HEAVENLY SECRETS
Emanuel Swedenborg

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AC EXODUS Chapter 16

THE DOCTRINE OF CHARITY

AC 8387. He who wishes to be saved must confess his sins and do repentance.

AC 8388. To confess sins is to become thoroughly acquainted with evils, to see them in one‘s self, to acknowledge them, to regard one’s self as guilty, and to condemn one‘s self on account of them. When this is done before God, it is to confess sins.

AC 8389. To do repentance is after one has thus confessed his sins and from a humble heart has made supplication for their forgiveness, to desist from them and to lead a new life according to the commands of faith.

AC 8390. He who merely acknowledges that he is a sinner like all others, and who regards himself as guilty of all evils, and does not examine himself--that is, see his sins--does indeed make confession, but not the confession of repentance, for he lives afterward as he had done before.

AC 8391. He who leads a life of faith does repentance daily; for he reflects upon the evils that are in him, acknowledges them, guards himself against them, and supplicates the Lord for aid.  For from himself man is continually falling, but is continually being raised up by the Lord. He falls from himself when he thinks what is evil with desire; and he is raised up by the Lord when he resists evil, and consequently does not do it. Such is the state with all who are in good; but they who are in evil are continually falling, and also are continually being uplifted by the Lord; but this to prevent them from falling into the most grievous hell of all, whither from themselves they incline with all their might: thus in truth uplifting them into a milder hell.

AC 8392. The repentance that is done in a state of freedom avails; but that which is done in a state of compulsion avails not. A state of compulsion is a state of sickness, a state of dejection of mind from misfortune, a state of imminent death; in a word, every state of fear which takes away the use of sound reason.  When an evil man who in a state of compulsion promises repentance and also does what is good, comes into a state of freedom, he returns into his former life of evil. The case is otherwise with a good man, such states being to him states of temptation in which he conquers.

AC 8393. Repentance of the mouth and not of the life is not repentance. Sins are not forgiven through repentance of the mouth, but through repentance of the life. Sins are continually being forgiven man by the Lord, for He is mercy itself; but sins adhere to the man, however much he may suppose that they have been forgiven, nor are they removed from him except through a life according to the commands of faith. So far as he lives according to these commands, so far his sins are removed; and so far as they are removed, so far they have been forgiven.  For by the Lord man is withheld from evil, and is held in good; and he is so far able to be withheld from evil in the other life, as in the life of the body he has resisted evil; and he is so far able to be held in good then, as in the life of the body he has done what is good from affection. This shows what the forgiveness of sins is, and whence it is.  He who believes that sins are forgiven in any other way, is much mistaken.

AC 8394. After a man has examined himself, and has acknowledged his sins, and has done repentance, he must remain constant in good up to the end of life.  If however he afterward falls back into his former life of evil, and embraces it, be commits profanation, for he then conjoins evil with good, and consequently his latter state becomes worse than his former one, according to the Lord’s words:--

When the unclean spirit goeth out of a man he walketh through dry places, seeking rest, but findeth none; then he saith, I will return into my house whence I came out; and when he is come, and findeth it empty, and swept, and garnished for him, then goeth he, and joineth to himself seven other spirits worse than himself, and having entered in they dwell there; and the last things of the man become worse than the first (Matt. 12:43-45).

EXODUS 16:1-36

1. And they journeyed from Elim, and all the assemblage of the sons of Israel came unto the wilderness of Sin, which is between Elim and Sinai, in the fifteenth day of the second month of their going out of the land of Egypt.

2. And all the assemblage of the sons of Israel murmured against Moses and against Aaron in the wilderness.

3. And the sons of Israel said unto them, Oh that we had died by the hand of Jehovah in the land of Egypt, when we sat by the flesh-pot, when we did eat bread to satiety! for ye have brought us forth unto this wilderness, to kill this whole congregation with hunger.

4. And Jehovah said unto Moses, Behold I am making it rain bread for you from heaven, and the people shall go out, and they shall gather the word of a day in its day, in order that I may try them, whether they will walk in My law, or not.

5. And it shall be in the sixth day, that they shall prepare that which they have brought, and there shall be double over what they shall gather day by day.

6. And Moses and Aaron said unto all the sons of Israel, In the evening, then ye shall know that Jehovah hath brought you out from the land of Egypt.

7. And in the morning, then ye shall see the glory of Jehovah, in that He heareth your murmurings against Jehovah; and what are we, that ye murmur against us?

8. And Moses said, In that Jehovah shall give you in the evening flesh to eat, and in the morning bread to satiety; in that Jehovah heareth your murmurings with which ye murmur against Him: what are we? your murmurings are not against us, but against Jehovah.

9. And Moses said unto Aaron, Say unto all the assemblage of the sons of Israel, Come ye near before Jehovah, for He hath heard your murmurings.

10. And it was, as Aaron spake unto the whole assemblage of the sons of Israel, that they looked back unto the wilderness, and behold the glory of Jehovah was seen in the cloud.

11. And Jehovah spake unto Moses, saying,

12. I have heard the murmurings of the sons of Israel; speak unto them, saying, Between the evenings ye shall eat flesh, and in the morning ye shall be sated with bread; and ye shall know that I am Jehovah your God.

13. And it was in the evening that the quail came up, and covered the camp; and in the morning there was a deposit of dew round about the camp.

14. And the deposit of dew went up, and behold upon the faces of the wilderness a small round thing, small as the hoar frost upon the earth.

15. And the sons of Israel saw, and they said a man to his brother, What is this (Man hoc)? for they knew not what it was.  And Moses said unto them, This is the bread which Jehovah hath given you to eat.

16. This is the word that Jehovah hath commanded, Gather ye of it everyone according to the mouth of his eating, an omer a head, according to the number of your souls, take ye everyone for him who is in his tent.

17. And the sons of Israel did so, and they gathered, collecting for the numerous and the few.

18. And they measured it with the omer, and it made nothing over for the numerous; and for the few there was no lack; they gathered everyone according to his eating.

19. And Moses said unto them, Let no one make a residue of it till the morning.

20. And they heard not unto Moses; and men made a residue of it until the morning, and it bred worms and stank, and Moses was angry with them.

21. And they gathered it morning by morning, everyone according to the mouth of his eating; and the sun grew hot, and it melted.

22. And it was that on the sixth day they gathered bread double, two omers for each one; and all the princes of the assemblage came and told Moses.

23. And he said unto them, This is what Jehovah spake, A rest, a sabbath holy to Jehovah, is the morrow; what ye will bake, bake ye; and what ye will boil, boil ye; and all that is left over, this lay ye by for you to keep until the morning.

24. And they laid it by till the morning, as Moses commanded, and it did not stink, and the worm was not in it.

25. And Moses said, Eat ye this today, because today is a sabbath to Jehovah, today ye shall not find it in the field.

26. Six days ye shall gather it, and on the seventh day is the sabbath, it shall not be in it.

27. And it was on the seventh day there went out some of the people for to gather, and they found none.

28. And Jehovah said unto Moses, How long do ye refuse to keep My commandments and My laws?

29. See ye, because Jehovah hath given you the sabbath, therefore He giveth you on the sixth day the bread of two days; rest ye everyone in his place, let no one go forth from his place on the seventh day.

30. And the people rested on the seventh day.

31. And the house of Israel called the name of it Manna; and it was like coriander seed, white; and the taste of it was like that of a cake in honey.

32. And Moses said, This is the word which Jehovah hath commanded, Fill an omer with it to be kept for your generations, to the end that they may see the bread wherewith I fed you in the wilderness, when I brought you forth from the land of Egypt.

33. And Moses said unto Aaron, Take an urn, and put the omerful of manna therein, and lay it up before Jehovah, to be kept for your generations.

34. As Jehovah commanded Moses, and Aaron laid it up before the Testimony to be kept.

35. And the sons of Israel did eat the manna forty years, until they came to a land inhabited; they did eat the manna until they came unto the border of the land of Canaan.

36. And an omer is the tenth part of an ephah.

THE CONTENTS

AC 8395. The preceding chapter treated of the second temptation of those who were of the spiritual church, which was from truth being perceived as undelightful.  In this chapter in the internal sense a third temptation is treated of, which is from the lack of good.  By the lack of bread and of flesh, at which the sons of Israel murmured, is signified a lack of good. Consolation after temptation is signified and described by the manna which they received, and by the quail.  Manna denotes spiritual good.  That this was given to them by the Lord continually, and without any care and aid of theirs, is signified by their receiving the manna daily, and by the worm breeding in it if they gathered more.

THE INTERNAL SENSE

AC 8396. Verse 1. And they journeyed from Elim, and all the assemblage of the sons of Israel came unto the wilderness of Sin, which is between Elim and Sinai, in the fifteenth day of the second month of their going out of the land of Egypt.  “And they journeyed from Elim,” signifies what is successive; “and all the assemblage of the sons of Israel came unto the wilderness of Sin,” signifies unto another state of temptation; “which is between Elim and Sinai,” signifies what is continuous and its quality; “In the fifteenth day of the second month,” signifies the state relatively; “of their going out of the land of Egypt,” signifies to their state when they were first liberated from infestations.

AC 8397. And they journeyed from Elim.  That this signifies what is successive, is evident from the signification of “journeying,” as being what is successive and continuous (n. 4375, 4554, 4585, 5996, 8181, 8345); and from the signification of “Elim,” as being a state of consolation after temptation (n. 8367), consequently by “they journeyed from Elim,” is signified what is successive of life in respect to states of temptations.  For when those who are of the spiritual church are undergoing temptations, they are brought from one temptation into another.  This is the successive that is here signified by “journeying.”  That “journeying” signifies what is successive of life, is because there are no spaces, as there are no times, in the other life; but states instead of them (n. 2625, 2837, 3356, 3387, 4321, 4882, 5605, 7381). Consequently movements do not signify movements, nor journeyings, journeyings; but changes and successions of states.

AC 8398. And all the assemblage of the sons of Israel came into the wilderness of Sin.  That this signifies unto another state of temptation, is evident from the signification of “coming,” as being the abode of the successive that is signified by “journeying” (n. 8397); from the signification of “the assemblage of the sons of Israel,” as being those who are of the spiritual church (n. 7843); from the signification of “the wilderness,” as being a state of undergoing temptations (n. 8098); and from the signification of “Sin,” as being the quality of this state; for names include the whole quality of the state of the thing treated of, as has been abundantly shown above.  From the temptation which is signified by the murmuring on account of the lack of bread and flesh, and from the consolation afterward which is signified by the manna and the quail, it is evident what “Sin” signifies, namely, the good which is from truth. Consequently “Sin,” which was a city of Egypt, and from which the wilderness of Sin took its name, in the opposite sense signifies the evil which is from falsity, in Ezekiel:--

I will pour out My wrath upon Sin, the strength of Egypt; and I will cut off the multitude of No; and I will set a fire in Egypt, grieving Sin shall grieve, and No shall be for a breaking through, and Noph for the enemies daily; the young men of Aven and of Pi-beseth shall fall by the sword, and these shall go into captivity; and in Tehaphnehes the day shall be darkened, when I shall break there the yokes of Egypt (Ezek. 30:15-18);

[2] here are treated of those who are in memory-knowledges, and hatch therefrom falsities from which are evils; “Egypt” here denotes memory-knowledge; “Sin,” the evil which is from falsity; and “No,” the falsity from which is evil.  That a deeper sense lies concealed here than that which stands forth in the letter, can be seen by everyone from this consideration alone--that the Word is Divine, and that, unless a deeper sense were in it, there would be scarcely any sense that can be apprehended, still less a sense containing what is holy.  Hence it is very manifest that the names in the Word denote things, and that from them there results a general sense that is worthy of the Word which is from Jehovah.  He who acknowledges the Word to be Divine cannot possibly deny this, provided he is willing to think from reason, or to form conclusions from an understanding that is for a while enlightened.

AC 8399. Which is between Elim and Sinai.  That this signifies what is continuous and its quality, is evident from the signification of “Elim,” and from the signification of “Sinai,” from which it is clear what that which is “between” signifies.  For “Elim,” from the fountains and palm-trees which were there, signifies the truth and good that belong to consolation after temptation (Exod. 15:27); and “Sinai,” from the law which was there promulgated, signifies good and the derivative truth; consequently what is continuous and the quality that is signified by “Sin,” are the good that is from truth.  The good that is from truth is the good that is in the spiritual man before regeneration, for he then does good from truth, that is, because it has been so commanded, consequently from obedience; whereas the good from which is truth is the good which is in the spiritual man after regeneration, for he then does good from affection.  The former good is signified by “Sin,” the latter by “Sinai.”

AC 8400. In the fifteenth day of the second month.  That this signifies the state relatively, is evident from the signification of the number “fifteen,” from the signification of “day,” and from the signification of “month.” By “month” is signified the end of a former state and the beginning of the following state, thus a new state (n. 3814); by “day” is signified state in general (n. 23, 487, 488, 493, 893, 2788, 3462, 3785, 4850, 7680); and by “fifteenth” is signified what is new, for by “fourteen days,” or “two weeks,” is signified an entire period, or a state from its beginning to its end (n. 728, 2044, 3845); consequently by “fifteen” is signified what is new, here what is new in life, which is signified by the manna that they received from heaven; for “manna” denotes the good of truth, which is the life of the spiritual man.  For the like is signified by “fifteen” as by “eight,” because the eighth day is the first day of the following “week. ”Eighth“ denotes any beginning, thus what is new as distinguished from what was before, (n. 2044, 2866); and all numbers in the Word signify things, (n. 482, 487, 575, 647, 648, 755, 813, 1963, 1988, 2075, 2252, 3252, 4264, 4495, 4670, 5265, 6175).

AC 8401. Of their going out of the land of Egypt.  That this signifies to their state when they were first liberated from infestations, is evident from the signification of ”going out“ and ”being brought out,“ as being to be liberated; and from the signification of ”the land of Egypt,“ as being infestations on the part of those who are in evil and the derivative falsities (n. 7278).

AC 8402. Verses 2, 3.  And all the assemblage of the sons of Israel murmured against Moses and against Aaron in the wilderness.  And the sons of Israel said unto them, Oh that we had died by the hand of Jehovah in the land of Egypt, when we sat by the flesh-pot, when we did eat bread to satiety! for ye have brought us forth unto this wilderness, to kill this whole congregation with hunger.  ”And all the assemblage of the sons of Israel murmured,“ signifies the suffering and the consequent complaint on account of the grievousness of the temptation; ”against Moses and against Aaron,“ signifies against truth Divine; ”in the wilderness,“ signifies a state of temptation; ”and the sons of Israel said unto them,“ signifies thought from anxiety; ”Oh that we had died by the hand of Jehovah in the land of Egypt,“ signifies that it would have been better for them to have been left by the Lord when they were in a state of infestations; ”when we sat by the flesh-pot,“ signifies a life according to what they like, and as they had desired; ”when we did eat bread to satiety,“ signifies that thus they had enjoyed the good of pleasures as much as they wished; ”for ye have brought us out,“ signifies after they were liberated; ”unto this wilderness,“ signifies a state of temptations; ”to kill this whole congregation with hunger,“ signifies that they were expiring from a lack of delight and of good.

AC 8403. And all the assemblage of the sons of Israel murmured. That this signifies the suffering and the consequent complaint on account of the grievousness of the temptation, is evident from the signification of ”to murmur,“ as being the suffering from the bitterness of the temptation, and the complaint (n. 8351); ”the assemblage of the sons of Israel“ denotes those who are of the spiritual church (n. 8398). Here a third temptation is treated of, which is on account of the lack of delight and of good. This temptation follows, in a series, the former one, which was on account of the lack of truth.

[2] They who have not been instructed about man‘s regeneration suppose that a man can be regenerated without temptation; and some that he has been regenerated when he has undergone one temptation. But be it known that without temptation no one is regenerated, and that many temptations follow on, one after another. The reason is that regeneration takes place to the end that the life of the old man may die, and the new heavenly life be insinuated, which shows that there must needs be a fight, for the life of the old man resists, and is not willing to be extinguished, and the life of the new man cannot enter except where the life of the old man has been extinguished. Hence it is evident that there is a fight on both sides, and this fight is a fiery one, because it is for life.

[3] He who thinks from enlightened reason can see and perceive from this that no man can be regenerated without a fight, that is, without spiritual temptation; and also that he is not regenerated by one temptation, but by many.  For very many kinds of evil have made the delight of his former life, that is, have made his old life; and it is impossible for all these evils to be suddenly and simultaneously mastered, because they cling to the man very firmly, having been rooted in parents from time immemorial, and consequently are innate in him, besides having been confirmed in him from his infancy through his own actual evils. All these evils are diametrically opposite to the heavenly good that is to be insinuated, and that is to make the new life.

AC 8404. Against Moses and against Aaron.  That this signifies against truth Divine, is evident from the representation of Moses, as being truth Divine proceeding immediately from the Lord, thus internal truth; and from the representation of Aaron, as being truth proceeding mediately from the Lord, thus external truth (n. 7009, 7089, 7382).

AC 8405. In the wilderness.  That this signifies a state of temptation, is evident from the signification of ”wilderness,“ as being a state of undergoing temptations (n. 6828, 8098).

AC 8406. And the sons of Israel said unto them.  That this signifies thought from anxiety, is evident from the signification of ”saying,“ when it relates to such things as affect the mind, as being thought (n. 3395, 7097, 7244, 7937). That it is from anxiety is evident, because this is said in temptation.

AC 8407. Oh that we had died by the hand of Jehovah in the land of Egypt.  That this signifies that it would have been better for them to have been left by the Lord when they were in a state of infestations, is evident from the signification of ”oh that,“ as being that it would have been better, or would have been preferable; from the signification of ”to have died by the hand of Jehovah,“ as being for them to have been left by the Lord. In the spiritual sense ”to have died“ signifies to be in evils and the derivative falsities, consequently to be in damnation, (n. 5407, 6119, 7494), and when it is said ”to have died by the hand of Jehovah,“ it denotes to be left by the Lord, for they who are left by Him, that is, who leave Him, rush into evils and the derivative falsities, and thus into damnation. ”Jehovah“ in the Word denotes the Lord, and the signification of ”the land of Egypt,“ is a state of infestations (n. 8401). Those who were of the spiritual church, who are represented by the sons of Israel, before they were liberated by the Lord, were infested by those who were in falsities from evil, who are represented by Pharaoh and the Egyptians, see (n. 6854, 6914, 7474, 7828, 7932, 8018, 8099, 8159, 8321).

AC 8408. When we sat by the flesh-pot.  That this signifies a life according to what they like, and as they had desired, is evident from the signification of a ”pot,“ as being a containant of good, and in the opposite sense a containant of evil; and from the signification of ”flesh,“ as being the heavenly own, thus good, and in the opposite sense man’s own, thus evil; and as by ”flesh“ is signified one‘s own, so by ”sitting by the flesh-pot“ is signified a life according to what they like, and as they desire, for this life is the life of one’s own.  A ”pot“ denotes a containant of good, and in the opposite sense a containant of evil, for the reason that by the flesh which is boiled in it is signified good, and in the opposite sense evil.  As a ”pot“ has this signification, therefore by it is also signified the corporeal or natural of man, because these are the containants of good or of evil.  Therefore in the universal sense by a ”pot“ is signified a man, and in a still more universal sense a people or a city, and then ”flesh“ signifies the good or the evil therein; as in Ezekiel:

The men that devise iniquity, and that give wicked counsel in this city, saying, It is not near, itself is the pot, We are the flesh; therefore thus said the Lord Jehovah, Your slain whom ye have put in the midst of it, these are the flesh, but itself is the pot (Ezek. 40:2, 3, 7);

here ”the pot“ denotes the city, or the people there; and ”the flesh“ denotes evil; for ”the slain,“ who are called ”the flesh,“ denote those with whom good and truth have been extinguished (n. 4503).

[2] Again:--

Utter a parable against the house of rebellion, and say unto them, Thus said the Lord Jehovah, Set on the pot, set it on, and also pour the pieces into it, every good piece, the thigh, and the shoulder; fill it with the choice of the bones; said the Lord Jehovih, Woe to the city of bloods, to the pot whose scum is therein, and whose scum is not gone out of it (Ezek. 24:3, 4, 6);

here ”the pot‘ denotes a city, or the people there, in whom is the evil of the profanation of good; the good which is “the flesh” there, is “the thigh and the shoulder,” the evil is “the scum” therefrom; the profanation of good is the remaining “scum;” therefore also it is called “the city of bloods.”

[3] In Jeremiah:--

Jehovah said unto Jeremiah, What seest thou? I said, I see a pot that is boiling, whose face is toward the north; then Jehovah said, From the north evil shall be opened upon all the inhabitants of the land (Jer. 1:12-14);

here a “boiling pot” denotes a people whom falsities have taken possession of; “the north” denotes the sensuous and corporeal of man from which evil springs.  The end of the church is here treated of, when the external, consequently the sensuous and corporeal, and with these falsity and evil, rule; for the Lord’s church goes successively from internal to external, and then expires.

[4] In Zechariah:--

In that day shall there be upon the bells of the horses, Holiness to Jehovah; and the pots in the house of Jehovah shall be like the bowls before the altar; and every pot in Jerusalem and in Judah shall be holiness to Jehovah Zebaoth, and all they that sacrifice shall come and take of them and shall boil in them (Zech. 14:20, 21);

the salvation of the faithful is here treated of; the faithful are “the pots,” so called from the reception of good from the Lord, and from this the pot is called “Holiness to Jehovah;” “the bells of the horses upon which is Holiness” denote truths corresponding to good. As “pots” denote recipients and containants of good, therefore also these together with the rest of the vessels of the altar were made of brass (Exod. 38:3); for “brass” signifies the good of the natural (n. 425, 1551).

[5] Moreover by “a pot” is signified doctrine. because of its containing the good and truth of the church. Doctrine is signified by “the pot” in which by command of Elisha pottage was boiled for the sons of the prophets of which we read in the second book of Kings:--

Elisha returned to Gilgal when there was a famine in the land, when the sons of the prophets were sitting before him: he said to his lad, Set on the great pot, and boil pottage for the sons of the prophets: one went out into the field to gather vegetables, and found a vine of the field, and gathered from it wild gourds of the field, and shred them into the pot of pottage: while they were eating of the pottage they cried, death in the pot, O man of God! but he said that they should take meal, which he threw into the pot; and he said, Pour out for the people, and let them eat; then there was no evil thing in the pot (2 Kings 4:38-41);

be it known that all Divine miracles involve such things as are of the Lord‘s kingdom and church (n. 7337, 8364), and that Elisha represents the Word of the Lord (n. 2762), and the prophets the doctrines therefrom (n. 2534, 7269); whence it is evident what of the church was represented by this miracle, namely, that the good of the church which has been falsified becomes good by means of truth from the Word; “famine” denotes a lack of the knowledges of truth and of good; “the pot,” doctrine; “pottage,” the good of the external rituals of the Jewish church; “wild gourds from the vine of the field,” falsification; “meal,” truth from the Word (n. 2177), whereby that which has been falsified, and which is “death in the pot,” becomes good. That “pots” signify containants of good, is because they were among the useful vessels in which food was prepared, and by food and all kinds of it are signified such things as nourish the soul, thus affections of good and of truth (n. 681, 1480, 3114, 4792, 5147, 5293, 5340, 5342, 5576, 5915).

AC 8409. As “flesh” signifies ones own in both senses, in the supreme sense the Lords Divine own, which is His Divine Human, thus the good of His love toward the universal human race; therefore “flesh” in the sense which has reference to man denotes one’s own made alive by the Lord‘s own, that is, it denotes the Lord’s own with man, thus the good of love to Him.  On the signification of “flesh” in this sense, (n. 3813, 7850). But in the opposite sense, “flesh” denotes man‘s own, thus the evil of the love of self, and from this the cupidities or concupiscences of this love (n. 999, 3813).  That man’s own is nothing but evil, (n. 210, 215, 694, 874-876, 987, 1023, 1044, 1047, 3812, 5660, 5786). That “flesh” denotes man‘s own, thus evil of every kind, is further evident from the following passages in Isaiah:--

I will feed thine oppressors with their flesh, and they shall be drunken with their blood, as with new wine (Isa. 49:26);

“to feed with flesh” denotes to be gorged with their own evil.

[2] In Jeremiah:--

Cursed is the man that trusteth in man, and maketh flesh his arm, but his heart departeth from Jehovah (Jer. 17:5);

“to make flesh his arm” denotes to trust in his own power; and therefore in (Isaiah 9:20) “to eat the flesh of his arm” denotes to trust in himself.  Again in Isaiah:--

Egypt is a man, and not God; and his horses flesh, and not spirit (Isa. 31:3);

“the horses of Egypt” denote memory-knowledges from a perverted understanding (n. 6125); “flesh” denotes what is dead’ “spirit,” what is alive; therefore the sons of Egypt are said to be “great in flesh” (Ezek. 16:26). What is “dead” is so called from evil, for spiritual death is from evil; and what is alive is so called from good, for spiritual life is from good.

[3] Hence it is that “flesh” and “spirit” in the Word are opposed to each other, as in the following passages:--

That which is born from the flesh is flesh, and that which is born of the spirit is spirit (John 3:6).

It is the spirit that maketh alive, the flesh profiteth nothing; the words that I speak to you are spirit, and are life (John 6:63).

Jehovah said, My Spirit shall not reprove man forever, for that he is flesh (Gen. 6:3);

here “flesh” denotes man‘s own.  In like manner in the following:--

Jesus said, Blessed art thou, Simon son of Jonah, for flesh and blood hath not revealed it, but My Father who is in the heavens (Matt. 16:17).

As many as received, to them gave He power to be son’s of God, to them that believe on His name; who were born, not of bloods, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God (John 1:12, 13);

“the will of the flesh” denotes one‘s own of the will; “the will of man,” one’s own of the understanding; “sons of God” denote the regenerate, and they who are being regenerated are all made alive from the Lord‘s own, which is “the flesh and body of the Lord,” and is the Divine good itself.

[4] As “flesh” in the opposite sense denotes man’s own, thus evil, it also denotes concupiscence, for the life of the flesh, which is the body‘s own life, is nothing but the pleasure of the senses, the delight of the appetites, and concupiscence.  That “flesh” denotes concupiscence, is evident from these words in Moses:--

The rabble that was in the midst of the people lusted a lust, whence the sons of Israel wept again, and said, Who shall feed us with flesh our soul is now dry, our eyes have nothing to turn to but the manna: and Jehovah said unto Moses, Say thou unto the people, Sanctify yourselves for the morrow, that ye may eat flesh, for ye have wept in the ears of Jehovah, saying, who shall feed us with flesh? for it was better with us in Egypt; Jehovah will give you flesh to eat, for a month of days, even until it come out from your nose, and it shall be a loathing to you. The flesh was yet between their teeth, before it was swallowed, when the anger of Jehovah was kindled against the people, and Jehovah smote the people with a very great plague, whence he called the name of that place “the graves of lust,” because there they buried the people that lusted (Num. 11:4, 6, 16, 18, 20, 33, 34).

From all this it is now evident what is signified by “sitting by the flesh-pot in the land of Egypt,” namely, a life according to what they like and as they had desired, thus a life of their own.

AC 8410. When we did eat bread to satiety.  That this signifies that thus they had enjoyed the good of pleasures as much as they wished, is evident from the signification of “eating,” as being appropriation (n. 3168, 3513, 3596, 4745), and also enjoyment (n. 7849); and from the signification of “bread,” as being the good of heavenly life, and in the opposite sense the good of natural life separate from heavenly life, thus the good of pleasures.  For by “bread” in the spiritual sense is meant the primary thing that nourishes the soul and preserves its spiritual life.  That this is the good of love, is evident from the life of heaven, which consists solely of this good.  But in the opposite sense by “bread” is meant the primary thing that nourishes those who are in hell, and sustains their life.  That this is the evil of the love of self and of the world, is evident from the life of hell, which consists solely in this.  Evil is to them good, for nothing is more delightful and sweet to them. This is here meant by “the good of pleasures.” And from the signification of “to satiety,” as being as much as they wished (or willed), for with the good it is the will that is sated with good, and With the evil it is the will that is sated with evil.

AC 8411. For ye have brought us forth.  That this signifies after they were liberated, is evident from the signification of “ bringing forth,” in this case from the land of Egypt, as being to liberate, namely, from a state of infestations.

AC 8412. Unto this wilderness.  That this signifies a state of temptations, is evident from the signification of a “wilderness,” as being a state of undergoing temptations (n. 8098).

AC 8413. To kill this whole congregation with hunger.  That this signifies that they were expiring from a lack of delight and of good, is evident from the signification of “killing,” as being to deprive of life, here, of that which is from delight and good, for in these the life of man consists (n. 3607, 6767); from the signification of “the congregation,” as being those who are of the spiritual church (n. 7843); and from the signification of “hunger,” as being a lack of good (n. 5893), here of the good of pleasures, which is signified by “bread” (n. 8410); for when that which nourishes the spiritual life, or the life of the spirit, is taken away, hunger results.  How the case herein is shall be briefly told.

[2] When the good of charity, which makes the spiritual life, is to be insinuated, the delight of the pleasures which had made the natural life is removed.  When this delight is removed, the man comes into temptation, for he believes that if he is deprived of the delight of pleasures, he is deprived of all life, because his natural life consists in this delight, or good, as he calls it.  But he does not know that when this delight of life is removed, spiritual delight, or good, is insinuated by the Lord in its place.  It is this good that is signified by the “manna;” the former good or delight being meant by the “flesh and bread in the land of Egypt,” and the privation of this being meant by “hunger.”

[3] But it is to be carefully observed that the man who is being regenerated is not deprived of the delight of the pleasures of the body and lower mind, for he fully enjoys this delight after regeneration, and more fully than before, but in inverse ratio.  Before regeneration, the delight of pleasures was everything of his life; but after regeneration, the good of charity becomes everything of his life; and then the delight of pleasures serves as a means, and as an ultimate plane, in which spiritual good with its happiness and blessedness terminates.  When therefore the order is to be inverted, the former delight of pleasures expires and becomes no delight, and a new delight from a spiritual origin is insinuated in its place.

AC 8414. Verses 4, 5.  And Jehovah said unto Moses, Behold, I am making it rain bread for you from heaven, and the people shall go out, and they shall gather the word of a day in its day, in order that I may try them, whether they walk in My law, or not.  And it shall be in the sixth day, that they shall prepare that which they have brought, and there shall be double over what they shall gather day by day.  “And Jehovah said unto Moses,” signifies consolation from the Lord; “Behold, I am making it rain bread for you from heaven,” signifies that heavenly good shall flow in; “and the people shall go out,” signifies life therefrom; “and they shall gather the word of a day in its day,” signifies continually according to need; “in order that I may try them,” signifies that thereby they will be examined; “whether they will walk in My law, or not,” signifies whether they can live a life of truth and good; “and it shall be in the sixth day,” signifies in the end of every state; “that they shall prepare that which they have brought,” signifies the disposal of the appropriated goods; “and there shall be double over what they gather day by day,” signifies that the goods are to be conjoined.

AC 8415. And Jehovah said unto Moses.  That this signifies consolation from the Lord, is evident from what follows, for the things which Jehovah said belong to consolation after temptation.  After temptations there is consolation, (n. 8367, 8370).

AC 8416. Behold, I am making it rain bread for you from heaven. That this signifies that heavenly good shall flow in, is evident from the signification of “raining,” as being a blessing (n. 2445), that “to rain” denotes a blessing is because rain comes down from heaven and causes the fertility of the earth, just as Divine good and truth descend from heaven into man and cause a blessing, whence it can be seen that in the proximate sense “to rain” signifies to flow in, for all good from the Divine flows in; and from the signification of “bread,” as being heavenly good.

AC 8417. And the people shall go out.  That this signifies life therefrom, is evident from the signification of “going,” as being life (n. 1293, 3335, 4882, 5493, 5605), in like manner here “going out,” that is, going to gather the manna.  On the signification of “going,” as being life, (n. 8420).

AC 8418. And they shall gather the word of a clay in its day. That this signifies continually according to need, is evident from the signification of “gathering,” as being to receive, for when “raining” signifies the influx of good from the Divine, “gathering” signifies reception, because they correspond to each other; from the signification of “the word.” as being the thing spoken of, here the bread or manna from heaven; and from the signification of “a day in its day,” as being continually according to need.  That it denotes continually is because they received it daily. “Daily” denotes continually, (n. 2838). And it denotes according to need, because they were to gather as much as they needed daily, and no more, namely, for everyone an omer.

AC 8419. In order that I may try them.  That this signifies that thereby they will be examined, is evident from the signification of “trying,” as here being to examine, for it follows, “whether they will walk in My law, or not.”

AC 8420. Whether they will walk in My law, or not.  That this signifies whether they can live a life of truth and good, is evident from the signification of “walking,” as being to live (n. 519, 1794); and from the signification of the “law,” as being the Word (n. 2606, 3382, 6752); and because it denotes the Word, it denotes Divine truth (n. 7463), thus also the doctrine of good and of truth.  Therefore “to walk in the law of Jehovah” denotes to live a life of truth and good according to doctrine.  That “to walk in the law” denotes to live according to the law, is known to everyone, because the phrase is used in common speech.  From this it is evident that “to walk” denotes to live, and also that in the very word “walk,” there is the signification of the spiritual sense; in like manner as in very many other expressions.  This comes from no other source than the influx of the spiritual world into the ideas of thought, and thus into words; for without this influx who would ever say “walking” to express living? as “walking in the law,” “in the statutes,” “in the commandments,” “in the fear of God.” The case is very similar with “going,” as denoting to live (n. 8417), and also with “journeying,” “advancing,” “sojourning.” That these expressions denote living, is because in the spiritual world there are no spaces, but instead thereof states of life (n. 2625, 2684, 2837, 3356, 3387, 4321, 4882, 5605, 7381).

AC 8421. And it shall be in the sixth day.  That this signifies in the end of every state, is evident from the signification of “day,” as being state (n. 23, 487, 488, 493, 2788, 3462, 3785, 4850, 7680); and from the signification of “the sixth,” as being the end of a state.  The reason why “the sixth day” denotes the end of a state is that “seven days” or “a week” signify an entire period, or a full state (n. 2044, 3845, 6508); whence the day preceding the seventh, that is, the sixth day, signifies the end of this state; and the day following, or the eighth day, signifies the beginning of the same state (n. 2044, 8400).

AC 8422. That they shall prepare that which they have brought. That this signifies the disposal of the appropriated goods, is evident from the signification of “preparing,” when said of goods that have been appropriated, as being disposal; and from the signification of “that which they have brought,” when the manna is meant by which good is signified, as being the goods which have been appropriated.  The gathering of the manna every day signifies the reception of good, and the eating of it signifies appropriation, consequently “to prepare that which they have brought” signifies the disposal of the goods which have been appropriated.  This disposal is effected by the Lord at the end of every state, which is signified by “the sixth day.”  Conjunction follows this disposal, and this conjunction is signified by “the seventh day.”

AC 8423. And there shall be double over what they gather day by day.  That this signifies that the goods are to be conjoined, is evident from the signification of “there being double,” as being to be conjoined. To be conjoined is signified by “double,” because “two” denotes conjunction, (n. 1686, 3519, 5194); from the signification of “gathering,” as being to receive (n. 8418); and from the signification of “day by day,” that is, on each day, as being continually (n. 8418).  That “two” denotes conjunction, is because there are two things to which all things in the universe bear relation, namely, good and truth, or what is the same, love and faith; for good is of love, and truth is of faith. Hence also there are two things with man which make his life, namely the will and understanding.  The will with man has been formed to receive good or love, and the understanding to receive truth or faith.  The conjunction of these two is called a “marriage,” for these two when conjoined are circumstanced in like manner as are a married pair: they love each other; they conceive and bring forth; and the consequent offspring is called “fruit.” From this it is now plain why “two” or “double” signifies conjunction, for without the conjunction of these two nothing is ever born or produced.  It may be added that from all this it can be plainly seen that without love or charity faith can produce no fruit; but that fruit must be from the two conjoined.

AC 8424. Verses 6-8.  And Moses and Aaron said unto all the sons of Israel, In the evening, then ye shall know that Jehovah hath brought you out from the land of Egypt. And in the morning, then ye shall see the glory of Jehovah, in that He heareth your murmurings against Jehovah; and what are we, that ye murmur against us?  And Moses said, In that Jehovah shall give you in the evening flesh to eat, and in the morning bread to satiety; in that Jehovah heareth your murmurings with which ye murmur against Him: what are we? your murmurings are not against us, but against Jehovah.  “And Moses and Aaron said unto all the sons of Israel,” signifies information from truth Divine; “In the evening, then ye shall know that Jehovah hath brought you out from the land of Eat,” signifies that in the end of the former state there shall be a revelation that they are liberated; “and in the morning, then ye shall see the glory of Jehovah,” signifies that in the beginning of a new state there will be the advent of the Lord; “in that He heareth your murmurings,” signifies that complaints will cease; “against Jehovah, and what are we, that ye murmur against us?” signifies that the complaints were against the Divine, and not against those who represented it; “and Moses said,” signifies information; “In that Jehovah shall give you in the evening flesh to eat,” signifies that in the end of the state good will be appropriated by means of delight; “and in the morning bread to satiety,” signifies that in the beginning of a new state they shall have as much good as they can receive; in that Jehovah heareth your murmurings,“ signifies that thus complaints will cease; ”with which ye murmur against Him,“ signifies that these were against the Divine; ”what are we?  your murmurings are not against us,“ signifies that they were not against those who represented the Divine; but against Jehovah,” signifies that hereafter they must beware.

AC 8425. And Moses and Aaron said unto all the sons of Israel. That this signifies information from truth Divine, is evident from the signification of “saying,” when concerning those things which were commanded by Jehovah to those who were of the spiritual church, as being information (n. 7769, 7793, 7825, 8041); from the representation of Moses and Aaron, as being truth Divine, Moses what is internal and Aaron what is external (n. 7009, 7089, 7382); and from the representation of the sons of Israel, as being those who are of the spiritual church (n. 6426, 6637, 6862, 6868, 7035, 7062, 7198, 7201, 7215, 7223).

AC 8426. In the evening, then ye shall know that Jehovah hath brought you out from the land of Egypt.  That this signifies that in the end of the former state there shall be a revelation that they are liberated, is evident from the signification of “evening,” as being the end of the former state; from the signification of “knowing,” as being to be revealed, for that which Jehovah gives to know is called “revelation;” and from the signification of “bringing out,” as being to liberate, here from the infestations which are signified by “the land of Egypt” (n. 7278).

[2] That “in the evening” denotes the end of a former state, is because the changes of state in the other life are circumstanced as are the times of day in the world, namely, morning, noon, evening, and night, or twilight, and again morning.  Be it known that in the spiritual world there are perpetual changes of state, and that all who are there pass through them.  The reason is that they may be continually perfected, for without changes of states or without variations continually succeeding one another in order, they who are in the spiritual world are not perfected. The changes of states which succeed each other in order like the times of the day and the times of the year, never return quite the same, but are varied.  The beginning of every state corresponds to morning on the earth, and also in the Word is sometimes meant by “morning;” but the end of every state corresponds to evening, and is likewise sometimes called “evening” in the Word. When it is morning they are in love; when it is noon, they are in light or in truth; but when it is evening they are in obscurity as to truths, and are in the delight of natural love.  This delight is what is signified by the quail which they received in the evening, and the good is what is signified by the manna which they received every morning.

[3] From all this it is evident what “the evening” signifies, namely, the end of the state of the thing treated of, consequently also the end of the state of the church.  But see what has previously been shown about the signification of “evening:” That in the other life there are alternations of states, as in the world there are alternations of times (n. 5672, 5962, 6110): That “evening” denotes the end of a former church, and “morning” the beginning of a new church (n. 2323, 7844): Consequently that “the evening and the morning” denote the advent of the Lord (n. 7844): That in heaven there are evening and twilight before morning; but not night, which is in hell (n. 6110).

AC 8427. And in the morning, then ye shall see the glory of Jehovah.  That this signifies that in the beginning of a new state there will be the advent of the Lord, is evident from the signification of “morning,” as being the beginning of a new state (n. 8426); and from the signification of “the glory of Jehovah,” as being His presence and advent. That “glory” denotes the presence and the advent of the Lord, is because in the supreme sense “glory” denotes the Divine truth which proceeds from the Lord, and the Divine truth appears before the eyes of the angels as light and brightness from the Sun which is the Lord. “Glory” denotes the Divine truth proceeding from the Lord, (n. 5922, 8267); and it denotes the intelligence and wisdom which are from Divine truth, (n. 4809); and from this it denotes the internal sense of the Word, because this sense is Divine truth in glory, (n. 5922).

[2] It is said that “in the morning they should see the glory of Jehovah,” because the rising of the sun and the light from it (which light in heaven enlightens the angelic sight both external and internal), and consequently the presence and the advent of the Lord, who is the Sun in heaven, corresponds to the time of morning on the earth, and is here signified by “morning.”  Therefore that light from the Sun, which light is the Divine truth proceeding from the Lord, thus is the Lord, is “glory.”  From all this it is evident that by “glory” is signified the presence and the advent of the Lord. That these are “glory,” is also evident from many passages in the Word; as in Moses:--

The cloud covered the mount, and the glory of Jehovah abode upon Mount Sinai, and the cloud covered it six days: the appearance of the glory of Jehovah was like devouring fire on the top of the mount before the eyes of the sons of Israel (Exod. 24:15-17);

it is evident that the presence of Jehovah, that is, of the Lord, appearing like a cloud and like fire upon the mount, is here called “the glory of Jehovah.” Again:--

The cloud covered the tent of meeting, and the glory of Jehovah filled the tabernacle. And Moses could not enter into the tent of meeting, because the cloud abode thereon, and the glory of Jehovah filled the tabernacle (Exod. 40:34, 36);

here also the presence of the Lord appearing as a cloud is called “glory.”

[3] And in the following:--

Moses and Aaron entered into the tent of meeting, and came out, and blessed the people; then appeared the glory of Jehovah toward the whole people (Lev. 9:23).

The glory of Jehovah appeared in the tent of meeting before all the sons of Israel (Num. 14:10; 16:19, 42).

The cloud filled the house of Jehovah, so that the priests could not stand to minister by reason of the cloud; because the glory of Jehovah filled the house of Jehovah (1 Kings 8:10, 11).

The temple was filled with smoke from the glory of God, and from His power; so that no one could enter into the temple (Rev. 15:8).

He showed me the great city, the holy Jerusalem, coming down from heaven from God, having the glory of God: the city hath no need of the sun, neither of the moon, to shine in it; for the glory of God doth lighten it, and the Lamb is the lamp thereof (Rev. 21:10, 11, 23);

here “the glory of God” manifestly denotes light from the Lord, which is the Divine truth proceeding from Him, thus the presence of the Lord, for the Lord is present in the truth which is from Him.

[4] That “the glory of Jehovah” denotes His presence, is further evident in Moses:--

Moses said unto Jehovah, Show me I pray Thy glory; to whom He said, I will make all My good pass before thee; and when My glory shall pass by, it shall be that I will put thee in a cleft of the rock, and will cover thee with My hand until I have passed by; but when I shall take away My hand thou shall see My back parts, and My faces shall not be seen (Exod. 33:18).

Here also “the glory of Jehovah” manifestly denotes His presence.  In Matthew:--

The disciples said unto Jesus, Tell us what shall be the sign of Thy coming? Jesus said, Then shall appear the sign of the Son of man, and they shall see the Son of man coming in the clouds of heaven with power and glory (Matt. 24:3, 30);

the last time of the former church and the first time of the new church is here treated of; “the Son of man” denotes truth Divine proceeding from the Lord; “the clouds of heaven” denote the Word in the sense of the letter; “power and glory” denote the internal sense, thus the Divine truth which shall then appear; “the coming of the Lord” denotes the acknowledgment of truth Divine by those who are of the new church, and the denial of it by those who are of the old church (n. 4060).

[5] That the Lord as to Divine truth is “glory,” is evident in Isaiah:--

The voice of one crying in the wilderness, Prepare ye the way of Jehovah; the glory of Jehovah shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together (Isa. 40:3, 5)

speaking of the Lord, who is “the glory.” In John:--

The Word became flesh, and dwelt in us, and we saw His glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father, full of grace and truth (John 1:14);

These things said Isaiah, when he saw His glory, and spake of Him (John 12:41);

here “glory” denotes the Lord.  In like manner in Moses:--

I am living, and the whole earth shall be filled with the glory of Jehovah (Num. 14:21);

here “the glory of Jehovah” denotes the advent of the Lord, and enlightenment by the Divine truth which is from Him.

[6] “Glory” denotes the Divine of the Lord in these passages:--

I am Jehovah, this is My name, and My glory will I not give to another (Isa. 42:8).

When the Son of man cometh in the glory of His Father with the holy angels (Mark 8:38).

It behooved the Christ to suffer, and to enter into His glory (Luke 24:46).

As by “the glory of Jehovah” is signified the Lord as to Divine truth, so also by “glory” are signified the Divine wisdom and intelligence, which are of the Divine truth from the Lord.  Wisdom and intelligence from the Divine are meant by “glory” in (Ezekiel 1:28; 8:4; 9:3; 10:4, 18, 19; 11:22, 23), which was represented there by a rainbow such as is seen in a cloud.

AC 8428. In that He heareth your murmurings.  That this signifies that complaints will cease, is evident from the signification of “hearing,” when said of Jehovah, as being to be merciful and to bring aid, thus that complaints will cease; and from the signification of “murmurings,” as being sufferings from the bitterness of temptation, and the consequent complaints (n. 8351).

AC 8429. Against Jehovah, and what are we that ye murmur against us?  That this signifies that the complaints were against the Divine, and not against those who represented it, is evident from the fact that “Jehovah” denotes the Divine, here the Divine truth which Moses and Aaron represented; and from the signification of “murmuring,” as being complaint (n. 8428).  And as it is said that “they murmured against Jehovah and not against Moses and Aaron,” Mere is signified that they murmured against Divine truth, which is represented by Moses and Aaron (n. 8425), and not against those who represent it; and therefore it is also said in the following verse, “What are we? your murmurings are not against us;” for the person who represents the Divine is relatively not anything. Moreover they who murmur against the person who represents, when he speaks from the Divine, do not murmur against the person, but against the Divine.

AC 8430. And Moses said, signifies information (n. 8425).

AC 8431. In that Jehovah shall give you in the evening flesh to eat.  That this signifies that in the end of the state good will be appropriated by means of delight, is evident from the signification of “evening,” as being the end of a state (n. 8426); and from the signification of “flesh,” as being one’s own made alive, or one‘s heavenly own which a man has from the Lord, thus the good of love (n. 148, 149, 780, 3813, 7850, 8409); but here the good of faith, because it was the flesh of a bird or flying thing called “quail.” For by a flying thing is signified what is spiritual, or what is of faith; consequently by its “flesh” is signified good of that quality, here the good of the natural man, or delight. Be it known that by “the manna” is signified the good of the internal or spiritual man, but by “the quail” the good of the external or natural man, which is called delight; and that such is their signification is evident from the fact that the manna was given in the morning time, but the quail in the evening time; and by that which is given in the morning time is signified spiritual good, and by that which is given in the evening time is signified natural good or delight. For in the other life the state of morning is when spiritual good, or the good of the internal man, is in clearness; and natural good, or the good of the external man, is in obscurity: but the state of evening is when natural good, or the good of the external man, is in clearness and spiritual good, or the good of the internal man, is in obscurity. These alternations thus succeed each other also to the intent that the man may be perfected, especially that good may be appropriated to him, which in the state of evening is effected by means of delight.

AC 8432. And in the morning bread to satiety.  That this signifies that in the beginning of a new state they shall have as much good as they can receive, is evident from the signification of “bread,” as being the good of love (n. 2165, 2177, 3464, 3478, 3735, 3813, 4211, 4217, 4735, 4976, 5915, 8410), but here the good of truth, which is the good of the spiritual church, because by “bread” is meant the manna; from the signification of “the morning,” as being the beginning of a new state (n. 8427); and from the signification of “to satiety,” which means as much as they desired (n. 8410), here as much as they could receive; for the good which flows in from the Lord is not given as much as men desire, but as much as they can receive; whereas evil is allowed as much as they desire.

AC 8433. In that Jehovah heareth your murmurings.  That this signifies that thus the complaints will cease, is evident from what was said above (n. 8428), where like words occur.

AC 8434. Which ye murmur against Him.  That this signifies that the complaints were against the Divine; and that what are we?  your murmurings are not against us, signifies that they were not against those who represented the Divine, is evident also from what was said above (n. 8429), where like words occur.

AC 8435. But against Jehovah.  That this signifies that hereafter they must beware, is evident from the fact that it is repeated that their murmurings are against Jehovah, that is, against the Divine.  Consequently by these words is now meant that hereafter they must beware of such complaints in temptations.

AC 8436. Verses 9-12.  And Moses said unto Aaron, Say unto all the assemblage of the sons of Israel, Come ye near before Jehovah, for He hath heard your murmurings.  And it was, as Aaron spake unto the whole assemblage of the sons of Israel, that they looked back unto the wilderness, and behold the glory of Jehovah was seen in the clouds.  And Jehovah spake unto Moses, saying, I have heard the murmurings of the sons of Israel; speak unto them, saying, Between the evenings ye shall eat flesh, and in the morning ye shall be sated with bread; and ye shall know that I am Jehovah your God.  “And Moses said unto Aaron,” signifies the influx of truth Divine proceeding immediately from the Lord through the truth Divine which proceeds mediately; “Say unto all the assemblage of the sons of Israel,” signifies instruction; “Come ye near before Jehovah,” signifies a state of reception, and the application thereto; “for He hath heard your murmurings,” signifies that He may bring aid on account of the suffering in the temptation; “and it was, as Aaron spake unto the whole assemblage of the sons of Israel,” signifies instruction from the Divine by means of influx; “that they looked back unto the wilderness,” signifies a recalling to mind of the state of temptation in which they had been; “and behold the glory of Jehovah was seen in the cloud,” signifies the presence of the Lord in truth accommodated to the perception; “and Jehovah spake unto Moses, saying,” signifies the truth which proceeds from the Divine of the Lord, and in which is the Lord’s presence; “I have heard the murmurings of the sons of Israel,” signifies that the complaints arising from the temptation will cease; “speak unto them, saying,” signifies information by means of influx; “Between the evenings ye shall eat flesh,” signifies that in the end of the state good will be appropriated by means of delight; “and in the morning ye shall be sated with bread,” signifies that in the beginning of a new state they shall have as much good as they can receive; “and ye shall know that I am Jehovah your God,” signifies that they may know that the Lord is the only God.

AC 8437. And Moses said unto Aaron.  That this signifies the influx of truth Divine proceeding immediately from the Lord through the truth Divine which proceeds mediately, is evident from the signification of “saying,” when by the truth Divine that proceeds immediately from the Lord, which is represented by Moses, through the truth Divine that proceeds mediately and is represented by Aaron, as being influx. “Saying” also denotes flowing in, (n. 5743, 6152, 6291, 7291, 7381, 8221, 8262); and “Moses” denotes the truth which proceeds immediately from the Lord; and “Aaron” the truth which proceeds mediately, (n. 7009, 7010, 7089, 7382). What is meant by “truth proceeding immediately from the Lord,” and what by “truth proceeding mediately,” see (n. 7055, 7056, 7058).

AC 8438. Say unto all the assemblage of the sons of Israel. That this signifies instruction, is evident from the signification of “saying,” when by truth Divine to those who are of the church, about the things to be done by Divine command, as being instruction (n. 7186, 7267, 7304, 7380, 7517, 8127); and from the signification of “the assemblage of the sons of Israel,” as being those who are of the spiritual church (n. 7843).

AC 8439. Come ye near before Jehovah.  That this signifies a state of reception and the application thereto, is evident from the signification of “coming near before Jehovah,” as being influx (n. 8159), and therefore also reception; for reception is the reciprocal of influx, because they correspond to each other. Ii‘ so far as a man receives the Divine influx, so far he is said to “come near before Him.” In the spiritual sense the coming near before Jehovah is nothing else, for coming near to Him is effected by means of faith and love; and as both faith and love are from Jehovah (that is, from the Lord), “coming near to Him” also denotes the reception of the good and truth that flow in from Him. That it also denotes application, is because reception is not anything unless there is also application, namely, to use. For the influx from the Divine passes first into the perception which is of the understanding with the man, thence it passes into the will, and next into act, that is, into good work, which is use, and there it ceases. When the influx of good and truth from the Lord makes this passage, then the good and truth are appropriated to the man; for then the influx goes down into the ultimate of order, that is, into the ultimate of nature, whither all Divine influx aims to come. The man in whom Divine influx thus advances may be called “a way of heaven.” From all this it can now be seen that by “coming near before Jehovah” is signified a state of reception and the application thereto; here, a state of reception of the good signified by “the manna,” and of the delight signified by “the quail.”

AC 8440. For He hath heard your murmurings.  That this signifies that He may bring aid on account of the suffering in the temptation, is evident from the signification of “hearing,” when said of Jehovah, as being to have compassion, and to bring aid, consequently also to cause to cease (n. 8428); and from the signification of “murmurings,” as being the suffering in temptation and the complaint (n. 8351, 8428, 8433).

AC 8441. And it was, as Aaron spake unto the whole assemblage of the sons of Israel.  That this signifies instruction from the Divine by means of influx, is evident from the signification of “speaking,” when by the Divine through the truth proceeding mediately from the Lord, which is represented by Aaron, as being instruction by means of influx, for the Divine influx with man is into the truth in which he has been instructed. “To speak” denotes influx, (n. 2951, 5481, 5797, 7270, 8128); and that it denotes instruction, (n. 7226, 7241); and from the representation of Aaron, as being the truth that proceeds mediately from the Lord (n. 7009, 7382).

AC 8442. That they looked back unto the wilderness.  That this signifies a recalling to mind of the state of temptation in which they had been, is evident from the signification of “looking back” toward anything, as being thought and reflection (n. 7341), therefore also a recalling to mind, for he who thinks and reflects, recalls to mind; and from the signification of “wilderness,” as being a state of undergoing temptations (n. 6828, 8098).

AC 8443. And behold the glory of Jehovah was seen in the cloud. That this signifies the presence of the Lord in truth accommodated to the perception, is evident from the signification of “the glory of jehovah,” as being the presence and the advent of the Lord (n. 8427); and from the signification of “the cloud,” as being the literal sense of the Word (n. 2135a, 4391, 5922, 6343, 6752, 8106), thus truth accommodated to the perception, for the Word in the letter is such truth.  But “the glory which is in the cloud” denotes Divine truth which is not so accommodated to the perception, because it is above the fallacies and appearances of the senses, thus it also denotes the internal sense of the Word (n. 2135a, 5922, 8427).  That “glory” denotes the internal sense of the Word, is because in this sense the Lord’s church and kingdom are treated of, and in the supreme sense the Lord Himself, in which sense also is the veriest Divine truth.  Truth Divine is not of one degree, but of many.  Truth Divine in the first degree, and also in the second, is that which proceeds immediately from the Lord; this is above the angelic understanding.  But truth Divine in the third degree is such as is in the inmost or third heaven; this is such that it cannot in the least be apprehended by man.  Truth Divine in the fourth degree is such as is in the middle or second heaven; neither is this intelligible to man.  But truth Divine in the fifth degree is such as is in the ultimate or first heaven; this can be perceived in some small measure by man provided he is enlightened; but still it is such that a great part of it cannot be expressed by human words; and when it falls into the ideas, it produces the faculty of perceiving and also of believing that the case is so.  But truth Divine in the sixth degree is such as is with man, accommodated to his perception; thus it is the sense of the letter of the Word.  This sense, or this truth, is represented by the cloud, and the interior truths are represented by the glory in the cloud.  This is the reason why Jehovah (that is, the Lord) so often appeared to Moses and to the sons of Israel in a cloud (Exod. 24:15, 16; 40:34, 35; 1 Kings 8:10, 11; Matt. 24:30).  The appearing of the Lord is by means of Divine truth, and moreover is Divine truth.  That a “cloud” denotes truth accommodated to the perception, is from the representatives in the other life, where angelic speech of the higher heavens appears to those who are beneath as light, and also as the brightness from light; whereas the speech of the angels of a lower heaven appears as a bright cloud, in form various, and in density or rarity according to the quality of the truths. From all this it can be seen that by “the glory of Jehovah seen in the cloud” is signified the presence of the Lord in truth accommodated to the perception.

AC 8444. And Jehovah spoke unto Moses, saying.  That this signifies the truth which proceeds from the Divine of the Lord, and in which is the Lord‘s presence, is evident from the signification of “speaking,” as being influx and instruction (n. 8441); and from the representation of Moses, as being the truth which proceeds from the Divine of the Lord (n. 6752, 6771, 6827, 7010, 7014, 7089, 7382).  The presence of the Lord in truth from the Divine is signified by Jehovah’s speaking with Moses out of the cloud in which the glory of Jehovah was seen; for “the glory of Jehovah” denotes the presence of the Lord in the truth which proceeds from Him (n. 8427).

AC 8445. I have heard the murmurings of the sons of Israel, signifies that the complaints arising from the temptation will cease (n. 8428, 8433), where are like words.

AC 8446. Speak unto them, saying. That this signifies information by means of influx, is evident from the signification of “speaking,” in the historicals of the Word, as being information (n. 8041); and of “saying,” as being influx (n. 6291, 7291, 7381, 8221, 8262).

AC 8447. Between the evenings ye shall eat flesh.  That this signifies that in the end of the state good will be appropriated by means of delight, see (n. 8431), where are like words.

AC 8448. And in the morning ye shall be sated with bread.  That this signifies that in the beginning of a new state they shall have as much good as they can receive, see also above (n. 8432).

AC 8449. And ye shall know that I am Jehovah your God.  That this signifies that they may know that the Lord is the only God, is evident from what was said and shown above (n. 7401, 7444, 7544, 7598, 7636).

AC 8450. Verses 13-15. And it was in the evening that the quail   came up, and covered the camp; and in the morning there was a deposit of dew round about the camp. And the deposit of dew went up, and behold upon the faces of the wilderness a small round thing, small as the hoar frost upon the earth. And the sons of Israel saw, and they said a man to his brother, What is this (Man hoc)? for they knew not what it was. And Moses said unto them, This is the bread which Jehovah hath given you to eat.  “And it was in the evening,” signifies the end of the state; “that the quail came up,” signifies natural delight through which is good; “and covered the camp,” signifies that it filled the natural of the man; “and in the morning,” signifies the beginning of a new state; “there was a deposit of dew round about the camp,” signifies the truth of peace adjoining itself; “and the deposit of dew went up,” signifies the insinuation of truth; “and behold upon the faces of the wilderness,” signifies a new will part; “a small round thing,” signifies the good of truth in the first formation; “small as the hoar frost upon the earth,” signifies truth in the form of good consistent and flowing; “and the sons of Israel saw,” signifies a perception; “and they said a man to his brother,” signifies amazement; “What is this? for they knew not what it was,” signifies at what was not known; “and Moses said unto them,” signifies information through truth from the Divine; “This is the bread which Jehovah hath given you to eat,” signifies that this is the good which must be appropriated and make their life, in the supreme sense that this is the Lord in you.

AC 8451. And it was in the evening.  That this signifies the end of the state, is evident from the signification of “evening,” as being the end of a state (n. 8426).

AC 8452. That the quail came up.  That this signifies natural delight through which is good, is evident from the signification of “quail,” as being natural delight.  That “the quail” denotes natural delight is because it was a bird of the sea, and by a bird of the sea is signified what is natural, and by its flesh, which was longed for, is signified delight (n. 8431). That it also denotes through which is good, is because it was given in the evening.  For when in the other life there is a state which corresponds to evening, then good spirits, and also angels, are remitted into the state of the natural affections in which they had been when in the world, consequently into the delights of their natural man.  The reason is that good may come out of it, that is, that they may thereby be perfected (n. 8426). All are perfected by the implantation of faith and charity in the external or natural man; for unless these are there implanted, good and truth cannot flow in from the internal or spiritual man, that is, from the Lord through this man, because there is no reception; and if there is no reception, the influx is stopped and perishes, nay, the internal man also is closed. From this it is plain that the natural must be brought into a state of accommodation, in order that it may be a receptacle.  This is effected by means of delights; for the goods that belong to the natural man are called delights, because they are felt.

[2] That “the quail” denotes natural delight is because, as before said, it is a bird of the sea; for it is said that it was carried off from the sea:--

A wind went forth from Jehovah, and carried off the quail from the sea, and let it down upon the camp (Num. 11:31);

and by “a bird of the sea” and its “flesh” is signified natural delight, and in the opposite sense the delight of concupiscence. This is signified by “the quail” in the following passage in Moses:--

The rabble that was in the midst of the people lusted a lust, and desired to have flesh; they said, Now is our soul dry, nor have our eyes anything (to look at) except the manna; there went forth a wind from before Jehovah, and carried off the quail from the sea, and let it down upon the camp; the people rose up all that day, and all the night, and all the morrow day, and gathered the quail; those who gathered least gathered ten homers, which they spread out for themselves by spreading out round about the camp; the flesh was yet between their teeth, ere it was swallowed, when the anger of Jehovah was kindled against the people, and Jehovah smote the people with a very great plague; wherefore He called the name of that place the graves of lust, because there they buried the people that lusted (Num. 11:4, 6, 31-34);

here “the quail” denote the delight of concupiscence.  It is called the delight of concupiscence when the delight of any corporeal or worldly love has dominion and takes possession of the whole man, even so as to extinguish the good and truth of faith with him.  This delight is what is described as the cause of their being smitten with a great plague.  But the natural delight which is signified in this chapter by the quail that was given to the people in the evening, is not the delight of concupiscence, but is the delight of the natural or external man corresponding to the good of the spiritual or internal man.  This delight has spiritual good within it, whereas the delight of concupiscence that is treated of in that chapter of Numbers has infernal evil within it.  Each is called delight, and each is also felt as delight, but there is the greatest possible difference between them; for one has heaven in it, and the other has hell; moreover, when the external is put off, the one becomes heaven to the man, and the other becomes hell.

[3] The case herein is like that of two women who in outward form are alike beautiful in face and agreeable in life, but in the inward form are utterly unlike, the one being chaste and sound, the other lewd and rotten; thus one as to her spirit being with the angels, the other as to her spirit being with devils. But what they really are does not appear, except when the external is unrolled, and the internal is revealed.  These things have been said in order that it may be known what the natural delight is in which is good, which is signified by “the quail” in this chapter; and what the natural delight is in which is evil, which is signified by “the quail” in the eleventh chapter of Numbers.

AC 8453. And covered the camp.  That this signifies that it filled the natural of the man, is evident from the signification of “covering,” as being to fill; and from the signification of “the camp,” as being goods and truths (n. 8193, 8196), here the natural of the man, which is the containant; for the natural contains goods and truths, and without these it is not a living natural, nor are the good and truth of the external or natural man anything without the natural.  Hence it is that as “the camp” signifies truths and goods, it also signifies the natural in which these are.

AC 8454. And in the morning.  That this signifies the beginning of a new state, is evident from the signification of “morning,” as being the beginning of a new state (n. 8427).

AC 8455. There was a deposit of dew round about the camp.  That this signifies the truth of peace adjoining itself, is evident from the signification of “dew,” as being the truth of peace (n. 3579).  “Dew” signifies the truth of peace because in the morning it comes down from heaven and appears upon the herbage like fine rain, and has also stored up in it something of sweetness or delight more than rain has, whereby the grass and the crops of the field are gladdened; and “morning” denotes a state of peace (n. 2780).  What peace is see (n. 2780, 3696, 4681, 5662), namely, that it is like dawn on the earth, which gladdens minds with universal delight; and the truth of peace is like the light of the dawn.  This truth, which is called “the truth of peace,” is the very Divine truth in heaven from the Lord, which universally affects all who are there, and makes heaven to be heaven; for peace has in it confidence in the Lord, that He directs all things, and provides all things, and that He leads to a good end.  When a man is in this faith, he is in peace, for he then fears nothing, and no solicitude about things to come disquiets him.  A man comes into this state in proportion as he comes into love to the Lord.

[2] All evil, especially self-confidence, takes away a state of peace. It is believed that an evil person is at peace when he is in gladness and tranquillity because all things succeed with him. But this is not peace; it is the delight and tranquillity of cupidities, which counterfeit a state of peace.  But in the other life this delight, being opposite to the delight of peace, is turned into what is undelightful, for this lies hidden within it.  In the other life the exteriors are successively unfolded even to the inmosts, and peace is the inmost in all delight, even in what is undelightful with the man who is in good. So far therefore as he puts off what is external, so far a state of peace is revealed, and so far he is affected with satisfaction, blessedness, and happiness, the origin of which is from the Lord Himself.

[3] Concerning the state of peace which prevails in heaven it can he said that it is such as cannot be described by any words, neither, so long as he is in the world, can it come into the thought and perception of man, by means of any idea derived from the world.  It is then above all sense.  Tranquillity of mind, content, and gladness from success, are relatively nothing; for these affect only his externals; whereas peace affects the inmost things of all-the first substances, and the beginnings of substances in the man, and therefrom distributes and pours itself forth into the substantiates and derivatives, and affects them with pleasantness; and affects the origins of ideas, consequently the man‘s ends of life, with satisfaction and happiness; and thus makes the mind of the man a heaven.

AC 8456. And the deposit of dew went up.  That this signifies the insinuation of truth, is evident from the signification of “going up,” as here being to be dissipated, and thus not to appear to the sight; and from the signification of “the dew,” as being the truth of peace. The deposit of this upon the manna signifies the insinuation of truth; for the truth of peace is the Divine truth proceeding from the Lord in heaven, which being the inmost insinuates itself into the truth which is beneath, and vivifies it, as the dew is wont to vivify the grass or growing crop upon which it falls in the morning.  When the truth which is beneath has been vivified by it, then the truth of peace goes up, that is, as to appearance ceases, and the truth which had received life from it comes into view. Thus is born the truth of faith.  For no truth of doctrine or of the Word becomes truth with man until it has received life from the Divine, and it receives life through the insinuation of the truth which proceeds from the Lord, which is called “the truth of peace.” This truth is not the truth of faith, but it is the life or soul of the truth of faith, and it disposes into the heavenly form all things which are in the truth that is called “the truth of faith,” and afterward it also disposes the truths themselves one with another. From all this it can be seen how the case is with the insinuation of truth with man by means of the truth of peace.  Be it also known that the lower or exterior things with the man who is being regenerated receive life in succession from the higher or interior things; thus the truth of faith from the truth of peace; and the truth of peace from the Lord Himself.  The insinuation of life from the Lord with those who are being regenerated is effected in successive order by Him, thus through what is inmost, and so through interior things to exterior.  Consequently with the regenerated there is a way opened even from the Lord; but with those who are not regenerated the way is closed.

AC 8457. And behold upon the faces of the wilderness.  That this signifies a new will part, is evident from the signification of “the wilderness,” as here being a new will part through the insinuation of truth.  For with the man of the spiritual church a new will part is formed by good through truth, and it appears with him as conscience.  That this conscience is a conscience of truth, is evident from what has been previously shown concerning the regeneration of the spiritual man. “The wilderness” properly signifies what is uncultivated and uninhabited; in the spiritual sense it signifies where there are no good and truth, thus also where there is no life (n. 1927, 2708, 3900), and therefore when it is said that the dew appeared upon the faces of the wilderness, and beneath the dew the manna, by “the wilderness” is signified a new will part.

AC 8458. A small round thing.  That this signifies the good of truth in its first formation, is evident from the signification of “small,” as being predicated of truth; and from the signification of “round,” as being predicated of good; consequently “a small round thing” is predicated of the good of truth.  The good with the man of the spiritual church is called “the good of truth,” and is truth not only as to origin, but also as to essence.  It is seen as truth, but it is felt as good.  Consequently as truth it forms the intellectual part of the mind, and as good it forms the new will part.  For in man the intellectual part is distinguished from the will part by the fact that the intellectual part presents to itself things in a form, and so that it may see them as in the light, whereas the will part is affected by them so that it simultaneously feels them as delight, thus as good, and this according to the quality of the form.  That “small” is predicated of truth, and “round” of good, has its cause in the manifestations of truth and of good in the other life.  When truths and goods are presented in a visible form, as they are in the other life openly before the eyes of spirits and angels, then truth is presented in a discrete quantity, consequently as much or as little, according to the quality of the truth; truth is also presented as angular in various forms, and it is also presented as white.  But good is there presented in a continuous quantity, thus not as much or as little; good is also presented as round, which is continuous in form; and in color as blue, yellow, and red.  That when good and truth are presented to view they appear in this way, comes from their difference as to quality, which when it becomes visible thus expresses and represents itself in a natural form.  Hence it is that things which in the world approach such forms signify either truths or goods, for there is nothing in the universe that in respect to its quality does not bear relation either to good or to truth.

AC 8459. Small as the hoar frost upon the earth.  That this signifies truth in the form of good, consistent and flowing, is evident from the signification of “small,” which is predicated of truth, and from the signification of “as the hoar frost,” as being to be in the form of good.  The good of truth, which is the good of the man of the spiritual church (n. 8458), is compared to hoar frost from the continuity of this as compared to snow.  Snow, from being small and white, is predicated of truth; but hoar frost, from its continuity, is predicated of truth made good, which is the good of truth.  That “snow” is predicated of truth is plain from the following passages:--

When Jesus was transfigured His vestments became shining, exceeding white as snow (Mark 9:23).

The angels at the sepulchre had an appearance as lightning, and clothing white as snow (Matt. 28:3).

I saw in the midst of the seven lampstands one like unto the Son of man; His head and His hairs were white as white wool, as snow (Rev. 1:13, 14).

Her Nazirites were whiter than snow, they were fairer than milk (Lam. 4:7).

Thou shalt purge me with hyssop, and I shall be clean; Thou shalt wash me, and I shall be made whiter than snow (Ps. 51:7).

I beheld till the thrones were cast forth, and the Ancient of Days did sit; His garment was like white snow, and the hair of His head like clean wool (Dan. 7:9).

In these passages “snow” is predicated of truth from its whiteness, and garments are compared to it, because “garments” in the spiritual sense denote truths (n. 4545, 4763, 5248, 5319, 5954, 6914, 6917, 6918).  From all this it is evident what is meant by “hoar frost,” namely, truth in the form of good. Truth is said to be consistent and flowing in the form of good, because truth is the form of good, and good is the life of this form, and is as it were its soul.

AC 8460. And the sons of Israel saw.  That this signifies a perception, is evident from the signification of “seeing,” as being to understand and perceive (n. 2150, 2325, 2807, 3764, 4403-4421, 4567).

AC 8461. And they said a man to his brother.  That this signifies amazement, is evident from the fact that “saying” involves that which follows, here that they were amazed when they saw the manna, as they said, “What is this (Man hoc)? because they knew not what it was;” and from the signification of “a man to his brother,” as being mutually (n. 4725).

AC 8462. What is this (Man hoc)? because they knew not what it was.  That this signifies amazement at what was not known, is evident from the fact that the word “manna” in its own tongue means What? thus, that which is not known.  That from this the bread that was given to the sons of Israel in the wilderness was called “manna,” is because this bread signifies the good of charity that is begotten through the truth of faith Before regeneration this good is quite unknown to man, and it is not even known that it exists.  For before regeneration a man believes that besides the delights of the love of self and of the world, which he calls good, there cannot be possible any good which is not from this source, or of such a nature.  If anyone should then say that there is an interior good which cannot come to our notice, consequently not to knowledge, so long as the delights of the love of self and of the would have dominion, and that this good is that in which are good spirits and angels, people would be amazed as at something which is quite unknown, and as at something that is not possible; when yet this good immensely transcends the delights of the love of self and of the world. They who are in the loves of self and of the world do not know what charity and faith are, and what it is to do good without recompense, and that this is heaven in man, and that they believe that nothing of joy and life would remain if they were deprived of the delights of these loves, when yet heavenly joy then begins, (n. 8037). From all this it is now evident why the manna was named from “What is this?”

AC 8463. And Moses said unto them.  That this signifies information through truth from the Divine, is evident from the signification of “saying,” as being information (n. 7769, 7793, 7825, 8041); and from the representation of Moses, as being the truth that belongs to the law from the Divine (n. 6771, 6827).

AC 8464. This is the bread which Jehovah hath given you to eat. That this signifies that this is the good which must be appropriated and make their life, in the supreme sense that this is the Lord in you, is evident from the signification of “bread,” as being good celestial and spiritual, and in the supreme sense, as being the Lord (n. 276, 680, 2165, 2177, 3464, 3478, 3735, 3813, 4211, 4217, 4735, 4976, 5915), here spiritual good, that is, the good of the man of the spiritual church, which is the good of truth (n. 8458). As this bread was the manna, it follows that by “the manna” is signified this good; which is also apparent from the description of it in the thirty-first verse:--It was like coriander seed, white; and the taste of it like that of a cake in honey; and likewise from the description of it in Numbers:--

The manna was like coriander seed, and the appearance thereof as the appearance of bdellium; they ground it in mills, or beat it in a mortar, and boiled it in a pot, and made cakes of it: the taste of it was as the taste of fresh oil (Numbers 11:7, 8).

From these particulars it is plain that in the spiritual sense “the manna” denotes the good of truth, that is, the good of the spiritual church.  Hence also it is called “the grain of the heavens,” in David:--

He commanded the skies from above, and opened the doors of the heavens, and made manna to rain down upon them, and gave them the grain of the heavens (Ps. 78:23, 24).

“Grain” denotes the good of truth, (n. 5295, 5410). “Manna” also denotes the good of truth which is given to those who undergo temptations and conquer, in John:--

To him that overcometh I will give to eat of the hidden manna, and I will give him a white stone (Rev. 2:17).

That in the supreme sense “the manna” denotes the Lord in us, is evident from the very words of the Lord in John:--

Your fathers did eat the manna in the wilderness, and are dead: this is the bread which cometh down from heaven, that one may eat thereof and not die: I am the living bread which came down from heaven; if anyone eat of this bread he shall live eternally (John 6:49-51, 58).

From all this it is very plain that by “the manna” in the supreme sense is signified the Lord.  The reason is that “the manna” denotes the good of truth, and all good is from the Lord, and consequently the Lord is in good, and is the good itself.  That this good will be appropriated to them and make their life, is signified by “eating” (n. 3168, 3513, 3596, 4745); for the good which is from the Lord makes the life of heaven with man, and thereafter nourishes and sustains it.

AC 8465. Verses 16-18.  This is the word that Jehovah hath commanded, Gather ye of it everyone according to the mouth of his eating, an omer a head, according to the number of your souls, take ye everyone for him who is in his tent.  And the sons of Israel did so, and they gathered, collecting for the numerous and for the few.  And they measured it with the omer, and it made nothing over for the numerous; and for the few there was no lack; they gathered everyone according to his eating. “This is the word that Jehovah hath commanded,” signifies a mandate about it from the Divine; “Gather ye of it everyone according to the mouth of his eating,” signifies reception and appropriation according to the capacity of each one; “an omer a head,” signifies enough for everyone; “according to the number of your souls,” signifies enough for all in the society; “take ye everyone for him who is in his tent,” signifies communication with them, and from this the general good; “and the sons of Israel did so,” signifies the effect; “and they gathered, collecting for the numerous and for the few,” signifies reception according to the power of each society; “and they measured it with the omer,” signifies the power of the reception of good; “and it made nothing over for the numerous; and for the few there was no lack,” signifies that there was a just proportion for everyone in particular and in general; “they gathered everyone according to his eating,” signifies reception according to the capacity of each one.

AC 8466. This is the word that Jehovah hath commanded.  That this signifies a mandate about it from the Divine, is evident from the signification of “the word,” as being the thing that is treated of; and from the signification of “commanding,” when by Jehovah, as being a mandate.

AC 8467. Gather ye of it every man according to the mouth of his eating.  That this signifies reception and appropriation according to the capacity of each one, is evident from the signification of “gathering,” when said of the good of truth that is signified by “the manna,” as being to receive; and from the signification of “each one according to the mouth of his eating,” as being appropriation according to the capacity of each one. For “according to the mouth of the eating,” when food is treated of, denotes according to the necessity demanded for nourishment; but when said of the good of truth, it denotes according to the capacity of reception and appropriation, because by “eating” in the spiritual sense is signified to be appropriated (n. 3168, 3513, 3596, 4745).

AC 8468. An omer a head.  That this signifies enough for everyone, is evident from the signification of “an omer,” as being sufficient; and from the signification of “for a head,” as being for each one.  That “an omer” denotes sufficient, is because it was the tenth part of an ephah, as is plain from the last verse of this chapter, and “ten’, signifies what is full (n. 3107); consequently ”a tenth part“ signifies what is sufficient, here for each one, that is, for a head. The ”omer“ is mentioned only in this chapter; in other places the ”homer,“ which was a measure containing ten ephahs, and consequently signified what is full; as in Hosea:--

I purchased a woman, an adulteress, for fifteen pieces of silver, and a homer of barley, and a half homer of barley (Hosea 3:1, 2);

where by ”a woman an adulteress“ is meant the house of Israel, in the spiritual sense the church there, the buying of which at a full price is signified by ”fifteen pieces of silver and a homer of barley;“ ”fifteen pieces of silver“ are predicated of truth, and ”a homer of barley,“ of good.

[2] In Ezekiel:--

Ye shall have balances of justice, and an ephah of justice, and a bath of justice: the ephah and the bath shall be of one measure, to lift the tenth of a homer to a bath, and to the tenth of a homer the ephah; according to the homer shall be thy measure: this is the heave-offering that ye shall heave, the sigh of an ephah from a homer of wheat, from a homer of barley: and the set portion of oil, the bath for oil, shall be the tenth of a bath out of the cor, ten baths a homer, for ten baths are a homer (Ezek. 45:10, 11, 13, 14);

the new earth and the new temple are here treated of, by which is signified the Lord‘s spiritual kingdom.  Everyone can see that there will not be a homer there, nor an ephah, nor a bath, nor a cor, neither will there be wheat, barley, or oil. Thus it is evident that by these things are signified such things as are in that kingdom, which plainly are spiritual things, thus things which have relation either to the good of charity or to the truth of faith.  A ”homer“ is predicated of good, because it is the measure of wheat and of barley; in like manner an ”ephah.“ But a ”bath“ is predicated of truth, because it is a measure of wine; and as it is also a measure of oil, by which is signified the good of love, it is said that a bath shall be the same part of a homer as is an ephah, which denotes in the spiritual sense that all things in that kingdom shall have relation to good, and also that the truth there will be good, and that this shall be given in fulness, because by ”a homer“ is signified what is full.

[3] In Isaiah:--

Many houses shall be in devastation, even great and beautiful, that there be no inhabitant, for ten acres of vineyard shall yield one bath, and a homer of seed shall yield an ephah (Isa. 5:9, 10);

here ”ten acres“ denotes what is full, and also much, in like manner ”a homer,“ but ”a bath“ and ”an ephah“ denote few; for when ”ten“ denotes much, ”a tenth part“ denotes a few. In Moses:--

If a man shall sanctify unto Jehovah of the field of his possession, then thy estimation shall be according to his sowing, the sowing of a homer of barley for fifty shekels of silver (Lev. 27:16);

where ”the sowing of a homer,“ and also ”fifty shekels,“ denote fulness of estimation.  As ”a homer“ signifies what is full, ”ten homers“ signify what is too much and superfluous (Num. 11:32).

AC 8469. According to the number of your souls.  That this signifies enough for all in the society, namely, of the good of truth which is signified by ”the manna,“ is evident from the signification of ”according to the number of the souls,“ as being sufficient for all in the society.  For when by ”an omer a head“ is signified enough for everyone, by ”according to the number of the souls“ is signified enough for all in the society. The subject here treated of is the good of those who are of the Lord’s spiritual kingdom, which good is signified by ”the manna,“ and that sufficient of this will be given for everyone and sufficient for the society; for each house of the sons of Israel represented one society in heaven (n. 7836, 7891, 7996, 7997).  As regards the societies in heaven the case is this.  Heaven consists of countless societies, which are distinct one from another.  Each society has a general good distinct from the good of other societies; and also each one in a society has a particular good distinct from the good of all others in the society.  From the distinct goods of those who are in the society, which are thus various, but yet accordant, there is produced a form, which is called ”the heavenly form.“ The universal heaven consists of such forms.  Relatively to goods these conjunctions are called ”forms,“ but relatively to persons they are called ”societies.“ These things were represented by the distinctions of the sons of Israel into tribes, families, and houses.

AC 8470. Take ye everyone for him who is in his tent.  That this signifies communication with them, and from this the general good, is evident from the signification of a ”tent,“ as being a society as to good; ”tent“ here signifies the like as ”house,“ for when they sojourned they were in tents. That every man should take for him who was there, signifies communication with them, thus also from this the general good. As these words involve those things which come forth in the societies in heaven (n. 8469), it shall be told further how the case is with those societies, in order that it may thereby be known what is meant by communication with those in the society, and with the general good arising therefrom, which is signified by ”everyone taking for him who was in his tent.“ Everyone in a society in heaven communicates his good to all who are in the society, and all therein communicate with each one, whence arises the good of all in general, that is, the general good. This good is communicated to the general good of other societies, whence arises a good still more general, and finally one most general.  Such is the communication in heaven, and hence it is that they are a one, just as are the organs, members, and viscera in man, which, although various and dissimilar, nevertheless by such communications form a one. Such a communication of goods is possible only through love, which is spiritual conjunction. The ”universal thing that forms and brings into order all things in general and in particular is the Divine good of Divine love from the Lord.

AC 8471. And the sons of Israel did so.  That this signifies the effect, is evident without explication.

AC 8472. And they gathered, collecting for the numerous and for the few.  That this signifies reception according to the power of each society, is evident from the signification of “gathering,” as being to receive (n. 8467); and from the signification of “collecting for the numerous and for the few,” as being according to the power of each society. How these things are, must be unfolded from those which come forth in the societies in heaven; for “the manna” denotes heavenly food, and heavenly food is good and truth, and good and truth in heaven are the Lord, because from Him. From all this it can be seen that these things which were decreed about the manna, are such as come forth in the said societies.  The case herein is that the Divine good which proceeds from the Lord is communicated to all in heaven universally and individually, but everywhere according to the power of receiving; for there are those who receive little, and there are those who receive much.  They who receive little are in the borders of heaven, but they who receive much are in the interiors Everyone there has a power of receiving according to the nature and amount of good acquired in the world.  The difference in power is what is signified by the terms “numerous” and “few.”

AC 8473. And they measured it with the omer.  That this signifies the power of the reception of good, is evident from the signification of “an omer,” as being what is sufficient (n. 8468), thus also power.

AC 8474. And it made nothing over for the numerous; and for the few there was no lack.  That this signifies that there was a just proportion for everyone in particular and in general, is evident from the signification of “making nothing over,” and also of “having no lack,” as being to employ a just proportion; and from the signification of “numerous” and “few,” as being a difference of power (n. 8472), here according to the power of everyone in particular and in general.

AC 8475. They gathered everyone according to his eating. That this signifies reception according to the capacity of each one, is evident from what was said above (n. 8467), where are the same words.

AC 8476. Verses 19, 20.  And Moses said unto them, Let no one make a residue of it till the morning.  And they heard not unto Moses; and men made a residue of it until morning and if bred worms and stank, and Moses was angry with them.  “And Moses said unto them,” signifies exhortation; “Let no one make a residue of it till the morning,” signifies that they should not be solicitous about acquiring it from themselves; “and they heard not unto Moses,” signifies no faith and thence no obedience; “and men made a residue of it until the morning,” signifies the abuse of good Divine, in that they desired to acquire it from themselves; “and it bred worms,‘ signifies that consequently it became filthy; ”and stank,“ signifies consequently infernal; ”and Moses was angry with them,“ signifies that consequently they turned away truth Divine from themselves.

AC 8477. And Moses said unto them.  That this signifies exhortation, is evident from the signification of ”saying,“ as involving what follows, here exhortation that they should not make a residue of it till the morning. ”Saying“ involves also exhortation, (n. 7090, 8178).

AC 8478. Let no one make a residue of it till the morning. That this signifies that they should not be solicitous about acquiring it from themselves, is evident from the fact that the manna was to be given every morning, and that worms would be bred in that which was left over, by which is signified that the Lord daily provides necessaries, and that therefore they ought not to be solicitous about acquiring them from themselves.  This also is meant by the ”daily bread“ in the Lord’s Prayer, and likewise by the Lord‘s words in Matthew:--

Be not solicitous for your soul, what ye shall eat, or what ye shall drink; nor yet for your body, what ye shall put on; why are ye solicitous about things to put on? consider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they toil not, neither do they spin: therefore be ye not solicitous, saying, What shall we eat? and what shall we drink? or, wherewithal shall we be clothed? for after all these things do the nations seek; doth not your Heavenly Father know that ye have need of all these things? seek ye first the kingdom of the heavens, and His righteousness, then shall all these things be added to you: therefore be ye not solicitous for the morrow, for the morrow will take care of the things of itself (Matt. 6:26, 28, 31-34).

In like manner in (Luke 12:11, 12, 22-31).

[2] As in this and the following verses in the internal sense care for the morrow is treated of, and as this care is not only forbidden, but is also condemned (that it is forbidden is signified by that they were not to make a residue of the manna till the morning, and that it is condemned is signified by that the worm was bred in the residue, and it stank), he who looks at the subject no deeper than from the sense of the letter may believe that all care for the morrow is to be cast aside, and thus that the necessaries of life are to be awaited daily from heaven; but he who looks at the subject deeper than from the letter, as for instance he who looks at it from the internal sense, is able to know what is meant by ”care for the morrow.“ It does not mean the care of procuring for one’s self food and raiment, and even resources for the time to come; for it is not contrary to order for anyone to be provident for himself and his own.  But those have care for the morrow who are not content with their lot; who do not trust in the Divine, but in themselves; and who have regard for only worldly and earthly things, and not for heavenly things.  With such there universally reigns solicitude about things to come, and a desire to possess all things and to dominate over all, which is kindled and grows according to the additions thus made, and finally does so beyond all measure. They grieve if they do not obtain the objects of their desire, and feel anguish at the loss of them; and they have no consolation, because of the anger they feel against the Divine, which they reject together with everything of faith, and curse themselves.  Such are they who have care for the morrow.

[3] Very different is the case with those who trust in the Divine. These, notwithstanding they have care for the morrow, still have it not, because they do not think of the morrow with solicitude, still less with anxiety.  Unruffled is their spirit whether they obtain the objects of their desire, or not; and they do not grieve over the loss of them, being content with their lot. If they become rich, they do not set their hearts on riches; if they are raised to honors, they do not regard themselves as more worthy than others; if they become poor, they are not made sad; if their circumstances are mean, they are not dejected. They know that for those who trust in the Divine all things advance toward a happy state to eternity, and that whatever befalls them in time is still conducive thereto.

[4] Be it known that the Divine Providence is universal, that is, in things the most minute; and that they who are in the stream of Providence are all the time carried along toward everything that is happy, whatever may be the appearance of the means; and that those are in the stream of Providence who put their trust in the Divine and attribute all things to Him; and that those are not in the stream of Providence who trust in themselves alone and attribute all things to themselves, because they are in the opposite, for they take away providence from the Divine, and claim it for themselves.  Be it known also that in so far as anyone is in the stream of Providence, so far he is in a state of peace; also that in so far as anyone is in a state of peace from the good of faith, so far he is in the Divine Providence. These alone know and believe that the Divine Providence of the Lord is in everything both in general and in particular, nay, is in the most minute things of all (n. 1919, 4329, 5122, 5894, 6058, 6481-6486, 6490, 7004, 7007), and that the Divine Providence regards what is eternal (n. 6491).

[5] But they who are in the opposite are scarcely willing to hear Providence mentioned, for they ascribe everything to their own sagacity; and what they do not ascribe to this they ascribe to fortune or chance; some to fate, which they do not educe from the Divine, but from nature.  They call those simple who do not attribute all things to themselves or to nature. From all this again it can be seen what is the quality of those who have care for the morrow, and what the quality of those who have no care for the morrow.

AC 8479. And they heard not unto Moses.  That this signifies no faith and thence no obedience, is evident from the signification of ”to hear,“ as being to perceive, to have faith, and to obey (n. 5017, 7216, 8361).

AC 8480. And men made a residue of it until the morning.  That this signifies the abuse of good Divine, in that they desired to acquire it from themselves, is evident from the signification of ”making a residue of it until the morning,“ as being to be solicitous about the acquisition of good of themselves (n. 8478), and consequently the abuse of good Divine.  It is termed ”abuse,“ when there arises what is alike in ultimates, but from a contrary origin.  Good arises from contrary origin, when it does so from man, and not from the Lord; for the Lord is good itself, consequently He is the source of all good.  The good which is from Him has in it what is Divine; thus it is good from its inmost and first being; whereas the good which is from man is not good, because from himself man is nothing but evil; consequently the good which is from him is in its first essence evil, although in the outward form it may appear like good.  The case herein is like that of flowers painted upon a tablet, as compared with the flowers that grow in a garden.  These flowers are beautiful from their inmosts; for the more interiorly they are opened, the more beautiful they are; whereas the flowers painted on a tablet are beautiful only in the outward form, and as to the inward one are nothing but mud and a mixture of earthy particles lying in confusion, as the Lord also teaches when He says of the lilies of the field that ”Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these“ (Matt. 6:29).

[2] Such is the case with the good that is from man in comparison with the good that is from the Lord.  A man cannot know that these goods are so different from each other, because he judges from outward things; but the angels well perceive whence comes the good with a man, and consequently what is the nature of it.  The angels who are with a man are in good from the Lord, and as it were dwell therein; but they cannot be in the good that is from a man; they remove themselves from it as far as they can, because inmostly it is evil. Good from the Lord has heaven in it, for this good is the form of heaven in an image, and in its inmost it stores up the Lord Himself, because in all the good that proceeds from the Lord there is a semblance of Himself, and consequently a semblance of heaven; whereas in the good that is from a man there is a semblance of the man, and as from himself a man is nothing but evil, there is a semblance of hell in it.  So great is the difference between good from the Lord, and good from man.

[3] Good from the Lord is with those who love the Lord above all things and the neighbor as themselves; but good from man is With those who love themselves above all things and despise the neighbor in comparison with themselves.  These are they who have care for the morrow, because they trust in themselves; but the former are they who have no care for the morrow, because they trust in the Lord (n. 8478).  They who trust in the Lord continually receive good from Him; for whatsoever happens to them, whether it appears to be prosperous or not prosperous, is still good, because it conduces as a means to their eternal happiness.  But they who trust in themselves are continually drawing evil upon themselves; for whatever happens to them, even if it appears to be prosperous and happy, is nevertheless evil, and consequently conduces as a means to their eternal unhappiness.  These are the things which are signified by the command that they should make no residue of the manna till the morning, and that what was left bred worms and stank.

AC 8481. And it bred worms.  That this signifies that consequently it became filthy, is evident from the signification of ”breeding worms,“ as being to produce what is filthy; for worms are produced from that which is filthy and stinking. The falsity of evil, which is in the good that is from our own, is compared to ”a worm“ because the case with them is similar; for falsity also gnaws and thus torments. There are two things which make hell, as there are two which make heaven. The two which make heaven are good and truth, and the two which make hell are evil and falsity.  Consequently it is these two in heaven which make the happiness there; and it is the two in hell which make the torment there. The torment in hell from the falsity is compared to ”a worm;“ and the torment from the evil there is compared to ”fire.“ So in Isaiah:--

As the new heavens and the new earth which I will make shall stand before Me, so shall your seed and your name stand: at last it shall come to pass from month to month, and from sabbath to its sabbath, that they shall stand before Me: then they shall go forth, and shall see the carcases of the men that have transgressed against Me, for their worm shall not die, and their fire shall not be quenched; and they shall be a loathing to all flesh (Isa. 66:22-24).

In like manner it is said by the Lord in Mark:--

Where their worm dieth not, and the fire is not quenched (Mark 9:44, 46, 48);

speaking of Gehenna or hell.  The filthiness of falsity is compared to ”a worm“ also in Moses:--

Thou shalt plant vineyards, and till them, but thou shalt neither drink of the wine, neither shalt thou gather, because the worm shall devour it (Deut. 28:39);

”Wine“ denotes truth from good, and in the opposite sense falsity from evil (n. 6377).

AC 8482. And stank.  That this signifies consequently infernal, is evident from the signification of ”to stink,“ as being infernal filth. ”To stink“ is here predicated of evil, and ”the worm“ is predicted of falsity; for when good becomes evil, it is like flesh, or like bread, when it  putrifies, and the falsity from this evil is like the worm which is produced therein from the putridity.

AC 8483. And Moses was angry with them.  That this signifies that they turned away truth Divine from themselves, is evident from the signification of ”to be angry,“ when said of Moses, by whom is represented truth Divine, as being a turning away from it (n. 5034, 5798). That this turning away appears as if it were on the part of the Lord, although it is on the part of man, (n. 5798). In the Word, anger and wrath, and even fury, against men, are often attributed to Jehovah, when yet with Jehovah they are pure love and pure mercy toward man, and not the slightest anger. This is said in the Word from the appearance; for when men are against the Divine and consequently shut off from themselves the influx of love and mercy, they cast themselves into the evil of the penalty, and into hell. This appears like unmercifulness and like vengeance from the Divine on account of the evil which they have done, when yet there is nothing of this kind in the Divine, but it is in the evil itself. (n. 1857, 2447, 6071, 6832, 6991, 6997, 7533, 7632, 7643, 7679, 7710, 7877, 7926, 8197, 8214, 8223, 8226-8228, 8282). From all this it is evident that by ”Moses being angry with them“ is signified that they turned away truth Divine from themselves.

AC 8484. Verses 21-24. And they gathered it morning by morning, everyone according to the mouth of his eating: and the sun grew hot and it melted. And it was that on the sixth day they gathered bread double, two omers for each one; and all the princes of the assemblage came and told Moses. And he said unto them, This is what Jehovah spake, A rest, a sabbath holy to Jehovah, is the morrow; what ye will bake, bake ye; and what ye will boil, boil ye; and all that is left over, this lay ye by for you to keep until the morning. And they laid it by till the morning, as Moses commanded, and it did not stink, and the worm was not in it. ”And they gathered it morning by morning,“ signifies the reception of good from the Lord continually; ”every man according to the month of his eating,“ signifies by everyone according to his power of appropriation; ”and the sun grew hot and it melted,“ signifies that it vanishes away according to the degree of the increase of concupiscence; ”and it was on the sixth day,“ signifies at the end of every state; ”they gathered bread double,“ signifies conjunction from the good received; ”two omers for each one,“ signifies power then; ”and all the princes of the assemblage came and told Moses,“ signifies reflection from primary truths; ”and he said unto them,“ signifies instruction; ”This is what Jehovah spake,“ signifies influx from the Divine; ”a rest,“ signifies a state of peace when there is no temptation; ”a sabbath holy to Jehovah is the morrow,“ signifies the conjunction of good and truth to eternity; ”what ye will bake, bake ye,“ signifies preparation for the conjunction of good; ”and what ye will boil, boil ye,“ signifies preparation for the conjunction of truth; ”and all that is left over, this lay ye by for you to keep until the morning,“ signifies the enjoyment of all good and truth then as it were from their own; ”and they laid it by till the morning,“ signifies the enjoyment that is to come; ”as Moses commanded,“ signifies according to instruction from truth Divine; ”and it did not stink, and the worm was not in it,“ signifies that there was nothing filthy therein, because in this way it was made their own by the Lord.

AC 8485. And they gathered it morning by, morning.  That this signifies the reception of good from the Lord continually, is evident from the signification of ”gathering the manna,“ as being the reception of good (n. 8467, 8472); and from the signification of ”morning by morning,“ or ”every morning,“ as being continually; for by ”morning by morning“ is signified every morrow, and by ”the morrow“ is signified what is eternal (n. 3998), thus also perpetually and continually.

AC 8486. Every man according to the mouth of his eating.  That this signifies by everyone according to his power of appropriation, is evident from what was said above (n. 8467), where are the like words.

AC 8487. And the grew hot, and it melted.  That this signifies that it vanishes away according to the degree of the increase of concupiscence, is evident from the signification of ”the sun growing hot,“ as being increasing concupiscence; and from the signification of ”melting,“ as being to vanish away.  That ”the sun grew hot,“ denotes increasing concupiscence, is because ”the sun“ in a good sense signifies heavenly love, for the reason that the Lord is the Sun in the other life, and that the heat which is from it is the good of love, and the light is the truth of faith. That the Lord is a sun, and that heavenly love is therefrom, (n. 1053, 1521, 1529-1531, 2120, 2441, 2495, 3636, 3643, 4060, 4321, 4696, 5084, 5097, 5377, 7078, 7083, 7171, 7173, 7270). Consequently in the opposite sense ”the sun“ denotes the love of self and of the world, and ”the heat“ or ”growing hot of the sun“ denotes in this sense concupiscence.

[2] How the case herein is, that the good of truth, which is signified by ”the manna,“ vanished according to the degree of increasing concupiscence, which is signified by its ”melting when the sun grew hot,“ shall be briefly told.  The good of truth, or spiritual good, is indeed given to the man of the spiritual church when he is being regenerated; but as all the delight of the love of self and of the world, which had previously constituted his life extinguishes this good (because they are opposites), therefore the pure good of truth cannot long abide with that man, but it is tempered by the Lord by means of the delights of the loves which had belonged to his previous life; for unless this good were so tempered, it would become undelightful to him, and thus would be loathed.  Such is heavenly good at first with those who are being regenerated. In so far therefore as the delights of the loves of self and of the world rise up, so far the good of heavenly love vanishes away, for as before said they are opposites; and it is the same the other way about.

[3] Hence it is that in heaven there are alternations of states, to which correspond the alternations of times in the world (n. 8426), and that thus by means of alternations they are remitted into the delights of natural pleasures; for without a change of the states the good of heavenly love would become as it were dry, and of slight estimation; but it is otherwise when it is tempered by means of natural delights at the same time, or successively. From this it is that at first when the manna was given to the sons of Israel every morning, the quail was also given in the evening; for by ”the quail“ is signified natural delight, and also the delight of concupiscence (n. 8452).

[4] But be it known that the concupiscences into which they who are in heaven are remitted when it is evening with them, are not concupiscences that are opposite to heavenly good, but those which in some measure agree with this good; for they are the delights of conferring benefits in a large way, and consequently something of glory, in which nevertheless there is benevolence and a study to be of service; they are also the delights of magnificence in the embellishments of home and the ornaments of dress, and many other similar delights. such are the delights which do not destroy the good of heavenly love (but still they hide it), and at last, according to the degree of the man‘s regeneration, they become the ultimate planes of heavenly good, and then they are no longer called ”concupiscences,“ but ”delights.“ That without a tempering by means of such things the good of heavenly love becomes as it were dry, and afterward is loathed as a thing of no value, is signified by the sons of Israel calling the manna dry food, and vile food, as we read when the quail was no longer given them, in Moses:--

The rabble that was in the midst lusted a lust, whence the sons of Israel also wept again, and said, Who shall feed us with flesh? now our soul is dry, our eyes have not anything (to look at) except the manna (Num. 11:4, 6).

The people spake against God, and against Moses: Wherefore have ye made us come up out of Egypt to die in the wilderness?  there is no tread, nor water; now doth our soul loathe this most vile bread (Num. 21:5).

Jehovah afflicted thee, and made thee hunger, and fed thee with manna, which thou knewest not, neither did thy fathers know; that He might teach thee that man doth not live by bread alone, but by every utterance of the mouth of Jehovah doth man live (Deut. 8:3).

[5] In like manner as by ”the manna,“ so also by ”the unleavened bread,“ there is signified good pure from falsities (n. 8058), which bread is for a similar reason called ”the bread of misery“ (Deut. 16:3) From all this it can now be seen what is meant by the good of truth vanishing away according to the degree of the increasing concupiscence, which is signified by ”the manna melting when the sun grew hot.“

AC 8488. And it was on the sixth day.  That this signifies at the end of every state, is evident from the signification of ”the sixth day,“ as being the end of every state (n. 8421).

AC 8489. They gathered bread double.  That this signifies conjunction from the good received, is evident from the signification of ”gathering the manna,“ as being the reception of good. That ”gathering“ denotes reception, (n. 8467, 8472); and also that ”manna“ denotes the good of truth, (n. 8464); and from the signification of ”double,“ as being conjunction (n. 8423).

AC 8490. Two omers for each one.  That this signifies power then, is evident from the signification of ”an omer,“ as being what is sufficient, and thus power (n. 8468, 8473), here enough, and power for conjunction; for by ”the seventh day“ or ”the sabbath“ is signified the conjunction of good and truth.

AC 8491. And all the princes of the assemblage came and told Moses.  That this signifies reflection from primary truths, is evident from the signification of ”the princes of the assemblage,“ as being primary truths (n. 1482, 2089, 5044); and from the signification of ”telling,“ as being reflection (n. 2862, 5508).

AC 8492. And he said unto them.  That this signifies instruction, is evident from the signification of ”saying,“ as involving the things that follow, here instruction, namely, how they were to do in the gathering of the manna on the day before the sabbath. ”Saying“ also denotes instruction, (n. 6879, 6881, 6883, 6891, 7186, 7267, 7304, 7380).

AC 8493. This is what Jehovah spake.  That this signifies influx from the Divine, is evident from the fact that Jehovah or the Lord instructs by means of influx, and that this is expressed in the historicals of the Word by ”saying,“ and ”speaking.“ ”To speak“ denotes influx, (n. 2951, 5481, 5797, 7270, 8128).

AC 8494. A rest.  That this signifies a state of peace when there is no temptation, is evident from the signification of ”a rest,“ such as there was on the days of the sabbath, as being a representative of a state of peace, in which is effected the conjunction of good and truth. But the six preceding days represented the combat and labor, consequently the temptations, which precede a state of peace; for after temptations comes a state of peace, and then there is the conjunction of good and truth. The six days which precede the seventh or the sabbath signified combat and labor, (n. 720, 737, 900); and after temptations there are tranquillity and peace, (n. 3696, 4572, 5246, 6829, 8367, 8370).

AC 8495. A sabbath holy to Jehovah is the morrow.  This signifies the conjunction of good and truth to eternity. It is evident from the signification of ”the sabbath,“ as being the conjunction of good and truth; and from the signification of ”the morrow,“ as being to eternity (n. 3998). He who does not know what the sabbath represented, and thus what it signified, cannot know why it was accounted the most holy of all things. But the reason why it was accounted most holy was that in the supreme sense it represented the union of the Divine and the Divine Human in the Lord; and in the relative sense the conjunction of the Divine Human of the Lord with the human race. Consequently the sabbath was most holy. And because it represented these things, it also represented heaven in respect to the conjunction of good and truth, which conjunction is called ”the heavenly marriage.“ And as the conjunction of good and truth is effected by the Lord alone, and nothing of it by man, and as it is effected in a state of peace, therefore it was most severely forbidden that man should then do any work, insomuch that the soul which did this was to be cut off, as we read in Moses:--

Ye shall keep the sabbath, because it is holy to you, he that profaneth it, dying shall die; for whosoever doeth work therein, that soul shall be cut off from the midst of his people (Exod. 31:14).

Therefore one was stoned who merely picked up sticks on that day (Num. 15:32-36).

Therefore also the commandment concerning the sabbath is the third commandment in the Decalogue, immediately following the two concerning the holy worship of Jehovah (Exod. 20:8; Deut. 5:12).

And therefore the sabbath is called ”an eternal covenant“ (Exod. 31:16),

for by ”covenant“ is signified conjunction (n. 665, 666, 1023, 1038, 1864, 1996, 2003, 2021, 6804).

[2] From all this it can now be seen what is meant in the internal sense by the things said in the following passages about the sabbath; as in Isaiah:--

Blessed is the man who keepeth the sabbath, that he profane it not; thus said Jehovah to the eunuchs who keep My sabbaths, and choose that in which I delight, and take hold of My covenant, I will give them in My house and within My walls a place and a name, better than sons and daughters; I will give them an eternal name, that shall not be cut off; whosoever keepeth the sabbath that he profane it not, and whoso taketh hold of My covenant, them will I bring in upon the mountain of My holiness, and I will cheer them in My house of prayer (Isa. 56:2-7);

from all this it is evident that by those who keep the sabbath holy” are meant those who are in conjunction with the Lord. That they shall be in heaven is signified by “a place and a name better than sons and daughters being given them in the house of Jehovah, an eternal name that shall not be cut off,” and by their being “brought in upon the mountain of holiness.”

[3] In the same:--

If thou turn away thy foot from the sabbath, not doing thy wills on the day of My holiness, but shalt call the sabbath delights, holy to Jehovah, honorable; and shalt honor it, so that thou do not then thy ways, nor find thy desire, or speak a word, then shalt thou be delighted upon Jehovah, and I will feed thee with the heritage of Jacob (Isa. 58:13, 14);

here it is very plain what was represented by “not doing any work on the sabbath day,” namely, that they should not do anything from their own, but from the Lord; for the angelic state in heaven is that they will and do nothing from themselves, or from their own, and do not even think and speak therefrom: their conjunction with the Lord consists in this.  Their own from which they are not to act, is signified by their “not doing their own wills, nor doing their own ways, nor finding their own desire, nor speaking a word.” This state with the angels is the heavenly state itself; and when they are in it, they have peace and rest, and the Lord also has rest; for when they have been conjoined with Him, they labor no more, because they are then in the Lord.  These things are signified by the words, “thus shalt thou call the sabbath the holy delights of Jehovah, and they shall be delighted upon Jehovah.” The Lord’s rest is signified by His resting on the seventh day after the six days‘ creation (Gen. 2:2).

[4] Like things are understood by these words in Jeremiah:--

If hearing ye shall hear Me, that ye bring not in a burden through the gates of this city on the sabbath day, and that ye hallow the sabbath day, so that ye do not any work therein, then shall there enter through the gates of this city kings and princes sitting upon the throne of David, riding in chariot and on horses, they and their princes, the man of Judah, and the inhabitants of Jerusalem; and this city shall be inhabited to eternity (Jer. 17:24, 25);

by “work Oh the sabbath” is signified everything that is from our own; the state of those who are not led by their own, but by the Lord, is described by their “entering through the gates of the city kings and princes sitting upon the throne of David, riding in chariot and on horses;” by “kings” are signified the truths of faith; by “princes,” the primary things thereof; by “sitting upon the throne of David,” that these are from the Lord; by “the chariot and horses,” the doctrinal and intellectual things of faith.  Be it known that all things which come from the man’s own are evil, and that all things which come from the Lord are good.  That with those who are led by the Lord all things flow in, down to the least thing of life both of intellect and of will, thus down to each and all things of faith and of charity, see what has been abundantly shown from experience, (n. 2886-2888, 6053-6058, 6189-6215, 6307-6327, 6466-6495, 6598-6626, 6982, 6985, 6996, 7004, 7055, 7056, 7058, 7147, 7270).

[5] That the sabbath was representative of the conjunction of the Lord with the human race, is evident in Ezekiel:--

I gave them My sabbaths that they might be for a sign between Me and them, to acknowledge that I Jehovah do sanctify them (Ezek. 20:12; Exod. 31:13).

Therefore also it was forbidden to kindle a fire on the sabbath day (Exod. 35:3), because by “fire” was signified everything that is of life; and by “kindling a fire,” that which is of life from man‘s own.  From all that has been said it is plain that the Lord is “the Lord of the sabbath,” according to His words in (Matthew 12:1-8); and it may be seen why many cures were performed by the Lord on the sabbath days (Matt. 12:10-13; Mark 3:1-8; Luke 6:6-11; 13:10-17; 14:1-6; John 5:9-18; 7:22, 23; 9:14, 16); for the diseases of which they were healed by the Lord involved spiritual diseases, which are from evil (n. 7337, 8364).

AC 8496. What ye will bake, bake ye.  That this signifies preparation for the conjunction of good; and what ye will boil, boil ye, signifies preparation for the conjunction of truth, is evident from the signification of “baking,” as being preparation for the conjunction of good because it is done by means of fire; and from the signification of “boiling,” as being preparation for the conjunction of truth because it is done by means of water; for by “water” is signified the truth of faith (n. 2702, 3058, 3424, 4976, 5668), and by “fire,” the good of love (n. 934, 5215, 6314, 6832, 6834, 6849, 7324, 7852). That it denotes preparation for conjunction, is plain; for what was baked and boiled was prepared for the following sabbath day, by which conjunction is signified, for they were forbidden to kindle a fire on the sabbath day (Exod. 35:3), thus to bake or boil on that day. “Baking” is said of bread and of the meat-offering, and was done by means of fire, (Isa. 44:15, 19; 1 Sam. 28:24; Ezek. 46:20; Lev.  6:17); and “boiling” is said of flesh, and was done by means of water, (Exod 29:31; Lev. 6:28; 1 Sam.  2:13, 15)

AC 8497. And all that is left over, this lay ye by for you to keep until the morning.  That this signifies the enjoyment of all good and truth then as it were from their own, is evident from the signification of “laying by what is over until the morning,” as being enjoyment on the sabbath day; that it denotes the enjoyment of good and of truth, is because that which remained over of what was baked and boiled was to be laid by, and then was to be eaten; for by “baking” is signified the preparation of good, and by “boiling” the preparation of truth (n. 8496); and by “eating” is signified enjoyment and appropriation (n. 3168, 3513, 3596, 3832, 4745, 7849); and from the signification of “for you to keep,” as being as it were from their own That these things are signified by these words is because the good and truth which flow in from the Lord are conjoined, and as it were appropriated.  Such is the conjunction of heaven (that is, of those who are in heaven) with the Lord. It is said “as it were from their own,” because the goods which are of faith and of charity cannot be given to man nor to angel so as to be their own, for men and angels are only recipients, or forms accommodated to receive life, thus good and truth, from the Lord. Life itself is from no other source. And as life is from the Lord, it cannot be appropriated otherwise than as appearing to be man’s own; but they who are in the Lord plainly perceive that life flows in, consequently good and truth, for these belong to life. The reason why life appears as man‘s own is that the Lord from Divine love wills to give and to conjoin all His own to man, and as far as it can be effected, does conjoin it. This “own” which is given by the Lord, is called the heavenly own (n. 731, 1937, 1947, 2882, 2883, 2891, 3812, 5660).

AC 8498. And they laid it by till the morning.  That this signifies the enjoyment that is to come, is evident from what was unfolded just above (n. 8497).

AC 8499. As Moses commanded.  That this signifies according to instruction from truth Divine, is evident from the signification of “commanding,” as being instruction; and from the representation of Moses, as being truth Divine.

AC 8500. And it did not stink, and the worm was not in it. That this signifies that there was nothing filthy therein, because in this way it was made their own by the Divine, is evident from the signification of “to stink,” as being the infernal filthiness that is predicated of evil (n. 8482); and from the signification of “worm,” as being also infernal filthiness, but that which is predicated of falsity (n. 8481). Such things are in whatever is done from man’s own, but heavenly and divine things are in those which are done from the Lord, (n. 8478).

AC 8501. Verses 25-27. And Moses said, Eat ye this today, because today is a sabbath to Jehovah, today ye shall not find it in the field.  Six days ye shall gather it, and on the seventh day is the sabbath, it shall not be in it. And it was on the seventh day, there went out some of the people for to gather, and they found none.  “And Moses said,” signifies information concerning this matter; “Eat ye this today,” signifies appropriation to eternity; “because today is a sabbath to Jehovah,” signifies because good has been conjoined with truth by the Lord; “today ye shall not find it in the field,” signifies that then good shall no longer be acquired by means of truth; “six days ye shall gather it,” signifies the reception of truth before it is being conjoined with good; “and on the seventh day is the sabbath,” signifies that afterward there is conjunction; “it shall not be in it,” signifies that no longer shall there be good by means of truth; “and it was on the seventh day,” signifies a state of conjoined good and truth; “they went out some of Me people for to gather, and they found none,” signifies that they desired to acquire, but it was not possible.

AC 8502. And Moses said.  That this signifies information concerning this matter, is evident from the signification of “saying,” as involving what follows, here information about the manna, that they would not find it on the sabbath day.

AC 8503. Eat ye this today.  That this signifies appropriation to eternity, is evident from the signification of “eating,” as being appropriation (n. 3168, 3513, 3596, 4745); and from the signification of “today,” as being to eternity (n. 2838, 3998, 4304, 6165, 6984).

AC 8504. Because today is a sabbath to Jehovah.  That this signifies because good has been conjoined with truth by the Lord, is evident from the signification of “the sabbath,” as being the conjunction of good and truth (n. 8495); and from the signification of “today,” as being to eternity (n. 8503); that “Jehovah” in the Word denotes the Lord, has been frequently shown above.

AC 8505. Today ye shall not find it in the field.  That this signifies that then good shall no longer be acquired by means of truth, is evident from the signification of “not finding,” when predicated of the good which is obtained by means of truth, as being to acquire no longer; and from the signification of “field,” as being man, here the mind of the man in which good is implanted by means of truth; for man is called “a field” from the fact that he receives the truths of faith, which are seeds, and brings forth the fruits of the seeds, which are goods.

[2] How the case herein is shall be briefly told. Before regeneration man acts from truth, but through it good is acquired; for truth becomes good with him when it becomes of his will, and thus of his life; but after regeneration he acts from good, and through it truths are procured. To make this still clearer. Before regeneration man acts from obedience; but after regeneration from affection. These two states are inverse to each other; for in the former state truth rules, but in the latter good rules; or, in the former state man looks downward or backward, but in the latter upward or forward.

[3] When a man is in the latter state, that is, when be acts from affection, he is no longer allowed to look back, and to do good from truth, for at that time the Lord flows into the good with him, and leads him by means of the good.  If at that time he were to look back, or were to do good from truth, he would act from his own; for he who acts from truth leads himself, whereas he who acts from good is led by the Lord.  This is what is meant by these words of the Lord:--

When ye see the abomination of desolation, let him that is upon the house not go down to take anything out of his house; and let him that is in the field not return back to take his garments (Matt. 24:15, 17, 18).

In that day, whosoever shall be upon the house, and his vessels in the house, let him not go down to take them away; and whosoever is in the field, let him likewise not turn back to the things behind him. Remember Lot‘s wife (Luke 17:31, 32).

How the case is further with these things see (n. 3652, 5895, 5897, 7923, 8506, 8510). These are the things which in the internal sense are signified by the words that “the manna would not be found in the field on the seventh day, and that there went out some of the people for to gather and they found none.”

AC 8506. Six days ye shall gather it.  That this signifies the reception of truth before it is being conjoined with good, is evident from the signification of “six days,” as being states of combat and of labor (n. 8494), here a state of the reception of truth, or a state when good is acquired through truth (n. 8505), for in this state there are labor and combat. In this state man is let into temptations, which are combats with the evils and falsities in him; and then the Lord fights for the man and also with him. But after this state there is a state of the conjunction of good and truth, thus at that time a state of rest for the Lord also. This state is what was represented by the rest on the seventh day, or day of the sabbath. That the Lord then has rest, is because when good has been conjoined with truth, the man is in the Lord, and is led by the Lord without labor and combat. This state is what is meant by the second state, treated of above, (n. 8505).

AC 8507. And on the seventh day is the sabbath.  That this signifies that afterward there is conjunction, is evident from the signification of “the seventh day” or “the sabbath,” as being the conjunction of good and truth (n. 8496).

AC 8508. It shall not be in it.  That this signifies that no longer shall there be good by means of truth, is evident from what has been unfolded above (n. 8505).

AC 8509. And it was on the seventh day.  That this signifies a state of conjoined good and truth, is evident from the signification of “the seventh day” or “sabbath,” as being the conjunction of good and truth (n. 8507).

AC 8510. There went out some of the people for to gather, and they found none.  That this signifies that they desired to acquire, but it was not possible, is evident from what was unfolded above (n. 8505). It is there made plain what it is to act from the truth which is of faith, and what from the good which is of charity, namely, that he who acts from the truth which is of faith is not yet in the order of heaven, but that he who acts from the good which is of charity is in this order. For the order in which man is led by the Lord is by man’s willing, consequently by means of good, for this is of the will, and then his understanding ministers, consequently truth, for this is of the understanding. When this state is attained, then is “the sabbath;” for then the Lord has rest; this state comes forth when good has been conjoined with truth. That this state is the Lord‘s “rest,” can be seen from the fact that Jehovah, or the Lord, after the creation and labor of six days, on the seventh day rested from all His work (Gen. 2:2). This state is the state of heaven; consequently heaven itself is called a “sabbath,” or in heaven there is said to be a “perpetual sabbath.” That by the creation in the first chapter of Genesis is meant a new creation or regeneration, and that by the six days in that chapter are meant temptations and combats, see what has been unfolded at chapters 1 and 2.

AC 8511. Verses 28-31. And Jehovah said Unto Moses, How long do ye refuse to keep My commandments and My laws?  See ye, because Jehovah hath given you the sabbath, therefore He giveth you on the sixth day the bread of two days; rest ye everyone in his place, let no one go forth from his place on the seventh day. And the people rested on the seventh day. And the house of Israel called the name of it Manna; and it was like coriander seed, white; and the taste of it was like that of a cake in honey. “And Jehovah said unto Moses,” signifies the appearing of the Divine obscured; “How long do ye refuse to keep My commandments and My laws?” signifies on account of their not acting according to Divine order; “see ye,” signifies that they should pay attention and reflect; “because Jehovah hath given you the sabbath,” signifies the conjunction of good and truth by the Lord; “therefore He giveth you on the sixth day the bread of two days,” signifies that on this account even to the end of the former state He gives as much good through truth as will afterward effect this conjunction; “rest ye everyone in his place,” signifies a state of peace; “let no one go forth from his place on the seventh day,” signifies that they must then remain in this state; “and the people rested on the seventh day,” signifies a representative then of the conjunction of good and truth in a state of peace; “and the house of Israel called the name of it Manna,” signifies its quality in respect to them; “and it was like coriander seed, white,” signifies the truth therein that it was pure; “and the taste of it was like that of a cake in honey,” signifies that the good was delightful because it had been made good from truth by means of delight.

AC 8512. And Jehovah said unto Moses.  That this signifies the appearing of the Divine obscured, is evident, from the signification of “Jehovah said,” as involving what follows, here that they did not keep His commandments and laws, thus that the appearing of the Divine among them was obscured.  For this takes place when anyone does not live according to the Divine commandments; because when anyone does live according to them, he lives according to Divine order, inasmuch as the Divine commandments are truths and goods which are in conformity with order; and when anyone lives according to order, he then lives in the Lord, because the Lord is order itself. From this it follows that he who does not live according to the commandments and laws which are of Divine order, does not live in the Lord, consequently that then the Divine is obscured with him. By living according to order is here meant to be led by the Lord through good, but to live not as yet according to order is to be led through truth; and when man is led through truth, the Lord does not appear to him; and therefore the man then walks in the dark, in which he does not see good. It is different when a man is led through good. He then sees in the light.

AC 8513. How long do ye refuse to keep My commandments and My laws?  That this signifies on account of their not acting according to Divine order, is evident from what has just been unfolded (n. 8512). That it may be known what it is to act according to Divine order, and what not to act according to it, something further shall be said. Everything that is done according to Divine order is inwardly open even to the Lord, and thus has heaven in it; but everything that is not done according to Divine order is inwardly closed, and thus has not heaven in it.

[2] Therefore Divine order is for the Lord to flow in through the interiors of man into his exteriors, thus through the will of man into his action. This takes place when the man is in good, that is, when he is in the affection of doing good for the sake of good, and not for the sake of himself. When a man does good for the sake of himself, and not for the sake of good, his interiors are closed, and he cannot be led of the Lord by means of heaven, but he is led by himself. The love determines by whom he is led, for everyone is led by his love. He who loves himself more than his neighbor, leads himself; but he who loves good is led by good, consequently by the Lord from whom is good.

[3] From all this it can be seen what the difference is between living according to order, and not living according to it. How a man must live for it to be according to order, the Word teaches, and the doctrine of faith from the Word. He who does not look beyond external things cannot possibly apprehend this; for he knows not what that which is internal is, scarcely that there is anything internal, and still less that this internal can he opened, and that when it is opened, heaven is therein.  The intelligent of the world are especially in this ignorance, and those of them who hold that there is something internal, nevertheless have no idea, or a fatuous idea, about it. Hence it is that they believe but little, and moreover apply their knowledges to confirm that all things are of nature.

AC 8514. See ye.  That this signifies that they should pay attention and reflect, is evident from the signification of “seeing,” as being to understand (n. 2325, 3863, 4404-4421, 5114); consequently as being to perceive (n. 2150, 3764, 4567, 4723, 5400); and also to reflect (n. 6836, 6839).

AC 8515. Because Jehovah hath given you the sabbath.  That this signifies the conjunction of good and truth by the Lord, is evident from the signification of “the sabbath,” as being the conjunction of good and truth (n. 8495); that it is by the Lord is signified by “Jehovah hath given,” for “Jehovah” in the Word denotes the Lord.

AC 8516. Therefore He giveth you on the sixth day the bread of two days.  That this signifies that on this account even to the end of the former state He gives as much good through truth as will afterward effect this conjunction, is evident from the signification of “the sixth day,” as being the end of a former state (n. 8421); from the signification of “the manna,” which here is “the bread,” as being the good of truth (n. 8462, 8464); and from the signification of “the sabbath,” for which also the manna was given on the sixth day and thus the bread of two days, as being the conjunction of good and truth (n. 8495). It was shown above that as by “the sabbath” was signified the conjunction of good and truth, therefore by “the manna not being found on the seventh day” is signified that when a man is in this conjunction he acts from good, and no longer from truth, and also that he must not act from truth any longer (n. 8510).

[2] But as this appears a paradox, it may be further unfolded in a few words. Everyone ought to be led to Christian good, which is called “charity,” through the truth of faith; for the truth of faith will teach not only what charity is, but also what its nature must be; and unless he learns this first from the doctrine of his church, for he cannot possibly know it from himself, he cannot be prepared and thus adapted to receive this good. For example: he must know from the doctrine of faith, that it is not of charity to do what is good for the sake of self, or for the sake of recompense, thus not to merit salvation through works of charity; be must also know that all the good of charity is from the Lord, and nothing at all from self; besides many other things which instruct what charity is, and what its quality must be.  From these considerations it can be seen that a man cannot be led to Christian good except through the truths which are of faith. A man must know further that truths do not of themselves enter into good, but that good adopts truths and adjoins them to itself; for the truths of faith lie in the memory of a man as in a field extended beneath the interior sight. Good from the Lord flows in through this sight, and chooses from them, and conjoins with itself, the truths which are in agreement with it. The truths which lie beneath cannot flow into the good which is above; for it is quite contrary to order, and even impossible, for the lower to flow into the higher (n. 5959).

[3] From all this it can now be known how Christian good is born with a man when he is being regenerated, and therefore also what must be the quality of the man when he has been regenerated, namely, that he acts from good, but not from truth; that is, that he is led of the Lord by means of good, and no longer by means of truth; for he is then in charity, that is, in the affection of doing this good. All who are in heaven are so led, for this is according to Divine order; and thus all things which they think and act flow as it were spontaneously and from freedom. It would be quite different if they were to think from truth and to act from it; for then they would think whether a thing ought to be so done, or not, and they would thus come to a stand still in every detail, and thereby would obscure the light they have, and finally they would act according to those things which they themselves love, thus according to influx from those things which favor their loves, which is to be led by themselves, and not by the Lord. From all this it is again evident what it is for good to be no longer acquired by means of truth, which is signified by their “gathering the manna for six days, and not finding it on the seventh” (n. 8505, 8506, 8510).

AC 8517. Rest ye everyone in his place.  That this signifies a state of peace, is evident from the signification of “resting,” as being a state of peace (n. 8494). That they were to rest on the sabbath day and do no work then, not even kindle a fire, nor prepare for themselves what they were to eat, was representative of a state of peace, in which the conjunction of good and truth is effected by the Lord; for all the conjunction of good and truth is effected in this state. When a man is in a state of peace, he is then also led of the Lord by means of good; if a man were then to lead himself, even by means of truth, he would dissipate the state of peace, and so there would he no conjunction (n. 8516).

AC 8518. no one go forth from his place on the seventh day. That this signifies that they must then remain in this state, is evident from what was unfolded above (n. 8494, 8517).

AC 8519. And the people rested on the seventh day.  That this signifies a representative then of the conjunction of good and truth in a state of peace, is evident from what was said above (n. 8494, 8517).

AC 8520. And the house of Israel called the name of it Manna. That this signifies its quality in respect to them, is evident from the signification of“ a name” and of “calling a name,” as being the quality of the thing (n. 144, 145, 1896, 2009, 2724, 3006, 3421, 6674). It was called “manna” from not being known, and it denotes the good of truth, which is the good of those who were of the spiritual church, (n. 8462, 8464).

AC 8521. And it was like coriander seed, white.  That this signifies the truth therein, that it was pure, is evident from the signification of “seed,” as being the truth of faith (n. 255, 1940, 2048, 3038, 3310, 3373). It is said “like coriander seed,” because this is white; for “white” is predicated of truth, and truth is also represented as white (n. 3301, 3993, 4007, 5319). The good of truth, which is signified by “the manna,” is now described, both what the quality of the truth therein is, and what the quality of the good therein is. The quality of the truth is described by its being “like coriander seed, white,” and the quality of the good by “the taste of it being like that of a cake in honey.”

[2] The good of truth, which is the good with those who are of the Lord’s spiritual kingdom, is quite different from the good which is with those who are of the Lord‘s celestial kingdom. The good of truth which is with those who are of the spiritual kingdom is implanted in the intellectual part, for there is formed by the Lord in this part a new will, which is that the man wills to do according to the truth that he has drawn from the teaching of his church; and when he wills and does this truth, it becomes with him good, and is called “spiritual good,” and also “the good of truth.” That this is really truth, he indeed believes, because he has faith from the teaching; but he has no perception whether it is true, unless he may seem to himself to have it from the fact that he has confirmed it with himself, partly from the sense of the letter of the Word, and partly from the fallacies of ideas that favor his received opinion; not considering that there is nothing which cannot be confirmed, even falsity itself, so as to appear like truth (n. 4741, 5033, 6865, 7012, 7680, 7950). Hence it is, that all of every faith believe their own dogmas to be true, even the Socinians, and also the Jews themselves.

[3] From all this it is evident what is the quality of the truth which is turned into good in the case of many who are of the church. None of these can see whether the teaching of their church is true, except those who are in the affection of truth for the sake of the uses of life. They who have this end in view are continually enlightened by the Lord, not only during their life in the world, but also afterward. These alone are they who can receive; for the Lord leads them by means of good, and by means of it gives them to see truth, and thus to believe. From all this it is evident what is the source and what the quality of the good with those who are of the Lord’s spiritual kingdom. But the good with those who are of the Lord‘s celestial kingdom is not implanted in the intellectual part, but in the will part. They who are in this good know from internal perception, which is from the Lord, whether a thing is true. On these two kinds of good, and the difference between them, (n. 2046, 2088, 2227, 2669, 2715, 2718, 3235, 3240, 3241, 3246, 4138, 4493, 5113, 6500, 6865, 7233, 7977, 7992).

AC 8522. And the taste of it was like that of a cake in honey. That this signifies that the good was delightful because it had been made from truth by means of delight, is evident from the signification of “the taste (saporis),” as being predicated of the delights that belong to good, because it corresponds to the delight of growing wise (sapiendi) (n. 3502, 4793); from the signification of “a cake,” as being spiritual good (n. 7978); and from the signification of “honey,” as being natural delight (n. 5620, 6857). From all this it follows that “the taste of it was like that of a cake in honey” signifies the good which is delightful because made from truth by means of delight. The source and method of arising, and thus the nature, of spiritual good are here described, namely that in its first origin it is truth, and that it is made good by the fact that it comes into act from the will, thus from affection; for whatever man wills from affection is perceived as good. But this good cannot arise except through the delights that are of the natural man. The spiritual man is introduced by means of these, and when he has been introduced, he has a consequent sense of this good. This then is what is signified by “the taste of the manna was like that of a cake in honey.”

AC 8523. Verses 32-34. And Moses said, This is the word which Jehovah hath commanded, Fill an omer with it to be kept for your generations, to the end that they may see the bread wherewith I fed you in the wilderness, when I brought you forth from the land of Egypt. And Moses said unto Aaron, Take an urn, and put the omer full of manna therein, and lay it up before Jehovah, to be kept for your generations. As Jehovah commanded Moses, and Aaron laid it up before the Testimony to be kept.  “And Moses said, This is the word which Jehovah hath commanded,” signifies a mandate; “Fill an omer with it,” signifies the highest degree of power; “to be kept for your generations,” signifies which is for those who are of the spiritual church; “to the end that they may see the bread wherewith I fed you in the wilderness,” signifies the good of truth when in a state of temptations; “when I brought you forth from the land of Egypt,” signifies after they had been liberated from infestations; “and Moses said unto Aaron, signifies influx; ”Take an urn,“ signifies truth; ”and put the omer full of manna therein,“ signifies good therein as much as it will hold; ”and lay it up before Jehovah,“ signifies that it may be in the presence of the Divine; ”to be kept for your generations,“ signifies that it may be the measure for those who are of that spiritual church; ”as Jehovah commanded Moses,“ signifies according to the mandate; ”and Aaron laid it up before the Testimony to be kept,“ signifies that it was in the presence of the Divine.

AC 8524. And Moses said, This is the word which Jehovah hath commanded.  That this signifies a mandate, is evident from the signification of ”the word which Jehovah hath commanded“ as being a Divine mandate (n. 8466).

AC 8525. Fill an owner with it.  That this signifies the highest degree of power, is evident from the signification of ”an omer,“ as being sufficient, and power (n. 8468, 8473); and as ”an omer“ denotes sufficient, or as much as one person has, so also it denotes his highest degree of power.

AC 8526. To be kept for your generations.  That this signifies which is for those who are of the spiritual church, is evident from the signification of ”generations,“ as being those things which are of faith and charity (n. 613, 2020, 2584, 6239), and therefore, in a determinate sense, those who are of the spiritual church, because it is they who are in faith and charity, and who are represented by the sons of Israel, whose ”generations“ are here meant. ”To be kept for them“ signifies to be for a memorial.

AC 8527. To the end that they may see the bread wherewith I fed you in the wilderness.  That this signifies the good of truth when in a state of temptations, is evident from the signification of ”the manna,“ which here is ”the bread,“ as being the good of truth (n. 8462, 8464); and from the signification of ”the wilderness,“ as being a state of undergoing temptations (n. 8098).

AC 8528. When I brought you forth from the land of Egypt.  That this signifies after they had been liberated from infestations, is evident from the signification of ”bringing forth,“ as being to liberate; and from the signification of ”the land of Egypt,“ as being infestations (n. 7278).  That ”the land of Egypt“ denotes infestations is because by ”the Egyptians and Pharaoh“ are signified those who infested the upright in the other life, and who also at this day infest them (n. 7097, 7220, 7228, 7317, 8148).

AC 8529. And Moses said unto Aaron.  That this signifies influx, is evident from the signification of ”saying,“ when by the internal Divine truth, which is represented by Moses, to the external truth Divine, which is represented by Aaron, as being influx; for Divine influx takes place through the truth which proceeds immediately from the Lord into the truth which proceeds mediately. Moses and Aaron in the representative sense denote these truths, (n. 7009, 7010, 7382).

AC 8530. Take an urn.  That this signifies truth, is evident from the signification of ”an urn,“ as here being truth. That ”an urn“ denotes truth, is because it was the vessel which received the manna, by which is signified good, and all truth is as a vessel for good; hence also by ”vessels“ in general are signified truths (n. 3068, 3079, 3316, 3318), and consequently by ”vessels“ in particular, and here by ”an urn.“ That truths are recipient vessels for good may be illustrated by various things in nature - as by light, which is recipient of the heat from the sun, the light signifying truth, and the heat in the light signifying good.  So it is with truth and good. It is similar with a garment in respect to the body, and with the body in respect to the soul; also with a blood-vessel and a fiber in respect to the blood and animal spirit enclosed therein; so also with the lungs in respect to the heart, consequently with the respiration of the lungs in respect to the pulse of the heart; in a word, with every organic form of the body in respect to the life which is therein. From these comparisons it can be seen what is the quality of truth without good, or what is the quality of faith without charity, namely, that it is like the organic forms of the body without life; that it is like the respiration of the lungs without the pulse of the heart, or like the lungs without the heart; and that it is like a blood-vessel and a fiber without blood and animal spirit; also like a body without a soul; consequently that it is like something inanimate; and if evil instead of good be therein it is like a carcass.

AC 8531. And put the omerful of manna therein.  That this signifies good therein as much as it will hold, is evident from the signification of ”the omerful,“ namely, as much as it will hold; and from the signification of ”the manna,“ as being spiritual good, or the good of truth (n. 8462, 8464).

AC 8532. And lay it up before Jehovah.  That this signifies that it may be in the Divine presence, is evident without explication.

AC 8533. To be kept for your generations.  That this signifies that it may be the measure for those who are of that spiritual church, is evident from the signification of ”an omer of manna,“ which was laid up to be kept, as being as much as is sufficient (n. 8468), thus also a measure, namely, of the amount of good this church had. ”Your generations“ denotes those who are of the spiritual church, (n. 8526). As regards the measure or degree of good that belongs to a church, be it known that goods in the other life vary in quality and in quantity, and that they are determined for everyone during his life in the world; they are determined according to the quality and quantity of each person’s faith and charity in his life.  When the Lord grants, the quality and quantity of the good of everyone in the other life is manifested before the angels; for it can be presented to view in the light of heaven, but not in the light of the world.  The case is the same in general, namely, in respect to the good of the church. The quantity and the quality of the good belonging to every individual, and to the church, are represented by weights and by measures in the Word; in the present case the quantity of the good of the spiritual church which is represented by the sons of Israel, by the ”omer of manna“ that was laid up before Jehovah to be kept.

AC 8534. As Jehovah commanded Moses.  That this signifies according to the mandate, is evident from the signification of ”commanding,“ when by Jehovah, as being a mandate (n. 8466, 8524).

AC 8535. And Aaron laid it up before the Testimony to be kept. That this signifies that it was in the presence of the Divine, is evident from the signification of ”laying up to be kept,“ as being for a memorial (n. 8526, 8533) and from the signification of ”before the Testimony,“ as being in the presence of the Divine. That ”the Testimony“ denotes the Divine is plain from what goes before, where it is said by Moses to Aaron that ”he should store it up before Jehovah“ (n. 8532), thus before the Divine.  That ”the Testimony“ denotes the Divine is because in the universal sense by ”the Testimony“ is meant the Word, and because the Word is truth Divine, thus the Lord.  That the Lord is ”the Word,“ is plain in John:--

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and God was the Word: and the Word was made flesh, and dwelt in as (John 1:1, 14).

That ”the Testimony“ denotes the Lord as to Divine truth is evident from the ark wherein was the Law published from Sinai, which is called ”the Testimony:“ that from this the tabernacle had all its sanctity, and that the Testimony was the holy Divine itself, is evident from the fact that above it was the propitiatory with the cherubs, and next outside the veil were the tables of gold with the loaves, and with the lamps; and that the most holy thing of worship was there administered by Aaron; also that Jehovah afterward spake with Moses there above the propitiatory between the two cherubs, thus from the Testimony (Exod. 25:16, 21, 22; 40:20).

AC 8536. Verses 35, 36.  And the sons of Israel did eat the manna forty years, until they came to a land inhabited; they did eat the manna until they came unto the border of the land of Canaan.  And an omer is the tenth part of an ephah.  ”And the sons of Israel did eat the manna forty years,“ signifies the appropriation of the good of truth in the state of all temptations; ”until they came to a land inhabited,“ signifies before they came to heaven, where good is everywhere; ”they did eat the manna until they came unto the border of the land of Canaan,“ signifies that there was appropriation of good from truth by them until they came to the region of heaven; ”and an omer is the tenth part of an ephah,“ signifies the amount of the good then.

AC 8537. And the sons of Israel did eat the manna forty years. That this signifies the appropriation of the good of truth in the state of all temptations, is evident from the representation of the sons of Israel, as being those who are of the spiritual church (n. 6426, 6637, 6862, 6868, 7035, 7062, 7198); from the signification of ”eating,“ as being appropriation (n. 3168, 3513, 3596, 4745); from the signification of ”the manna,“ as being the good of truth (n. 8464); and from the signification of ”forty years,“ as being states of temptations. ”Years“ denote states, (n. 482, 487, 488, 493, 893); and ”forty“ denotes temptations, (n. 730, 862, 2272, 2273, 8098).

AC 8538. Until they came to a land inhabited.  That this signifies before they came to heaven where good is everywhere, is evident from the signification of ”land,“ here the land of Canaan, as being the Lord‘s kingdom, thus heaven (n. 1607, 3038, 3481, 3686, 3705, 4240, 4447, 5136). Heaven is called ”a land inhabited“ from good, for ”inhabited“ signifies what is alive from good (n. 2268, 2451, 2712, 3613, 8269, 8309).

AC 8539. They did eat the manna until they came unto the border of the land of Canaan.  That this signifies that there was appropriation of good from truth by them until they came to the region of heaven, is evident from the signification of ”the manna,“ as being the good of truth; from the signification of ”eating,“ as being appropriation (n. 8537); and from the signification of ”the land of Canaan,“ as being heaven (n. 8538); thus ”the border of the land of Canaan“ denotes the entrance to heaven, or the region where heaven begins. From all this it is evident that by their ”eating the manna until they came to the border of the land of Canaan“ is signified that the good of truth was appropriated by them even up to the region of heaven.

[2] How the case herein is, is evident from what was said before concerning the acquisition of good by means of truth, namely, that before regeneration all good is procured by means of truth, but that after regeneration man is led of the Lord by means of good; and that the former state is signified by ”the six days“ which precede the seventh, and that the latter state is signified by ”the seventh day“ or ”the sabbath.“ From this it is also plain that the former state was represented by the journeyings of the sons of Israel in the wilderness forty years, and that the latter state was represented by their introduction into the land of Canaan.  The case herein is that man is outside of heaven so long as he acts from truth and not from good; and he comes into heaven when he acts from good, for he is then actuated by the Lord according to the order of heaven, into which he does not come, consequently not into heaven, where order is, until he has been prepared, which is effected for good through truth. On these two states, see (n. 7923, 8505, 8506, 8510, 8512, 8516).

AC 8540. And an omer is the tenth part of an ephah.  That this signifies the amount of the good then, is evident from the signification of ”an omer is the tenth part of an ephah,“ as being as much as is sufficient, for by ”ten“ is signified what is full (n. 3107), and therefore by ”a tenth part“ is signified as much as is sufficient (n. 8468) and from the signification of ”an ephah,“ as being good. That ”an ephah“ denotes good is because by it and by an omer were measured dry things that served for food, such as wheat, barley, fine flour; and by things that are used for food are signified goods: and by ”a bath“ and by ”a hin“ were measured liquids, which served for drink; consequently by these measures were signified truths.  The containant receives this signification from the contents.

[2] That the ephah was a measure is plain from the following passages:--

An ephah of justice, and a hin of justice, shall ye have (Lev.  19:36).

The ephah and the bath shall be one measure, because the ephah is the tenth of a homer (Ezek. 45:11).

Ye shall have balances of justice, and an ephah of justice, and a bath of justice (Ezek. 45:10).

It is in like manner a measure in (Amos 8:5).

[3] That ”an ephah“ denotes good is plain from the passages where the ”meat-offering“ is treated of, for which meal or fine flour was measured by an ephah (Lev. 5:11; Num. 5:15; 28:5; Ezek. 45:24; 46:7, 11).  The ”meat-offering“ signifies good.  And also from this passage in Zechariah:

The angel speaking in me said unto me, Lift up I pray thine eyes, What is this that goeth forth? and I said, What is it? He said, This is the ephah that goeth forth; he said moreover, This is their eye in all the earth.  And behold there was lifted up a talent of lead, and at the same time this woman sitting in the midst of the ephah. Then he said, she is evil, and he cast her into the midst of the ephah, and he cast a stone of lead upon the mouth thereof. And I lifted up mine eyes, and saw, when behold there came forth two women, and the wind was in their wings; they had two wings like the wings of a stork; and they lifted up the ephah between the earth and the heaven; and I said unto the angel that spake in me, Whither do these carry off the ephah? who said unto me, To build her a house in the land of Shinar; and it shall be prepared, and she shall abide there upon her seat (Zech. 5:5-11).

[4] What these things signify it is impossible for anyone to know except from the internal sense, and unless he thereby knows what is meant by ”the ephah,“ what by ”the woman in the midst of it,“ what by ”the stone of lead upon the mouth of the ephah,“ also what is meant by ”Shinar.“ When each detail is unfolded, it is clear that the profanation which was at that time in the church is signified; for by ”the ephah“ is signified good; by ”the woman,“ evil, as is there openly stated; by ”the stone of lead,“ falsity of evil shutting up, for ”a stone“ denotes external truth, and consequently in the opposite sense falsity (n. 643, 1298, 3720, 6426), and ”lead“ denotes evil (n. 8298). Thus by ”the woman in the midst of the ephah, upon the mouth of which was a stone of lead,“ is signified evil shut up in good by falsity, which is the same thing as profanation, for profanation is evil conjoined with good (n. 6348). ”The two women lifting up the ephah between the earth and the heaven“ denote the churches (n. 252, 253) by which what was profane was rejected; ”Shinar, whither the woman in the ephah was carried off“ denotes external worship, within which is what is profane (n. 1183, 1292).

CONTINUATION ABOUT THE SPIRITS AND INHABITANTS OF THE EARTH JUPITER

AC 8541. As regards their Divine worship, the chief point is that they acknowledge our Lord as the Most High, who rules heaven and earth; they call Him, The One Only Lord. And because they acknowledge and worship Him during the bodily life, they accordingly seek Him after death, and find that He is the same as our Lord. They were asked whether they know that the One Only Lord is a Man?  They answered that they all know that He is a Man, because on their earth He has been seen by many as a Man, and because He instructs them in the truth, preserves them, and gives eternal life to those who believe in Him. They said further that He has revealed to them how they should live, and how they should believe; and that what has been revealed is handed down by the parents to their children, and that thus the teaching spreads to all the families, and thus throughout the whole nation that is from one father. They added that they seem to themselves to have the teaching inscribed on their minds, which they conclude from the fact that they instantly perceive, and acknowledge as of themselves, whether what is said by others about the life of heaven with man is true, or not.

AC 8542. The greatest care is taken that no one should fall into wrong opinions about the One Only Lord; and if they observe that anyone begins to think wrongly about Him, they first admonish him, then deter him by means of threats, and finally by means of punishments. They said that they have observed that if any such thing has crept into any family, that family is taken from among then’, not by any death penalties inflicted by their companions, but by deprivation of breathing and consequently of life by spirits, after they have first been threatened with death. For on that earth spirits speak with the people, and chastise them if they have done evil, and also if they have intended to do evil (n. 7801-7812); consequently if they think badly about the One Only Lord, they are threatened with death unless they repent.  In this way the worship of the Lord, who to them is the supreme Divine, is preserved there.

AC 8543. They do not know that their One Only Lord was born a man on this earth. They said that it is of no concern to them to know this, but only to know that He is a Man, and directs the universe. when I said that on our earth He is named Jesus Christ, and that ”Christ“ means the Anointed or King, and ”Jesus“ Saviour, they said that they do not worship Him as a King, because royalty savors of what is worldly, but that they worship Him as the Saviour. And because a doubt was injected by the spirits of our earth, whether their One Only Lord is the same as our Lord, they removed the doubt by recalling that they had seen Him in the Sun, and that they recognized that it was He whom they had seen on their earth. On this subject see (n. 7173); and that our Lord is the Sun of heaven, (n. 1053, 3636, 3643, 4060, 4321, 5097, 7078, 7083, 7171, 7173).

AC 8544. When the spirits of the earth Jupiter had stayed with me for several weeks, there suddenly flowed into them a doubt whether their One Only Lord is the same as our Lord; but this doubt, which inflowed in a moment, was also dissipated in a moment. It flowed in from some spirits from our earth; and then to my surprise, the spirits of Jupiter blushed with shame so great at their for a moment doubting it, that they told me not to publish it on this earth, lest they should be charged with some unbelief on that account, when yet they now know it better than others.

AC 8545. There were spirits from the earth Jupiter with me while I was reading the seventeenth chapter of John, about the Lords love, and about His glorification; and then they heard what is there written, a holy influence took possession of them, and they confessed that all things therein are Divine. But then spirits from our earth who were unbelievers continually suggested objections, saying that He was born an infant, lived a man, appeared like other men, was crucified, and the like. But the spirits of the earth Jupiter paid no attention to these things.  They said that such are their devils, whom they abhor, adding that nothing heavenly finds room in the minds of those spirits of our earth, but only what is earthly, which they call dross. That such is the case, they found out with certainty from the fact that when those spirits heard that on their earth the inhabitants walk naked, obscenity at once took possession of their thoughts, and they paid no attention to their heavenly life, of which they heard at the same time (n. 8375).

AC 8546. Once also I talked with the spirits of the earth Jupiter about the Lord, saying that no one can do any good from himself, but from the Lord, who is Good itself, consequently the fountain of all good. They then modestly replied that they suppose they can do good of themselves, and do not know otherwise. But when it was shown them that all good comes solely from the Lord, they said that they spoke after the human manner, and that this was said in a heavenly manner, and that their angels so think, and they themselves also, in so far as they become angels. They added that it is simpler to speak in that way. It was then given to reply that the Lord allows those who live in simplicity and innocence so to speak, provided they know that nothing of good comes from themselves, but all from the Lord.

AC 8547. The spirits of the earth Jupiter were very much affected, and rejoiced, when they heard it said that the One Only Lord is the only Man, and that all have from Him that they are called men; but that they are men in so far as they be. become images of Him, that is, in so far as they love Him and love he neighbor, thus in so far as they are in good; for the good of love and of faith is the Lord‘s image.


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