HEAVENLY SECRETS
Emanuel Swedenborg

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AC GENESIS Chapter44

GENESIS 44:1-34

1. And he commanded him that was over his house, saying, Fill the men‘s bags with food, as much as they can carry, and put everyone’s silver in his bag‘s mouth.

2. And put my cup, the silver cup, in the bag’s mouth of the youngest, and his grain silver. And he did according to the word of Joseph that he had spoken.

3. The morning grew light, and the men were sent away, they and their asses.

4. They were gone out of the city, not yet far off, and Joseph said unto him that was over his house, Up, follow after the men; and when thou dost overtake them, say unto them, Wherefore do ye return evil for good?

5. Is not this it in which my lord drinketh, and in which divining he divineth? Ye have done evil in so doing.

6. And he overtook them, and he spake unto them these words.

7. And they said unto him, Wherefore speaketh my lord according to these words? Far be it from thy servants to do according to this word.

8. Behold, the silver which we found in our bag‘s mouth we brought back to thee out of the land of Canaan; and how should we steal out of thy lord’s house silver or gold?

9. With whomsoever of thy servants it be found, let him die, and we also will be to my lord for servants.

10. And he said, Now also according to your words so be it; he with whom it is found shall be to me a servant, and ye shall be blameless.

11. And they hastened, and made everyone his bag come down to the earth, and opened every man his bag.

12. And he searched; he began at the eldest, and left off at the youngest; and the cup was found in Benjamin‘s bag.

13. And they rent their garments, and laded everyone his ass, and returned to the city.

14. And Judah and his brethren entered Joseph’s house, and he was yet there; and they fell before him to the earth.

15. And Joseph said unto them, What deed is this that ye have done?  Knew ye not that such a man as I divining divineth?

16. And Judah said, what shall we say to my lord? what shall we speak? and how shall we be justified?  God hath found out the iniquity of thy servants; behold we are servants to my lord, both we, and he also in whose hand the cup was found.

17. And he said, Far be it from me to do this; the man in whose hand the cup was found, he shall be to me a servant; and ye, go ye up in peace to your father.

18. And Judah came near unto him, and said, By me, my lord, let thy servant I pray speak a word in my lord‘s ears, and let not thine anger be kindled against thy servant; for thou art even as Pharaoh.

19. My lord asked his servants, saying, Have ye a father, or a brother?

20. And we said unto my lord, We have a father, an old man, and a child of his old ages, the youngest; and his brother is dead, and he alone is left to his mother, and his father loveth him.

21. And thou saidst unto thy servants, Make him come down unto me, and I will set mine eye upon him.

22. And we said unto my lord, The boy cannot leave his father; and should he leave his father, he will die.

23. And thou saidst unto thy servants, If your youngest brother come not down with you, ye shall see my faces no more.

24. And it came to pass when we came up unto thy servant my father, we told him the words of my lord.

25. And our father said, Return ye, buy us a little food.

26. And we said, We cannot go down: if our younger brother be with us, then will we go down; for we cannot see the man’s faces, and our youngest brother he not with us.

27. And thy servant my father said unto us, Ye know that my wife bare me two sons:

28. And the one went out from me, and I said, Surely tearing he is torn in pieces; and I have not seen him hitherto.

29. And ye are taking this one also from my faces, and if harm befall him ye will make my gray hairs go down in evil to the grave.

30. And now when I come to thy servant my father, and the boy he not with us, and his soul is bound in his soul.

31. And it shall come to pass when be seeth that the boy is not, that he will die; and thy servants will make thy servant our father‘s gray hairs go down in sorrow to the grave.

32. For thy servant became surety for the boy from being with my father, saying, If I bring him not back unto thee I shall sin to my father all the days.

33. And now I pray let thy servant remain instead of the boy a servant to my lord, and let the boy go up with his brethren.

34. For how shall I go up to my father and the boy he not with me? peradventure I shall see the evil that shall come upon my father.

THE CONTENTS

AC 5728. The subject treated of in this chapter in the internal sense is the intermediate between the internal celestial man and the external natural man; and first that the internal celestial man filled the intermediate with spiritual truth from itself. The intermediate is ”Benjamin,“ the spiritual truth with it is ”Joseph’s silver cup,“ the internal celestial man is ”Joseph,“ and the external natural man is the ”ten sons of Jacob.“

AC 5729. The subject next treated of is the temptation of the external natural man, which continues until there is willing submission to the internal celestial. The temptation is described by their being accused, and by their returning in despair to Joseph. The willing submission is described by their all offering themselves for servants, and Judah‘s offering himself in their stead. The conjunction of the external man with the internal is not accomplished without temptation and willing submission.

AC 5730. In the representative historic sense the subject here treated of is Jacob’s descendants, that they were rejected, but that they obstinately insisted on being representative.  Their being rejected is meant by Joseph‘s desiring to send them away, and to keep Benjamin only; their obstinately insisting is involved in the particulars of their confession and entreaty.

THE INTERNAL SENSE

AC 5731. Verses 1, 2. And he commanded him that was over his house, saying, Fill the men’s bags with food, as much as they can carry, and put everyone‘s silver in his bag’s mouth. And put my cup, the silver cup, in the bag‘s mouth of the youngest, and his grain silver. And he did according to the word of Joseph that he had spoken. ”And he commanded him that was over his house, saying,“ signifies influx from himself; ”Fill the men’s bags with food,“ signifies into the natural with the good of truth; ”as much as they can carry,“ signifies to sufficiency; ”and put everyone‘s silver in his bag’s mouth,“ signifies together with truth anew in the exterior natural; ”and put my cup, the silver cup, in the bag‘s mouth of the youngest,“ signifies interior truth bestowed on the intermediate; ”and his grain silver,“ signifies the truth of good; ”and he did according to the word of Joseph that he had spoken,“ signifies that it was so done.

AC 5732. And he commanded him that was over his house, saying. That this signifies influx from himself, is evident from the signification of ”commanding,“ as being influx (n. 5486); and from the signification of ”him that was over his house,“ as being which communicated. That it was from himself, namely, from the internal celestial, which Joseph represents, is plain. That ”to command“ is influx, is because in heaven no one is commanded or ordered; but thought is communicated, and the other acts willingly in accordance therewith.  Communication of thought together with a desire which wills that something be done, is influx, and on the part of the recipient is perception, and therefore by ”commanding“ is signified also perception (n. 3661, 3682).

[2] Moreover in heaven they not only think, but also talk together, but about things of wisdom; yet in their conversation there is nothing of command from one to another, for no one desires to be master and thereby to look upon another as a servant; but everyone desires to minister to and serve the others. From this it is plain what form of government there is in the heavens, which is described by the Lord in Matthew:--

It shall not be so among you; but whosoever would become great among you should be your minister, and whosoever would be first should be your servant (Matthew 20:26, 27);

and again:--

He that is greatest among you shall be your minister.  Whosoever shall exalt himself shall be humbled, and whosoever shall humble himself shall be exalted (Matthew 23:11, 12).

He does this who loves his neighbor from the heart, or who feels delight and blessedness in doing good to others for no selfish end; that is, who has charity toward the neighbor.

AC 5733. Fill the men’s bags with food.  That this signifies into the natural with the good of truth, is evident from the signification of a ”bag,“ as being the exterior natural (n. 5497); and from the signification of ”food,“ as being the good of truth (n. 5340, 5342, 5410, 5426, 5487, 5582, 5588, 5655). From this it is plain that by his ”commanding him that was over his house to fill the men‘s bags with food“ is signified influx from himself into the natural with the good of truth. As the expressions ”good of truth“ and ”truth of good“ frequently occur, the difference between them shall be stated. He who does not know what the celestial church is relatively to the spiritual church, cannot possibly know this difference. The truth of good is of the celestial church, and the good of truth is of the spiritual church.  With those who were of the celestial church, good was implanted in the will part, which is the proper seat of good, and from this good, that is, through this good from the Lord, they had a perception of truth; hence they had the truth of good.  But with those who are of the spiritual church, good is implanted in the intellectual part by means of truth, for all truth is of the intellectual part, and through truth they are led to good, to do truth being their good; hence they have the good of truth.  The latter is properly predicated of those who are of the spiritual church; yet the truth of good, although not properly, is also predicated of them, of which more will be said elsewhere.

AC 5734. As much as they can carry.  That this signifies to sufficiency, may be seen without explication.

AC 5735. And put everyone’s silver in his bag‘s mouth.  That this signifies together with truth anew in the exterior natural, is evident from the signification of ”silver,“ as being truth (n. 1551, 2954, 5658); and from the signification of the ”bag’s mouth,“ as being the threshold of the exterior natural (n. 5497). What the exterior natural is, and what the interior, see (n. 4570, 5118, 5126, 5497, 5649). That it is truth anew, is because silver was once before placed in their bag‘s mouth (Gen. 42:25, 27, 28, 35).

AC 5736. And put my cup, the silver cup, in the bag’s mouth of the youngest.  That this signifies interior truth bestowed on the intermediate, is evident from the signification of a ”silver cup,“ as being the truth of faith that is from the good of charity (n. 5120), and because it is called ”my cup,“ that is, Joseph‘s, it is interior truth (as Benjamin represents the intermediate, also as to truth, he represents interior truth, (n. 5600, 5631), thus spiritual truth, (n. 5639); from the signification of the ”bag’s mouth,“ when predicated of Benjamin as the intermediate, as being where it is adjoined to the natural; for an intermediate to be an intermediate communicates with the external and with the internal (n. 5411, 5413, 5586), its exterior here being the natural; and from the representation of Benjamin, who is here the ”youngest,“ as being the intermediate (n. 5411, 5413, 5443, 5688). From these things it is plain what is signified by Joseph‘s putting his silver cup in Benjamin’s bag.

AC 5737. And his grain silver.  That this signifies the truth of good, is evident from the signification of ”silver,“ as being truth (n. 1551, 2954, 5658); and from the signification of ”grain,“ as being good (n. 5295, 5410); for the interior or spiritual truth which proceeds from the internal celestial, which is ”Joseph,“ is the truth of good. What the truth of good is, see (n. 5733).

AC 5738. And he did according to the word of Joseph that he had spoken.  That this signifies that it was so done, is evident without explication.

AC 5739. Verses 3-5. The morning grew light, and the men were sent away, they and their asses. They were gone out of the city, not yet far off, and Joseph said unto him that was over his house, Up, follow after the men; and when thou dost overtake them, say unto them, Wherefore do ye return evil for good? Is not this it in which my lord drinketh, and in which divining he divineth? Ye have done evil in so doing.  ”The morning grew light,“ signifies a state of enlightenment at that time; ”and the men were sent away, they and their asses,“ signifies that the external natural man was removed some what with its truths and memory-knowledges; ”they were gone out of the city, not yet far off,“ signifies the amount of removal; ”and Joseph said unto him that was over his house,“ signifies perception and influx anew; ”Up, follow after the men,“ signifies that it should now adjoin them to itself; ”and when thou dost overtake them,“ signifies mediate adjunction; ”say unto them, Wherefore do ye return evil for good?“ signifies why is there a turning away; ”is not this it in which my lord drinketh? “ signifies that there was interior truth with them received from the celestial; ”and in which divining he divineth?“ signifies that the celestial knows hidden things from its Divine; ”ye have done evil in so doing,“ signifies that it is contrary to Divine law to claim it to themselves.

AC 5740. The morning grew light.  That this signifies a state of enlightenment at that time, is evident from the signification of ”morning“ and ”growing light,“ as being a state of enlightenment. ”Morning“ in the supreme sense is the Lord (n. 2405, 2780); and therefore when it is said ”the morning grew light,“ it signifies a state of enlightenment, for all enlightenment is from the Lord. ”Rising in the morning“ also means a state of enlightenment, (n. 3458, 3723).

AC 5741. And the men were sent away, they and their asses. That this signifies that the external natural man was removed somewhat with its truths and memory-knowledges, is evident from the representation of Jacob‘s sons, who are here the ”men,“ as being the truths of the church in the natural (n. 5403, 5419, 5427, 5458, 5512), and therefore the external natural man (n. 5680); from the signification of ”asses,“ as being memory-knowledges (n. 5492); and from the signification of ”sent away, and not far off,“ as being that it--the external natural man--was removed somewhat. From this it is plain that by ”the men were sent away, they and their asses, not far off,“ is signified the external natural man, removed somewhat with its truths and memory-knowledges, namely, from the internal celestial which is represented by Joseph.

[2] As regards the signification of ”asses,“ be it known that they signified one thing when they were used for riding, and another when they served for carrying burdens; for judges, kings, and their sons rode upon he-asses, she-asses, and also upon mules, and these then signified rational, and also natural, truth and good (n. 2781); for which reason when the Lord as Judge and King entered Jerusalem, He rode upon an ass with a colt; for this was the mark of judgeship, and also of royalty. But when asses served for carrying burdens, as here, then they signified memory-knowledges. for is the case different with these knowledges.  One who in thinking of man’s interior things advances no further than to the knowledges that are of the memory, supposes that everything of man consists in these knowledges, not being aware that memory-knowledges are the lowest things in man, and such as for the most part are put away when the body dies (n. 2475-2480); but the things that are in them, namely truth and good together with their affections, remain; and also with the evil there remain falsity and evil together with their affections; memory-knowledges being as it were the body of these.  So long as a man lives in the world, he has truth and good, or falsity and evil, in the memory-knowledges, for these are what contain them; and because memory-knowledges contain, and therefore as it were carry, interior things, they are signified by the asses which serve for carrying burdens.

AC 5742. They were gone out of the city, not yet far off.  That this signifies the amount of removal, may be seen from what has gone before.

AC 5743. And Joseph said unto him that was over his house. That this signifies perception and influx anew, is evident from the signification of ”saying“ in the historicals of the Word, as being to perceive; and because it is perception in respect to him who hears and receives, it is influx in respect to him who says; for they mutually answer to each other. His ”commanding him that was over his house“ denotes influx from himself, (n. 5732).

AC 5744. Up, follow after the men.  That this signifies that it ought now to adjoin them to itself, is evident from the signification of ”following after the men and overtaking them,“ as being to adjoin; for ”to follow“ denotes a disposition to adjoin, and ”to overtake“ denotes adjunction.  In the rest of this chapter is described the return of Jacob‘s sons, and in the following chapter the manifestation of Joseph, by which is signified the conjunction of the celestial of the spiritual with truths in the natural. Hence it is plain that by ”follow after the men“ is signified that it ought now to adjoin them to itself.

AC 5745. And when thou dost overtake them.  That this signifies mediate adjunction, is evident from the signification of their being overtaken by him that was over Joseph’s house, as being mediate adjunction.

AC 5746. Say unto them, Wherefore do ye return evil for good? That this signifies why is there a turning away? is evident from the signification of ”returning evil for good,“ as being to turn away, for evil is nothing else than a turning away from good; for they who are in evil spurn good, that is, spiritual good, which is of charity and faith.  That ”evil“ is a turning away, is very evident from the evil in the other life; for they appear in the light of heaven with the feet upward and the head downward (n. 3641), thus wholly inverted, and consequently turned away.

AC 5747. Is not this it in which my lord drinketh?  That this signifies that the interior truth with them was received from the celestial, is evident from the signification of a ”cup,“ which is meant by ”this in which my lord drinketh,“ as being interior truth (n. 5736); and from the representation of Joseph, who is here ”my lord,“ as being the celestial of the spiritual (n. 5307, 5331, 5332), here the celestial, because interior truth is treated of, which is spiritual and proceeds from the celestial.  That it was received is signified by the cup being placed at Joseph‘s command in the mouth of Benjamin’s bag.

[2] They are accused as if they had taken the cup. The reason why they were so accused, although the cup had been placed there, is plain from the internal sense, which is this. The truth which is bestowed by the Lord is first received as if it were not bestowed; for before regeneration the man supposes that he procures truth for himself, and so long as he supposes this he is in spiritual theft.  To claim good and truth to one‘s self, and to attribute them to one’s self for righteousness and merit, is to take away from the Lord that which is His (n. 2609, 4174, 5135).  It was in order that this might be represented, that this thing was done by Joseph; but still their being accused of theft was in order that conjunction might be effected, for until man has been regenerated he cannot but so believe.  He does indeed say with his lips from doctrine that all the truth of faith and good of charity are from the Lord, yet he does not believe it until faith has been implanted in good, when for the first time he acknowledges it from the heart.

[3] Confession from doctrine is quite another thing than confession from faith.  Many, even those who are not in good, can confess from doctrine, for doctrine to them is merely knowledge; but none can confess from faith except those who are in spiritual good, that is, in charity toward the neighbor. That they were accused of theft in order to bring about conjunction, is plain also from the fact that Joseph thereby brought them back to him, and kept them awhile in thought about what they had done, and that he then manifested, that is conjoined, himself to them.

AC 5748. And in which divining he divineth?  That this signifies that the celestial knows hidden things from its Divine, is evident from the signification of ”divining,“ as being to know hidden things.  That it is from the Divine, is because the celestial of the spiritual, which is ”Joseph,“ represents truth from the Divine, or truth in which is the Divine (n. 5703)

AC 5749. Ye have done evil in so doing.  That this signifies that it is contrary to Divine law to claim it to themselves, is evident from the signification of ”theft,“ which is meant here by the ”evil which they did,“ as being to claim to one‘s self that which belongs to the Lord, namely, the truth which is signified by Joseph’s silver cup (n. 5747). That this is contrary to the Divine law is manifest (n. 2609). The reason why man ought not to claim to himself anything that is from the Lord, thus not truth and good, is that he may be in the truth; and in so far as he is in the truth, so far he is in the light in which angels are in heaven; and in so far as he is in this light, so far he is in intelligence and wisdom; and in so far as he is in intelligence and wisdom, so far he is in happiness. This is the reason why man ought to acknowledge from the faith of the heart that nothing of truth and good is from himself, but all from the Lord, and this because it is so.

AC 5750. Verses 6-10. And he overtook them, and he spake unto them these words. And they said unto him, Wherefore speaketh my lord according to these words? Far be it from thy servants to do according to this word. Behold, the silver which we found in our bag‘s mouth we brought back to thee out of the land of Canaan; and how should we steal out of thy lord’s house silver or gold?  With whomsoever of thy servants it be found, let him die, and we also will be to my lord for servants. And he said, Now also according to your words so be it; he with whom it is found shall be to me a servant, and ye shall be blameless.  ”And he overtook them,“ signifies mediate adjunction; ”and he spake unto them these words,“ signifies the influx of this thing; ”and they said unto him,“ signifies perception; ”therefore speaketh my lord according to these words?“ signifies reflection why such a thing flows in; ”far be it from thy servants to do according to this word,“ signifies when it is not from the will; ”behold the silver which we fold in our bags‘ mouth,“ signifies when truth was bestowed gratuitously; ”we brought back to thee out of the land of Canaan,“ signifies submitted from a principle of religion; ”and how should we steal out of thy lord’s house silver or gold?“  signifies why then shall we claim to ourselves truth and good, which are from the Divine celestial; ”with whomsoever of thy servants it be found, let him die,“ signifies that he is damned who does so; ”and we also will be to my lord for servants,“ signifies that they will be associates forever without freedom from their own; ”and be said, Now also according to your words,“ signifies that indeed it would be so from justice; ”so be it,“ signifies a milder sentence; ”he with whom it is found shall be to me a servant,“ signifies that he with whom it is shall be forever without freedom of his own; ”and ye shall be blameless,“ signifies that the rest shall be at their own disposal, because not sharing in the fault.

AC 5751. And he overtook them.  That this signifies mediate adjunction, is evident from what was said above (n. 5745).

AC 5752. And he spake unto them these words.  That this signifies the influx of this thing, is evident from the signification of ”speaking,“ as being influx (n. 2951, 3037, 5481); and from the signification of ”words,“ as being things. A ”thing“ and a ”word“ are expressed in the original language by the same term.

AC 5753. And they said unto him.  That this signifies perception, is evident from the signification of ”saying“ in the historicals of the Word, as being perception.

AC 5754. Wherefore speaketh my lord such words as these? That this signifies reflection why such a thing flows in, is evident from the signification of ”speaking,“ as being to flow in; and from the signification of ”such words as these,“ as being this thing or such a thing (n. 5752).  Reflection is involved in the word ”wherefore,“ which is a word of questioning with one‘s self.

AC 5755. Far be it from thy servants to do according to this word.  That this signifies when it is not from the will, namely of claiming truth to themselves, is evident from the signification of ”doing,“ as being to will; for all deed is of the will.  The deed itself is natural, and the will is the spiritual source of it.  Its not being from the will is signified by ”far be it from thy servants.“

AC 5756. Behold the silver which we found in our bags’ mouth. That this signifies when truth was bestowed gratuitously, is evident from the signification of ”silver,“ as being truth (n. 1551, 2954, 5658); and from the signification of ”we found,“ as being bestowed gratuitously, for everyone‘s grain silver was returned to him, thus was bestowed gratuitously (n. 5530, 5624); and from the signification of the ”bags’ mouth,“ as being the threshold of the exterior natural (n. 5497).

AC 5757. We brought back to thee out of the land of Canaan. That this signifies submitted from a principle of religion, is evident from the signification of ”bringing back,“ as being to submit (n. 5624); and from the signification of the ”land of Canaan,“ as being what is religious. The ”land of Canaan“ signifies various things, for the reason that it signifies that which includes very many things; for it signifies the Lord‘s kingdom, the church, and consequently the man of the church, because he is a church; and as it signifies these, it signifies also the celestial which is of the church, namely, the good of love; and also its spiritual, which is the truth of faith, and so on; here therefore it signifies the religious principle which is of the church; for it is of the religious principle of the church that no one ought to claim truth and good to himself. From these things it is plain why the same expression sometimes signifies a number of things; for when it involves several things in the complex, it also signifies those which it involves, according to the series of things in the internal sense. That the ”land of Canaan“ is the Lord’s kingdom, see (n. 1413, 1437, 1607, 3038, 3481, 3705); and also the church, (n. 3686, 3705, 4447). From these flow its other significations.

AC 5758. And how should we steal out of thy lord‘s house silver or gold?  That this signifies why then shall we claim to ourselves truth and good, which are from the Divine celestial, is evident from the signification of ”stealing,“ as being in the spiritual sense to claim to one’s self that which belongs to the Lord (n. 5749); from the signification of ”silver,“ as being truth (n. 1551, 2954, 5658); and from the signification of ”gold,“ as being good (n. 113, 1551, 1552, 5658). In this whole chapter spiritual theft is treated of, which is the claiming to one‘s self of the good and truth that are from the Lord. This is a matter of so great moment that a man after death cannot be admitted into heaven until he acknowledges  at heart that nothing of good or truth is from himself, but all from the Lord, and that whatever is from himself is nothing but evil.  The fact that this is so, is shown to man after death by many experiences.  The angels in heaven plainly perceive that all good and truth are from the Lord; and moreover that by the Lord they are withheld from evil and kept in good and so in truth, and this by a mighty force.

[2] It has been given me plainly to perceive this now for many years, and also that in so far as I have been left to my own or to myself, I have been inundated with evils, and so far as I have been withheld therefrom by the Lord, I have been lifted up from evil into good.  Therefore to claim truth and good to one’s self is contrary to the universal that reigns in heaven, as well as contrary to the acknowledgment that all salvation is of mercy, that is, that man of himself is in hell, but is of mercy drawn out thence by the Lord.  Man cannot be in humiliation, nor consequently can he receive the Lord‘s mercy (for this flows in only in humiliation or into a humble heart), unless he acknowledges that there is nothing but evil from himself, and that all good is from the Lord.  Without this acknowledgment a man attributes to himself as merit, and at length as righteousness, whatever he does; for to claim to himself the truth and good which are from the Lord is to make himself righteous.  This is the source of many evils; for he then regards self in everything that he does for the neighbor, and when he does this he loves himself above all others, whom he then despises, if not in word, yet in heart.

AC 5759. With whomsoever of thy servants it be found, let him die.  That this signifies that he is damned who does so, is evident from the signification of ”dying,“ as being to be damned for spiritual death is nothing else than damnation.  It is plain from what was said just above (n. 5758), that they who claim to themselves the truth and good which are of the Lord, cannot be in heaven, but are outside of it; and they who are outside of heaven are damned.  But this law is one of judgment from truth; whereas when judgment is made at the same time from good, then they who do what is true and good, and from ignorance or simplicity attribute these to themselves, are not damned, but in the other life are set free by a method of vastation. Moreover everyone ought to do what is true and good as of himself, yet believing that it is from the Lord (n. 2882, 2883, 2891); and when he does so, then as he grows up and increases in intelligence and faith he puts off that fallacy, and at last acknowledges at heart that his every effort of doing good and thinking truth was and is from the Lord. Wherefore he that was sent by Joseph, though he indeed confirms, yet presently rejects, the judgment that he should die with whom the cup was found; for he says, ”Now also according to your words so be it; he with whom it is found shall be to me a servant, and ye shall be blameless,“ words which convey a milder sentence. But it is otherwise with those who do so, not from ignorance and simplicity, but from principles which they have confirmed in their faith, and also in life. Yet because they do what is good, the Lord from mercy preserves in them something of ignorance and simplicity.

AC 5760. And we also will be to my lord for servants.  That this signifies that they will be associates forever without freedom from their own, is evident from the signification of ”we also,“ as being associates; and from the signification of ”being servants,“ as being to be without freedom from their own; for one who is a servant has no freedom from his own, but is dependent on the own and freedom of his master. What it is to be without freedom from one’s own, will of the Lord‘s Divine mercy be told in the following pages.

AC 5761. And he said, Now also according to your words.  That this signifies that it would indeed be so from justice, is evident from what has been explained just above (n. 5758, 5759). Its being from justice that he who did this should die is signified by, ”now also according to your words;“ but a milder sentence now follows.

AC 5762. So be it. That this signifies a milder sentence, is evident from the words that follow, in which this milder sentence is given.

AC 5763. He with whom it is found shall be to me a servant. That this signifies that he with whom it is, shall be forever without his own freedom, is evident from the signification of a ”servant,“ as being to be without one’s own freedom (n. 5760). The case is this. Joseph‘s silver cup, placed by his order with Benjamin, signifies interior truth (n. 5736, 5747).  He who is in interior truth knows that all truth and good are from the Lord, and also that all freedom from his own, or from the man himself, is infernal; for when a man thinks or does anything from his own freedom, he thinks and does nothing but evil.  In consequence he is a servant of the devil, for all evil flows in from hell.  He also feels delight in such freedom, because it agrees with the evil in which he is, and into which he was born.  Wherefore this freedom from one’s own must be put off, and heavenly freedom must be put on instead, which consists in willing what is good and thence doing it, and in desiring what is true and thence thinking it. When a man receives this freedom he is a servant of the Lord, and is then in freedom itself, and not in the bondage in which he was before, and which appeared like freedom.  This then is what is meant by being forever without one‘s own freedom. The nature and source of freedom may be seen in (n. 2870-2893); and that freedom itself is to be led by the Lord, (n. 2890).

AC 5764. And ye shall be blameless.  That this signifies that the rest shall be at their own disposal, because not sharing in the fault, is evident from the signification of ”blameless“ in regard to a servant, as being to be at his own disposal; because not sharing in the fault, follows.  It was of old a custom among the Gentiles, when anyone sinned, to make his companions also guilty of the offence, and even to punish a whole house for the crime of one in it.  But such a law is derived from hell, where all the companions conspire together for evil.  The societies there are so constituted that they act together as one against good, and thus they are kept consociated, though they are in deadly hatred one against another. They are in the union and friendship of robbers.  Hence because companions in hell conspire together for evil, when they do evil they are all punished. But to do so in the world is wholly contrary to the Divine order; for in the world the good are consociated with the evil, because one does not know what the interiors of another are, and for the most part does not care. Wherefore the Divine law for men is that everyone shall pay the penalty of his own iniquity; as is written in Moses:--

The fathers shall not die for the sons, neither shall the sons die for the fathers; everyone shall be slain in his own sin (Deut. 24:16);

and in Ezekiel:--

The soul that hath sinned, it shall die, neither shall the father bear the iniquity of the son. The righteousness of the righteous shall be upon him, and the wickedness of the wicked shall be upon him (Ezek. 18:20).

From these passages it is plain how the case is with what the sons of Jacob said, ”with whomsoever of thy servants it he found, let him die, and we also will be to my lord for servants.“ But he who was sent by Joseph changed this judgment, and said, ”he with whom it is found shall be to me a servant, and ye shall be blameless;“ in like manner further on where Judah says to Joseph, ”Behold we are servants to my lord, both we and he also in whose hand the cup was found.“ And Joseph said, ”Far be it from me to do this; the man in whose hand the cup was found, he shall be to me a servant; and ye, go ye up in peace to your father“ (verses 16, 17).

AC 5765. Verses 11, 12.  And they hastened, and they made everyone his bag come down to the earth, and opened every man his bag.  And he searched; he began at the eldest, and left off at the youngest; and the cup was found in Benjamin’s bag.  ”And they hastened,“ signifies impatience; ”and made everyone his bag come down to the earth,“ signifies that they brought what was in the natural down to things of sense; ”and opened every man his bag,“ signifies that they might thus make the matter manifest to themselves; ”and he searched,“ signifies investigation; ”he began at the eldest, and left off at the youngest,“ signifies order; ”and the cup was found in Benjamin‘s bag,“ signifies that interior truth from the celestial was with the intermediate.

AC 5766. And they hastened.  That this signifies impatience, is evident from the signification of ”hastening,“ when persons are eager to clear themselves, as being impatience.

AC 5767. And they made everyone his bag come down to the earth.  That this signifies that they brought what was in the natural down to things of sense, is evident from the signification of ”making to come down,“ when it has reference to what here follows, as being to bring to; from the signification of a ”bag,“ as being the exterior natural (n. 5497); and from the signification of the ”earth,“ when it is said that they ”made come down to“ it, as being the ultimate and lowest, thus the sensuous; for the sensuous is the lowest and ultimate, because things of sense are in the very threshold to the outside world.  To bring to things of sense, is wholly to confirm that a thing is so; for the matter is then brought down to the evidence of the senses.

AC 5768. And opened every man his bag.  That this signifies that they might thus make the matter manifest to themselves, is evident from the signification of ”opening the bag,“ as being to open what is in the natural, thus to make the matter manifest.

AC 5769. And he searched.  That this signifies investigation, is evident without explication.

AC 5770. He began at the eldest, and left off at the youngest. That this signifies order, is evident from what has been said above (n. 5704).

AC 5771. And the cup was found in Benjamin’s bag.  That this signifies that interior truth from the celestial was with the intermediate, is evident from the signification of the ”cup,“ as being interior truth (n. 5736); and from the representation of Benjamin, as being the intermediate (n. 5411, 5413, 5443). That such truth from the celestial was with the intermediate, is signified by the cup being placed in Benjamin‘s bag by Joseph’s order.  How these matters stand is clear from what has been said before.

AC 5772. Verses 13-17.  And they rent their garments, and laded everyone his ass, and returned to the city.  And Judah and his brethren entered Joseph‘s house, and he was yet there; and they fell before him to the earth.  And Joseph said unto them, What deed is this that ye have done?  Knew ye not that such a man as I divining divineth? And Judah said, What shall we say to my lord?  what shall we speak? and how shall we be justified? God hath found out the iniquity of thy servants; behold we are servants to my lord, both we, and he also in whose hand the cup was found.  And he said, Far be it from me to do this; the man in whose hand the cup was found, he shall be to me a servant; and ye, go ye up in peace to your father.  ”And they rent their garments,“ signifies mourning; ”and laded everyone his ass, and returned to the city,“ signifies that truths were brought back from things of sense to memory-knowledges; ”and Judah and his brethren entered,“ signifies the good of the church with its truths; ”Joseph’s house,“ signifies communication with the internal; ”and he was yet there,“ signifies foresight; ”and they fell before him to the earth,“ signifies humiliation; ”and Joseph said unto them,“ signifies their perception then; ”What deed is this that ye have done?“ signifies that to claim to themselves what is not theirs is an enormous evil; ”knew ye not that such a man as I divining divineth?“ signifies that it cannot be concealed from Him who sees future and hidden things; ”and Judah said,“ signifies perception given to the good of the church in the natural; ”What shall we say to my lord? what shall we speak?“ signifies a wavering; ”and how shall we be justified?“ signifies that we are guilty; ”God hath found out the iniquity of thy servants,“ signifies confession; ”behold we are servants to my lord,“ signifies that they are forever to be deprived of freedom of their own; ”both we,“ signifies the associates; ”and he also in whose hand the cup was found,“ signifies as well as he with whom there is interior truth from the Divine celestial; ”and he said, Far he it from me to do this,“ signifies that it should by no means he so; ”the man in whose hand the cup was found,“ signifies but that he with whom is interior truth received from the Divine; ”he shall be to me a servant,“ signifies that he will be forever subject; ”and ye, go ye up in peace to your father,“ signifies that the associates, with whom there is not that truth, are to return to the former state.

AC 5773. And they rent their garments.  That this signifies mourning, is evident from the signification of ”rending the garments,“ as being mourning on account of truth being lost (n. 4763), here on account of truths from their own which they could no longer claim to themselves, because they had offered themselves as servants both in the presence of him that was over Joseph‘s house (verse 9), and in the presence of Joseph himself (verse 16), whereby is signified that they would be without freedom from their own, thus without truths from themselves.  As regards mourning on account of truths from their own, which is signified by their ”rending their garments and offering themselves as servants,“ be it known that a turning about takes place with those who are being regenerated, namely, that they are led to good by means of truth, and afterward from good they are led to truth. When this turning about takes place, or when the state is changed and becomes the inverse of the former one, there is mourning; for they are then let into temptation, whereby what is of their own is weakened and broken down, and good is insinuated, and with good a new will, and with this a new freedom, thus a new own This is represented by Joseph’s brethren returning in despair to Joseph, and offering themselves to him as servants, and their being kept in that state for some time, and by Joseph‘s not manifesting himself until after the temptation; for when the temptation is over, the Lord shines on them with comfort.

AC 5774. And laded everyone his ass, and returned to the city. That this signifies that truths were brought back from things of sense into memory-knowledges, is evident from the signification of an ”ass,“ as being memory-knowledge (n. 5492), that ”lading the ass“ means bringing back from things of sense, is because by ”making their bags come down to the earth“ is signified bringing what was in the natural down to things of sense (n. 5767), and raising it from them is therefore here meant by ”lading;“ and from the signification of a ”city,“ as being doctrinal truth (n. 402, 2449, 2943, 3216).

[2] What it is to bring back truths from things of sense into memory-knowledges must be briefly explained.  Things of sense are one thing, memory-knowledges another, and truths another.  They succeed one another in turn; for memory-knowledges come forth from things of sense, and truths from memory-knowledges; for the things which enter by the senses are laid up in the memory, and from them the man concludes memory-knowledge, or perceives from them memory-knowledge which he learns; from the memory-knowledges he then concludes truths, or perceives from them truth which he learns.  Every man so progresses as he grows up from childhood.  When he is a child he thinks and apprehends things from things of sense; when older he thinks and apprehends things from memory-knowledges; and afterward from truths. This is the way to the judgment into which man grows with age.

[3] From this it may be seen that things of sense, memory-knowledges, and truths, are distinct, and even remain distinct--so much so that a man is sometimes in things of sense, as when he thinks only of what meets the senses; sometimes in memory-knowledges, as when he elevates his mind out of things of sense, and thinks interiorly; and sometimes in truths which have been concluded from memory-knowledges, as in the case when he thinks more interiorly. Everyone who reflects upon it can know these things from himself. Man can also bring truths down into memory-knowledges, and see them in these, and he can also bring memory-knowledges down into things of sense, and contemplate them therein; as well as the converse. From this it is now plain what is meant by bringing what is in the natural down to things of sense, and by bringing truths back from things of sense into memory-knowledges.

AC 5775. And Judah and his brethren entered.  That this signifies the good of the church with its truths, is evident from the representation of Judah, as being the good of the church (n. 5583, 5603) and from the representation of his brethren, as being truths in the natural. That Judah entered and spoke with Joseph, and not Reuben the firstborn, or any other of them, is because Judah chiefly represented good; and it is good that communicates with the celestial from the Divine, and not truths, because truths have no communication with the Divine except through good. This is the reason why Judah alone spoke.

AC 5776. Joseph’s house.  That this signifies communication with the internal, is evident from the signification of ”entering the house,“ as being communication; and from the representation of Joseph, as being the internal (n. 5469). That ”entering a house“ denotes communication, is because by a ”house“ is signified the man himself (n. 3128, 5023), thus what makes the man, namely his mind with truth and good (n. 3538, 4973, 5023); and therefore when ”entering a house“ is spoken of, it means entering into his mind, thus to have communication.

AC 5777. And he was yet there.  That this signifies foresight, may be seen from the fact that it was foreseen by Joseph that they would return, and he therefore stayed at home in order to manifest himself to Benjamin and consequently to the others; and in the internal sense that conjunction might be effected of the truths in the natural with the Divine celestial. It is called ”foresight,“ because in the supreme sense it treats of the Lord who in this sense is ”Joseph.“

AC 5778. And they fell before him to the earth.  That this signifies humiliation, is evident without explication.

AC 5779. And Joseph said unto them.  That this signifies their perception then, is evident from the signification of ”saying,“ as being perception.  That it is their perception, is because it is said by Joseph, and by Joseph is represented the internal; and from the internal, that is, through the internal from the Lord, comes all perception. From no other source does perception come, nor even sensation.  It appears as if sensation, as also perception, come by influx from the external; but this is a fallacy, for it is the internal that feels through the external.  The senses placed in the body are nothing but organs or instruments that are of service to the internal man in order that it may be sensible of what is in the world; wherefore the internal flows into the external, causing it to feel, to the end that it may thereby perceive and be perfected; but not the reverse.

AC 5780. What deed is this that ye have done?  That this signifies that to claim to themselves what is not theirs is an enormous evil, is evident from the signification of the theft of which they were accused, as being to claim to themselves the truth and good that belong to the Lord: this is the ”deed“ that is meant in the internal sense. What this evil is, see (n. 5749, 5758).

AC 5781. Knew ye not that such a man as I divining divineth? That this signifies that it cannot be concealed from Him who sees future and hidden things, is evident from the signification of ”divining,“ as being to know from His Divinity things that are hid (n. 5748), and also future things, because it is predicated of the Lord, who is ”Joseph“ in the supreme sense.  That it cannot be concealed is plain from the very words.

AC 5782. And Judah said.  That this signifies perception given to the good of the church in the natural, is evident from the signification of ”saying“ in the historicals of the Word, as being perception; that it is ”given“ is because all perception comes from the internal, that is, flows in through the internal from the Lord (n. 5779); and from the representation of Judah, as being the good of the church (n. 5583, 5603, 5775). As regards the representation of Judah, he it known that in the supreme sense he represents the Lord as to the Divine love, and in the internal sense His celestial kingdom (n. 3654, 3881), thus the celestial of love there; here therefore Judah represents the good of love in the church in the natural, because he is now among those who represent the things that are in the natural which are to be conjoined with the internal.

AC 5783. What shall we say to my lord? what shall we speak? That this signifies a wavering, is evident from the feeling expressed in these words, as being a wavering.

AC 5784. And how shall we be justified?  That this signifies that we are guilty, is evident from the signification of ”how shall we be justified?“ (that is, that they cannot he justified), as being that they are guilty; for he who cannot be justified is guilty.  Their acknowledging themselves to be guilty is plain from their offering themselves as servants to Joseph.

AC 5785. God hath found out the iniquity of thy servants.  That this signifies confession, namely of their having done wrong, here in their having sold Joseph, and in the internal sense in their having estranged themselves from truth and good, and thereby separated themselves from the internal, is evident without explication.

AC 5786. Behold we are servants to my lord.  That this signifies that they are forever to be deprived of freedom of their own, is evident from the signification of ”servants,“ as being to be without freedom from their own (n. 5760, 5763). What it is to be deprived of freedom from their own has also been told in the numbers cited; but as this is a matter of the greatest moment, it shall be stated again. There is an external man, and there is an internal; the external man is that through which the internal acts; for the external is only an organ or instrument of the internal.  This being so, the external must be wholly subordinate and subject to the internal; and when it is subject, heaven acts through the internal into the external, and disposes it according to such things as are of heaven.

[2] The contrary takes place when the external is not subject, but rules, as it does when the man has as his end the pleasures of the body and of the senses, especially those of the love of self and the world, and not those of heaven. To have as the end is to love the one and not the other; for when a man has such things as the end, he no longer believes that there is any internal man, nor that there is anything in himself which is to live when the body dies.  For his internal, not having rule, merely serves the external to enable it to think and reason against good and truth, because in this case no other influx through the internal is open. For this reason it is that such persons wholly despise, and even turn away from, the things that are of heaven.  From these things it is clear that the external man, which is the same as the natural man, ought to be entirely subject to the internal which is spiritual, and consequently to be without freedom from its own.

[3] Freedom from one‘s own is to indulge in pleasures of every kind, to despise others in comparison with one’s self, to subject them to one‘s self as servants, or else to persecute and hate them, to delight in evils that befall them, and more so in those which the man himself brings on them purposely or deceitfully, and to desire their death.  Such are the results of freedom from one’s own.  It is plain therefore what a man is when he is in this freedom, namely, a devil in human form.  But when he loses this freedom, he then receives from the Lord heavenly freedom, which is utterly unknown to those who are in freedom from their own. These suppose that if the latter freedom were taken away from them, they would have no life left; when in fact life itself then begins; and joy, bliss, happiness, with wisdom, then come, because this freedom is from the Lord.

AC 5787. Both we.  That this signifies the associates, is evident from the signification of ”both we,“ as being the associates (n. 5760).

AC 5788. And he also in whose hand the cup was found.  That this signifies as well he with whom there is interior truth from the Divine celestial, is evident from the signification of ”in whose hand,“ as being with whom; from the signification of the ”cup,“ as being interior truth (n. 5736); and from the representation of Joseph, as being the Divine celestial.

AC 5789. And he said, Far be it from me to do this.  That this signifies that it should by no means be so, is evident without explication.

AC 5790. The man in whose hand the cup was found.  That this signifies that he with whom is interior truth received from the Divine, is evident from what was said just above (n. 5788).

AC 5791. And he shall be to me a servant.  That this signifies that he will be forever subject, is evident from the signification of a ”servant,“ as being to be forever without freedom from one‘s own (n. 5786), thus to be forever subject.

AC 5792. And ye, go ye up in peace to your father.  That this signifies that the associates, with whom there is not that truth, are to return to the former state, is evident from the representation of Jacob’s ten sons, as being the associates with whom the cup was not found--that is, the interior truth which is signified by the ”cup“ (n. 5736, 5788, 5790); and from the signification of ”go ye up in peace to your father,“ as being to return to the former state; for when they are not accepted by the internal, which is ”Joseph,“ the former state then awaits them.

AC 5793. Verses 18-31. And Judah came near unto him, and said, By me, my lord, let thy servant I pray speak a word in my lord‘s ears, and let not thine anger be kindled against thy servant; for thou art even as Pharaoh. My lord asked his servants, saying, Have ye a father, or a brother? And we said unto my lord, We have a father, an old man, and a child of his old ages, the youngest; and his brother is dead, and he alone is left to his mother, and his father loveth him. And thou saidst unto thy servants, Make him come down unto me, and I will set mine eye upon him. And we said unto my lord, The boy cannot leave his father; and should he leave his father, he will die. And thou saidst unto thy servants, If your youngest brother come not down with you, ye shall see my faces no more. And it came to pass when we came up unto thy servant my father, we told him the words of my lord. And our father said, Return ye, buy us a little food. And we said, We cannot go down; if our youngest brother be with us, then will we go down; for we cannot see the man’s faces, and our youngest brother he not with us. And thy servant my father said unto us, Ye know that my wife bare me two sons; and the one went out from me, and I said, Surely tearing he is torn in pieces; and I have not seen him hitherto: and ye are taking this one also from my faces, and if harm befall him, ye will make my gray hairs go down in evil to the grave. And now when I come to thy servant my father, and the boy he not with us, and his soul is bound in his soul; and it shall come to pass when he seeth that the boy is not, that he will die; and thy servants will make thy servant our father‘s gray hairs go down in sorrow to the grave.  ”And Judah came near unto him,“ signifies the communication of the external man with the internal through good; ”and said,“ signifies perception; ”By me, my lord,“ signifies entreaty; ”let thy servant I pray speak a word in my lord’s ears,“ signifies for reception and hearing; ”and let not thine anger he kindled against thy servant,“ signifies lest he turn away; ”for thou art even as Pharaoh,“ signifies that it has dominion over the natural; ”my lord asked his servants, saying,“ signifies perception of their thought; ”Have ye a father, or a brother? “ signifies that there is good which is the source, and truth which is the means; ”and we said unto my lord,“ signifies reciprocal perception; ”We have a father, an old man,“ signifies that they have spiritual good as the source; ”and a child of his old ages, the youngest,“ signifies truth therefrom which is new; ”and his brother is dead,“ signifies that internal good is not; ”and he alone is left to his mother,“ signifies that this is the only truth of the church; ”and his father loveth him,“ signifies that it has conjunction with spiritual good from the natural; ”and thou saidst unto thy servants,“ signifies perception given; ”Make him come down unto me,“ signifies that the new truth must be in subjection to internal good; ”and I will set mine eye upon him,“ signifies influx then of truth from good ”and we said unto my lord,“ signifies reciprocal perception; ”The boy cannot leave his father,“ signifies that this truth cannot he separated from spiritual good; ”and should be leave his father, he will die,“ signifies that if it were separated the church would perish; ”and thou saidst unto thy servants,“ signifies perception concerning that thing; ”If your youngest brother come not down with you,“ signifies if it be not subject to internal good; ”ye shall see my faces no more,“ signifies that there will be no mercy, and no conjunction with truths in the natural; ”and it came to pass when we came up unto thy servant my father,“ signifies elevation to spiritual good; ”we told him the words of my lord,“ signifies knowledge of this thing; ”and our father said,“ signifies perception from spiritual good; ”Return ye, buy us a little food,“ signifies that the good of truth should be appropriated; ”and we said, We cannot go down,“ signifies objection; ”if our youngest brother be with us, then will we go down,“ signifies unless there be with them a conjoining intermediate; ”for we cannot see the man‘s faces,“ signified because there will be no mercy or conjunction; ”and our youngest brother he not with us,“ signifies except by means of an intermediate; ”and thy servant my father said unto us,“ signifies perception from spiritual good; ”Ye know that my wife bare me two sons,“ signifies that if there be spiritual good which is of the church, there will be internal good and truth; ”and the one went out from me,“ signifies the seeming departure of internal good; ”and I said, Surely tearing he is torn in pieces,“ signifies perception that it perished by evils and falsities; ”and I have not seen him hitherto,“ signifies because it has vanished; ”and ye are taking this one also from my faces,“ signifies if the new truth also should depart; ”and if harm befall him,“ signifies by evils and falsities; ”and ye will make my gray hairs go down in evil to the grave,“ signifies that spiritual good, and thus the internal of the church, would perish; ”and now when I come to thy servant my father,“ signifies the good of the church corresponding to the spiritual good of the internal church; ”and the boy he not with us,“ signifies if the new truth is not with them; ”and his soul is bound in his soul,“ signifies since there is a close conjunction; ”and it shall come to pass when he seeth that the boy is not, that he will die,“ signifies that spiritual good will perish; ”and thy servants will make thy servant our father’s gray hairs go down in sorrow to the grave,“ signifies that all will be over with the church.

AC 5794. And Judah came near unto him.  That this signifies the communication of the external man with the internal through good, is evident from the signification of coming near” to speak with anyone, as being communication; and from the representation of Judah, as being the good of the church in the natural (n. 5782).  That it is the communication of the external man with the internal, is because Judah represents the good of the church in the natural or external man, and Joseph, good in the internal.  That it is “through good,” is because the communication takes place solely through good, and not through truth unless there is good in the truth.

AC 5795. And said.  That this signifies perception, is evident from the signification of “saying,” as being perception.

AC 5796. By me, my lord.  That this signifies entreaty, is plain from what follows.

AC 5797. Let thy servant I pray speak a word in my lord‘s ears. That this signifies for reception and hearing (that is, entreaty therefor), is evident from the signification of “speaking a word,” as being influx (n. 2951, 5481), and as it is influx, it is reception on the part of the other (n. 5743) and from the signification of “ears,” as being obedience (n. 4551, 4653), here a kind hearkening or hearing, because an inferior is speaking to a superior.  Hence it is plain that by “Let thy servant I pray speak a word in my lord’s ears,” is signified entreaty for reception and hearing.

AC 5798. And let not thine anger be kindled against thy servant.  That this signifies lest he turn away, is evident from the signification of “anger,” as being a turning away (n. 5034), because one who is angry with another turns away, for in that state he does not think like him, but against him. That “anger” is a turning away is plain from many passages in the Word, especially from those where anger and wrath are ascribed to Jehovah or the Lord, by which is signified a turning away--not that Jehovah or the Lord ever turns away, but that man does so; and when he turns away it seems to him as if the Lord did so, for he is not heard.  The Word so speaks in accordance with the appearance. And because “anger” is a turning away, it is also an assault on good and truth on the part of those who have turned away; while on the part of those who have not turned away, there is no assault, but repugnance on account of aversion to what is evil and false.

[2] That “anger” is an assault has been shown above (n. 3614); that it is also a turning away, and likewise the penalty when truth and good are assailed, is plain from the following passages. In Isaiah:--

Woe to them that decree decrees of iniquity. They shall fall under the bound, and under the slain. For all this His anger is not turned away. Woe to Asshur, the rod of Mine anger. I will send him against a hypocritical nation, and against the people of wrath will I give him a charge. He thinketh not right, and his heart doth not meditate right (Isa. 10:1, 4-7);

“anger” and “wrath” denote a turning away and opposition on man‘s part, and the attendant punishing and not hearing appear like anger; and as it is on man’s part, it is said, “Woe to them that decree decrees of iniquity. He thinketh not right, and his heart doth not meditate right.”

[3] In the same:--

Jehovah with the vessels of His anger, to destroy the whole land. Behold, the day of Jehovah cometh, cruel, with indignation, wrath and anger, to make the earth a waste, that He may destroy the sinners thereof out of it. I will shake the heaven, and the earth shall be shaken out of her place in the indignation of Jehovah Zebaoth, and in the day of the wrath of His anger (Isa. 13:5, 9, 13);

the “heaven” and the “earth” here denote the church, which having turned away from truth and good, its vastation and destruction are described by the “indignation, anger, and wrath” of Jehovah; when in fact it is quite the contrary, namely, that the man who is in evil is indignant, angry, and wroth, and sets himself in opposition to good and truth. The penalty which is from the evil is attributed to Jehovah on account of the appearance. Elsewhere occasionally in the Word the last time of the church and its destruction are called the “day of the anger of Jehovah.”

[4] Again:--

Jehovah hath broken the staff of the wicked, the rod of the rulers. Thou wilt smite the peoples in fury, with an incurable stroke, ruling the nations with anger (Isa. 14:5, 6);

where the meaning is similar.  This is as with a culprit who is punished by the law, and who ascribes the evil of the penalty to the king or judge; not to himself.  Again:--

Jacob and Israel because they would not walk in the ways of Jehovah, neither heard they His law; He poured upon him the wrath of anger, and the violence of war (Isa. 42:24, 25).

In Jeremiah:--

I will fight against you in an outstretched hand and a strong arm, and in anger, and in wrath, and in great heat. Lest my fury go forth like fire, and burn and be not quenched, because of the wickedness of your works (Jer. 21:5, 12);

in this passage “fury,” “anger,” and “great heat” are nothing else than the evils of penalty because of the turning away from what is good and true, and an assault thereon.

[5] By Divine law all evil is attended with the penalty, and wonderful to say, in the other life the evil and the penalty cleave together; for as soon as an infernal spirit does evil more than usual, punishing spirits are at hand, and punish him, and this without advertence.  That evil of penalty because of turning away is meant, is plain, for it is said, “because of the wickedness of your works.” In David:--

He sent upon them the wrath of His anger, indignation and fury, and distress, and an inroad of evil angels. He levelled a path for His anger, He spared not their soul from death (Ps. 78:49, 50; Isa. 30:27, 30; 34:2; 54:8; 57:17; 63:3, 6; 66:15; Jer. 4:8; 7:20; 15:14; 33:5; Ezek. 5:13, 15; Deut. 9:19, 20; 29:20, 22, 23; Rev. 14:9, 10; 15:7).

[6] “Wrath,” “anger,” “indignation,” “fury,” in these passages also denote a turning away, assault, and consequent penalty.  That the penalty for turning away and assault is ascribed to Jehovah or the Lord, and is called “anger,” “wrath,” and “fury in Him,” is because the race sprung from Jacob had to be kept in the representatives of a church, which are merely external; and they could not have been kept in them except through fear and dread of Jehovah, and unless they had believed that He would do them evil from anger and wrath.  They who are in externals without an internal cannot otherwise be brought to do external things; for there is nothing interior that binds them.  Moreover the simple within the church, from the appearance apprehend no otherwise than that God is angry when anyone does evil. Yet everyone who reflects can see that there is nothing of anger, still less of fury, with Jehovah or the Lord; for He is mercy itself and good itself, and is infinitely above willing evil to anyone. Nor does the man who is in charity toward the neighbor do evil to anyone.  All the angels in heaven are such; and how much more the Lord Himself!

[7] But in the other life the case is this. When the Lord reduces heaven and its societies into order, which is continually being done on account of new comers, and gives them bliss and happiness, and when this flows into the societies which are in the opposite (for in the other life all the societies of heaven have opposed to them societies in hell, whence there is equilibrium), and these feel a change owing to the presence of heaven, they are then angry and wrathful, and burst forth into evil, and at the same time rush into the evil of the penalty.  Moreover when evil spirits or genii approach the light of heaven, they begin to be in anguish and torment (n. 4225, 4226), which they attribute to heaven, and consequently to the Lord; when in fact it is they themselves that bring the torment upon themselves; for evil is tortured when it comes near to good.  Hence it is evident that nothing but good is from the Lord, and that all evil is from those who turn away, who are in the opposite, and who attack. From this arcanum it is evident how the matter stands.

AC 5799. For thou art even as Pharaoh.  That this signifies that it has dominion over the natural, is evident from the representation of Pharaoh, as being the natural in general (n. 5160); and from the representation of Joseph, as being the internal. That the internal has dominion over the natural is represented by Joseph‘s being set over all the land of Egypt, and also over all Pharaoh’s house (Gen. 41:40, 41).

AC 5800. My lord asked his servants, saying.  That this signifies perception of their thought, is evident from the signification of “asking,” as being to perceive another‘s thought (n. 5597). That “asking” signifies this, is because in the spiritual world or in heaven no one has need to ask another what he thinks about such things as are of his affection, because the one perceives the other’s thought which is thence derived; and moreover the internal which Joseph represents does not ask the external which Jacob‘s sons represent, for the external has its all from the internal.  Hence it is plain that by “asking” is signified the perception of the thought.  We occasionally read in the Word that Jehovah asks man, when yet He knows all and everything that man thinks; but this is so said because man believes that his thought is concealed from everyone because it is within him.  The asking is in consequence of this appearance and the derivative belief.

AC 5801. Have ye a father, or a brother?  That this signifies the good which is the source, and the truth which is the means, is evident from the representation of Israel, who is here the “father,” as being spiritual good or the good of truth (n. 3654, 4598), that it is the good which is the source, is because the truths in the natural are from the spiritual good; and from the representation of Benjamin, who is here the “brother,” as being truth; that it is the truth which is the means, is because through this there is conjunction of the truths of the church in the natural (which Jacob’s sons represent) with the spiritual good which is “Israel;” and as the conjunction is through this, it is described in many passages how his father loved Benjamin who represents this truth, and how Judah could not return with the others to his father unless Benjamin were with them. In regard to this truth, see (n. 5835).

AC 5802. And we said unto my lord.  That this signifies reciprocal perception, is evident from the signification of “saying,” as being perception, as often explained.  That reciprocal perception is meant is plain.

AC 5803. We have a father, an old man.  That this signifies that they have spiritual good as the source, is evident from the representation of Israel, who is here the “father,” as being spiritual good which is the source (n. 5801). In regard to the representation of Israel, it may be seen above (n. 4286, 4292, 4570) that he represents the spiritual church, and indeed its internal, which is the good of truth, or spiritual good from the natural. What spiritual good or the good of truth is, see (n. 5526, 5733).

AC 5804. And a child of his old ages, the youngest.  That this signifies truth therefrom which is new, is evident from the representation of Benjamin, who is here the “child, the youngest,” as being truth (n. 5801); as also that a “child” or “son” is truth, (n. 489, 491, 1147, 2623, 3373); and from the signification of “old age,” as being newness of life (n. 3492, 4220, 4676). Hence it is plain that by a “child of old ages, the youngest,” is signified truth which is new. The case herein is this. The man who is being regenerated and becoming spiritual is first led to good by means of truth; for man does not know what spiritual good, or what is the same thing, Christian good is, except through truth or through doctrine drawn from the Word. In this way he is initiated into good. Afterward, when he has been initiated, he no longer is led to good through truth, but to truth through good, for he then not only sees from good the truths which he knew before, but also from good brings forth new truths which he did not and could not know before; for good is attended with a longing for truths, because with these it is, as it were, nourished, it being perfected by them. These new truths differ greatly from the truths which he had previously known; for those which he then knew had but little life, while those which he now acquires have life from good.

[2] When a man has come to good by means of truth, he is “Israel;” and the truth which he then receives from good, that is, through good from the Lord, is new truth, which is represented by Benjamin while he was with his father. By means of this truth good becomes fruitful in the natural, and brings forth numberless truths wherein is good.  In this way the natural is regenerated, and through fruitfulness first becomes like a tree with good fruits, and successively like a garden. From all this it is evident what is meant by new truth from spiritual good.

AC 5805. And his brother is dead.  That this signifies that internal good is not, is evident from the representation of Joseph, as being the celestial of the spiritual (n. 4592, 4963, 5249, 5307, 5331, 5332), thus internal good, for this is the same as the celestial of the spiritual; and from the signification of “being dead,” as being to be no more (n. 494). The difference between the representation of Joseph as being internal good, and that of Israel as being spiritual good, is this. “Joseph” is internal good from the rational, and “Israel” is internal good from the natural (n. 4286).  This difference is such as is that between celestial good, or the good that is of the celestial church, and spiritual good, or the good that is of the spiritual church, which goods have already been frequently treated of.  It is said that such internal or celestial good is not there; which is signified by “his brother is dead.”

AC 5806. And he alone is left of his mother.  That this signifies that this is the only truth of the church, is evident from the representation of Benjamin, who here is the “only one left,” as being new truth, (n. 5804) and from the signification of “mother,” as being the church (n. 289, 2691, 2717, 5581).  In regard to this, that the truth which Benjamin here represents, and which is described above (n. 5804) is the only truth of the church, the case is this. This truth is that truth which is from spiritual good (which is “Israel”), and which is represented by Benjamin when with his father; but it is a still more interior truth when with Joseph.  The truth which Benjamin represents when with his father, and which is called new truth, is that which alone makes man to be the church; for in this truth, or in these truths, there is life from good.  That is to say, the man who is in truths of faith from good, he is the church; but not the man who is in truths of faith and not in the good of charity.  For the truths with this man are dead, even though they are the same truths.  From this it may be seen what is meant by this being the only truth of the church.

AC 5807. And his father loveth him.  That this signifies that it has conjunction with spiritual good from the natural, is evident from the signification of “love,” as being conjunction from the representation of Israel, who here is he that “loves him,” as being spiritual good from the natural (n. 4286, 4598); and from the representation of Benjamin, who is he whom “the father loves,” as being new truth (n. 5804, 5806).  The conjunction of this truth with that good is what is signified by “his father loving him.” There cannot fail to be conjunction with this truth, because it is from that good.  Between this truth and good there is conjunction like that between father and son; also like that between the willing of the mind and its understanding; for all good is of the will, and all truth is of the understanding. When the will wills good, this good is insinuated into the understanding, and there takes form according to the quality of the good; and this form is truth. And because the new truth is thus born, it is evident that there must be conjunction.

[2] In regard to love as being conjunction, be it known that love is spiritual conjunction, because it is a conjunction of the minds, or of the thought and the will, of two.  From this it is evident that regarded in itself love is purely spiritual, and that the natural of it is the delight of consociation and conjunction. In its essence love is the harmony resulting from changes of the state, and variations in the forms or substances, of which the human mind consists. This harmony, if from the heavenly form, is heavenly love. It is evident therefore that love cannot have any other origin than the Divine love itself which is from the Lord; thus that love is the Divine which flows into forms, and so disposes them that their changes of state and variations may be in the harmony of heaven.

[3] But the opposite loves, namely, the loves of self and of the world, are not conjunctions but disjunctions. They indeed appear like conjunctions, but this is because each regards the other as one with himself so long as they are in pursuit of gains and honors, or in revenge and persecution toward those who oppose them. But as soon as the one does not favor the other, there is disjunction. It is otherwise with heavenly love, which is altogether averse to doing well to another for the sake of self; but does it for the sake of the good that is in the other, and which he receives from the Lord; consequently for the sake of the Lord Himself from whom is the good.

AC 5808. And thou saidst unto thy servants.  That this signifies perception given, is evident from the signification of “saying” in the historicals of the Word, as being perception; and because something was said to them, it signifies perception given.

AC 5809. Make him come down unto me.  That this signifies that the new truth must be in subjection to internal good, is evident from the signification of “making to come down,” for to come to the internal in order to be conjoined, is to become subject to it, because everything which is below or exterior must be wholly subordinate or subject to the higher or interior, in order that there may be conjunction; and from the representation of Benjamin, who here is he whom they should make to come down, as being new truth (n. 5804, 5806); and from the representation of Joseph, who is he to whom he should come down, as being internal good, as shown before.

AC 5810. And I will set my eye upon him.  That this signifies the influx then of truth from good, is evident from the signification of “setting the eye upon” anyone, as being to communicate the truth which is of faith. The “eye” corresponds to the intellectual sight, and to the truths of faith, (n. 4403-4421, 4523-4534). And because “to set the eye upon” anyone is communication, it is also influx; for internal good, which Joseph represents, does not communicate except by influx with the truth represented by Benjamin, because this truth is below.

AC 5811. And we said unto my lord.  This signifies reciprocal perception, as above (n. 5802).

AC 5812. The boy cannot leave his father.  That this signifies that this truth cannot be separated from spiritual good, is evident from the signification of “leaving,” as being to be separated; from the representation of Israel as being spiritual good from the natural (n. 4286, 4598, 5807); and from the representation of Benjamin as being new truth (n. 5804, 5806).  This truth is called a “boy,” because it is born last; for this truth is not born until the man is regenerate.  He then receives newness of life through this new truth conjoined with good. Therefore also this truth is signified by “a child of his old ages, the youngest” (n. 5804).

AC 5813. And should he leave his father, he will die.  That this signifies that if it were separated the church would perish is evident from the signification of “leaving,” as being to be separated (n. 5812); and from the signification of “dying,” as being to be no more (n. 494), thus to perish. As this truth conjoined with spiritual good makes the church (n. 5806), if it were separated from that good, the church would perish.  Moreover Israel, who here is the “father,” represents the church (n. 4286), but not without this truth.

AC 5814. And thou saidst unto thy servants, signifies perception concerning this thing (n. 5808).

AC 5815. If your youngest brother come not down with you.  That this signifies if it be not subject to internal good, is evident from what has been said above (n. 5809).

AC 5816. Ye shall see my faces no more.  That this signifies that there will be no mercy and no conjunction with the truths in the natural, is evident from the signification of the “face,” when predicated of the Lord, as being mercy (n. 222, 223, 5585); and therefore “not to see the faces” is that there is no mercy (n. 5585, 5592); and when there is no mercy, there is also no conjunction, for there is no love, which is spiritual conjunction. The Divine love is called “mercy” in respect to the human race, beset with miseries so great. That there would be no conjunction with the truths in the natural, is because by the sons of Jacob, to whom these words were said, are represented truths in the natural (n. 5403, 5419, 5427, 5458, 5512).

[2] As to there being no mercy and no conjunction with the truths in the natural, unless the truth which is represented by Benjamin be subject to the internal good which is “Joseph,” the case is this.  The truth which makes man to be the church is the truth which is from good; for when man is in good then from good he sees truths and perceives them, and thus believes that they are truths; but not at all if he is not in good. Good is like a little flame which gives light and illumines, and causes man to see, perceive, and believe truths. For the affection of truth from good determines the internal sight thither, and withdraws the sight from worldly and bodily things, which include darkness. Such is the truth which Benjamin here represents. That this is the only truth of the church may be seen above (n. 5806), that is, it is the only truth which makes man to be the church. But this truth must be altogether subject to the internal good which is represented by Joseph; for the Lord flows in through internal good, and gives life to the truths which are below; thus also to this truth which is from spiritual good from the natural, which is represented by Israel (n. 4286, 4598).

[3] From these things it is also plain that conjunction takes place by means of this truth with the truths which are below; for unless this truth were subject to internal good, so that it had therefrom an influx of good into itself, there would be no reception of the mercy which continually flows in from the Lord through internal good, for there would be no intermediate. And if there were no reception of mercy, there would be no conjunction.  This is what is signified by “if your youngest brother come not down with you, ye shall see my faces no more.”

AC 5817. And it came to pass when we came up unto thy servant my father.  That this signifies elevation to spiritual good, is evident from the signification of “coming up,” as being elevation, of which presently; and from the representation of Israel, who here is the “father,” as being spiritual good from the natural (n. 4286, 4598).  The elevation which is signified by “coming up,” is toward interior things, as here from the truths in the natural which are represented by the ten sons of Jacob, to the spiritual good from the natural which is represented by Israel.  For there is an exterior and an interior natural (n. 5497, 5649); in the interior natural is the spiritual good which is “Israel,” and in the exterior natural are the truths of the church which are the “sons of Jacob.” Therefore by “coming up to the father” is signified elevation to spiritual good.

AC 5818. We told him the words of my lord.  That this signifies knowledge of this thing, is evident without explication.

AC 5819. And our father said.  That this signifies perception from spiritual good, is evident from the signification of “saying” in the historicals of the Word, as being perception; and from the representation of Israel, who here is the “father,” as being spiritual good (n. 3654, 4286, 4598).

AC 5820. Return ye, buy us a little food.  That this signifies that the good of truth should be appropriated, is evident from the signification of “buying,” as being to appropriate to one‘s self (n. 5397, 5406, 5410, 5426); and from the signification of “food,” as being the good of truth (n. 5410, 5426, 5487, 5582, 5588, 5655). Spiritual food is in general all good, but specifically it is the good which is acquired by means of truth, that is, truth in the will and in act, for this good becomes good from the willing and doing, and is called the good of truth.  Unless truth thus becomes good, it does not benefit the man in the other life; for when he comes into the other life it is dissipated, because it does not agree with his will, thus not with the delight of his love. He who has learned truths of faith in the world, not for the sake of willing and doing them and thus turning them into goods, but only that he may know and teach them for the sake of honor and gain, even although he may in the world be considered most learned, yet in the other life he is deprived of the truths and is left to his own will, that is, his life. And he then remains as he had been in his life; and wonderful to say he is then averse to all the truths of faith: and denies them to himself, howsoever he had before confirmed them. To turn truths to goods by willing and doing them, that is, by life, is what is meant by appropriating the good of truth, which is signified by “buy us a little food.”

AC 5821. And we said, We cannot go down.  That this signifies objection, is evident without explication.

AC 5822. If our youngest brother be with us, then will we go down.  That this signifies unless there be with them a conjoining intermediate, is evident from the representation of Benjamin, who here is the “youngest brother,” as being a conjoining intermediate (n. 5411, 5413, 5443, 5639, 5668). In regard to this, that Benjamin represents the intermediate between the celestial of the spiritual, or internal good, which is “Joseph,” and truths in the natural, which are the “ten sons of Jacob,” and also that he represents new truth (n. 5804, 5806, 5809), the case is this. An intermediate in order to be an intermediate must derive something from each, namely from the internal and from the external; otherwise it is not a conjoining intermediate. The intermediate which Benjamin represents derives from the external or natural that it is new truth there; for the new truth which he represents is in the natural, because it is from the spiritual good from the natural, which his father represents as Israel (n. 5686, 5689); but the intermediate derives this by influx from the internal which is represented by Joseph.  Thus it derives something from each. This is the reason why Benjamin represents a conjoining intermediate, and also new truth--new truth when with his father, a conjoining intermediate when with Joseph. This is a secret which cannot be more clearly set forth; and it cannot be understood except by those who are in the thought that there is with man an internal and an external distinct from each other; and who are also in the affection of knowing truths. These are enlightened in respect to the intellectual part by the light of heaven, so that they see what others do not see, thus also this secret.

AC 5823. For we cannot see the man’s faces.  That this signifies because there will be no mercy or conjunction, is evident from what has been said above (n. 5816), where are the same words.

AC 5824. And our youngest brother, he not with us.  That this signifies except by means of an intermediate, is evident from the representation of Benjamin, as being an intermediate (n. 5822).

AC 5825. And thy servant my father said unto us.  That this signifies perception from spiritual good, is evident from the signification of “saying,” as being perception; and from the representation of Israel, who here is the “father,” as being spiritual good from the natural (n. 3654, 4598, 5801, 5803, 5807).

AC 5826. Ye know that my wife bare me two sons.  That this signifies that if there be spiritual good which is of the church, there will be internal good and truth, is evident from the representation of Israel, who says this of himself, as being spiritual good from the natural (n. 5825); from the representation of Rachel, who is here the “wife who bare him two sons,” as being the affection of interior truth (n. 3758, 3782, 3793, 3819); and from the representation of Joseph and Benjamin, who are the “two” whom she bare, as being internal good and truth--Joseph internal good, and Benjamin interior truth.

[2] In regard to this, that there will be internal good and truth if there be spiritual good which is of the church, the case is this.  The spiritual good which Israel represents is the good of truth, that is, truth in the will and in act.  This truth, or this good of truth, in man, makes him to be the church.  When truth has been implanted in the will (which is perceived by the fact that the man is affected with truth for the sake of the end that he may live according to it), then there is internal good and truth.  When man is in this good and truth, then the kingdom of the Lord is in him, and consequently he is the church, and together with others like him makes the church in general.  From this it may be seen that in order that the church may be the church, there must be spiritual good, that is, the good of truth, but by no means truth alone--from which at this day the church is called the church, and one church is distinguished from another.  Let everyone think within himself whether truth would be anything unless it had life for the end.  What are doctrinal things without this end? and what the precepts of the Decalogue without a life according to them?  For if anyone is acquainted with these, and with all their meaning in its fulness, and yet lives contrary to them, of what benefit are they? have they any effect at all? except, with some, damnation? The case is similar with the doctrinals of faith from the Word, which are precepts of Christian life, for they are spiritual laws.  Neither do these conduce to anything unless they become of the life.  Let a man consider within himself whether there is anything in him that is anything except what enters into his very life; and whether the life of man, which is life, is anywhere else than in his will.

[3] From this then it is that it is said by the Lord in the Old Testament, and confirmed in the New, that all the Law and all the Prophets are founded in love to God, and love to the neighbor, thus in the life itself, but not in faith without life; therefore by no means in faith alone, consequently neither in confidence, for this is impossible without charity.  If this appears with the evil in times of danger, or when death is at hand, it is a spurious or false confidence; for not the least of this confidence appears in them in the other life, however much they may have professed it with apparent ardor at the approach of death.  That faith, whether you call it confidence or trust, effects nothing with the wicked, the Lord Himself teaches in John:--

As many as received, to them gave He the power to be sons of God, to them that believe in His name; who were born, not of bloods, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God (John 1:12, 13).

[4] They who are “born of bloods” are those who do violence to charity (n. 374, 1005), also who profane truth (n. 4735); they who are “born of the will of the flesh” are those who are in evils from the love of self and of the world (n. 3813); and they who are “born of the will of man” are those who are in persuasions of falsity; for a “man” signifies truth, and in the opposite sense falsity.  They who are “born of God” are those who have been regenerated by the Lord, and thence are in good.  These are they who receive the Lord, and these are they who believe in His name, and these are they to whom He gives the power to be sons of God, but not to the others; from which it is very plain what faith alone effects for salvation.

[5] Moreover in order that man may be regenerated and become the church, he must be introduced through truth to good; and he is introduced when truth becomes truth in the will and in act.  This truth is good, and is called the good of truth, and produces new truths continually; for then for the first time it makes itself fruitful.  The truth which is thence brought forth or made fruitful is what is called internal truth, and the good from which it is, is called internal good; for nothing becomes internal until it has been implanted in the will, because what is of the will is the inmost of man.  So long as good and truth are outside of the will, and in the understanding only, they are outside of the man; for the understanding is without, and the will is within.

AC 5827. And the one went out from me.  That this signifies the seeming departure of internal good, is evident from the signification of “going out,” or going away, as being departure; and from the representation of Joseph as being internal good.  That the departure was seeming only is plain, for Joseph still lived.  The case herein is this.  By what has been related of Joseph, from beginning to end, is represented in its order the glorification of the Lord‘s Human, and consequently in a lower sense the regeneration of man, for this is an image or type of the Lord’s glorification (n. 3138, 3212, 3296, 3490, 4402, 5688).  With the regeneration of man the case is this.  In the first state when a man is being introduced through truth into good, the truth appears manifestly, because it is in the light of the world, and not far from the sensuous things of the body.  But it is not so with good, for this is in the light of heaven, and remote from the sensuous things of the body, for it is within in man‘s spirit. Hence it is that the truth which is of faith appears manifestly, but not good, although this is continually present, and flows in, and makes the truths live.  Man could not possibly be regenerated in any other way.  But then this state has been passed through, then good manifests itself, and this by love to the neighbor, and by the affection of truth for the sake of life.  These also are the things represented by Joseph’s being carried away and not appearing to his father, and by his afterward manifesting himself to him.  This also is meant by the seeming departure of internal good, which is signified by “the one went out from me.”

AC 5828. And I said, Surely, tearing he is torn in pieces. That this signifies perception that it has perished by evils and falsities, is evident from the signification of “saying,” as being perception; and from the signification of “being torn in pieces,” as being to perish by evils and falsities, that is, the internal good which is represented by Joseph, (n. 5805).  That “to be torn in pieces” has this signification, is because in the spiritual world there is no other tearing in pieces than that of good by evils and falsities.  The case herein is like death and what relates to death.  In the spiritual sense these do not signify natural death, but spiritual death, which is damnation, for there is no other death in the spiritual world.  So likewise “tearing” does not signify in the spiritual sense such tearing as is done by wild beasts, but the tearing to pieces of good by evils and falsities. Moreover the wild beasts which tear, signify in the spiritual sense the evils of cupidities and the derivative falsities, which also are represented by wild beasts in the other life.

[2] The good which continually flows in from the Lord with man, does not perish except by evils and the derivative falsities, and by falsities and the derivative evils. For as soon as this good, continuous through the internal man, comes to the external or natural man, it is met by evil and falsity, by which the good is torn in pieces and extinguished in various ways as by wild beasts. By this the influx of good through the internal man is checked and stayed, and consequently the inner mind, through which is the influx, is closed, and only so much of the spiritual is admitted through it as to enable the natural man to reason and speak, but this only from earthly, bodily, and worldly things, and indeed contrary to good and truth, or in accordance with them from pretence or deceit.

[3] It is a universal law that influx adjusts itself according to efflux, and if efflux is checked influx is checked.  Through the internal man there is an influx of good and truth from the Lord, and through the external there must be an efflux, namely into the life, that is, in the exercise of charity. When there is this efflux then there is continual influx from heaven, that is, through heaven from the Lord; whereas if there is no efflux, but resistance in the external or natural man (that is, evil and falsity which tear to pieces and extinguish the inflowing good), it follows from the universal law just mentioned that the influx adjusts itself to the efflux, consequently that the influx of good draws back, and thereby the internal through which is the influx is closed; and through this closing there comes stupidity in spiritual things, even until the man who is such neither knows nor is willing to know anything about eternal life, and at last becomes insane, so that he opposes falsities against truths, calling them truths and the truths falsities, and evils against goods, making them goods and the goods evil. Thus he tears good completely to pieces.

[4] That which is “torn” is occasionally mentioned in the Word, whereby in the proper sense is signified that which perishes through falsities from evils; but that which perishes through evils is called a “carcass.” When only what is “torn” is mentioned, both are signified, for the one involves the signification of the other; but it is otherwise when both are mentioned, for then a distinction is made.  Because that which is “torn” signified in the spiritual sense that which had perished by falsities from evils, therefore it was forbidden in the representative church to eat any. thing torn, which by no means would have been thus forbidden unless that spiritual evil had been understood in heaven. Otherwise what harm would there have been in eating flesh torn by a wild beast?

[5] Of “torn” things, that they were not to be eaten, it is thus written in Moses:--

The fat of a carcass and the fat of that which is torn may be for every use, provided in eating ye shall not eat it (Lev. 7:24).

Again:--

A carcass and that which is torn he shall not eat, to be defiled therewith: I am Jehovah (Lev. 22:8).

And again:--

Men of holiness ye shall be to Me; therefore ye shall not eat the flesh that is torn in the field; ye shall cast it forth to dogs (Exod. 22:31).

In Ezekiel:--

The prophet saith, Ah Lord Jehovih! behold my soul hath not been defiled, and a carcass and that which is torn I have not eaten from my youth until now, so that the flesh of abomination hath not come into my mouth (Ezek. 4:14).

From these passages it is plain that it was an abomination to eat that which was torn, not because it was torn, but because it signified the tearing of good to pieces by falsities which are from evils, whereas a “carcass” signified the death of good by evils.

[6] The tearing of good to pieces by falsities from evils is meant also in the following passages from David in the internal sense:--

The likeness of the wicked is as a lion, he desireth to tear, and as a young lion that sitteth in hiding places (Ps. 17:12).

Again:--

They opened their mouth against me, a tearing and a roaring lion (Ps. 22:13).

And yet again:--

Lest they tear my soul as a lion, tearing but none rescuing (Ps. 7:2).

A “lion” denotes those who vastate the church.  Where it is said above of Joseph, that he was sold by his brethren, and that his tunic stained with blood was sent to his father, then his father also said, “It is my son‘s tunic, an evil wild beast hath devoured him, tearing, Joseph is torn in pieces” (Gen. 37:33). “To be torn in pieces” is to be dissipated by falsities from evil, (n. 4777).

AC 5829. And I have not seen him hitherto.  That this signifies because it has vanished, is evident without explication.

AC 5830. And ye are taking this one also from my faces.  That this signifies if the new truth also should depart, is evident from the representation of Benjamin, of whom this is said, as being new truth (n. 5804, 5806, 5809, 5822); and from the signification of “taking him from my faces,” as being to estrange from spiritual good, thus to depart.  Because this truth is from spiritual good which is “Israel,” if it should depart, it would be all over with the good itself; for good takes its quality from truths, and truths take their being from good; thereby they have life together.

AC 5831. And if harm befall him.  That this signifies by evils and falsities, is evident from the signification of “harm befalling” anyone, as being to be injured by evils and falsities. No other “harm” is meant in the spiritual sense, because in the spiritual world all harm is from evils and falsities.

AC 5832. And ye will make my gray hairs go down in evil to the grave.  That this signifies that spiritual good, and thus the internal of the church, would perish, is evident from the representation of Israel, as being spiritual good (n. 5807, 5812, 5813, 5817, 5819, 5825), and the internal of the spiritual church (n. 4286); from the signification of “gray hairs,” as being the ultimate of the church; and from the signification of “going down in evil to the grave,” as being to perish (n. 4785).  “To go down in good into the grave” is to rise again and to be regenerated (n. 2916, 2917, 5551), wherefore “to go down in evil into the grave” is the opposite, thus to perish. As to the internal of the church perishing if the truth represented by Benjamin were to perish, the case is this. In order that good may be good it must have its own truths; and truths must have their own good in order to be truths. Good without truths is not good, and truths without good are not truths. Together they form a marriage, which is called the heavenly marriage.  Wherefore if one departs, the other perishes; and the one may depart from the other through a tearing in pieces by evils and falsities.

AC 5833. And now when I come to thy servant my father.  That this signifies the good of the church corresponding to the spiritual good of the internal church, is evident from the representation of Judah, who says this of himself, as being the good of the church (n. 5583, 5603, 5782); and from the representation of Israel, who here is his “father,” as being spiritual good (n. 5807, 5812, 5813, 5817, 5819, 5825). The good of the church which Judah represents is the good of the external church; whereas the spiritual good which Israel represents is the good of the internal church (n. 4986). For every church of the Lord is internal and external; and the things of the external church correspond to those which are of the internal church. Thus also the good of the church which Judah represents, corresponds to the spiritual good represented by Israel.

AC 5834. And the boy he not with us.  That this signifies if the new truth is not with it, is evident from the representation of Benjamin, who here is the “boy,” as being new truth (n. 5804, 5806, 5822).

AC 5835. And his soul is bound in his soul.  That this signifies since there is close conjunction, is evident from the signification of “soul,” as being life, thus “the soul of the one being bound in the soul of the other” signifies the life of the one in the life of the other, consequently that there is close conjunction--here of spiritual good, which is “Israel,” with the truth from this good, which is “Benjamin.” As to there being so close a conjunction between good and its truth, like the soul of the one which is bound in the soul of the other, the case is this. The mind of man, which is the man himself, and is where the man’s life is, has two faculties, one allotted to the truths of faith, the other to the good of charity. The faculty which is allotted to the truths of faith is called the understanding, and that which is allotted to the good of charity is called the will.  In order that man may be man, these two faculties must make a one.

[2] But that at the present day these two faculties are altogether disjoined, may be seen from the fact that a man can understand that a thing is true, and yet not will it. He can understand that all things in the Decalogue are true, also in some measure those in the doctrinals which are from the Word; nay, he may also be able intellectually to confirm them, and even to preach them, but yet will otherwise, and from willing act otherwise. It is plain from this that these two faculties in man are disjoined. But that they ought not to be disjoined may be known from the fact that to understand truth would elevate a man toward heaven, and to will evil would draw him down toward hell, and so he would hang between the two. But still his will, in which his very life consists, would draw him downward, thus inevitably into hell. Therefore lest this happen, these two faculties must be conjoined, which is done through regeneration by the Lord, and this through the implantation of the truth of faith in the good of charity. For thus through the truth of faith the man is endowed with a new understanding, and through the good of charity with a new will; whence he has two faculties which make one mind.

AC 5836. And it shall come to pass when he seeth that the boy is not, that he will die.  That this signifies that spiritual good will perish (that is, if the truth which is “Benjamin” departs), is evident from the representation of Israel as being spiritual good; and from the representation of “dying,” as being to cease to be such (n. 494), thus to perish. Good would perish if its truth should depart, (n. 5830, 5832).

AC 5837. And thy servants will make thy servant our father‘s gray hairs go down in sorrow to the grave.  That this signifies that all will be over with the church, is evident from the things unfolded above (n. 5832), where like things are said. That Israel, who is the “father,” is here the church, is because spiritual good, which he represents, makes the church in man; insomuch that whether you say “spiritual good,” or “the church,” it is the same thing, for they cannot be separated. Therefore it is that in the Word, especially in the prophets, “Israel” is the spiritual church.

AC 5838. Verses 32-34. For thy servant became surety for the boy from being with my father, saying, If I bring him not back unto thee I shall sin to my father all the days. And now I pray let thy servant remain instead of the boy a servant to my lord, and let the boy go up with his brethren. For how shall I go up to my father and the boy he not with me? peradventure I shall see the evil that shall come upon my father.  “For thy servant became surety for the boy from being with my father, saying,” signifies adjunction to itself; “If I bring him not back unto thee,” signifies unless it be conjoined with spiritual good; “I shall sin to my father all the days,” signifies a turning away, and thus that there would be no good of the church; “and now I pray let thy servant remain instead of the boy a servant to my lord,” signifies submission; “and let the boy go up with his brethren,” signifies in order that interior truth may be conjoined with spiritual good; “for how shall I go up to my father and the boy he not with me?” signifies that spiritual good from the natural would he without interior truth; “peradventure I shall see the evil that shall come upon my father,” signifies perception that it will perish.

AC 5839. For thy servant became surety for the boy from being with my father, saying.  That this signifies adjunction, is evident from the signification of “becoming surety for” another, as being to adjoin him to one’s self (n. 5609). For the truth which Benjamin represented, while it is not so much with spiritual good, which is the “father,” may in the meantime be with the good of the external church which Judah represents; for this good and spiritual good act as one by correspondence.

AC 5840. If I bring him not back unto thee.  That this signifies unless it be conjoined with spiritual good, is evident from the signification of “bringing back,” as being to be conjoined again; and from the representation of Israel, as being spiritual good.

AC 5841. I shall sin to my father all the days.  That this signifies a turning away, and thus that there would be no good of the church, is evident from the signification of “sinning,” as being disjunction (n. 5229, 5474), thus a turning away; and if the good of the external church which Judah represents, averts itself from the good of the internal church represented by Israel, there is no longer any good of the church. The conjunction itself causes that there is good from which is the church.  With these two goods, of the internal church and of the external, the case is this. The good of the internal church, or internal good, produces the good of the external church, or external good, by influx and because it is so, internal good elevates to itself external good in order that this may look to it, and through it upward toward the lord. This takes place when there is conjunction; but if there is disjunction, external good turns itself away, and looks downward, and thus perishes.  It is this turning away which is signified by “I shall sin to my father all the days.”

AC 5842. And now I pray let thy servant remain instead of the boy a servant to my lord.  That this signifies submission, is evident from the fact that to offer one‘s self as a servant in the place of another is to deprive one’s self of freedom from one‘s own, and to submit one’s self altogether to the other.  By these words is signified the submission of the natural or external man under the internal; for when the good there submits itself, the very truths there submit themselves, for truths are of good.

AC 5843. And let the boy go up with his brethren.  That this signifies in order that interior truth may be conjoined with spiritual good, is evident from the representation of Benjamin, as being new truth (n. 5804, 5806, 5809, 5822), thus interior truth; and from the signification of “going up with his brethren,” as being to be again conjoined with his father, that is, with the spiritual good which is represented by Israel. The interior truth which Benjamin here represents, is the new truth, for this is interior relatively to the truths which are below.  For the truth which proceeds from good is interior truth; thus this truth is so because it proceeds from spiritual good, which is “Israel.” The good of charity from the will, thus from affection, is internal good, or the good of the internal church; but the good of charity not from affection but from obedience, and not from the will but from doctrine, is external good, or the good of the external church; and it is the same with the truths which are from it.

AC 5844. For how shall I go up to my father, and the boy he not with me?  That this signifies that spiritual good from the natural would be without interior truth, is evident from the representation of Israel, who here is the “father,” as being spiritual good from the natural; and from the representation of Benjamin, who here is the “boy,” as being interior truth (n. 5843).

AC 5845. Peradventure I shall see the evil that shall come upon my father.  That this signifies a perception that it will perish, is evident from the signification of “seeing,” as being to understand (n. 2807, 3863, 4403-4421), and thence to perceive (n. 3764, 4567, 5400).  That it will perish is signified by the “evil which shall come upon him,” the same as by “making his gray hairs go down in evil to the grave” (n. 5832), also that if his father did not see him with his brethren, he “would die” (n. 5836).  This is the evil that is signified. Spiritual good, which is “Israel,” would perish if the truth which is “Benjamin” should depart, (n. 5832).

OF THE ANGELS AND SPIRITS WITH MAN

AC 5846. The influx from the spiritual world into man is in general of such a nature that man cannot think or will anything of himself, but everything flows in; good and truth from the Lord through heaven, thus through the angels who are with the man; evil and falsity from hell, thus through the evil spirits who are with the man; and this into the man‘s thought and will.  This I know will appear a very great paradox because it is contrary to the appearance; but experience itself shall declare how the matter stands.

AC 5847. No man, spirit, or angel ever has any life from himself, thus neither can he think and will from himself; because in thinking and willing is the life of man, and speaking and acting is the life thence derived. For there is one only life, that of the Lord, which flows into all, but is variously received, and indeed according to the quality which a man has induced on his soul by his life.  Hence with the evil, goods and truths are turned into evils and falsities, but with the good they are received--goods as goods, and truths as truths.  This may be compared to the light of the sun flowing into objects, which is modified and varied in them diversely according to the form of the parts, and thus is turned into colors, some sad and some cheerful. While a man lives in the world he induces a form on the purest substances of his interiors, so that it may be said that he forms his soul, that is, its quality; and according to this form is received the life of the Lord, which is the life of His love toward the universal human race. That there is one only life, and that men, spirits, and angels are recipients of life, see (n. 1954, 2021, 2706, 2886-2889, 2893, 3001, 3318, 3337, 3338, 3484, 3741-3743, 4151, 4249, 4318-4320, 4417, 4524, 4882).

AC 5848. In order that the life of the Lord may flow in and be received according to all law in man, there are continually with him angels and spirits--angels from heaven, and spirits from hell; and I have been informed that there are with everyone two spirits and two angels.  That there are spirits from hell is because man of himself is continually in evil, for he is in the delight of the love of self and of the world, and in so far as man is in evil, or in this delight, so far angels from heaven cannot be present.

AC 5849. The two spirits adjoined to man cause him to be in communication with hell, and the two angels cause him to be in communication with heaven. Without communication with heaven and hell, man could not live even a moment.  If these communications were taken away, the man would fall dead as a stock; for then would be taken away the connection with the First Esse, that is, with the Lord. This has also been shown me by much experience.  The spirits with me were removed a little, and then as they were removed I began as it were to expire, and indeed should have expired if they had not been sent back. But I know that few will believe there is any spirit with them, nor even that there are any spirits; and this chiefly for the reason that at this day there is no faith, because no charity, and thus it is not believed that there is a hell, nor even that there is a heaven, nor consequently that there is any life after death.  Another reason is that they do not see spirits with their eyes for they say, “If I should see, I would believe; what I see, this is; but what I do not see, I do not know whether it is.” When yet they know, or might know, that man’s eye is so dull and gross that it does not even see many things that exist in ultimate nature, as is evident from microscopes which make them visible.  How then could it see what is within even purer nature, where spirits and angels are?  These man cannot see except with the eye of his internal man, for this is accommodated to such vision. But the sight of this eye is not opened to man while he is in this world, for many reasons.  From all this it is evident how far distant is the faith of this day from the faith of ancient times, when it was believed that every man had his angel with him.

AC 5850. The truth of the matter is this. From the Lord through the spiritual world into the subjects of the natural world there is a general influx and also a particular influx--a general influx into those things which are in order, a particular influx into those things which are not in order.  Animals of every kind are in the order of their nature, and therefore into them there is general influx.  That they are in the order of their nature is evident from the fact that they are born into all their faculties, and have no need to be introduced into them by any information.  But men are not in their order, nor in any law of order, and therefore they receive particular influx; that is, there are with them angels and spirits through whom the influx comes.  And unless these were with men, they would rush into every wickedness and would plunge in a moment into the deepest hell.  Through these spirits and angels man is kept under the auspices and guidance of the Lord.  The order into which man was created would be that he should love the neighbor as himself, and even more than himself.  Thus do the angels.  But man loves only himself and the world, and hates the neighbor, except in so far as he favors his commanding and possessing the world.  Therefore as the life of man is altogether contrary to heavenly order, he is ruled by the Lord through separate spirits and angels.

AC 5851. The same spirits do not remain constantly with a man, but are changed according to the man‘s states, that is, the states of his affection, or of his loves and ends, the former being removed and others succeeding.  In general there are with man spirits of such a quality as is the man himself.  If he is avaricious, there are spirits who are avaricious; if he is haughty, there are haughty spirits; if he is desirous of revenge, there are spirits of this character; if he is deceitful, there are the like spirits. Man summons to himself spirits from hell in accordance with his life. The hells are most exactly distinguished according to evils of cupidities, and according to all the differences of evil. Thus there is never any lack of spirits like himself to be called out and adjoined to a man who is in evil.

AC 5852. The evil spirits with man are indeed from the hells, but while they are with him they are not in hell, but taken out from thence. The place where they then are is midway between hell and heaven, and is called the WORLD OF SPIRITS, of which mention has often been made before. In this world called the world of spirits there are also good spirits who likewise are with man. Into that world also come men immediately after death, who after tarrying a while there, are either sent away into the lower earth, or are let down into hell, or taken up into heaven, each one according to his life. In that world the hells are terminated above, being there closed or opened at the good pleasure of the Lord; and in that world heaven is terminated below; thus it is an interval that distinguishes heaven from hell. From this it may now be known what the world of spirits is. When evil spirits who are with man are in that world, they are not in any infernal torment, but are in the delights of the love of self and of the world, as also of all the pleasures in which the man himself is; for they are in every thought and every affection of the man; but when they are sent back into their hell, they return into their former state.

AC 5853. The spirits who come to a man enter into all his memory and into all the memory-knowledges that he possesses. Thus they put on all things belonging to the man, insomuch that they know no otherwise than that these are their own. This is a prerogative that spirits have above man.  Hence it is that all things which the man thinks they think, and all things which the man wills they will; and conversely, whatever the spirits think the man thinks, and whatever the spirits will the man wills; for they act as a one by conjunction. Yet on both sides it is supposed that such things are in and from themselves, both on the part of the spirits and on the part of the men.  But this is a fallacy.

AC 5854. It is provided by the Lord that spirits should flow into what is thought and willed by man, but angels into his ends, and thus through the ends into all that follows from the ends.  Angels also flow in through good spirits into the goods of life and truths of faith with man, by means of which they lead him away from evils and falsities as far as possible. This influx is tacit, imperceptible to the man, but still operating and efficient in secret. Especially do they avert evil ends and insinuate good ones.  But in so far as they cannot do this, they withdraw, and flow in more remotely, and more absently, and then evil spirits come nearer; for angels cannot be present in evil ends, that is, in the loves of self and of the world, and yet they are present from afar.

[2] The Lord could through angels lead man into good ends by omnipotent force; but this would be to take away the man’s life, for his life consists in entirely contrary loves.  Therefore the Divine law is inviolable, that man shall be in freedom, and that good and truth, or charity and faith, shall be implanted in his freedom, and by no means in compulsion; because what is received in a state of compulsion does not remain, but is dissipated. For to compel a man is not to insinuate into his will, because it is then the will of another from which he acts; and therefore when he returns to his own will, that is, to his own freedom, this is rooted out.  The Lord therefore rules man through his freedom, and as far as possible withholds him from the freedom of thinking and willing evil; for unless man were withheld by the Lord, he would be continually plunging into the deepest hell.

[3] It was said that the Lord could through angels lead man into good ends by omnipotent force; for evil spirits can be driven away in an instant, even if there should be myriads about a man, and this indeed by means of one angel; but then the man would come into such torment and into such a hell that he could not possibly endure it, for he would be miserably deprived of his life.  For the life of man is from cupidities and phantasies against good and truth.  If this life were not sustained through evil spirits and thus attended, or at least led, he would be reduced to nothing and would not survive a minute. For nothing else is seated in him than the love of self and of gain, and of reputation for their sake, thus whatever is contrary to order.  Wherefore unless he should be reduced into order moderately and by degrees, through the leading of his freedom, he would at once expire.

AC 5855. Before the way was opened to me to speak with spirits, I was of the opinion that no spirit nor angel could ever know or perceive my thoughts, because they were within me, and known to God alone.  And then it once happened that I observed that a certain spirit knew what I was thinking, for he spoke with me about what I was thinking of, in a few words, and gave an indication of his presence by a certain sign. At this I was astounded, chiefly because he knew my thoughts. From this it was evident how difficult it is for a man to believe that any spirit knows what he is thinking, when yet he knows not only the thoughts which the man himself knows, but also the least things of his thoughts and affections, which the man does not know--nay, such things as the man can never know during the life of the body. This I know from the continuous experience of many years.

AC 5856. Communications of societies with other societies are effected through spirits whom they send forth and through whom they speak.  These spirits are called SUBJECTS. When any society was present with me, I could not know it until they sent forth a spirit, at the sending of whom communication was at once opened.  This is a very familiar thing in the other life and is frequently done.  From this it may be seen that the spirits and angels who are with man, are for the sake of communication with societies in hell and with societies in heaven.

AC 5857. I have sometimes spoken with spirits about the surpassing capacity they have above men for putting on at their first coming all things of the man‘s memory; and though they had previously known nothing of the sciences, of the languages, and other things which the man has learned and imbued from childhood even to old age, they nevertheless come in a moment into possession of all; so that with the learned they are learned, with the ingenious they are ingenious, and with the prudent they are prudent. At these remarks, those spirits became elated, for they were not good, and therefore it was given to tell them further that with the ignorant they are ignorant, and with the stupid they are stupid, with the insane and foolish they are insane and foolish; for they put on all the interiors of the man with whom they are, thus also his fallacies, phantasies, and falsities, consequently his insanities and follies.  But evil spirits cannot approach little children, because these have not yet in their memory anything that evil spirits can put on; and therefore with little children there are good spirits and angels.

AC 5858. From much experience it has been given me to know that whatever the spirits think and speak from the memory of a man, they suppose to be their own and in themselves.  If they are told that this is not the case, they are highly indignant--such is the fallacy of sense that prevails with them. To convince them that such is not the case, they were asked whence they knew how to speak with me in my mother tongue, and yet they had known nothing at all of it during their life in the body, and how they knew the other languages in which I am skilled, although from themselves they did not know one; do they believe that these languages are theirs? Moreover I read the Hebrew language before them, and they understood it as much as I did,--even little children--but no further.  All the knowledges also that are in my memory are in theirs.  By this they were convinced that when they come to a man, they come into possession of all his knowledges, and that they are in falsity in believing them to be their own. They have also their own knowledges, but are not permitted to draw them out, to the end that they may serve man through his knowledges as well as for various other reasons, of which above (n. 2476, 2477, 2479), and because there would he the greatest confusion if spirits were to flow in from their own memory (n. 2478).

AC 5859. Some spirits came to me by ascending, and said that they had been with me from the beginning, knowing no otherwise.  But when I showed them to the contrary, they at last confessed that they had now come for the first time, but because they had at once put on all things of my memory, they could know no otherwise.  From this again it was evident that when spirits come to a man they instantly put on all the man’s memory-knowledges as if they were their own; and also that when a number of spirits are present, they each of them put on these knowledges, and they each of them suppose that they are their own. Into this faculty comes man immediately after death. Hence also it is that when good spirits come into a heavenly society, they put on and possess all the wisdom of all in that society--for such is the communion--and this although in the life of the body they had known nothing whatever of such things as are said in the heavenly society. This is the case if when in the world they had lived in the good of charity, for this good is attended with the appropriation to itself of everything of wisdom, because this is secretly implanted in good itself; and it is from this that they know as it were from themselves things which in the bodily life had been incomprehensible and even unutterable.

AC 5860. The spirits who are with man also put on his persuasions, whatever these may be, as has been proved to me by much experience.  Thus they put on man‘s persuasions not only in civil and moral things, but also in the spiritual things of faith.  From this it may be seen that the spirits with those who are in heresies, in fallacies and illusions as to the truths of faith, and in falsities, are in the like, with not the slightest difference. The reason of this is that man may be in his freedom, and not he disturbed by anything of the spirit’s own.

AC 5861. From all this it is plain that during his life in the world a man is as to his interiors, thus as to his spirit, in company with other spirits, and is so adjoined to them that he cannot think anything or will anything except together with them, and that thereby there is a communication of his interiors with the spiritual world, and that in this way and not otherwise can he be led by the Lord.  When a man comes into the other life he has with him his unbelief in there having been with him any spirit, especially any from hell. There is therefore shown him, if he desires it, the society of spirits in whose company he had been, and from which emissary spirits had been with him.  And then after passing through some preliminary states, he at last returns to the same society, because this society has acted in unity with the love which had obtained the dominion with him.  I have sometimes seen their societies shown to them.

AC 5862.  It is not known to the spirits with man, but only to angels from the Lord, that they are with him, because they are adjoined to his soul or spirit, and not to his body.  Those things which from the thoughts are determined into speech, and those which from the will are determined into acts in the body, flow in order into act by general influx, according to the correspondences with the Grand Man; and therefore the spirits who are with man have nothing in common with these things: thus they do not speak through man‘s tongue, which would be obsession; nor see through his eyes, nor hear through his ears, what is in the world.  It is otherwise with me, for the Lord has opened my interiors so that I might see the things in the other life: hence spirits have known that I was a man in the body, and opportunity has been given them of seeing through my eyes things in the world, and of hearing those speaking to me who were in my company.

AC 5863. If evil spirits perceived that they are with man, and that they are spirits separate from him, and if they could flow into what is of his body, they would try to destroy him in a thousand ways, for they hold man in deadly hatred.  And as they knew that I was a man in the body, they were in a continual effort to destroy me, not only as to the body, but especially as to the soul; for to destroy man and any spirit is the very delight of life of all those who are in hell; but I have been continually protected by the Lord.  From this it is evident how dangerous it is for man to be in living company with spirits, unless he is in the good of faith.

AC 5864.  As evil spirits have heard that spirits are with man, they have supposed that so they might assail these spirits, and together with them man.  They have also sought them a long time, but in vain.  Their intention was to destroy them. For as the delight and bliss of heaven is to do good to man, and to promote his eternal welfare, so on the other hand the delight of hell is to do evil to man, and to contribute to his eternal ruin.  In such opposition are they.

AC 5865.  There was a certain spirit, not evil, to whom it was permitted to pass over to a certain man and speak with me from thence. When he came to the man he said that there appeared to him as it were a kind of black inanimate something, or as it were a black lifeless mass. This was the bodily life of the man, which he was permitted to view. It was said that the bodily life of a man who is in the good of faith appears, when one is permitted to view it, not black, but woody and of the color of wood. The same was given me to know by another experience.  A certain evil spirit was let into the state of the body, by thinking from the sensuous things of the body, thus from the external memory.  He then seemed to me as a black lifeless mass. When he was restored, he said that he had supposed he was in the life of the body. In other cases spirits are not allowed to look into the bodily things of man, for these are in the world and its light, and when spirits look at those things which are of the light of the world, these appear as mere darkness.

AC 5866. A continuation about the angels and spirits with man will be found at the end of the following chapter.


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