ”house“ in the spiritual sense they understood man (n. 3128), and by the ”rooms“ and ”bed-chambers“ they understood man‘s interiors.  Therefore ”coming or entering into the chamber“ signified to be in one’s self, consequently so as not to appear; and because ”entering the chamber“ was significative, it is therefore frequently mentioned in the Word, us in Isaiah:--

Go, My people, enter into thy bed-chambers, and shut thy door after thee; hide thyself as it were for a little moment, until the anger be overpast (Isa. 26:20);

that ”entering into the bed-chambers“ does not here mean to do so literally, but to keep one‘s self in concealment, and in one’s self, is very evident.

[2] In Ezekiel:--

He said unto me, Son of man, hast thou seen what the elders of the house of Israel do in the dark, every man in the chambers of his image? for they say, Jehovah seeth us not (Ezek. 8:12);

where ”to do in the dark, every man in the chambers of his image“ denotes inwardly within themselves, in the thoughts. The interior things of their thought and affection were represented to the prophet by chambers, and were called ”chambers of the image.“

[3] In Moses:--

Abroad shall the sword bereave, and out of the chambers terror, both young man and virgin, the suckling with the old man (Deut. 32:25);

where the ”sword“ denotes the vastation of truth and the punishment of falsity (n. 2799); ”terror out of the chambers“ denotes out of man‘s interiors. That the ”chambers“ here are not the chambers that are meant is evident.

[4] In David:--

Who watereth the mountains from His chambers (Ps. 104:13);

”to water the mountains“ in the spiritual sense is to bless those who are in love to the Lord, and in love toward the neighbor. A ”mountain“ is the celestial of love, (n. 795, 1430, 4210); hence ”from His chambers“ is from the interiors of heaven.  In Luke:--

Whatsoever ye have spoken in the darkness shall be heard in the light, and that which ye have spoken in the ear in the bed-chambers shall be proclaimed upon the roofs (Luke 12:3);

where also ”bed-chambers“ denote the interiors of man, namely, what he has thought, what he has purposed, and what he has endeavored to do.  In Matthew:--

When thou prayest, enter into thy bed-chamber, and when thou hast shut thy door, pray in secret (Matthew 6:6);

”to enter into the bed-chamber and pray“ means not in the outward appearance; for this was said representatively.

AC 5695. And he washed his faces.  That this signifies that it so arranged, is evident from the signification of ”washing the faces,“ as here being to arrange so as not to appear; for the face was washed that no trace of tears might appear, consequently it was arranged in this way.  How the case is with these things will of the Lord’s Divine mercy be told in the following pages.  Here something must be said about the correspondence of the face with the interiors.  The face is the external representative of the interiors, for the face is so formed that the interiors may appear in it as in a representative mirror, and that another may know from it of what mind the person is toward him; so that when he speaks he shows his feelings by his face as well as by his words.  The most ancient people, who were of the celestial church, had a face like this; and all the angels have it, for they have no desire to conceal from others what they think, because they think well and only well toward the neighbor, nor have they any lurking thought of wishing well to the neighbor for the sake of themselves.  But the infernals, when not seen in the light of heaven, have a different face from that which corresponds to their interiors.  The reason is that in the life of the body their faces had shown charity toward the neighbor, merely for the sake of their own honor and gain, and yet they had never wished well to the neighbor except in so far as he favored them. The result is that the make up of their faces is so much out of agreement with their interiors that sometimes enmities, hatreds, revenges, and murderous feeling are within, while their faces are made up so as to beam with love toward the neighbor.  This shows how great at the present day is the disagreement between the interiors and the exteriors, resulting in the cultivation of such arts.

AC 5696. And went out.  That this signifies by removal, is evident from the signification of ”going out,“ as here being removal; for one who removes himself goes out or withdraws from another. The case in the internal sense is this. By Joseph in the supreme sense is represented the Lord; by the ten sons of Israel are represented the truths and goods in the natural with those who are being regenerated; and by Benjamin is represented the intermediate.  There is mercy from love toward the intermediate because thereby the things beneath are regenerated. But the Lord‘s love and mercy do not appear until conjunction through the intermediate has been effected. It is also so arranged that they do not appear; for should they appear, regeneration could not be effected. This arrangement is made by removal and concealment-- not that the Lord ever removes or conceals mercy; but when one who is being regenerated is let into his evils, it appears to him as if the Lord were remote and hidden.  It is the evils that interpose and have this effect, just as dense clouds interpose between us and the sun, and make it seem distant and hide it.  This is the concealment and removal that are meant.

AC 5697. And he restrained himself.  That this signifies concealment, is evident from the signification of ”restraining one’s self,“ as being to conceal; for he who restrains himself conceals what he inwardly wills. What is here meant by concealment may be seen just above (n. 5696).

AC 5698. And said, Set on bread.  That this signifies perception of conjunction through the intermediate with truths in the natural, is evident from the signification of ”saying,“ as being perception; and from the signification of ”setting on bread,“ as being conjunction through the intermediate with truths in the natural. By the setting on of bread is meant the banquet itself, and by banquets and feasts is signified conjunction, specifically initiation to conjunction (n. 3596, 3832, 5161).  That it is a conjunction through the intermediate with truths in the natural, follows from the series, for ”Benjamin“ is the intermediate, and the ten sons of Jacob are truths in the natural, as has already been shown; and because the conjunction is through the intermediate, on seeing Benjamin Joseph commanded that they should eat with him--”and when Joseph saw Benjamin with them, he said to him that was over his house, Bring the men to the house, and slaying slay, and make ready; for the men shall eat with me at noon“ (verse 16).

AC 5699. And they set on for him alone, and for them alone. That this signifies an outward appearance that the internal was as if separated from them, is evident from the signification of ”setting on for him alone, and for them alone,“ as being separation; and as the internal is represented by Joseph, and the external by Israel‘s ten sons (n. 5469), therefore by these words is signified the separation of the internal from the external, but only in appearance, because he gave them food from his own table, sending portions to each.

AC 5700. And for the Egyptians, who did eat with him, alone. That this signifies the separation of the memory-knowledges which are in inverted order, is evident from the representation of the Egyptians, as being memory-knowledges that are in inverted order; and from the signification of ”who did eat with him alone,“ as being separation (n. 5699).  By the Egyptians ”who did eat with him“ are meant the Egyptians who ate at Joseph’s house; that they did not eat with Joseph is plain, because they ate alone.  By ”Egypt“ or the ”Egyptians“ in a good sense are signified the memory-knowledges of the church (n. 1462, 4749, 4964, 4966); but in the opposite sense are signified the memory-knowledges which are in inverted order, thus which are contrary to the truths of the church (n. 1164, 1165, 1186). In this sense ”Egypt“ is mentioned in many passages of the Word.  That ”Egypt“ signifies these memory-knowledges, is because the memory-knowledges of the Ancient Church, which were representative and significative of celestial and spiritual things, and which were cultivated among the Egyptians more than among others, were turned by them into magic; whereby they completely inverted the memory-knowledges of the representative church.

[2] Memory-knowledges are said to be in inverted order when men abuse heavenly order to do evil; for heavenly order is that good be done to all.  Hence it comes to pass that when they have thus inverted heavenly order, they at last deny Divine things, the things of heaven, and consequently those of charity and faith.  They who become such know how to reason acutely and skillfully from memory-knowledges, because they reason from the senses, and to reason from these is to reason from such things as are external, that is, from such as are of the body and the world, which take direct hold of man‘s senses and feelings.  Unless such things have been illumined by the light of heaven, and thereby arranged in an entirely different order, they put the man in so great an obscurity as to heavenly things that he not only comprehends none of them, but even wholly denies, and at last rejects them, and then as far as he may, blasphemes them.  When memory-knowledges are in order, they are arranged by the Lord in the form of heaven; but when they are in inverted order, they are arranged in the form of hell, and then things most false are in the midst, and those which confirm them are at the sides, while truths are without, and because they are without they can have no communication with heaven where truths reign; and therefore interior things are closed to such persons; for heaven is open by means of things interior.

AC 5701. Because the Egyptians cannot eat bread with the Hebrews.  That this signifies that they could not possibly be conjoined with the truth and good of the church, is evident from the representation of the Egyptians, as being those who are in inverted order, thus in evil and falsity (n. 5700); from the signification of ”eating bread,“ as being to be conjoined (n. 5698); and from the representation of the Hebrews, as being those who are in genuine order, thus in the truth and good of the church. By the ”land of the Hebrews“ is signified the church, (n. 5136, 5236), and this because the Hebrew Church was the second Ancient Church, (n. 1238, 1241, 1343). ”Eating bread“ is mentioned here, and above ”setting on bread,“ because by ”bread“ is signified all food in general (n. 2165), thus the banquet.  The reason why by ”bread“ is signified all food and the banquet itself, is that in the spiritual sense ”bread“ is celestial love, and celestial love contains within it all things of good and truth, thus all things of spiritual food. ”Bread“ is celestial love, (n. 276, 680, 2165, 2177, 2187, 3464, 3478, 3735, 4211, 4217 4735, 4976),

AC 5702. Because this is an abomination to the Egyptians.  That this signifies that they are in opposition, is evident from the representation of the Egyptians, as being those who are in inverted order (n. 5700); and from the representation of the Hebrews, to eat with whom was an abomination to the Egyptians, as being those who are in genuine order (n. 5701); thus they are in opposition to each other, whence comes aversion, and at last abomination.  In regard to this abomination be it known that those who are in inverted order, that is, in evil and the derivative falsity, become at last so averse to the good and truth of the church that when they hear them, and especially when they hear the interior things of them, they so greatly abominate them that they feel as it were a nausea and vomiting.  This has been told and shown me, when I have wondered why the Christian world does not receive these interior things of the Word.  There appeared spirits from the Christian world who, on being compelled to hear the interiors of the Word, were seized with so great a nausea that they said they felt as if they were going to vomit; and I was told that such is the Christian world at this day almost everywhere.  The reason of its being so is that they are in no affection of truth for truth’s sake, still less in the affection of good from good. Their thinking and speaking anything from the Word or from their doctrine is from habit acquired from early childhood, and from the established form; thus it is an external without an internal.

[2] That all things of the Hebrew Church that was afterward instituted among Jacob‘s descendants were an abomination to the Egyptians, is plain not only from their being unwilling even to eat with them, but also from the sacrifices which the Hebrew Church regarded as the chief part of its worship being an abomination to them, as is evident in Moses:--

Pharaoh said, Go ye, sacrifice in the land; but Moses said, It is not meet so to do; because we shall sacrifice the abomination of the Egyptians to Jehovah our God; lo if we sacrifice the abomination of the Egyptians before their eyes will they not stone us? (Exod. 8:25, 26).

The pasturing of flocks, and a shepherd also, were an abomination to them, as is plain in Moses:--

Every shepherd of a flock is an abomination unto the Egyptians (Gen. 46:34).

Thus the Egyptians abominated everything that belonged to that church.  The reason was that at first the Egyptians had been among those who constituted the Ancient representative Church (n. 1238, 2385); but in course of time they rejected the God of the Ancient Church, that is, Jehovah or the Lord, and served idols, especially calves; and they also turned into magic the very representatives and significatives of the celestial and spiritual things of the Ancient Church, which they had learned when they belonged to that church.  Hence order was inverted with them, and consequently all things of the church were an abomination to them.

AC 5703. And they sat before him.  That this signifies that they were set in order by his presence, is evident from the signification of ”sitting,“ as here being to be set in order, for they were placed in order by Joseph, as appears from what follows (for they were amazed that the firstborn should sit according to his birthright, and the youngest according to his youth); and from the signification of ”before him,“ as being by his presence.  The case herein is this. In the supreme sense by Joseph is represented the Lord, and by Israel’s sons, the goods and truths in the natural; when the Lord is present, then all things are set in order by His very presence.  The Lord is order itself; and therefore where He is present there is order, and where there is order He is present.  The order itself is described in the pages that now follow, which is that truths be rightly set in order under good.

AC 5704. The firstborn according to his birthright, and the youngest according to his youth.  That this signifies according to the order of truths under good, is evident from the signification of ”sitting according to birthright and according to youth,“ as being according to the order of truths under good; for the sons of Israel represent the truths of the church in their order. (See the explication of the twenty-ninth and thirtieth chapters of Genesis). Therefore to sit ”according to their birth“ is according to the order of truths.  But the truths of the church which the sons of Israel represent do not come into any order except through Christian good, that is, through the good of charity toward the neighbor and of love to the Lord; for in good there is the Lord, and hence in good there is heaven; consequently in good there is life, thus living active force; but never in truth without good.  That good sets truths in order after its own likeness is very manifest from every love, even from the loves of self and of the world, thus from the love of revenge, of hatred, and of the like evils.  They who are in these evils call evil good, because to them evil is delightful.  This so-called good of theirs sets in order the falsities which to them are truths, so that they may favor it, and at last sets all these falsities which they call truths in such an order as to effect persuasion.  But this order is such as is the order in hell; whereas the order of truths under the good of celestial love is such as is the order in the heavens; and from this the man who has such order within him, that is, who has been regenerated, is called a little heaven, and moreover is a heaven in the least form, for his interiors correspond to the heavens.

[2] That it is good which sets truths in order is evident from the order in the heavens.  There all the societies are set in order according to the truths under good which are from the Lord; for the Lord is nothing but Divine good; Divine truth is not in the Lord, but proceeds from Him; and according to this Divine truth under Divine good are all the societies in the heavens set in order.  That the Lord is nothing but Divine good, and that Divine truth is not in Him, but proceeds from Him, may be illustrated by comparison with the sun of the world.  The sun is nothing but fire, and light is not in it, but proceeds from it; and likewise the things that are of light in the world, such as vegetable forms, are set in order by the heat which proceeds from the sun‘s fire and is in its light, as is evident in the time of spring and summer.  As universal nature is a theater representative of the Lord’s kingdom, so also is this universal.  The sun represents the Lord, the fire of it His Divine love, and the heat from it the good which flows therefrom, and the light the truths which are of faith; and because they are representative, therefore in the Word in the spiritual sense by the ”sun“ is meant the Lord (n. 1053, 1521, 1529-1531, 3636, 3643, 4321, 5097, 5377), and by ”fire“ love (n. 934, 4906, 5071, 5215); thus the sun‘s fire is representatively the Divine love, and the heat from it is good from the Divine love. Light represents truth, (n. 2776, 3138, 3190, 3195, 3222, 3339, 3636, 3643, 3862, 3993, 4302, 4409, 4413, 4415, 4526, 5219, 5400).

AC 5705. And the men were amazed, everyone at his companion. That this signifies a change of state of each one among them, is evident from the signification of ”to be amazed,“ as being an unexpected and sudden change of state in the thoughts, which being the cause of the amazement is signified in the internal sense; and from the signification of ”everyone at his companion,“ as being of each one among them; for the subject treated of is the order of truths under good caused by the presence of the internal (n. 5703, 5704), and as the order is new, there is therefore a change of state of each one among them, which is signified by ”the men being amazed, everyone at his companion.“

AC 5706. And he brought out portions from his faces unto them. That this signifies goods applied to everyone from mercy, is evident from the signification of ”portions,“ namely of food, as being goods (for all kinds of food signify goods, and drink of every kind signifies truths).  That these are applied to everyone is plain from what follows, and is signified by ”he brought out to them;“ and from the signification of ”faces,“ when predicated of the Lord, who is represented by Joseph, as being mercy (n. 222, 223, 5585).

AC 5707. And he multiplied Benjamin’s portion above the portions of them all.  That this signifies good for the intermediate above the goods for the truths in the natural, is evident from the signification of ”portions,“ as being goods (n. 5706); from the representation of Benjamin, as being the intermediate (n. 5411, 5413, 5427, 5428, 5443, 5586, 5612); and from the representation of Jacob‘s ten sons, above the portions of whom he made Benjamin’s portion, as being truths in the natural (n. 5403, 5419, 5427, 5458, 5512).

[2] From this it is plain that by his ”multiplying Benjamin‘s portion above the portions of them all“ is signified good for the intermediate above the goods for the truths in the nature.  The reason why there was good for the intermediate above the goods for the truths in the natural, is that the intermediate is interior, and what is interior abounds with goods more than that which is exterior. Few know how this is, namely, that the interior abounds with goods and truths more than the exteriors.  The reason is that few, if any, have hitherto known that the interior is distinct from the exterior, and indeed so distinct that they can be separated, and that when separated the interior lives and the exterior dies, but that so long as they are conjoined, the exterior lives from the interior. If this had first been known, it might then have been known what the interior is as compared with the exterior--that in the interior there are thousands of things which in the exterior appear as one; for the interior is in a purer sphere, and the exterior in a grosser, and that which is in a purer sphere is capable of receiving distinctly thousands of things more than that which is in a grosser sphere.  Hence it is that when the man who has led a life of good comes after death into heaven, he can receive thousands of thousands more things of intelligence and wisdom and happiness than when he lived in the world; for in heaven he is in a purer sphere, and is in his interiors, and has put off the grosser things of the body.  From all this it is now plain what is meant by good for the intermediate above the goods for the truths in the natural, which is signified by his ”multiplying Benjamin’s portion above the portions of them all.“

AC 5708. Five measures.  That this signifies much increased, is evident from the signification of ”five,“ as being much; and from the signification of ”measures,“ as being states of truth from good (n. 3104).  As regards ”five,“ it is a number that signifies a little, likewise some, and also much.  Its signification depends upon its relation to the number of which it is a part (n. 5291): as a part of ”ten“ it involves the same as ten, but in a less degree, because it is half of the number ten; for as numbers formed by multiplication signify the like with their simple numbers (n. 5291, 5335), so numbers produced by division signify the like as their multiples--for instance ”five“ the same as ”ten,“ and as ”twenty,“ and also as ”one hundred“ and ”one thousand,“ and so on. ”Ten“ denotes what is full, (n. 3107, 4638). Five more measures were given to Benjamin than to the rest of his brethren because of the signification of the matter in the internal sense; ten measures could not have been given, for they would have been far too much.  By traditions from the Most Ancient Church the ancients knew what some numbers signified, and therefore they made use of these numbers when anything occurred which they might serve to signify, as here the number ”five;“ and in other cases they applied several other numbers, as ”three“ to signify what is full from beginning to end; ”seven“ to signify what is holy; ”twelve“ to signify all things in their complex.

AC 5709. And they drank.  That this signifies the application of truths under good, is evident from the signification of ”drinking,“ as being the communication and appropriation of truth (n. 3168, 3772, 4017, 4018), hence also its application.  It is ”under good,“ because all the application of truth is effected under good (n. 5704).

AC 5710. And drank largely with him.  That this signifies abundantly, is evident from the signification of ”drinking,“ as being to apply truths under good (n. 5709); hence ”to drink largely“ denotes abundantly. From the things unfolded in this chapter it is evident that the subject treated of is initiation to the conjunction of the natural with the celestial of the spiritual, and in a subsequent chapter the first conjunction is treated of; for the first conjunction is represented by Joseph‘s manifesting himself to his brethren; the second by his going to meet his father and brethren, and bringing them down into Egypt.

CONTINUATION CONCERNING CORRESPONDENCE, HERE CONCERNING THE CORRESPONDENCE OF DISEASES WITH THE SPIRITUAL WORLD

AC 5711. As the correspondence of diseases is to be treated of, be it known that all diseases in man have correspondence with the spiritual world; for whatever in universal nature has not correspondence with the spiritual world cannot exist, having no cause from which to exist, consequently from which to subsist.  The things that are in nature are nothing but effects; their causes are in the spiritual world, and the causes of these causes, which are ends, are in the interior heaven. Nor can the effect subsist unless the cause is constantly in it, because the effect ceases when the cause ceases.  Regarded in itself the effect is nothing else than the cause, but so clothed outwardly as to enable the cause to act as a cause in a lower sphere.  Similar to the relation of the effect to the cause is that between the cause and the end; unless a cause also exists from its cause, which is an end, it is not a cause; for a cause without an end is a cause in no order, and where there is no order nothing is effected.  From this it is now plain that regarded in itself an effect is a cause, and that regarded in itself a cause is an end, and that an end of good is in heaven and proceeds from the Lord; consequently that an effect is not an effect unless a cause is in it, and constantly in it; and that a cause is not a cause unless an end is in it, and constantly in it; and that an end is not an end of good unless the Divine which proceeds from the Lord is in it.  Hence it is also plain that as each and all things in the world have come forth from the Divine, they continue to come forth from the Divine.

AC 5712. These things have been said in order that it may be known that diseases also have correspondence with the spiritual world; not a correspondence with heaven, which is the Grand Man, but with those who are in what is opposite, thus with those who are in the hells.  By the spiritual world in the universal sense is meant both heaven and hell; for when man dies he passes out of the natural into the spiritual world. That diseases have correspondence with such is because they correspond to the cupidities and passions of the lower mind, which are also their origins; for the origins of diseases are, in general, intemperance, luxury of various kinds, mere bodily pleasures, as also feelings of envy, hatred, revenge, lewdness, and the like, which destroy man’s interiors; and when these are destroyed the exteriors suffer, and drag man into disease, and so into death.  It is known in the church that the death of man is from evils, or on account of sin; and it is the same with diseases, for these belong to death.  From all this it is evident that even diseases have correspondence with the spiritual world, but with unclean things there; for diseases are in themselves unclean, because as before said they spring from unclean things.

AC 5713. All the infernals induce diseases, but with a difference, for the reason that all the hells are in the desires and lusts of evil, and thus are contrary to the things of heaven; wherefore they act upon man from what is opposite. Heaven, which is the Grand Man, holds all things together in connection and safety; hell, being in what is opposite, destroys and severs all things.  Consequently if the infernals are applied they induce diseases and at last death.  Yet they are not permitted to flow as far as into the solid parts of the body, or into the parts of which man‘s viscera, organs, and members consist, but merely into his cupidities and falsities. It is only when the man falls into disease that they flow into such unclean things as belong to the disease; for as before said nothing ever takes place in man without a cause in the spiritual world.  If the natural with man were separated from the spiritual, it would be separated from all cause of existence, and thus from all that is vital.  Yet this does not hinder man’s being healed in a natural way; for the Lord‘s providence concurs with such means.  The this is so has been given me to know by much experience, and this so often and for so long that no doubt was left; for evil spirits from such places have been applied to me often and long, and according to their presence they induced pains, and also diseases. I was shown where they were, and what they were, and was told also where they came from.

AC 5714. One who in the life of the body had been a consummate adulterer, and had made his highest delight consist in committing adultery with many women, whom he immediately afterward discarded and held in aversion, persisted in such practices even to old age.  Moreover he had also been devoted to pleasures, and did not desire to act well to anyone and do him a service, except for his own sake, especially for the sake of his adultery.  He was with me for several days, being seen under the feet; and when the sphere of his life was communicated to me, to whatever part he came he inflicted a pain in the periosteums and nerves of that part, as for instance in the toes of the left foot; and when he was permitted to rise up he inflicted pain in the parts where he was, especially in the periosteums in the loins, and in the periosteums of the breast under the diaphragm, and also in the interior of the teeth. While his sphere was operating it caused also great oppression in the stomach.

AC 5715. There once appeared a great quadrangular opening that extended obliquely downward to a considerable depth. In the deep was seen a round opening, which was then open but presently was closed.  From it exhaled a dangerous heat, collected from various hells, and arising from cupidities of various kinds, as from arrogance, lewdness, adultery, hatred, revenge, quarrels, and fights, from which arise in the hells such heat as exhaled.  When it acted upon my body it instantly brought on disease like that of a burning fever; but when it ceased to flow in, this effect of disease at once ceased.  When a man falls into such a disease as he has contracted from his life, then forthwith an unclean sphere corresponding to the disease attaches itself, and is present as a fomenting cause. That I might know for certain that this is the case, there have been spirits with me from a number of hells, through whom the sphere of exhalations thence was communicated; and according as it was permitted to act upon the solid parts of the body, I was seized with oppression, with pain, even with the corresponding disease, which ceased in an instant then those spirits were driven away; and that no room for doubt might be left, this has been done a thousand times.

AC 5716. There are also spirits not far therefrom who infuse unclean colds, like those of a shivering fever, as has been granted me to know by experience.  The same spirits induce such things as disturb the mind, and they also bring on swoons.  The spirits from this neighborhood are most malicious.

AC 5717. There are some who not only relate to the most viscid substances of the brain, which are its excrementitious things, but also know how to infect them as if with poisons. When such spirits arrive they rush within the skull, and thence by continuity even into the spinal marrow.  This cannot be felt by those whose interiors are not open.  It has been given me plainly to feel the inroad, and also the effort to destroy me; but this was vain, because I was protected by the Lord.  They strove to take away from me all the capacity of the intellect.  I plainly felt their operation, and felt also pain from it, which however soon ceased.  I afterward spoke to them, and they were compelled to confess whence they were. They said that they lived in dark forests, where they durst not injure their companions, because in that case their companions were allowed to treat them cruelly.  Thus they are kept in bonds. They are ugly, having the face of a wild beast, and hairy.  I was told that they are such as had formerly slain whole armies, as we read in the Word; for they rushed into the chambers of everyone’s brain, and inspired terror, together with such madness that they killed each other.  At the present day such spirits are kept shut up within their own hell, and are not let out.  These too bear relation to deadly tumors of the head within the skull.  It was said above that they rush within the skull and by continuity therefrom even into the spinal marrow; but be it known that it is only an appearance that the spirits themselves rush in, they being borne along outside by a way which corresponds to the spaces in question within the body, which is felt within as if there were an inroad.  This sensation is caused by correspondence, from which their operation is easily brought to bear upon the man to whom it is directed.

AC 5718. There is a certain kind of spirits who, because they wish to have dominion, and to be sole rulers over all others, to this end stir up enmities, hatreds, and fights among others. I have seen the consequent fights, and wondered at them.  I inquired who they were, and was told that they were that kind of spirits who excite such passions because they are bent on being sole rulers, according to the maxim, Divide and rule. It was also granted me to talk with them, and they immediately said that they rule all.  But it was given to answer that they were insanity personified if they sought to establish their rule by such means.  They talked with me from above at a middle height over the forehead.  They spoke with fluency, because in the bodily life they had excelled in eloquence.  I was instructed that they are such as relate to the thick phlegm of the brain, from which organ they take away vitality by their presence, and induce on it torpor, whence come obstructions, giving rise to a number of diseases, as well as to dulnesses.

[2] It was noticed that they were devoid of all conscience, and that they made human prudence and wisdom to consist in stirring up enmities, hatreds, and intestine fights, in order to rule. It was given to ask them whether they know that they are now in the other life, where they are to live to eternity, and that there are spiritual laws there which utterly forbid such actions, and that while they were in the world they might among fools be esteemed and believed to be wise, but that among the wise they are insane.  This displeased them.  I continued, that they ought to know that heaven consists in mutual love, or that of one toward another, whence there is order in heaven, whereby so many myriads are ruled as one; but that the contrary is the case with them, because they instigate others to breathe against their companions nothing but what savors of hatred, revenge, and cruelty. They replied that they cannot be other than they are; whereupon it was given to say that from this they may know that everyone‘s life remains with him after death.

AC 5719. They who despise and ridicule the Word in the letter, and still more who do this to the things contained therein in the deeper sense, and consequently to the doctrinal things that are from the Word, and who at the same time are in no love toward the neighbor, but are in the love of self, bear relation to the vitiated things of the blood, which find their way to all the veins and arteries, and taint the whole mass. Lest by their presence they should bring anything of the kind upon man, they are kept separate from others in their own hell, and communicate only with those who are of this nature; for these throw themselves into the breath and sphere of that hell.

AC 5720. Hypocrites have been with me, those namely who have spoken in a holy manner about Divine things, and with an affection of love about the public and the neighbor, and have borne witness to what is just and equitable, and yet in their heart have despised and even laughed at these things. When they were permitted to flow into the parts of the body to which they correspond by opposition, they inflicted pain on the teeth, so severe on their nearest presence that I could not bear it; and in proportion as they were removed, the pain ceased.  This was shown repeatedly, that no doubt might remain.  Among them was one whom I had known in the life of his body, and I therefore spoke to him; and at his presence also there was pain in the teeth and gums.  When he was raised upward to the left, the pain attacked the left jaw, and invaded the bone of the left temple down to the bones of the cheek.

AC 5721. The most stubborn of all are they who during their life in the body had appeared more just than others, and had also been established in dignity, and on both accounts had authority and weight, and yet had believed nothing, and had lived a mere life of the love of self, being inflamed with inward hatred and revenge against all who did not favor them, and pay them reverence, and still more against those who in any way opposed them. If in these they detected any blemish they made an enormous evil of it, and defamed them, even though they might be among the best of citizens.

[2] In the other life such persons speak as they had done in this world, with authority and weight, and as if from justice; wherefore many suppose that they are to be believed above others.  Yet they are most malicious.  When they are applied to a man, they induce great pain by weariness, which they continually inflate and increase, even to the utmost impatience; which induces so great a weakness in the mind and in consequence in the body that the man can scarcely rise from his bed.  This was shown me by such weakness seizing me when they were present, and yet ceasing according to the degree in which they were removed.

[3] They make use of many an art in order to infuse weariness and consequent weakness, especially by means of disparagements and defamations among themselves and their associates, whose common sphere they inject. When these persons reason within their closets about Divine worship, faith, and eternal life, they utterly reject them, and this they do as from a pre-eminent wisdom.  In the other life they are willing to be called devils, provided they are allowed to rule over the hells, and thus from supreme power--as they believe--to act against the Divine.  Inwardly they are filthy, because pre-eminently in the love of self, and thereby in hatred and revenge, and in cruelty against all who do not pay court to them.

[4] They are severely punished, as I have also heard, until they desist from leading others astray by an appearance of justice. When this appearance is taken away from them, they speak in another tone.  They are afterward cast out from the world of spirits, and are then carried toward the left, and there are cast down deep into hell.  Their hell is toward the left at a mid distance.

AC 5722. There are others who in the life of the body have been most filthy, their filthiness being such as to be unmentionable.  By their presence and influx into the solid parts of the body they induce a weariness of life, and such torpor in the members and limbs that the man cannot rise from his bed. They are very stubborn, and do not desist through penalties, as do other devils.  They appear beside the head, and as if lying there.  When they are driven away, it is not done suddenly, but gently, and they are then by degrees rolled down toward lower places; and when they come into the deep, they are tormented there so severely that they cannot but desist from infesting others. Such is their delight in doing evil that nothing is more delightful to them.

AC 5723. There were spirits with me who induced so severe an oppression in the stomach that I seemed to myself scarcely able to live.  The oppression was so great that with others it would have brought on a swoon. But they were removed, and then it at once ceased.  I was told that such spirits are they who in the life of the body had been devoted to no pursuit, not even at home, but solely to pleasure, and besides had lived in foul idleness and sloth, and had not cared anything for others.  Moreover they had despised the faith.  In short, they had been animals, not men. The sphere of such produces numbness in the members and joints of the sick.

AC 5724. There are in the brain viscidities in which is mingled something spirituous or vital, and these viscidities, expelled from the blood there, fall first among the meninges, then among the fibers, part of them into the great ventricles of the brain, and so on. The spirits who relate by correspondence to those viscidities which have something spirituous or some life in them, appear almost directly above the middle of the head at a mid distance, and are such that from habit acquired in the life of the body they stir scruples of conscience, and intrude in matters of no conscience, and in this way burden the conscience of the simple.  Nor do they know what ought to engage the conscience, but make everything that occurs a matter of conscience.  Such spirits induce a sensible anxiety in the part of the abdomen beneath the region of the diaphragm.  They are also present in temptations, and inject anxieties, at times unbearable. Those of them who correspond to the viscous phlegm of less vitality then keep the thought fixed in these anxieties.  Moreover when I have been in discourse with them, in order to know their quality, they tried in various ways to burden the conscience. This had been the delight of their life; and it was given me to notice that they cannot attend to reasons, and that they do not possess that more universal view of things that would enable them to see the singular ones.

AC 5725. It has been granted me to learn by experience what an inundation or deluge is in the spiritual sense.  Such an inundation is two-fold, one of cupidities, and the other of falsities.  That which is of cupidities belongs to the will part, and is on the right side of the brain; but that which is of falsities belongs to the intellectual part, in which is the left side of the brain. When a man who has lived in good is remitted into his own, thus into the sphere of his own life, there then appears as it were an inundation; and when he is in this inundation he is indignant, angry, thinks restlessly, desires impetuously. This takes place in one way when the left side of the brain where there are falsities is inundated, and in another when the right side where evils are is inundated.  But when the man is kept in the sphere of life which he had received from the Lord by regeneration, he is then entirely out of such an inundation, and is as it were in a serene and sunny, cheerful and happy state, thus far from indignation, anger, unrest, cupidities, and the like.  This is the morning or springtime of spirits; the other is their evening or autumn. It was given me to perceive that I was outside this inundation, and this for quite a long time; while I saw that other spirits were in it.  Afterward however I myself was immersed, and then I noticed the appearance of an inundation.  In such an inundation are they who are in temptations.  By it too I was instructed what the ”flood“ signifies in the Word--that the last posterity of the most ancient people, who were of the Lord’s celestial church, were completely inundated with evils and falsities, and thus perished.

AC 5726. As death is from no other source than sin, and sin is all that which is contrary to Divine order, therefore evil closes the very smallest and most invisible vessels, of which are composed the next larger ones, also invisible; for the vessels which are smallest of all and wholly invisible are continued from man‘s interiors.  Hence comes the first and inmost obstruction, and hence the first and inmost vitiation into the blood.  When this vitiation increases, it causes disease, and finally death.  If however man had lived a life of good, his interiors would be open into heaven, and through heaven to the Lord; and so too would the very least and most invisible little vessels (the traces of the first threads may be called little vessels, on account of the correspondence).  In consequence man would be without disease, and would merely decline to extreme old age, even until he became again a little child, but a wise one; and when the body could no longer minister to his internal man or spirit, he would pass without disease out of his earthly body into a body such as the angels have, thus out of the world directly into heaven.

AC 5727. This is the end of the subject of correspondence. In the following pages, at the close of the chapters, of the Lord’s Divine mercy I will speak of the spirits and angels with man; then of influx, and of the intercourse of the soul with the body; and afterward of the inhabitants of other earths.


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