HEAVENLY SECRETS
Emanuel Swedenborg

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AC EXODUS Chapter 25

THE DOCTRINE OF CHARITY AND OF FAITH

AC 9443. The Forgiveness of Sins shall now be spoken of.

AC 9444. The sins done by a man are rooted in his very life, and make it; and therefore no one is liberated from them unless he receives new life from the Lord, which is effected by means of regeneration.

AC 9445. That from himself a man cannot do what is good or think what is true; but only from the Lord, is evident in John:--

A man can do nothing except it be given him from heaven (John 3:27).

He that abideth in Me, and I in him, the same beareth much fruit; for without Me ye can do nothing (John 15:5).

From this it is evident that no one can withdraw anyone from sins, thus forgive them, save the Lord alone.

AC 9446. The Lord continually flows into man with the good of love and the truths of faith; but these are variously received; being received in one way by one person, and in a different way by another; by those who have been regenerated they are received well; but by those who do not suffer themselves to be regenerated they are received ill.

AC 9447. Those who have been regenerated are continually kept by the Lord in the good of faith and of love, and are then withheld from evils and falsities.  And those who do not suffer themselves to be regenerated by the Lord are also withheld from evil and kept in good, for good and truth continually flow in from the Lord with every man; but the infernal loves in which they are, namely, the loves of self and of the world, stand in the way, and turn the influx of good into evil, and that of truth into falsity.

AC 9448. From all this it is evident what the Forgiveness of Sins is. To be able to be kept by the Lord in the good of love, and the truths of faith, and to be withheld from evils and falsities, is the Forgiveness of Sins. And to shun evil and falsity, and to feel aversion for them, is then Repentance.  But these are possible only with those who, through regeneration, have received new life from the Lord; because these things belong to the new life.

AC 9449. The signs that sins have been forgiven are the following.  Delight is felt in worshiping God for the sake of God; in being of service to the neighbor for the sake of the neighbor; thus in doing good for the sake of good, and in believing truth for the sake of truth There is an unwillingness to merit by anything that belongs to charity and faith. Evils, such as enmities, hatreds, revenges, unmercifulness, adulteries, in a word, all things that are against God and against the neighbor, are shunned and are held in aversion.

AC 9450. But the signs that sins have not been forgiven are the following. God is not worshiped for the sake of God; and the neighbor is not served for the sake of the neighbor; thus good is not done and truth is not spoken for the sake of good and truth, but for the sake of self and the world.  There is a desire to merit by our deeds; others are despised in comparison with ourselves; delight is felt in evils, such as enmities, hatred, revenge, cruelty, adulteries; and the holy things of the church are held in contempt, and are at heart denied.

AC 9451. When sins have been forgiven, they are believed to be wiped off, and washed away as dirt is with water. Nevertheless they remain in the man; and their being said to be “wiped off” is from the appearance when the man is withheld from them.

AC 9452. The Lord regenerates a man from Divine Mercy. This is done from his infancy down to the last of his life in the world, and afterward to eternity.  Thus it is from Divine Mercy that the Lord withdraws a man from evils and falsities, and leads him to the truths of faith and goods of love, and afterward keeps him in these.  And after this, in Divine Mercy He raises him to Himself in heaven, and makes him happy.  All this is what is meant by the Forgiveness of Sins from Mercy.  They who believe that sins are forgiven in any other way, are quite mistaken; for it would be the absence of mercy to see a multitude of men in the hells, and not save them, if it could be done in any other way. And yet the Lord is mercy itself, and wills not the death of anyone, but that he may live.

AC 9453. Consequently those who do not suffer themselves to be regenerated, thus who do not suffer themselves to be withheld from evils and falsities, remove and cast away from themselves these mercies of the Lord. Therefore it is the man who is in fault if he cannot be saved.

AC 9454. This is what is meant in John:--

As many as received Him, to them gave He power to be sons of God, to them that believe in His name; who were born, not of bloods, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God (John 1:12, 13);

“of bloods” denotes those who are opposed to the goods of faith and of charity; “of the will of the flesh” denotes those who are in evils from the loves of self and of the world; “of the will of man” denotes those who are in falsities thence derived; to be “born of God” denotes to be regenerated.  That no one can come into heaven unless he is regenerated, is taught in the same:--

Verily, verily I say unto thee, Except a man be born anew, be cannot see the kingdom of God. Verily, verily, I say unto thee, Except a man be born of water and of the spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God (John 3:3, 5);

“to be born of water” denotes through the truth of faith; and “to be born of the spirit” denotes through the good of love. From all this it can now be seen who they are whose sins have been forgiven; and who they are whose sins have not been forgiven.

EXODUS 25:1-40

1. And Jehovah spake unto Moses, saying,

2. Speak unto the sons of Israel, and let them take for Me a collection; from every man whom his heart hath moved willingly ye shall take My collection.

3. And this is the collection which ye shall take from them; gold, and silver, and brass:

4. And blue, and crimson, and scarlet double-dyed, and fine linen, and goats‘ wool:

5. And skins of red rams, and badgers’ skins, and shittim wood:

6. Oil for the luminary, spices for the oil of anointing, and for the incense of spices:

7. Onyx stones, and stones for filling, for the ephod, and for the breastplate.

8. And let them make for Me a sanctuary, that I may dwell in the midst of them.

9. According to all that I show thee, the form of the Habitation, and the form of all the vessels thereof, even so shall ye make it.

10. And let them make an ark of shittim wood; two cubits and a half the length thereof, and a cubit and a half the breadth thereof, and a cubit and a half the height thereof.

11. And thou shalt overlay it with pure gold, from within and from without shalt thou overlay it, and shalt make upon it a border of gold round about.

12. And thou shalt cast four rings of gold for it, and put them upon the four corners thereof; and two rings shall be on the one side of it, and two rings on the other side of it.

13. And thou shalt make staves of shittim wood, and overlay them with gold.

14. And thou shalt put the staves into the rings on the sides of the ark, to carry the ark withal.

15. The staves shall be in the rings of the ark; they shall not be removed from it.

16. And thou shalt put into the ark the Testimony which I shall give thee.

17. And thou shalt make a propitiatory of pure gold; two cubits and a half the length thereof, and a cubit and a half the breadth thereof.

18. And thou shalt make two cherubs, of solid gold shalt thou make them, at the two ends of the propitiatory.

19. And make one cherub at the one end, and one cherub at the other end; out of the propitiatory shall ye make the cherubs upon the two ends thereof.

20. And the cherubs shall spread out their wings upward, covering with their wings over the propitiatory, and their faces a man‘s to his brother; toward the propitiatory shall be the faces of the cherubs.

21. And thou shalt put the propitiatory upon the ark from above; and unto the ark thou shalt put the Testimony that I shall give unto thee.

22. And there I will meet with thee, and I will speak with thee from above the propitiatory, from between the two cherubs which are over the ark of the Testimony, all that I shall command thee for the sons of Israel.

23. And thou shalt make a table of shittim wood; two cubits the length thereof, and a cubit the breadth thereof, and a cubit and a half the height thereof.

24. And thou shalt overlay it with pure gold, and make thereto a border of gold round about.

25. And thou shalt make unto it a closure of a hand-breadth round about, and thou shalt make a border of gold for the closure thereof round about.

26. And thou shalt make for it four rings of gold, and put the rings upon the four corners that are on the four feet thereof.

27. Over against the closure shall the rings be, for houses for the staves to carry the table.

28. And thou shalt make the staves of shittim wood, and overlay them with gold, and the table shall be carried with them.

29. And thou shalt make the little dishes thereof, and the cups thereof, and the salvers thereof, and the little brooms thereof, with which it shall be covered; of pure gold shalt thou make them.

30. And thou shalt set upon the table the bread of faces, unto My faces continually.

31. And thou shalt make a lampstand of pure gold; solid shall the lampstand be made, its shaft, and its reed; its cups, its pomegranates, and its flowers, shall be out of it:

32. And there shall be six reeds going out of the sides there of; three reeds of the lampstand out of the one side thereof, and three reeds of the lampstand out of the other side thereof:

33. Three almond-shaped cups in one reed, a pomegranate and a flower; and three almond-shaped cups in one reed, a pomegranate and a flower; so for the six reeds going out of the lampstand.

34. And in the lampstand four almond-shaped cups, its pomegranates and its flowers.

35. And a pomegranate under two reeds out of it, and a pomegranate under two reeds out of it, and a pomegranate under two reeds out of it, for the six reeds going out of the lampstand.

36. Their pomegranates and their reeds shall be out of it, all of them, one solid of pure gold.

37. And thou shalt make the lamps thereof seven; and it shall make its lamps go up, to give light over against the faces of it.

38. And the tongs thereof, and the basins thereof, shall be of pure gold.

39. A talent of pure gold shall it be made, with all these vessels.

40. And see and make them in the form which thou wast made to see in the mountain.

THE CONTENTS

AC 9455. In this chapter is described the collection that was made for the tabernacle, for the tables therein, and also for the garments of Aaron; likewise the construction of the ark, of the table for the bread, and of the lampstand; by which were represented the heavens where the Lord is, and all the celestial and spiritual things which are from the Lord therein. By the Habitation was represented heaven itself; by the ark in it, the inmost heaven; by the Testimony or law in the ark, the Lord; by the breads of faces upon the table, and by the lampstand, the celestial things; and by the garments of Aaron the spiritual things, which are from the Lord in the heavens.

THE INTERNAL SENSE

AC 9456. Verses 1, 2.  And Jehovah spake unto Moses, saying, Speak unto the sons of Israel, and let them take for Me a collection; from every man whom his heart hath moved willingly ye shall take My collection.  “And Jehovah spake unto Moses, saying,” signifies instruction concerning the holy things of heaven that were to be represented; “Speak unto the sons of Israel,” signifies the representative church; “and let them take for Me a collection,” signifies the interior things of worship that were to be represented, and that are the things required; “from every man whom his heart hath moved willingly,” signifies that all things should be from love and thus from freedom; “ye shall take My collection,” signifies the things required for worship.

AC 9457. And Jehovah spake unto Moses, saying.  That this signifies instruction concerning the holy things of heaven that were to be represented, is evident from what follows; for by “what Jehovah spake unto Moses” are signified the holy things of heaven that were to be represented.  For among the Israelitish people there was instituted a church in which were to be representatively presented in an external form the celestial things of the good of love and the spiritual things of the good and truth of faith, such as are in heaven, and such as must be in the church.  From this it is evident that by “Jehovah spake,” is signified instruction concerning the holy things of heaven that were to be represented.  Inasmuch as the things that follow are representative of the celestial and spiritual things which are in the heavens from the Lord, it shall be told what a representative church is, and why it was instituted.

[2] There are three heavens: the inmost or third; the middle or second; and the ultimate or first. In the inmost heaven reigns the good of love to the Lord; in the middle heaven, the good of charity toward the neighbor; and in the ultimate heaven are represented the things which are thought, said, and come forth in the middle and inmost heavens.  The representatives in this heaven are countless, consisting of paradises, gardens, forests, fields, plains; also of cities, palaces, houses; likewise of flocks and herds, animals and birds of many kinds, besides numberless other things.  These things appear before the eyes of the angelic spirits there more clearly than similar things appear in the light of noon on earth; and wonderful to say, their signification also is perceived.

[3] Such things appeared also to the prophets when their interior sight, which is the sight of the spirit, was opened; as horses to Zechariah (Zech. 6:1-8); animals that were cherubs, and afterward the new temple with all things belonging to it, to Ezekiel (Ezekiel 1, 9, 10, 40, 48); a lampstand, thrones, animals that also were cherubs, horses, the New Jerusalem, and many other things, to John, as described in the Revelation; in like manner horses and chariots of fire to the young man of Elisha (2 Kings 6:17).  Things like these appear constantly in heaven before the eyes of spirits and angels, and they are natural forms in which the internal things of heaven terminate, and in which they are portrayed, and are thus presented to view before the very eyes.  These things are representations.

[4] A church is therefore representative when the internal holy things of love and faith from the Lord and to the Lord are presented to view by means of forms visible in the world; as in this chapter and the following by the ark, the propitiatory, the cherubs, the tables there, the lampstand, and all the other things of the tabernacle. For this tabernacle was so constructed as to represent the three heavens and all things therein; and the ark, in which was the Testimony, so as to represent the inmost heaven and the Lord Himself therein.  Therefore its form was shown to Moses in the mountain, Jehovah then saying that they should “make for Him a sanctuary, and He would dwell in the midst of them” (verse 8).  Everyone who has some capacity of thinking interiorly can perceive that Jehovah could not dwell in a tent, but that He dwells in heaven; and that this tent could not be called a sanctuary unless it referred to heaven, and to the celestial and spiritual things therein.  Consider what it would be for Jehovah, the Creator of heaven and earth, to dwell in a small habitation of wood, overlaid with gold and surrounded with curtains, unless heaven and the things of heaven had been there represented in a form.

[5] For the things represented in a form do indeed appear in a like form in the lowest or first heaven before the spirits who are there; but in the higher heavens are perceived the internal things which are represented, and which as before said are the celestial things of love to the Lord, and the spiritual things of faith in the Lord. Such were the things that filled heaven when Moses and the people were in a holy external, and adored this tent as the habitation of Jehovah Himself.  From this it is plain what a representative is, and also that through it heaven, thus the Lord, was present with man.

[6] Therefore when the Ancient Church ceased, a representative church was instituted among the Israelitish people, in order that by means of such representatives there might be the conjunction of heaven, thus of the Lord, with the human race; for without the conjunction of the Lord through heaven, man would perish, because he has his life by virtue of this conjunction.  These representatives however were only external means of conjunction, with which the Lord miraculously conjoined heaven (n. 4311). But when the conjunction through these things also perished, the Lord came into the world and opened the internal things themselves that were represented, which are those of love and faith in Him.  These internal things now effect the conjunction; nevertheless at the present day the only means of conjunction is the Word, because it has been so written that each and all things therein correspond, and thus represent and signify the Divine things that are in the heavens.

AC 9458. Speak unto the sons of Israel.  That this signifies the representative church, is evident from the representation of the sons of Israel, as being the church, specifically the spiritual church (n. 8805, 9340), but here the representative church, because such things are treated of as represented the holy things of the church and of heaven, namely, the ark, the propitiatory, the cherubs, the table upon which were the breads of faces, the lampstand; and in following chapters the tabernacle, the garments of Aaron, the altar, and the sacrifices, all of which were representative.  That the spiritual church is signified by “the sons of Israel” is because it was represented by them. But that with that people a representative church could not be instituted; but only the representative of a church, (n. 4281, 4288, 4311, 4444, 4500, 6304, 7048, 9320).

AC 9459. And let them take for Me a collection.  That hereby are signified the interior things of worship that were to be represented, and that are the things required, is evident from the signification of “a collection,” as being the things required for worship, here the interior things that were to be represented; for such are signified by the things collected for the tent, for the tables, for the lampstand, and also for the garments of Aaron; namely, gold, silver, brass, blue, crimson, scarlet double-dyed, fine linen, goats’ wool, and many other things; as is evident from their signification, which is treated of in what follows.

AC 9460. From every man who in his heart hath moved willingly. That this signifies that all things should be from love, and thus from freedom, is evident from the signification of “whom his heart hath moved willingly,” as being from freedom.  That it denotes from love, is because all freedom is of love, for that which a man does from love, he does from freedom. That the “heart” denotes that which is of the love because of the will, (n. 7542, 8910, 9050, 9113, 9300); and that all freedom is of love or of affection, (n. 2870-2893, 3158, 9096); consequently that worship must be from freedom, (n. 1947, 2880, 2881, 7349).

AC 9461. Ye shall take My collection.  That this signifies the things required for worship, is evident from the signification of a “collection,” as being the interior things of worship which were to be represented, and which are required (n. 9459).

AC 9462. Verses 3-7.  And this is the collection which ye shall take from them; gold, and silver, and brass; and blue, and crimson, and scarlet double-dyed, and fine linen, and goats‘ wool; and skins of red rams, and badgers’ skins, and shittim wood; oil for the luminary, spices for the oil of anointing, and for the incense of spices; onyx stones, and stones for filling, for the ephod, and for the breastplate.  “And this is the collection which ye shall take from them,” signifies that these things shall by all means be required; “gold and silver,” signifies good and truth in general; “and brass,” signifies external good; “and blue,” signifies the celestial love of truth; “and crimson,” signifies the celestial love of good; “and scarlet double-dyed,” signifies mutual love; “and fine linen,” signifies the truth thence derived; “and goats‘ wool,” signifies the good thence derived; “and skins of red rams, and badgers’ skins,” signifies the external truths and goods by which they are held together; “and shittim wood,” signifies the goods of merit which are from the Lord, thus of the Lord alone; “oil for the luminary,” signifies the internal good which is in mutual love and charity; “spices for the oil of anointing,” signifies the internal truths that belong to the inaugurating good; “and for the incense of spices,” signifies for acceptable perception; “onyx stones, and stones for filling,” signifies spiritual truths and goods in general; “for the ephod, and for the breastplate,” signifies which should be for a covering for external and internal celestial things.

AC 9463. And this is the collection which ye shall take from them.  That this signifies that these things shall by all means be required, is evident from the signification of “the collection,” as being the things required (n. 9459, 9461). That it signifies that they should by all means be required, is because it is here said a third time, and repetition implies necessity.

AC 9464. Gold, and silver.  That this signifies internal good and truth in general, is evident from the signification of “gold,” as being good, and of “silver,” as being truth (n. 113, 1551, 1552, 2954, 5658, 6112, 6914, 6917, 8932).  That internal good and truth are meant is because by “brass,” which follows, is signified external good.

AC 9465. And brass.  That this signifies external good, is evident from the signification of “brass,” as being natural good, or what is the same thing, external good (n. 425, 1551). External good is the good of the external or natural man; but internal good is the good of the internal or spiritual man.

AC 9466. And blue.  That this signifies the celestial love of truth, is evident from the signification of “blue” (hyacinthinum), as being the celestial love of truth.  That “blue” by this signification, is because it belongs to the color of the sky, and because by this color is signified truth from a celestial origin, which is truth from the good of love to the Lord. This good reigns in the inmost heaven, and in the middle or second heaven it is presented to view as crimson and blue; the good itself as crimson, and the derivative truth as blue. For in the other life, and in heaven itself, there appear most beautiful colors, all deriving their origin from good and truth.  For the sphere of the affections of good and truth is sensibly presented before the eyes of angels and spirits by means of colors, and specific things by variously colored objects. They are presented to the nostrils also by means of odors. For everything celestial, which is of good, and everything spiritual, which is of truth, is represented in the lower heavens by such things as appear in nature, thus to the very senses of the spirits and angels there.  The reason why the spheres of the affection of good and truth are visibly presented by means of colors, is that the colors are modifications of heavenly light, thus of intelligence and wisdom (n. 4530, 4677, 4742, 4922).

[2] This then is the reason why among the things that were collected for the tabernacle, and for the garments of Aaron, were blue, crimson, scarlet double-dyed, and skins of red rams; for by the tabernacle was represented the heaven of the Lord, and by the things of which it was constructed and woven together were represented the celestial and spiritual things that belong to good and truth; in like manner by the garments of Aaron (n. 9457).  This is the reason why the veil, within which was the ark of the testimony, was woven of blue, crimson, scarlet double-dyed, and fine linen (Exod. 26:31); in like manner the covering for the door of the tent (Exod.  26:36), and likewise the covering of the gate of the court (Exod. 27:16); also why the loops upon the edge of the curtain were of blue (Exod. 26:4). Therefore also it was that the ephod was of gold, blue, crimson, scarlet double-dyed, and fine linen, all interwoven; and likewise the breastplate of judgment (Exod. 28:6, 15).

[3] By “blue” is signified the celestial love of truth, and by “garments of blue,” the knowledges of truth from this love, in Ezekiel:--

Fine linen with broidered work from Egypt was thy spread, that it might be to thee for a sign; blue and crimson from the isles of Elishah were thy covering. These were thy traders with perfect things, with bales of blue and broidered work, and with treasures of precious garments (Ezek. 27:7, 24);

speaking of Tyre, by which are signified the knowledges of truth and good (n. 1201); knowledge and the derivative intelligence are described by “broidered work from Egypt,” and by “blue and crimson from the isles of Elishah;” “broidered work from Egypt” being the memory-knowledge of truth; “blue and crimson from the isles of Elishah” being the intelligence of truth and good.

[4] In the same:--

Two women, the daughters of one mother, committed whoredoms in Egypt in their youth, Oholah and Oholibah.  Oholah committed whoredom under Me; and doted on the Assyrians her neighbors, clothed in blue, commanders and leaders; horsemen riding on horses (Ezek. 23:2-6);

“Oholah” is Samaria, “Oholibah” is Jerusalem (Ezek. 23:4). “Samaria” here denotes the spiritual church perverted; “committing whoredom in Egypt” denotes falsifying truths by means of memory-knowledges; “doting on the Assyrians her neighbors” denotes to love the consequent reasonings; “clothed with blue” denotes the appearances of the truth that is from good, because from the literal sense of the Word wrongly unfolded.

[5] In like manner in Jeremiah:--

Silver beaten out is brought from Tarshish, and gold from Uphaz, the work of the smith and of the hands of the metal-caster; blue and crimson are their clothing; all the work of the wise (Jer. 10:9);

speaking of the idols of the house of Israel, by which are signified false doctrinal things confirmed from the external sense of the Word badly unfolded (n. 9424); “the work of the smith and of the hands of the metal-caster,” and also “they are all the work of the wise,” denote that it was from self-intelligence; “silver from Tarshish, and gold from Uphaz” denote truth and good so appearing in the external form, because from the Word; in like manner “blue and crimson,” which were “their clothing.”

[6] In John:--

I saw the horses in the vision, and them that sat on them, having breastplates as of fire and of blue and of sulphur, by whom was the third part of men killed (Rev. 9:17, 18);

where “horses and they that sat on them” denote the inverted and perverted understanding of truth; “breastplates as of fire, of blue, and of sulphur” denote the defense of falsities that are from the evils of diabolical loves.  Here therefore “fire” denotes the infernal love of evil; and “blue” the infernal love of falsity; thus in the opposite sense; for most things in the Word have also an opposite sense.

AC 9467. And crimson.  That this signifies the celestial love of good, is evident from the signification of “crimson,” as being the celestial love of good.  The reason why this is signified by “crimson,” is that by a red color is signified the good of celestial love.  For there are two fundamental colors from which come the rest: the color red, and the color white.  The color “red” signifies the good which is of love; and the color “white” signifies the truth which is of faith.  That the color “red” signifies the good which is of love, is because it comes from fire, and “fire” denotes the good of love; and the color “white” signifies the truth which is of faith, because it comes from light, and “light” denotes the truth of faith. That “fire” denotes the good of love, (n. 5215, 6314, 6832, 6834, 6849, 7324, 9434); and that “light” denotes the truth of faith, (n. 2776, 3195, 3636, 3643, 3993, 4302, 4413, 4415, 5400, 8644, 8707, 8861, 9399, 9407); that “red” denotes the good of love, (n. 3300); and “white,” the truth of faith, (n. 3993, 4007, 5319).

[2] From this it is evident what the remaining colors signify; for in so far as they partake of red they signify the good of love; and in so far as they partake of white they signify the truth of faith; for all the colors that appear in heaven are modifications of heavenly light and flame upon these two planes.  For heavenly light is real light, and in itself is the Divine truth that proceeds from the Divine good of the Lord; wherefore the modifications of this light and flame are variegations of truth and good, thus of intelligence and wisdom.

[3] This shows why the veils and curtains of the tent, and also the garments of Aaron, were to be woven of blue, crimson, scarlet double-dyed, and fine linen (Exod. 26:1, 31, 36; 27:16; 28:6, 15); namely, that by these things might be represented the celestial things that belong to good, and the spiritual things that belong to truth.

[4] Good from a celestial origin is signified by “crimson” also in Ezekiel:--

Fine linen with broidered work from Egypt was thy spread, blue and crimson from the Isles of Elishah were thy covering (Ezek. 27:7);

speaking of Tyre, by which are signified the knowledges of truth and good; “blue and crimson for a covering” denote the knowledges of truth and good from a celestial origin.

[5] Like things are signified by “crimson and fine linen” in Luke:--

There was a certain rich man, who was clothed in crimson and fine linen, and fared splendidly every day (Luke 16:19);

by the “rich man” was meant in the internal sense the Jewish nation and the church among them, which was called “rich” from the knowledges of good and truth from the Word there existing; “garments of crimson and fine linen” denote these knowledges; “garments of crimson,” the knowledges of good; and “garments of fine linen,” the knowledges of truth; both from a celestial origin, because from the Divine.  The like is also signified by “crimson” in the Revelation:--

A woman sitting upon a scarlet beast, arrayed in crimson and scarlet (Rev. 17:3, 4);

treating of Babylon, by which is signified the church wherein the holy things of the Word are applied to profane uses, that is, to such as aim at dominions in heaven and on earth; thus from the infernal love of self and of the world.

AC 9468. And scarlet double-dyed.  That this signifies mutual love, is evident from the signification of “scarlet,” and of “double-dyed,” as being celestial truth, which is the same as the good of mutual love. There are two kingdoms into which the angelic heaven has been divided - the celestial kingdom, and the spiritual kingdom; and in each there is an internal and an external. The internal in the celestial kingdom is the good of love to the Lord, and the external is the good of mutual love. It is this latter good which is signified by “scarlet double-dyed;” by “scarlet” the good itself, and by “double-dyed” its truth. But in the spiritual kingdom the internal is the good of charity toward the neighbor, and the external is the good of obedience from faith. That “scarlet double-dyed” signifies the good of mutual love and its truth, is from its appearance in the other life; for when the sphere of this good and truth is presented to view in the lowest heaven, it appears of a scarlet color; because that which flows down from the celestial heaven and appears beneath, takes its color from flame, and beneath becomes scarlet from the shining whiteness of the light of the middle heaven, through which it passes. Hence, it is that among other colors, scarlet double-dyed was employed upon the curtains of the Habitation (Exod. 26:1); upon the veil before the ark (Exod.  26:31); upon the covering for the door of the tent (Exod.  26:36); upon the covering at the gate of the court (Exod.  27:16); upon the ephod (Exod. 28:6); upon the belt (Exod. 28:8) upon the breastplate of judgment (Exod.  28:15); and upon the fringes of the robe of the ephod (Exod.  28:33).

[2] That “ scarlet double-dyed” signifies the good of mutual love, which is the external good of the celestial kingdom or church, is evident from the fact that a cloth of scarlet double-dyed was to be spread over the table on which were the breads of faces, and that it was to be covered next with a covering of badgers‘ skins (Num. 4:8).  For the inmost things that belong to the celestial kingdom or church, were signified by the things upon the table, especially by the breads; but exterior things by the coverings.  From this also it is that the things to be collected are enumerated in this order; namely, the inmost things first, which were blue and crimson; the more outward things in the second place, which were scarlet double-dyed, fine linen, and goats’ wool; and lastly the outermost things, which were skins of red rams and badgers‘ skins; in like manner everywhere in what follows.

[3] As external celestial good and its truth are signified by “scarlet double-dyed,” therefore the Word as to the external sense, and its derivative doctrine, are expressed by this color, for the reason that the Word is the Divine truth that proceeds from the Divine good of the Lord, and this appears as a flaming light in the inmost heaven, and as a shining white light in the middle heaven.

[4] The Word and its derivative doctrine are thus expressed in the second book of Samuel:--

David lamented a lamentation over Saul and over Jonathan; and he wrote down to teach the sons of Judah the bow.  Ye daughters of Israel weep over Saul, who clothed you in double-dyed with delights, who put an ornament of gold upon your apparel (2 Samuel 1:17, 18, 24);

“to clothe in double-dyed” denotes to instruct in the truths that belong to the good of mutual love, thus in truths from a celestial origin. The subject treated of in this prophetic utterance is the doctrine of faith separated from the doctrine of love and charity; namely, that through the doctrine of faith separated, truths are extinguished, but are restored through the doctrine of love and charity. For by “the Philistines,” by whom Saul and Jonathan were slain, are signified those who are in the doctrine of faith separated from the doctrine of love and charity (n. 3412, 3413, 8093, 8096, 8099, 8313); and by “teaching the sons of Judah the bow” is signified instructing in the truths of doctrine those who are in the good of love and charity. That “the sons of Judah” denote those who are in the good of love, (n. 3654, 3881, 5583, 5603, 5782, 5794, 5833, 6363); and that a “bow” denotes the doctrine of truth, (n. 2686, 2709).

[5] In Jeremiah:--

Thou therefore, O wasted one, what wilt thou do? Though thou clothest thyself with double-dyed, though thou deckest thee with an ornament of gold, in vain shalt thou make thyself beautiful (Jer. 4:30);

the church that has been laid waste is here treated of; “clothing herself with double-dyed,” and “decking herself with an ornament of gold,” denotes to teach the truths of doctrine that are from a celestial origin, and the goods of life, consequently truths and gods from the Word. In like manner in the same:--

They that did eat delicacies have been laid waste in the streets; thee that were brought up upon scarlet have embraced a dunghill (Lam. 4:5);

“to be brought up upon scarlet” denotes to be instructed from the Word from infancy in the good of mutual love.

[6] As the things that belong to the external sense of the Word appear in heaven of a scarlet color, for the reason spoken of above, therefore they who apply the external sense of the Word to the confirmation of falsities from the evils of the love of self and of the world, and thus to those which are contrary to the truths and goods of love to the Lord and of mutual love, are said to be “clothed in crimson and scarlet;” for so do their outward things appear, because they are from the Word; but their internal things are profane.  Such things are signified by “scarlet” in John:--

I saw a woman sitting upon a scarlet beast, full of names of blasphemy; she was clothed in crimson and scarlet (Rev. 17:3, 4);

speaking of Babylon, by which is meant a religion in which the holy things of the Word are profaned by being applied to falsities that favor diabolical loves, which are the loves of self and of the world, thus to gaining dominion in the heavens and on earth.  Again in the same:--

The great city that was clothed in fine linen, and crimson, and scarlet; and gilded with gold, and precious stone, and pearls (Rev. 18:16).

Therefore also among the merchandise of Babylon are enumerated “fine linen, crimson, and scarlet” (Rev. 18:12).

[7] As the external of the Word appears in heaven of a scarlet color, and as there is an influx out of heaven into man’s memory, in which what is drawn from the Word appears of such a color, therefore scarlet was employed in relation to the remembrance of things; as in Moses:--

The sons of Israel shall make them a train upon the borders of their garments, and shall put upon the train of the border a scarlet   thread, that by it they may remember all the commandments of Jehovah, and do them (Num. 15:38, 39).

[8] For the same reason also it was customary in ancient time when significatives were in use, to bind a scarlet thread for the remembrance or recollection of a thing, as we read of Perez the son of Tamar, upon whose hand “the midwife bound a double dyed thread” (Gen. 38:28, 30); and as we read of the harlot Rahab, who “bound a scarlet thread in the window, that the spies might remember their promise” (Josh. 2:18, 21).

[9] As a man cannot be withdrawn from evils and falsities except by means of the truths and goods that are with him from the Word, therefore in the cleansing of leprosy there were employed “cedar wood, scarlet, and hyssop” (Lev. 14:4-7, 49-52); for “leprosy” denotes truth profaned, thus falsified (n. 6963); and “to be cleansed from” these things denotes to be withdrawn from them by means of the truths and goods which are from the Word. In like manner scarlet was employed “in the waters of separation and expiation made from a red heifer” (Num. 19:6); “the waters of separation and expiation” also signified purification and withdrawal from evils and falsities by means of truths and goods from the Word.

[10] As most things have an opposite sense, so also have “double-dyed” and “scarlet,” and then they signify falsities and evils which are opposed to the before-mentioned truths and goods; as in Isaiah:--

Though your sins be as double-dyed, they shall be as white as snow; though they be red as scarlet, they shall be as wool (Isa. 1:18);

the case herein is the same as with “red,” with “blood,” with “flame,” and with “fire,” which in the genuine sense signify the goods of love and of faith; but in the opposite sense the evils contrary to them.

AC 9469. And fine linen.  That this signifies the truth thence derived, namely, from the good which is from a celestial origin, is evident from the signification of “linen,” as being truth (n. 7601); and from that of “fine linen,” as being truth from the Divine (n. 5319); both in the natural man.  That “fine linen” denotes truth from a celestial origin, is because of its whiteness and softness.

AC 9470. And goats‘ wool.  That this signifies the good thence derived, namely, from the good of mutual love, is evident from the signification of a “she-goat,” as being the good of innocence in the external or natural man (n. 3519, 7840); and from the signification of the “wool” thereof, as being the truth of this good. But as good is here signified, and not truth, therefore in the original tongue it is not said “goats’ wool,” but only “goats,” as also in other passages; as in the following in Exodus:--

All the women that were wise brought that which they had spun, the blue, the crimson, the scarlet double-dyed, the fine linen. And they whose heart stirred them up, spun goats (Exod.  35:25, 26);

“to spin goats” denotes what was made from the wool of goats.

[2] But that “wool” denotes truth from a celestial origin, which in itself is good, is evident from the passages in the Word where it is mentioned; as in Hosea:--

She said, I will go after my lovers, that give me my bread and my water, my wool and my flax. Therefore will I return, and take my grain in its time, and will rescue My wool and My flax (Hosea 2:5, 9);

the perverted church is here treated of, which is here called the “mother;” the “lovers” with whom she is said to have “committed whoredom,” denote those who pervert goods and truths; “bread and water” denote the internal goods of love and truths of faith; “wool and flax” denote the same, but external.

[3] In Daniel:--

I beheld till the thrones were cast forth, and the Ancient of Days did sit; His garment was like the white snow, and the hair of His head was like the clean wool (Daniel 7:9);

the vastation of the church in respect to all the truth of faith, and its restoration by the Lord, are here treated of; a complete vastation is signified by “the thrones being cast forth;” “the Ancient of Days” denotes the Lord as to celestial good, such as was in the Most Ancient Church, which was a celestial church, and which in the Word is called “ancient;” its external truth is signified by the “garment that was like the white snow;” and its external good by the “hair of the head that was like the clean wool.” In like manner in John:--

In the midst of the seven lampstands was one like to the Son of man; His head and His hair were white as white wool, as snow (Rev. 1:13, 14).

[4] Such truth, which being a form of celestial good, is in itself good, is also signified by “wool” in these passages Damascus was thy merchant in wine of Helbon, and wool of Zachar (Ezek. 27:18).

Though your sins be as double-dyed, they shall be as white as snow; though they be red like scarlet, they shall be as wool (Isa. 1:18).

[5] As by the garments of Aaron were represented such things as belong to the Lord‘s spiritual kingdom, thus the spiritual things or truth, his garments of holiness were of linen, and not of wool; for “linen” denotes spiritual truth, but “wool” celestial truth, which relatively is good.  For this reason it is said in Ezekiel:--

The priests, the Levites, the sons of Zadok, when they enter in at the gate’ of the inner court, they shall put on garments of linen; and no wool shall come upon them. Linen tires shall be upon their heads, breeches of linen upon their loins (Ezek.  44:15, 17, 18).

That the garments of Aaron also were not of wool, but of linen, is evident from (Leviticus 16:4, 32).

[6] From all this it can be seen that “linen” signifies spiritual truth, which is the truth of the good of faith; but that “wool” signifies celestial truth, which is the truth of the good of love; and as those who are in the latter truth cannot be in the former truth, for the two differ as do the light from the sun and the light from the stars, therefore it was decreed that “a mixed garment of wool and linen was not to be worn” (Deut. 22:11). That there is such a distinction between the celestial and the spiritual, and that the two are not together in one subject, (n. 9277).

AC 9471. And skins of red rams, and badgers‘ skins.    That this signifies the external truths and goods by which they are held together, is evident from the signification of “skins,” as being external things (n. 3540); from the signification of “rams,” as being spiritual things which are of truth (n. 2830, 4170); from the signification of “red” as being good (n. 3300), thus “skins of red rains” denote the external truths that are from good; and from the signification of “badgers,” as being goods. That “badgers” have this signification is evident from the fact that in the Word, where truth is spoken of, good also is spoken of, by reason of the heavenly marriage of truth and good (n. 9263, 9314). Consequently as “skins of red rams” signify external truths which are from good, “badgers’ skins” signify the goods themselves.  The reason why they denote the truths and goods by which (internal truths and goods) are held together, is that all external things keep internal things together, as is also herb evident from the use of these skins, in that they served for coverings; the skins of badgers, for coverings over things more holy than the skins of rams (Exod. 26:14; Num. 4:6, 8, 10, 12, 14).

AC 9472. And shittim wood.  That this signifies the goods of merit which are from the Lord and thus of the Lord alone, is evident from the signification of “wood,” as being the good of merit (n. 1110, 2784, 2812, 4943, 8740). The good of merit is the good that proceeds from the Divine Human of the Lord, which is Christian good, or spiritual good with man. It is this good by which man is saved; for good which proceeds from any other source is not good, because the Divine is not in it, thus neither is heaven in it, consequently salvation is not in it. Shittim wood was the wood of the most excellent cedar; and by the “cedar” is signified the spiritual of the church.  That shittim wood was a species of cedar, is evident in Isaiah:--

I will set in the wilderness the cedar of Shittah, and the myrtle, and the wood of oil (Isa. 41:19);

where “the cedar of Shittah” denotes spiritual good, and “the wood of oil” celestial good. As the good of merit that belongs to the Lord alone is the only good that reigns in heaven, and that makes heaven, therefore this wood was the only wood employed in the construction of the tabernacle (by which heaven was represented); as for instance for the ark itself, in which was the testimony; for its staves; for the table upon which were the breads of faces, and its staves; for the planks of the Habitation; for the bars and pillars of the covering; and also for the altar and its staves; as is evident from (verses 10, 13, 23, 28) of this chapter; from (Exod. 26:15, 26, 37) of the following chapter; and (Exod. 27:1 and 6).

AC 9473. Oil for the luminary.  That this signifies the internal good which is in mutual love and in charity, is evident from the signification of “oil,” as being the good of love (n. 886, 4582, 4638); and from the signification of “the luminary,” as being mutual love and charity.  That “the luminary” denotes mutual love, is from its flame, by which this love is signified; and that it denotes charity, is from the heat and light from it; for spiritual heat is the good of charity, and spiritual light is the truth of faith.

[2] It shall here be briefly stated what is meant by the internal good in mutual love, and in charity. Nothing comes forth from itself, but from what is prior to itself.  This is the case also with truth and good.  That from which another thing comes forth is internal; and that which comes forth is its external.  Each and all things that come forth are like cause and effect.  No effect can come forth without an efficient cause.  The efficient cause is the internal of the effect, and the effect is its external. They  are also like endeavor and motion. No motion can come forth without endeavor, insomuch that when the endeavor ceases the motion ceases.  Wherefore the internal of motion is endeavor, or moving force.  The case is similar with living endeavor, which is will; and with living motion, which is action. No action can come forth without will, insomuch that when will ceases action ceases; and therefore the internal of action is will. From all this it is evident that in each and all things there must be an internal, in order that they may come forth, and that they may afterward subsist; and that without an internal they are not anything.

[3] So also it is with the good which is of love; unless there is an internal good in it, it is not good.  The internal good in the good of faith is the good of charity, which is spiritual good; but the internal good in the good of charity is the good of mutual love, which is external celestial good; and the internal good in the good of mutual love is the good of love to the Lord, which is the good of innocence; and this good is internal celestial good. But the internal good in the good of love to the Lord, that is, in the good of innocence, is the good Divine itself that proceeds from the Divine Human of the Lord, and consequently it is the Lord Himself.  This last good must be in all good, in order that it may be good; and therefore there is not any good unless its internal is from this source; for unless its internal is from this source, it is not good but evil, because it is from the man himself, and that which proceeds from man is evil; for man regards himself in all the good that he does, and also regards the world, and thus not the Lord nor heaven.  If the Lord and heaven are thought of by him, they are to him as means to serve his own honor and his own profit. Consequently these goods are like whited sepulchres, which outwardly appear beautiful; but inwardly are full of dead men‘s bones, and of all uncleanness (Matt. 23:27, 29).

AC 9474. Spices for the oil of anointing.  That this signifies the internal truths that belong to the inaugurating good, is evident from the signification of “spices,” as being interior truths, which are the truths of internal good; from the signification of “oil,” as being the good of love (n. 9473); and from the signification of “anointing,” as being inauguration to represent; for the things that were to represent holy things were anointed with perfumed oil, and so were inaugurated; as is evident from the following words in Exodus:--

Take unto thee of the chief spices, noble myrrh, perfumed cinnamon, sweet-scented calamus, cassia, olive oil. And thou shalt make it an oil of anointing of holiness, an ointment of ointment; it shall be an oil of anointing of holiness, with which thou shalt anoint the tent and all the vessels thereof, the lampstand and the vessels thereof, the altar of incense, the altar of burnt-offering and all the vessels thereof, and the laver and the base thereof.  Thus thou shalt sanctify them, that they may be the holy of holies.  And thou shalt anoint Aaron and his sons (Exod. 30:23-31).

The reason why these things were holy after they had been anointed, was that they then represented holy things; from which it is evident that the anointing was an inauguration to represent.

[2] That the anointing was done with oil was because “oil” signified celestial good; and celestial good is the good of love from the Lord, and consequently the good of love to the Lord.  This good is the very essential in each and all things of heaven and eternal life.  The reason why this oil was made perfumed by spices was that it might represent that which is acceptable; for “odor” signifies perception; and an agreeable and sweet odor, an acceptable perception (n. 925, 1514, 1517-1519, 3577, 4624-4634, 4748).  And as all the perception of good is by means of truth, therefore spices were employed, by which are signified interior truths (n. 4748, 5621).

[3] It shall be briefly stated further why the oil of anointing, and also the incense, were to be made sweet-scented.  “Oil,” as before said, signifies the good of love; and “spice,” internal truth.  The good which is of love does not come to perception except through truths, for truth is the witness of good, and is also the revelation of good, and may be called the form of good.  The case herein is as with the will and the understanding in man.  The will can manifest itself only through the understanding, for the understanding receives the good of the will, and makes it clear.  Moreover the understanding is the form of the will, and truth belongs to the understanding, and good to the will.  From all this it can be seen why the oil of anointing was made perfumed, and also the incense.  But the difference between them is that the perfume of the oil of anointing signifies the acceptableness of internal perception, whereas the perfume of the incense signifies the acceptableness of external perception; for the perfume of the oil of anointing was unaccompanied by smoke, thus it presented its sweet odor without any external appearance; but the perfume of the incense was accompanied with smoke.

AC 9475. And for the incense of spices.  That this signifies for acceptable perception, is evident from the signification of “incense,” as being the things of worship which are acceptably perceived, such as confessions, adorations, prayers, and the like; and from the signification of “spices,” as being the truths of faith which are acceptable because from good; for sweet odors signify what is acceptable, in accordance with their perfumes, and whatever is acceptable is so from good through truths.  It is for this reason that by “the incense of spices” is signified the acceptable perception of truth from good.  The spices of which this incense was compounded are enumerated, and its preparation is described, in these words:--

Take unto thee spices, stacte, and onycha, and galbanum; sweet spices, and pure frankincense. Thou shalt make them an incense salted, pure, holy. Thou shalt beat some of it very small, and put some of it before the testimony in the tent of meeting; it shall be to you the holy of holies. The incense shall be to thee holy for Jehovah (Exod. 30:34-37).

The altar of incense, and the burning of the incense itself, are thus described:--

Thou shalt make an altar to burn incense upon. Thou shalt overlay it with pure gold. Thou shalt put it before the veil that is over the ark of the testimony, before the propitiatory, that Aaron may burn thereon incense of spices every morning; when be dresseth the lamps, he shall burn it; and between the evenings (Exod. 30:1-8; 37:25-29; 40:26, 27).

When Aaron shall come into the holy place, he shall take a censer full of coals of fire from off the altar; and his fists full of incense of spices beaten small; then he shall bring it within the veil, so that he may put the incense upon the fire before Jehovah, and the cloud of the incense may cover the propitiatory that is upon the testimony (Lev. 16:3, 12, 13).

[2] As by “incense” were signified such things of worship as are from good through truths - as are all the things that belong to the faith that is from the good of love - therefore fire was taken from the altar; for by “the fire of the altar” was signified the good of Divine love (n. 934, 4906, 5071, 5215, 6314, 6832, 6834, 6849, 7324, 7852); and therefore when fire was taken from any other source, they were smitten with a plague, and died (Lev. 10:1, 2; Num. 17:10-13); for by fire from some other source, or strange fire, was signified love not Divine.

[3] That such things as belong to the faith that is from the good of love and charity - as for instance confessions, adorations, and prayers - are signified by “incense,” is evident in the following passages:--

Accepted are my prayers as incense before Thee (Ps. 141:2).

The four animals, and the four and twenty elders, fell down before the Lamb, having each one of them a harp, and golden vials full of incense, which are the prayers of the saints (Rev. 5:8).

Another angel came, having a golden censer, and there was given unto him much incense, that he should add it to the prayers of all the saints upon the golden altar which was before the throne. The smoke of the incense went up from the prayers of the saints (Rev. 8:3, 4).

[4] The reason why such things are signified by “incense” is that they belong to the thought and thence to the mouth; but the things which belong to affection, and thence to the heart, are signified by the “meat-offering” in Malachi:--

From the rising of the sun even to its going down, the name of Jehovah shall be great among the nations, and in every place shall Incense be offered to My name, and a clean meat-offering (Mal. 1:11);

and by “the burnt-offering’ in Moses:--

The sons of Levi shall teach Jacob Thy judgments, and Israel Thy law; they shall put incense in Thy nostrils, and a burnt-offering upon Thine altar (Deut. 33:10);

here ”incense“ denotes such things as belong to the thought and the mouth, and that bear relation to the truths of faith; and the ”meat-offering“ and ”burnt-offering“ denote such things as belong to the affection and the heart, and bear relation to the goods of love.  Consequently in the opposite sense worship from falsities of faith is meant by ”burning incense to other gods“ (Jer. 1:16; 44:3, 5); and by ”burning incense to idols“ (Ezek. 8:11; 16:18); and by ”burning incense to the Baals“ (Hosea 2:13).

AC 9476. Onyx stones and stones for filling.  That this signifies spiritual truths and goods in general, is evident from the signification of ” onyx stones,“ as being the truths of faith that are from love, or spiritual truths; for the truths of faith which are from love are spiritual truths; and from the signification of ”stones for filling,“ as being the goods of faith, or spiritual goods.  That ”stones for filling“ denote the goods of faith, and ”onyx stones“ the truths of faith, is because the stones for filling were for the breastplate, and by ”the breast plate“ upon the ephod was signified the good of faith, or spiritual good; but the onyx stones were upon the shoulders of the ephod, and by ”the shoulders“ of the ephod are signified the truths of faith, or spiritual truths. That by precious stones in the Word are signified the truths and goods of faith, or spiritual truths and goods, (n. 114, 643, 3858, 6335, 6640). And as the truths and goods of faith are signified by precious stones, intelligence and wisdom are also signified by them, for intelligence is from the truths of faith, and wisdom is from the goods of faith.  So in Ezekiel:--

Full of wisdom, and perfect in beauty, thou hast been in Eden the garden of God; every precious stone was thy covering, the ruby, the topaz, the diamond, the tarshish, the onyx (Ezek.  28:12, 13, 15);

speaking of the king of Tyre, by whom is signified intelligence from the knowledges of the truth of faith (n. 1201).

AC 9477. For the ephod, and for the breastplate.  That this signifies which should be for a covering for external and internal celestial things, is evident from the signification of ”the ephod,“ as being that which covers celestial good; for by Aaron as high priest was represented the Lord as to the good of love; by his garments, and especially the ephod, was represented the truth of faith which is from the good of love.  The good of love is celestial, and the truth of faith is its covering, for truths cover goods; wherefore truths are signified in the Word by ”garments“ (n. 4545, 5248, 5319, 5954, 9093, 9212). For the celestial things that belong to the good of love are represented in heaven naked, and therefore those who are from the Lord‘s celestial kingdom appear without clothing; but those who are from the spiritual kingdom (who are those introduced by the Lord into the good of charity through the truths of faith) appear clothed with garments.  This kingdom is beneath the celestial kingdom, and that which is beneath is a covering for that which is above; for that which is lower is exterior, and that which is higher is interior (n. 2148, 3084, 4599, 5146, 8325). From this it is plain what is signified by ”the ephod“ when by Aaron is represented the Lord as to the Divine celestial. That priests represented the Lord as to Divine good, and kings as to Divine truth, (n. 6148). But be it known that by ”the ephod“ was signified the covering for external celestial things, and by ”the breastplate“ the covering for internal celestial things.  But more shall be said of these in what follows, where the ephod, and the breastplate in which were the Urim and Thummim, are treated of.

AC 9478. Verses 8, 9.  And let them make for Me a sanctuary, that I may dwell in the midst of them. According to all that I show thee, the form of the Habitation, and the form of all the vessels thereof, even so shall ye make it.  ”And let them make for Me a sanctuary,“ signifies a representative of the Lord, and thus of heaven; ”that I may dwell in the midst of them,“ signifies the consequent presence of the Lord in the representative church; ”according to all that I show thee, the form of the Habitation,“ signifies a representative of heaven where the Lord is; ”and the form of all the vessels thereof,“ signifies a representative of all the celestial and spiritual things that are from Him; ”even so shall ye make it,“ signifies a sure and genuine representative.

AC 9479. And let them make for Me a sanctuary.  That this signifies a representative of the Lord, and thus of heaven, is evident from the signification of ”a sanctuary,“ as being the Lord, and as being heaven; but here a representative of the Lord and of heaven, because it was a tabernacle made of wood and covered all round with curtains, and this could not have been a sanctuary except by means of the representation.  For ”a sanctuary“ denotes holiness itself, and nothing is holy except the Divine alone, thus the Lord alone (n. 9229). That heaven is ”a sanctuary,“ is because heaven is heaven from what is Divine there; for the angels who are there make heaven in proportion as they have (something) from the Divine of the Lord; but in proportion as they have (anything) from themselves, they do not make heaven. From this it is plain how it is to be understood that the Lord is the all in all of heaven. That the Lord dwells in His own, thus in the Divine with the angels, and thus in heaven, (n. 9338).

[2] That in the supreme sense ”the sanctuary“ denotes the Lord, because He alone is holy, and that alone is holy which proceeds from Him; and also that ”the sanctuary“ denotes heaven, and likewise the church, and that those things are ”sanctuaries“ which are in heaven and in the church from the Lord, is evident from the passages in the Word in which ”a sanctuary“ and ”sanctuaries“ are spoken of; as in Ezekiel:--

The Lord Jehovah said, I will scatter them in the lands, and I will be to them a little sanctuary in the lands whither they shall come (Ezek. 11:16);

where ”a sanctuary“ denotes the Lord Himself; for ”the Lord Jehovih,“ and ”Jehovah,“ in the Word, denote the Lord (n. 9373). Again:--

Look forth from the heavens, and behold from the habitation of Thy holiness (Isa. 63:15).

As the throne of glory, the height from eternity, is the place of the sanctuary (Jer. 17:12);

in which passages ”the habitation of holiness,“ and ”the sanctuary,“ denote heaven.

[3] Again:--

Little is lacking but that Thou wilt possess the people of Thy holiness; our adversaries have trodden down Thy sanctuary (Isa. 63:18).

The nations have come into His sanctuary (Lam. 1:10).

The Lord hath cast off His altar, He hath abhorred His sanctuary (Lam. 2:7).

The Lord Jehovih said, Behold I will profane My sanctuary, the magnificence of your strength, the desire of your eyes (Ezek. 24:21).

I will make your cities a waste, and will desolate your sanctuaries (Lev. 26:31).

In these passages ”the sanctuary“ denotes the church, and ”sanctuaries,“ the things that belong to the church.  From all this it is evident why the tabernacle is called ”a sanctuary,“ namely, from the fact that by it was represented heaven and the church, and that by the holy things therein were represented Divine things that are from the Lord in heaven and in the church.

AC 9480. That I may dwell in the midst of them.  That this signifies the consequent presence of the Lord in the representative church, is evident from the signification of ”dwelling in the midst,“ when said of the Lord, as being His presence; for by ”dwelling“ is signified to be and to live (n. 1293, 3613, 4451); and therefore ”dwelling in the midst“ denotes to be present, and to live present.  That it signifies presence in the representative church, is because the presence of the Lord with that people was not in the internal things that belong to love and faith; but only in the external things that represented these. As to the nature of this presence, (n. 4311, 9320, 9380).

AC 9481. According to all that I show thee, the form of the Habitation.  That this signifies a representative of heaven where the Lord is, is evident from the signification of ”the form of the Habitation,“ as being a representative of heaven; for a ”form“ denotes a representative, and ”the Habitation“ denotes heaven. That a ”form“ denotes a representative, is because the Divine things in the heavens are also presented to view in a form. These visible things are representatives.  That ”the Habitation“ denotes heaven where the Lord is, (n. 8269, 8309). The nature of the representatives that appear in heaven is evident from the prophets; as from John in the Revelation:--the lampstands (Rev. 1:12); a throne with four and twenty thrones around it, and four animals before the throne (Rev. 4:2); a book sealed with seven seals (chap. 5); horses going forth when the seals were opened (chap. 6); angels variously arrayed, with vials (chap. 4, 10, 15); a white horse (chap. 19); and lastly the New Jerusalem, of which the walls, gates, foundation, and its height, breadth, and length are described (chaps. 21, 22).  There are similar things in other prophets.

[2] All these things are representatives such as continually appear before the angels in the heavens, and present in a visible form the Divine celestial things that belong to the good of love, and the Divine spiritual things that belong to the good of faith. The sum total of such things was represented by the tabernacle and the things that were in it; as by the ark itself; by the table on which were the breads; by the altar of incense; by the lampstand; and by all other things. As these things were forms of Divine celestial and spiritual things, therefore when they were seen by the people at the time they were in holy worship, there were then presented in heaven the things that were represented; which as before said were the Divine celestial things that belong to the good of love to the Lord, and the Divine spiritual things that belong to the good of faith in the Lord.  Such an effect in heaven had all the representatives of that church.  Be it known that there are always spirits and angels with man, and that he cannot live without them; in like manner that through them man has connection with the Lord, and that in this way the human race and also heaven subsist. From this it can be seen to what end the representatives, and also the rituals, of the church, were instituted among the Israelitish nation; also to what end the Word was given, wherein all things of the literal sense correspond to Divine things which are in heaven; thus wherein all the things are representative, and all the words significative. From this, man has connection with heaven, and through heaven with the Lord. Without this connection man would have no life whatever, for without connection with the very Being of Life from whom comes all the manifestation of life, no one has any life.

[3] But these things are not apprehended by those who believe that life is in man himself; and that he lives independently of spirits or angels; thus without any influx through heaven from the Divine; when yet everything unconnected with the Divine perishes and becomes nothing; and nothing can possibly exist without what is prior to itself, thus without the Divine, which is the First, and the Very Being from Itself, that is, Jehovah; and consequently neither can it subsist, for to subsist is to perpetually come forth. As the ”Habitation“ signifies heaven where the Lord is, it also signifies the good of love and of faith, for these make heaven; and because all good is from the Lord, and heaven is called heaven from love and faith in the Lord, therefore also in the supreme sense the ”Habitation“ signifies the Lord; as is plain in (Isa. 63:15; Jer.  25:30; Ezek. 37:26, 27; Ps. 26:8; 43:3; 90:1; 91:9; Exod. 15:13; Deut. 12:5). From this it is evident that the tabernacle was called ”the sanctuary,“ and ”the Habitation of Jehovah,“ because of this representation.

AC 9482. And the form of all the vessels thereof.  That this signifies a representative of all the celestial and spiritual things which are from the Lord, is evident from the signification of a ”form,“ as being a representative (n. 9481); and from the signification of ”vessels,“ as being truths (n. 3068, 3079, 3316, 3318), here the celestial and spiritual things which are from the Lord; for by ”the vessels“ are meant all things that were in the tabernacle, and constituted it, and by these are signified celestial and spiritual things when by the tabernacle itself is signified heaven where the Lord is (n. 9479), and by the testimony that was in the ark, the Lord Himself.

AC 9483. Even so shall ye make it.  That this signifies a sure and genuine representative, is evident from the signification of ”so making it,“ when it is repeated, and becomes the conclusion, as being what is sure and genuine.

AC 9484. Verses 10-16. And let them make an ark of shittim wood; two cubits and a half the length thereof and a cubit and a half the breadth thereof, and a cubit and a half the height thereof And thou shalt overlay it with pure gold, from within and from without shalt thou overlay it, and shalt make upon it a border of gold round about. And thou shalt cast four rings of gold for it, and put them upon the four corners thereof; and two rings shall be on the one side of it, and two rings on the other side of it.  And thou shalt make staves of shittim wood, and overlay them with gold. And thou shalt put the staves into the rings on the sides of the ark, to carry the ark withal. The staves shall be in the rings of the ark; they shall not be removed from it. And thou shalt put into the ark the Testimony which I shall give thee. ”And let them make an ark,“ signifies the inmost heaven; ”of shittim wood,“ signifies righteousness; ”two cubits and a half the length thereof,“ signifies all in respect to good; ”and a cubit and a half the breadth thereof,“ signifies full in respect to truth; ”and a cubit and a half the height thereof,“ signifies full in respect to degrees; ”and thou shalt overlay it with pure gold,“ signifies that all these things must be founded on good; ”from within and from without shalt thou overlay it,“ signifies everywhere; ”and shalt make upon it a border of gold round about,“ signifies a fixing of the bounds by good, lest they be approached and injured by evils; ”and thou shalt cast four rings of gold for it,“ signifies the Divine truth conjoined with Divine good that is round about on all sides; ”and put them upon the four corners thereof,“ signifies stability; ”and two rings shall be on the one side of it, and two rings on the other side of it,“ signifies the marriage of truth with good and of good with truth; ”and thou shalt make staves of shittim wood,“ signifies the power thence derived; ”and overlay them with gold,“signifies good everywhere; ”and thou shalt put the staves into the rings,“ signifies the power of the Divine sphere; ”On the sides of the ark,“ signifies in ultimates; ”to carry the ark withal,“ signifies thus the coming-forth and subsistence of heaven; ”the staves shall be in the rings of the ark,“ signifies that the power shall endure from the Divine sphere of good and truth; ”they shall not be removed from it,“ signifies forever, without change; ”and thou shalt put into the ark the Testimony,“ signifies the Divine truth, which is the Lord in heaven; ”which I shall give thee,“ signifies its representative.

AC 9485. And let them make an ark.  That this signifies the inmost heaven, is evident from the signification of the ”ark,“ as being the inmost heaven; for by the ”testimony“ or ”law“ in the ark is signified the Lord, for the reason that the ”testimony“ denotes the Divine truth, and Divine truth is the Lord in heaven (n. 9503).  It is from this that the ark signifies the inmost heaven; and therefore it was a most holy thing, and was worshiped by the people as Jehovah; for it was believed that Jehovah dwelt there, and between the cherubs, as is evident in David:--

We heard in Ephrathah; we will enter into His habitation; we will bow at the footstool of His feet. Arise O Jehovah unto Thy rest; Thou, and the ark of Thy strength (Ps. 132:6-8);

treating of the Lord; ”Ephrathah“ is Bethlehem, where the Lord was born (Mic. 5:2; Matt. 2:6); the ”habitation“ denotes heaven where the Lord is; ”Thou and the ark of Thy strength“ denote the Lord and His representative.

[2] That the ark is a representative of the Lord, is plain in Jeremiah:--

I will bring you back to Zion; in those days they shall say no more, The ark of the covenant; neither shall it come up upon the heart; neither shall they make mention of it; neither shall they long for it; neither shall it be repaired any more. At that time they shall call Jerusalem the throne of Jehovah; and all the nations shall be gathered together to it, on account of the name of Jehovah, to Jerusalem (Jer. 3:14, 16, 17);

treating of a new church.  The representative of the former church, which representative was then to be abolished, is meant by ”the ark,“ which was ”not to be spoken of any more, neither to come up upon the heart, nor to be repaired.“ ”Jerusalem, to which the nations were to be gathered,“ denotes this new church.  From this it is plain that by ”the ark“ is signified a representative of the Lord and of the worship of Him in the church, the same as was signified by ”the continual (burnt-offering),“ and by ”the habitation of the sanctuary,“ in (Daniel 8:11).

[3] That the ark was worshiped as Jehovah by the Israelitish and Jewish people, and that it was believed that He dwelt therein, and between the cherubs, is manifest in these passages:

David made them bring up the ark of God, the name of which is called the name of Jehovah Zebaoth, that sitteth on the cherubs upon it (2 Sam. 6:2).

When the ark set forward, Moses said, Rise up, Jehovah, let Thine enemies be scattered. When it rested, he said, Return, Jehovah, unto the ten thousands of the thousands of Israel (Num. 10:33-36).

That the inmost heaven was signified by ”the ark,“ was because by the whole tabernacle or tent was represented the universal angelic heaven; its ultimate by the court; its middle by the habitation where the priest ministered; and its inmost by the habitation within the veil, where was the ark in which was the testimony.

AC 9486. Of shittim wood.  That this signifies righteousness, is evident from the signification of ”shittim wood,“ as being the good of merit that belongs to the Lord alone (n. 9472), thus also righteousness, which is the good of merit.  For by His own power the Lord reduced the universal heaven into order, and subjugated the hells, and at the same time made the Human in Himself Divine, whereby He has merit and righteousness; and therefore the only good that reigns in heaven and makes heaven, is the good of merit and the righteousness of the Lord; thus His Divine Human, for this was made merit and righteousness.

[2] That these things were done by the Lord of His own power, is evident in the following passages:--

Who is this that cometh from Edom? I that speak in righteousness, Great to save. I have trodden the winepress alone; and of the peoples there was no man with Me. I looked around, but there was none to help; and I was amazed, but there was none to uphold; therefore Mine own arm brought salvation to Me (Isa.  63:1-5).

He saw that there was no man, and was amazed that there was none to intercede; therefore His own arm brought salvation to Him; and His righteousness, it upheld Him.  He put on righteousness as a coat of mail (Isa. 59:16, 17).

This is His name whereby they shall call Him, Jehovah our righteousness (Jer. 23:8; 33:15, 16).

I lay down My life that I may take it again. No one taketh it away from Me; I lay it down of Myself; I have power to lay it down, and I have power to take it again (John 10:17, 18).

From these passages it is plain that in respect to the Divine Human the Lord has merit and righteousness from Himself.  As by ”the ark“ is signified heaven where the Lord is, there was employed in its construction shittim wood, by which this good is signified; for by ”wood“ in general is signified good (n. 643, 3720, 8354); and therefore they who place merit in works appear in the other life to cut wood, beneath which there is something of the Lord (n. 1110, 4943, 8740). Consequently by cutting the wood of the burnt-offering is signified the good of merit, or the good of works (n. 2784, 2812).

AC 9487. Two cubits and a half the length thereof.  That this signifies all in respect to good, is evident from the signification of ”two and a half,“ as being much, and what is full; and when spoken of the Divine, as being all.  That ”two and a half“ denotes much, and what is full, is because this number signifies the like as five, ten, a hundred, and a thousand; for the double of two and a half is five, the double of five is ten, ten times ten is a hundred, and when numbers are doubled and multiplied they signify the like as the simple numbers of which they are compounded (n. 5291, 5335, 5708, 7973). That the number ”five“ signifies much, and what is full, (n. 5708, 5956, 9102); in like manner ”ten,“ (n. 3107, 4638); also ”a hundred,“ (n. 2636, 4400); and ”a thousand,“ (n. 2575, 8715). Hence these numbers, when said of the Divine, denote all. And from the signification of ”length,“ as being good (n. 1613, 8898).

[2] That ”length“ in the Word signifies good, and ”breadth“ truth, may seem a paradox, but still it is so.  It originates in the fact that each and all things in the Word signify such things as belong to heaven and the church, thus as bear relation to the good of love, and to the truth of faith. Nothing of space - such as implies length and breadth - can be predicated of these; but instead of space the state of being, which is the state of good, and from this the state of manifestation, which is the state of truth. Moreover in heaven spaces are appearances arising from these states (n. 4882, 9440). From all this it can be seen that real things are signified by the measures and dimensions in Ezekiel 40-47, where the new temple and the new earth are treated of; consequently here also, where the ark, the Habitation, and the court, the tables therein, and the altars, are treated of; and in like manner in the description of the temple of Jerusalem; and again in that of the holy Jerusalem coming down out of heaven, in that it was four-square, its length as great as its breadth (Rev. 21:16; Zech. 2:1, 2); for by ”Jerusalem“ is signified the New Church; and by its measurement as to length, the quality of its good; and as to breadth, the quality of its truth.

[3] That by ”breadth“ is signified truth, is very manifest in the following passages:--

In straitness I called upon Jah; He answereth me in breadth (Ps. 118:5).

Thou hast made my feet to stand in breadth (Ps. 31:8).

The stretching out of the wings of Asshur shall be the fullness of the breadth of the land (Isa. 8:8).

I raise up the Chaldeans, a bitter and swift nation, that walketh in the breadths of the land (Hab. 1:6);

”to walk in the breadths of the land,“ when said of the Chaldeans, denotes to destroy the truths of faith.

AC 9488. And a cubit and a half the breadth thereof.  That this signifies full in respect to truth, is evident from the signification of ”one and a half,“ as being what is full. The reason why this number signifies what is full, is that ”three“ has this signification; for the half of a number signifies the like as double the number, because when a number is multiplied it retains the signification the simple number had before it was multiplied (n. 5291, 5335). That ”three“ denotes what is full, (n. 2788, 7718, 9188); and that all numbers in the Word signify real thing, (n. 482, 487, 575, 647, 648, 755, 813, 1963, 1988, 2075, 2252, 3252, 4264, 4495, 4670, 5265, 5291, 5335, 5708, 6175, 7973). And from the signification of ”breadth,“ as being truth (n. 9487).

AC 9489. And a cubit and a half the height thereof.  That this signifies full in respect to degrees, is evident from the signification of ”height,“ as being degrees in respect to good, and in respect to truth.  ”Height“ has this signification because all good and the derivative truth proceed from the Lord, and the Lord is in the highest, and is therefore called ”the Highest“ (n. 8153); for He is the sun of heaven (n. 5097, 8812), and the sun is above the’ heavens, and is the center from which the universal heaven that is beneath comes forth and subsists. All the heights in heaven, being determined from its sun as the center, are differences of good and of the derivative truth.  Consequently they who are in the inmost heaven are nearer to the Lord, because they are in the good of love to Him; thus are in good above all others.  Those who are in the middle heaven are more distant from Him, because they are in a lower good; and still more distant are those who are in the ultimate heaven.  But those who are in hell have been altogether removed from the Lord, because they are in evil and the derivative falsity.  These do not even look toward the sun, but backward from it; and therefore when they are looked at by the angels, they appear in an inverted position, with feet upward and head downward.  Now as the distances and spaces in the other life are appearances in accordance with the states of good and the derivative truth (n. 9440), therefore in the spiritual sense ”height“ signifies degrees in respect to good, and in respect to truth, or degrees from the Highest, who is the Lord, and thus the Divine good itself.

[2] From this it is evident what is signified by ”height“ in the following passages; as in Jeremiah:--

They shall come and sing in the height of Zion, and shall flow together unto the good of Jehovah, and their soul shall be as a watered garden (Jer. 31:12);

where ”the height of Zion“ denotes celestial good, which is the good above spiritual good; and because ”height“ denotes good, therefore it is said that ”they shall flow together to the good of Jehovah.“ In Ezekiel:--

Asshur was a cedar in Lebanon. Its height was made high, and its branches became long by reason of many waters. It was beautiful in its greatness, In the length of its branches (Ezek. 31:3, 5, 7);

”Asshur“ denotes an enlightened rational; ” a cedar in Lebanon,“ the spiritual church; and its ”height,“ the degree of good.

[3] Again:--

In the mountain of the height of Israel will I plant it (Ezek. 17:23).

In the mountain of My holiness, and in the mountain of the height of Israel, all the house of Israel shall serve Me (Ezek.  20:40).

”The mountain of the height of Israel“ denotes the highest degree of good and of the derivative truth with those who are of the spiritual church. As most expressions in the Word have an opposite sense, so also has ”height,“ and in this sense it signifies the evil of the love of self, thus self-exaltation of mind; as in (Isaiah 14:14; Ezekiel 31:10, 14; 32:5; Amos. 2:9). A further reason why ”height“ denotes degrees in respect to good and the derivative truth, is that what is ”high“ signifies what is internal, and good is perfect according to the degrees toward interior things. That what is ”high“ denotes what is internal, (n. 1735, 2148, 4210, 4599).

AC 9490. And thou shalt overlay it with pure gold.  That this signifies that all these things must be founded on good, is evident from the signification of ”overlaying,“ when said of heaven which is signified by ”the ark,“ as being to lay the foundation; and from the signification of ”gold,“ as being good (n. 113, 1551, 1552, 5658, 6914, 6917).  That ”overlaying“ denotes to lay the foundation, is because the good that proceeds from the Lord as a sun (for the heat from this sun is the good of love) encompasses not only heaven in general, but also the heavenly societies in heaven in particular, and likewise every angel individually, and thus protects them from the breaking in of evil from hell That which in heaven encompasses, forms also the foundation, for heaven leans or rests upon it as a house upon its foundation, and as the outermost parts of the body rest on the air and ether which press round them; for that which encompasses, bounds, encloses, and holds together; consequently supports and sustains.  From this it is plain that by ”overlaying“ is signified to lay the foundation; and by ”overlaying with gold,“ to lay the foundation upon good.

AC 9491. From within and from without shalt thou overlay it. That this signifies everywhere, is evident from the signification of ”within and without,“ as being everywhere, namely, round about; because it is said, ”thou shalt overlay it.“ For within there was shittim wood, which was overlaid with gold, and by ”shittim wood“ is signified the good itself that proceeds from the Divine Human of the Lord (n. 9472, 9486); but from without and from within there was gold, by which is also signified good, but such good as appears before the senses, thus relatively external.  By ”everywhere round about, from within and from without,“when said of heaven which is signified by ”the ark,“ is meant heaven in general, and every heavenly society in particular; heaven in general is meant by ”from without,“ and the heavenly societies by ”from within,“ because they are within heaven.

AC 9492. And shalt make upon it a border of gold round about. That this signifies a fixing of the bounds by good, lest they be approached and injured by evils, is evident from the signification of ”a border,“ as being a fixing of the bounds; and from the signification of ”gold,“ as being good (n. 9490).  It is said ”lest they be approached and injured by evils,“ because the good that proceeds from the Lord protects those who are in heaven, lest they be approached and injured by evils from hell.  For the bells continually breathe evil, and endeavor to destroy heaven (n. 8295); whence there appears there as it were an effervescence, and as it were a boiling up (n. 8209).  For in the minds of those who are in the hells is seated hatred against the neighbor and hatred against God; and therefore they are infuriated when they perceive the bliss of the upright (n. 1974). But the good that proceeds from the Lord, which encompasses heaven in general, and the heavenly societies and individual angels there in particular, protects, and represses the assaults, and this continually.  That a sphere of endeavors to do evil and to destroy is perpetual from the hells; and a sphere of endeavors to do good and to protect is perpetual from the Lord, (n. 8209). This bounding good, by which the Lord protects heaven, is signified by ”the border of gold round about the ark.“

AC 9493. And thou shalt cast four rings of gold for it.  That this signifies the Divine truth conjoined with Divine good that is round about on all sides, is evident from the signification of ”rings,“ as being the conjunction of good and truth; here of Divine truth with Divine good, because by ”the ark“ is signified heaven where the Lord is (n. 9496). That there were four rings was because by this number is signified conjunction (n. 1686, 8877); and that they were of gold was because by ”gold“ is signified good (n. 113, 1551, 1552, 5658, 6914), and good is that with which truth is conjoined, for good is like soil, and truth is like the seed.

AC 9494. And put them upon the four corners thereof. That this signifies stability is evident from the signification of ”corners,“ as being strength and stability.  That ”corners“ have this signification is because in the corners there is the greatest resistance, and also the binding together of the whole.  As a ”corner“ denotes strength and stability, such as is that of Divine truth from Divine good, therefore the Lord is called ”the cornerstone“ in the following passages:--

The stone which the builders rejected is become the head of the corner (Ps. 118:22; Matt. 21:42).

Out of Judah shall come forth the cornerstone, out of him the nail, and out of him the war-bow (Zech. 10:4).

The Lord Jehovih layeth in Zion a tried stone, a precious corner of foundation (Isa. 28:16);

where in like manner a ”corner“ denotes the stability of the doctrine that is from the truth which is from good.

[2] In Jeremiah:--

They shall not take from thee a stone for a corner, nor a stone of foundations (Jer. 51:26).

As by ”corners“ is signified stability, therefore horns were placed upon the four corners of the altar, of which we read in  Thou shalt make the horns of the altar upon the four corners; out of itself shall its horns be (Exod. 27:2). That ”horns“ denote the power of truth from good, thus strength and stability (n. 2832, 9081).

[3] By ”corners“ are signified strength and power also in these passages:--

A fire is gone forth out of Heshbon which hath devoured the corners of Moab (Jer. 48:45).

There shall arise a star out of Jacob, and a scepter shall rise out of Israel, and shall bruise the corners of Moab (Num.  24:17).

”Moab,“ whose power was to be ”destroyed,“ denotes those who adulterate the goods of the church (n. 2468); their ”corners“ denote the powers of falsity from adulterated goods. As ”corners“ denote power and strength, therefore they who are not in the power of truth from good are called ”corners cut off“ (Jer. 9:26; 25:23). What is signified by ”corners“ when the quarters of the world, or the winds, are meant by them, (n. 9642).

AC 9495. And two rings shall be on the one side of it, and two rings on the other side of it. That this signifies the marriage of truth with good and of good with truth, is evident from the signification of ”rings,“ as being the conjunction or marriage of good with truth (n. 9493).  This marriage is reciprocal, that is, of truth with good and of good with truth.  An idea of this marriage may be had from the conjunction of the heart and the lungs.  The heart conjoins itself with the lungs, and the lungs in turn conjoin themselves with the heart; for the heart from its right side sends forth blood into the lungs, and the lungs in turn send it back into the heart; but into its left side, and so on continually.  Such also is the marriage in heaven of good with truth and of truth with good, where also the heart corresponds to the good which is of love, and the lungs to the truth which is of faith (n. 3883-3896, 9300).  That two rings were to be on the one side and two rings on the other side, was because ”two“ signifies conjunction (n. 1686, 5194, 8423), and ”the side“ signifies the good that is to be conjoined with truth, in order that there may be power therefrom.

AC 9496. And thou shalt make staves of shittim wood.  That this signifies the power thence derived, is evident from the signification of ”staves,“ as being the power that belongs to truth from good; and from the signification of ”shittim wood,“ as being the good of merit that belongs to the Lord alone (n. 9472, 9486).  It shall now be told why it was that heaven could be represented by the ark and the Habitation; the fixing of the bounds by the border; stability by the corners; the conjunction of good with truth by the rings; and power by the staves. It has been shown that all nature, with each and all things therein that are in order, is representative of the Lord‘s kingdom, that is, of heaven and the heavenly things therein (n. 9280).  It has also been shown that the universal heaven bears relation to a man, and that for this reason heaven is called the Grand Man (n. 9276). From this it now follows that all the forms by which heavenly things are represented, bear relation to the human form, and have their signification in accordance with their agreement with this form.

[2] From this it is now plain why it is that when ”the ark“ signifies heaven where the Lord is, ”the border of the ark“ signifies the fixing of the bounds; ”the sides,“ the good with which truth is to be conjoined; ”the corners,“ stability; ”the rings,“ the conjunction itself; and ”the staves,“ power.  For the staves bear relation to the arms in man, and therefore they signify the same as the arms; the rings bear relation to the joints or sockets by which the arms are joined to the breast; the corners, to the projections themselves, where this joining is effected; the sides, to the chest or thorax; the border, to the circumference in which the bounds are fixed. From this it can be seen that by ”the staves,“ as by ”the arms,“ is signified power.  That the ”arms,“ and ”hands,“ denote power, (n. 878, 4931-4937, 5327, 5328, 6292, 6947, 7188, 7189, 7205, 7518, 7673, 8050, 8153, 8281, 9025, 9133); and that by ”the sides“ is signified the same as by ”the chest“ or ”thorax“ of the body, namely, good; for in this part are the heart and lungs, and by ”the heart“ is signified celestial good, and by ”the lungs“ spiritual good, (n. 3883-3896, 9300). From this it is plain that by ”the rings“ is signified the same as by the joints or joinings of the chest to the shoulders, and of the shoulders to the arms; namely, the conjunction of good with truth; and that by ”the corners“ is signified stability, for there the strength of the body puts itself forth, and its strength and power come forth through the arms. From all this it can be seen why it is that natural forms not living represent the same as living forms, that is, as the forms in the human body; namely, from the fact that heaven bears relation to a man, and the things in heaven to those which are in man, as can be seen from what has been abundantly shown concerning the correspondence of man with the Grand Man, or with heaven (n. 9276).

[3] As the staves by which the ark was carried signified power, so also did the staves or bars by which the gates of cities were fastened, as is evident from the following passages.  In Hosea:--

The sword falls upon his cities, and consumes his bars (Hosea 11:6);

”the sword“ denotes truth fighting against falsity; ”cities“ denote doctrinal things; and ”bars,“ power.  Again:--

For your sake I have sent to Babel, and I will throw down all her bars (Isa. 43:14).

The mighty men of Babel sit in their strongholds; their power is given to oblivion; her bars are broken (Jer. 51:30).

I will break the bar of Damascus (Amos 1:5).

I will break in pieces the gates of brass, and cut in sunder the bars of iron (Isa. 45:2; Ps. 105:16).

They have neither gates, nor bars; they dwell alone (Jer.  49:31).

They all dwell without wall; having neither bars nor gates (Ezek. 38:11).

Her gates are sunk into the earth; He hath destroyed and broken in pieces her bars (Lam. 2:9).

Praise thy God, O Zion, for He strengtheneth the bars of thy gates (Ps. 147:12, 13).

In these passages ”cities“ signify doctrinal things (n. 2449, 2712, 3216, 4492, 4493); ”gates“ signify stability and protection; and ”bars“ (or ”staves“) signify the power belonging to the truth that is from good. That all power belongs to truth, but to the truth which is from good, (n. 6344, 6423, 8200, 8304, 9133, 9327, 9410).

AC 9497. And overlay them with gold. That this signifies good everywhere, is evident from the signification of ”overlaying,“ as being to encompass, thus to be everywhere; and from the signification of ”gold,“ as being good (n. 9490).

AC 9498. And thou shalt put the staves into the rings.  That this signifies the power of the Divine sphere, is evident from the signification of ”staves,“ as being power (n. 9496); and from the signification of ”the rings,“ as being Divine truth conjoined with Divine good, which is everywhere round about (n. 9493), thus the Divine sphere which encompasses and encloses heaven in general, and the heavenly societies and the individual angels themselves in particular, according to what has been before shown (n. 9490, 9492).  For the Divine truth that proceeds from the Divine good of the Lord is not to be conceived of as speech and the influx thereof into the ear; but as a sphere from the sun, which by degrees, as it is removed from the sun, decreases in ardor and brightness, and at last becomes so tempered as to be accommodated to the reception of the angels. Within this sphere, but far from the sun on account of its ardor and brightness, is the angelic heaven.  This sphere also extends outside heaven down into hell, but those who are there do not receive it in a suitable manner, but turn it into the opposite.  From this it can be seen what is meant by the Divine sphere which encloses and holds together heaven, namely, that it is Divine truth conjoined with Divine good, which is everywhere around heaven, and around those who are in heaven.  The heat that proceeds from the Lord as the sun in heaven is the Divine good of His Divine love accommodated to the reception of the angels who are in heaven; and the light that proceeds from the Lord as the sun is the Divine truth of His Divine good. Nevertheless both together are called ”the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord.“

AC 9499. On the sees of the ark.  That this signifies in ultimates, is evident from the signification of ”the sides of the ark,“ as being the Divine sphere that encompasses heaven in its ultimates; for ”the sides“ denote the boundaries, here, those of heaven.  But the ultimates and boundaries in heaven differ from those in the world in this respect, that in the world they are such relatively to spaces, but in heaven relatively to goods conjoined with truths.  The Divine good conjoined with the Divine truth, which is the ultimate of heaven, and by which it is bounded, enclosed, and held together, is comparatively as is the atmosphere in the world, which flows around man and holds together all the surface of his body in its connection, so as to prevent its dissolution; but in the world that which does this is natural, and operates on the human body as on what is material; whereas in heaven it is the Divine celestial and the Divine spiritual from the Lord which operates around an angel, and holds him together in his form and power.

AC 9500. To carry the ark withal.  That this signifies thus the coming-forth and subsistence of heaven, is evident from the signification of ”bearing,“ as being continually in a state of good and truth, thus to come forth and subsist; for by ”the staves in the rings“ is signified the power of the Divine sphere, that is, the power of Divine truth conjoined with Divine good (n. 9498), thus the coming-forth and the subsistence, because heaven subsists through this power; and from the signification of ”the ark,“ as being heaven (n. 9485).

AC 9501. The staves shall be in the rings of the ark.  That this signifies that the power shall endure from the Divine sphere of good and truth, is evident from the signification of ”the rings of the ark,“ as being the Divine sphere of good and truth; and from the signification of ”the staves,“ as being power (n. 9498).

AC 9502. They shall not be removed from it.  That this signifies forever without change, is evident from the signification of ”not being removed,“ as being the coming-forth and subsistence forever and without change.  For heaven came forth and was created through the Divine sphere of good and truth that encompasses and encloses heaven in general and in particular; and through the same sphere it subsists and is preserved; for subsistence is a perpetual coming-forth, and preservation is a perpetual creation.  Perpetuity without change was represented by the non-removal of the staves from the ark; and the eternal protection of heaven through the Divine sphere of good and truth from the Lord was represented by the staves being under the wings of the cherubs, and by their being ”covered;“ as is evident from the first book of Kings:--

The cherubs spread forth their wings over the place of the ark, so that the cherubs covered the ark and the staves thereof from above. And the staves were drawn out, and He heads of the staves were seen from the holy place toward the faces of the sanctuary; but they were not seen without (1 Kings 8:7, 8).

AC 9503. And thou shalt put into the ark the Testimony. That this signifies the Divine truth which is the Lord in heaven, is evident from the signification of ”the ark,“ as being heaven; and from the signification of ”the Testimony,“ as being the Divine truth, and thus the Lord in heaven.  That Divine truth is the Lord in heaven, is because the Lord is good itself and truth itself, both of which proceed from Him, and that which proceeds from Him is Himself.  Hence it is that the Lord is heaven; for the Divine truth which is from Him and is received by the angels, makes heaven; consequently the more perfectly the angels receive the Divine truth which is from the Lord, thus the more perfectly they receive the Lord, the more perfect human forms they are, and finally so perfect that their beauty surpasses belief.  He who shall see, as I have, will be amazed; for they are heavenly loves and charities in form, which form is the truly human form.  The reason why the angels are human forms, is that the Divine in heaven is the Lord, and they who receive from Him the Divine truth in good are images of Him.

[2] As to the signification of ”the Testimony,“ a distinction is made in the Word between ”laws,“ ”statutes,“ ”judgments,“ ”precepts,“ ”testimonies,“ ”words,“ ”commands,“ ”truths,“ and ”covenants,“ as can be seen from very many passages; especially in David, in Psalms cxix., where these are all mentioned, but ”testimonies,“ in (Ps. 119:2, 14, 31, 46, 59, 88, 95, 111, 119, 129, 138, 144, 168); and likewise in other places in David:--

The law of Jehovah is perfect, restoring the soul; the testimony of Jehovah is steadfast, making wise the simple. The commandments of Jehovah are right, making glad the heart; the precept of Jehovah is pure, enlightening the eyes. The judgments of Jehovah are truth, they are righteous altogether (Ps. 19:7-9);

and also in Moses (Deut. 4:45; 6:17, 20); and in (Jeremiah 44:23).  From all this it can be seen that ”the Testimony“ denotes the Divine truth which testifies concerning the Lord; thus the Word, for in the supreme sense the Word treats of the Lord alone, and consequently in the internal sense it testifies concerning Him; that is it teaches Him and the truths of faith and the goods of love which are from Him.  In this sense ”testimony“ is used also in the Revelation:--

Who were slain for the word of Gad, and for the testimony which they held (Rev. 6:9).

They overcame the dragon by the blood of the Lamb, and by the word of their testimony (Rev. 12:11)

”the blood of the Lamb“ denotes the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord (n. 7846, 7877, 9127, 9393), and ”the word of the testimony“ denotes the Divine truth received by man; in like manner in (Rev. 12:17; 19:10).

[3] That the Divine truth which proceeds from the Lord is called ”the testimony,“ is because it testifies concerning the Lord, as is evident from the words of the Lord Himself in John:--

He that cometh from heaven is above all.  What He hath seen and heard, that He testifieth. He that receiveth His testimony hath set his seal to this, that God is true (John 3:31-33).

I am He that testifieth of Myself, and the Father that sent Me testifieth of Me (John 8:18).

Search the Scriptures, and these are they which testify of Me (John 5:39).

The Paraclete, the Spirit of truth, He shall testify of Me (John 15:26).

From these passages it is evident that the Divine truth is called ”the testimony“ for the reason that it testifies concerning the Lord.  This Divine truth is the Word, for as before said, in the supreme sense the Word treats of the Lord alone; consequently the Word is Divine, and from this comes its holiness.  The Ten Words also, that is, the Law promulgated from Mount Sinai, and inscribed on the two tables, and stored up in the ark, is what is here called ”the Testimony“. That this Law signifies the Word, that is, the Divine truth proceeding from the Lord, in its whole complex, (n. 9416).  That it is the Lord from whom comes the Divine truth, is plain from His words to Pilate:--

Pilate saith, Art thou a King? Jesus answered, Thou sayest I am a King.  To this was I born, and for this am I come into the world, that I should give testimony to the truth (John 18:37);

by ”a king“ in the internal sense is signified the Divine truth (n. 1672, 2015, 2069, 3009, 3670, 4581, 4966, 5044, 5068, 6148); and therefore He said ”I am a king, and to this was I born, that I should give testimony to the truth,“ that is, that He is the Divine truth.  From all this it is now plain that by ”the Testimony“ in the ark is signified the Divine truth, thus the Lord in heaven.

AC 9504 Which I shall give thee.  That hereby is signified its representative, is evident from the representation of Moses, to whom it was to be given, as being the Lord as to Divine truth (n. 9372).

AC 9505. Verses 17-22. And thou shalt make a propitiatory of pure gold; two cubits and a half the length thereof, and a cubit and a half the breadth thereof  And thou shalt make two cherubs, of solid gold shalt thou make then, at the two ends of the propitiatory.  And make one cherub at the one end, and one cherub at the other end; out of the propitiatory shall ye make the cherubs upon the two ends thereof.  And the cherubs shall spread out their wings upward, covering with their wings over the propitiatory, and their faces a man to his brother; toward the propitiatory shall be the faces of the cherubs. And thou shalt put the propitiatory upon the ark from above; and unto the ark thou shalt put the Testimony that I shall give unto thee.  And there I will meet with thee, and I will speak with thee from above the propitiatory, from between the two cherubs which are over the ark of the Testimony, all that I shall command thee for the sons of Israel.  ”And thou shalt make a propitiatory of pure gold,“ signifies the hearing and reception of all things that belong to worship from the good of love; ”two cubits and a half the length thereof,“ signifies all in respect to good; ”and a cubit and a half the breadth thereof,“ signifies full in respect to truth; ”and thou shalt make two cherubs,“ signifies no admission and approach to the Lord except through the good of love; ”of solid gold shalt thou make them,“ signifies a representative of this good; ”at the two ends of the propitiatory,“ signifies celestial good and spiritual good; ”and make one cherub at the one end, and one cherub at the other end,“ signifies an approach for celestial good and an approach for spiritual good; ”out of the propitiatory shall ye make the cherubs upon the two ends thereof,“ signifies the reception of all things of worship from these goods; ”and the cherubs shall spread out their wings upward,“ signifies elevation by means of the truth of faith; ”covering with their wings over the propitiatory,“ signifies the spiritual things that cover; ”and their faces a man to his brother,“ signifies the conjunction of truth and good; ”toward the propitiatory shall be the faces of the cherubs,“ signifies the interiors continually looking to good, and thus to the Lord; ”and thou shalt put the propitiatory upon the ark from above,“ signifies thus the hearing and reception of all things of worship that are from the good of love; ”and unto the ark thou shalt put the Testimony,“ signifies from the Lord in heaven; ”that I shall give thee,“ signifies the representative; ”and there I will meet with thee,“ signifies hearing and reception; ”and I will speak with thee from above the propitiatory,“ signifies conjunction; ”from between the two cherubs,“ signifies where celestial good and spiritual good have been conjoined; ”which are over the ark of the Testimony,“ signifies with the Lord in heaven; ”all that I shall command thee for the sons of Israel,“ signifies the worship of the representative church.

AC 9506. And thou shalt make a propitiatory of pure gold. That this signifies the hearing and reception of all things that belong to worship from the good of love, is evident from the signification of ”a propitiatory,“ as being a cleansing from evils, or the forgiveness of sins, consequently the hearing and reception of all things that belong to worship; and from the signification of ”gold,“ as being the good of love (n. 113, 1551, 1552, 5658, 6917).  That ”the propitiatory“ denotes a cleansing from evils and the forgiveness of sins, is evident from the passages in the Word where ”propitiation“ or ”expiation“ is mentioned.

[2] That it also denotes the reception of all things of worship, is because those only are heard who have been propitiated or expiated, that is, cleansed from evils; and their worship alone is received by the Lord; but those are not heard who are in evils, that is, who have not been expiated or propitiated.  On this account also Aaron was not allowed to approach the propitiatory until he had cleansed and expiated himself and the people.  That for this reason ”the propitiatory“ denotes the hearing and reception of all things of worship, is also evident from the fact that Jehovah spoke with Moses over the propitiatory between the two cherubs. That it is worship from the good of love that is received, is because no one is admitted into heaven, thus to the Lord, except one who is in good, namely, in the good of love to the Lord and in the good of charity toward the neighbor (n. 8516, 8539, 8722, 8772, 9139, 9227, 9230, 9274); consequently no one else is heard, and his worship received.  For this reason also cherubs were over the propitiatory; for by ”the cherubs“ is signified guard and providence lest the Lord be approached except through the good of love, thus lest any enter into heaven except those who are in good, and also lest those who are in heaven be approached and injured by those who are in hell. From all this it can be seen what was signified by the propitiatory being upon the ark, and by the cherubs being over the propitiatory; and further by the propitiatory and the cherubs being of pure gold; for ”gold“ signifies the good of love, and ”the ark“ signifies heaven where the Lord is.

[3] That ”the propitiatory“ signifies cleansing from evils, thus the forgiveness of sins, is evident from the passages in the Word where ”propitiation“ or ”expiation“ is mentioned; as in the following passages:--

O Jehovah, expiate our sins for Thy name’s sake (Ps.  79:9).

He, being merciful, expiated their iniquity (Ps. 78:38).

Thou shalt expiate me with hyssop, and I shall be made clean; Thou shalt wash me, and I shall be made whiter than snow (Ps. 51:7).

Evil shall come upon thee, which thou shalt not know how to avert by prayer; calamity shall fall upon thee, which thou shall not be able to expiate (Isa. 47:11).

Sing, ye nations, His people; who will avenge the blood of His servants, and will make expiation for His land, for His people (Deut. 32:43).

[4] Expiations were made by means of sacrifices, and after they had been made, we read, ”The priest shall expiate him from sin, and he shall be forgiven“ (Lev. 4:26, 31, 35; 5:6, 10, 13, 16, 18; 9:7; 15:15, 30). Expiation was also made by means of silver (Exod. 30:16; Ps. 49:8). Therefore there was a day of expiations before the feast of tabernacles (Lev. 22:27-32). But be it known that these expiations were not real cleansings from evils, nor forgivenesses of sins, but represented them; for every ritual with the Israelitish and Jewish nation was merely representative of the Lord, of His kingdom and church, and of such things as belong to heaven and the church. In what manner the representations presented such things before the angels in heaven, (n. 9229).

[5] As cleansing from evils and forgiveness of sins were signified by ” the propitiatory,“ there were also signified by it the hearing and reception of all things that belong to worship; for he who has been cleansed from evils is heard, and his worship is received.  This was represented by Jehovah speaking above the propitiatory with Moses, and commanding what the sons of Israel should do, as is evident from (verse 22) of the present chapter, where it is said, ”There I will meet with thee, and I will speak with thee from above the propitiatory, from between the two cherubs that are over the ark of the testimony, all that I shall command thee for the sons of Israel.“ In like manner in another place: ”When Moses spake with Jehovah, he heard the voice speaking from above the propitiatory that was upon the ark of the testimony, from between the two cherubs“ (Num. 7:89).  That a man would be heard and his worship received after he had been cleansed from evils, was represented by Aaron‘s not entering into the holy of holies within the veil before the propitiatory until he had first expiated himself and the people, which was effected by means of washing, sacrifices, incense, and blood; and it is said, ”So shall he expiate the holy place from the uncleannesses of the sons of Israel, and from their transgressions as to all their sins“ (Lev. 16:16); ”and that Jehovah would appear there in a cloud“ (Lev. 16:2). ”In a cloud“ denotes in Divine truth accommodated to the reception and apprehension of men, such as is the Word in the sense of the letter (n. 4060, 4391, 5922, 6343, 6752, 8106, 8443, 8781).

AC 9507. Two cubits and a half the length thereof. That this signifies all in respect to good, is evident from what was shown above (n. 9487).

AC 9508. And a cubit and a half the breadth thereof, signifies full in respect to truth, as may also be seen above (n. 9488).

AC 9509. And thou shalt make two cherubs. That this signifies no admission and approach to the Lord except through the good of love, is evident from the signification of ”cherubs,“ as being guard and providence lest the Lord should be approached except through the good of love.  As this was signified by the ”cherubs,“ they were placed over the propitiatory that was upon the ark, and therefore they were made of solid gold; for by the ”ark“ is signified heaven where the Lord is (n. 9485), and by ”gold,“ the good of love (n. 9490). That there is no approach to the Lord except through the good of love, is because love is spiritual conjunction, and all good is of love.  Therefore those who are in the good of love to the Lord are brought in to Him in heaven, because they are conjoined with Him; and so are those who are in the good of love toward the neighbor, for the neighbor is the good of one’s fellow citizen, the good of our country, the good of the church, the good of the whole kingdom of the Lord, and in the supreme sense, the Lord Himself, because from Him is this good with man.

[2] During regeneration man has two states, one after the other.  The first one is when the man is led by means of the truths of faith to the good of love.  The second is when he is in the good of love; and when he is in this, he is in heaven with the Lord.  From this it is evident that this good is heaven itself with man, because this good is the Lord with him, for it is from the Lord. Concerning these two successive states with the man who is being regenerated, (n. 7923, 7992, 8505, 8506, 8516, 8512, 8516, 8643, 8648, 8658, 8685, 8690, 8701, 9224, 9227, 9230, 9274); and that a man comes into heaven when he is in good, that is, when he is led by the Lord by means of good, (n. 8516, 8539, 8722, 8772, 9139).

[3] That the ”cherubs“ signify guard and providence lest the Lord and also heaven be approached except through the good of love, that is, except by those who are in the good of love; and also lest the good which is from the Lord in heaven and with man be injured; is evident from the passages in the Word where ”cherubs“ are mentioned; as in Genesis:--

And He cast out the man; and He caused to dwell at the east of the garden of Eden cherubs, and the flame of a sword that turned itself, to guard the way of the tree of lives (Genesis 3:24);

that ”the cherubs“ here are guards is evident, for it is said ”to guard the way of the tree of lives.“ ”The tree of lives“ denotes the good of love which is from the Lord, thus the Lord; and it is guarded by its not being approached except through the good of love.

[4] It is believed that the Lord can be approached through the truths of faith; but He cannot be approached through these truths when they are separated from the good of love; nor indeed can heaven; but as soon as truths separated wish to enter, heaven is closed against them, thus the way to the Lord; and as truth cannot enter by virtue of itself, unless good is in it, and it thereby becomes the truth of good, so neither can the understanding, and still less can memory-knowledges separated from the good of the will.

[5] As guard and providence lest the Lord be approached, and also heaven, except through the good of love, is signified by ”the cherubs,“ therefore in the Word Jehovah is said ”to sit on the cherubs,“ and also ”to ride“ and ”to dwell upon the cherubs,“ as in the following passages:

Give ear, O Shepherd of Israel, Thou that sittest upon the cherubs, shine forth (Ps. 80:1).

Jehovah shall reign; the peoples shall shake. He sitteth on the cherubs (Ps. 99:1).

Jehovah rode upon a cherub, and did fly (Ps. 18:10).

Jehovah Zebaoth, that dwellest on the cherubs (Isa.  37:16).

And for this reason there were cherubs on the curtains of the Habitation, and on the veil (Exod. 26:1, 31; 36:35); and also upon the walls of the temple round about, and upon the doors thereof (1 Kings 6:23-29, 31-35); and in like manner in the new temple described in (Ezekiel 41:18-20).  That there were cherubs upon the curtains of the Habitation, upon the veil, upon the walls of the temple, and upon the doors of it, signified the guard of the Lord lest the holy Divine should be approached except through the good of love; and that there were cherubs upon the ark signified that the Lord Himself was not to be approached except through this good. Therefore also the cherubs were made of solid gold, and in the temple at Jerusalem were made of wood of oil, for by ”gold“ and by ”oil“ is signified the good of love.

[6] This guard and providence of the Lord is described by the four animals, each of which had four faces, under the throne on which the Lord was, in Ezekiel chapters 1 and 10; and also by the four animals round about the throne on which the Lord was, in the (Rev. 4:6-10; 5:6, 8, 9, 14).  By ”the four animals“ is signified under various aspects the good that proceeds from the Lord, and guarding and protecting lest there be admitted anything else except the good of love to the Lord, and the good of love toward the neighbor; by the ”throne“ upon which the Lord was, is signified heaven.

AC 9510. Of solid gold shalt thou make them.  That this signifies a representative of this good, is evident from the signification of ”gold,“ as being the good of love (n. 113, 1551, 1552, 5658, 6917); that gold is not the good of love, but the representative of it, is manifest; in like manner the olive-wood of which the cherubs in the temple at Jerusalem were made (1 Kings 6:23). That ”olive-wood“ denotes the good of love, (n. 886); and also the ”oil“ itself, (n. 3728, 4582, 4638).

AC 9511. At the two ends of the propitiatory. That this signifies celestial good and spiritual good, is evident from the signification of the ”cherub“ at one end, as being the approach through celestial good; and from the signification of the ”cherub“ at the other end, as being the approach through spiritual good. The same is here signified by ”the two ends“ as by the Lord‘s right and left hands; by His ”right hand“ is signified the good of celestial love, which is the good of love to the Lord; and by His ”left hand“ the good of spiritual love, which is the good of love toward the neighbor.  From this also all things on man’s right side correspond to celestial good; and those on his left side to spiritual good; for all things with man correspond to heaven.  Those who are in these goods are meant by ”sitting on the Lord‘s right and left hands“ in Mark:--

To sit on My right hand, and on My left hand, is not Mine to give; except to those for whom it hath been prepared (Mark 10:40);

”to give to those for whom it hath been prepared“ signifies to bestow from mercy upon those who are in the good of life and of faith (n. 9305), thus on those who are in celestial good and in spiritual good.

AC 9512. And make one cherub at the one end, and one cherub at the other end.  That this signifies the approach for celestial good and for spiritual good, is evident from the signification of a ”cherub,“ as being admission and approach to the Lord through the good of love (n. 9509); and from the signification of ”at the one end and at the other end,“ as being celestial good and spiritual good (n. 9511).

AC 9513. Out of the propitiatory shall ye make the cherubs upon the two ends thereof. That this signifies the reception of all things of worship from these goods, is evident from the signification of ”the propitiatory,“ as being the hearing and reception of all things of worship from the good of love (n. 9506); from the signification of ”the cherubs,“ as being admission and approach to the Lord through this good (n. 9509); and from the signification of ”the two heads,“ as being celestial good and spiritual good (n. 9511).  From this it is plain that by, ”out of“ the propitiatory shall ye make the cherubs on the two ends thereof” is signified the reception of all things of worship from these goods. What celestial good is, and what spiritual good, and what the difference between them, (n. 9277).

AC 9514. And the cherubs shall spread out their wings upward.  That this signifies the elevation effected by the truth of faith, is evident from the signification of “wings,” as being the truths of faith and from the signification of “spreading out the kings upward,” as being to be elevated; for in the spreading out of the wings upward there is the endeavor to elevate one’s self, the act of which is elevation. From this it is plain that by “the wings of the cherubs being spread out upward” is signified the elevation of good to the Lord by means of the truths of faith; for by “the cherubs” is signified approach to Him through good.  It shall here be briefly stated how the case is with the elevation of good by means of the truths of faith.  There are two things to which all things in heaven, and also all things in the world, bear relation, namely, good and truth.  Good without truth is not good, and truth without good is not truth; for good without truth has no quality, and truth without good has no being; for truth is the very form of good, and there must be form in order that there may be quality; and good is that very being the manifestation (existere) of which is truth.

[2] Good is to truth exactly as the will is to the understanding, for the will has been allotted to the reception of good, and the understanding to the reception of truth.  The will receives its quality from the understanding, and the understanding its being from the will; for the will is formed in the understanding, and thus puts on quality.  Good also is to truth as the body is to the arms and feet, and in the case of flying creatures, as the body is to the Wings.  A body without arms and feet, or without wings, cannot move itself, but with their aid it moves itself.  Moreover in the Word the body corresponds to good, and the arms and wings to truths, and also to the powers of good through truths.  From these comparisons, which are also correspondences, it may be known how the case is with the elevation of good by means of the truths of faith, which in general are called “spiritual” things. That “wings” denote the truths of faith, (n. 8764).

AC 9515. Covering with their wings over the propitiatory. That this signifies the spiritual things that cover (or protect), is evident from the signification of “covering over the propitiatory,” as being to cover the good through which there is an approach to the Lord; and from the signification of “wings,” as being the truths of faith, or things spiritual (n. 9514, 8764). Spiritual things are said to “cover,” because the celestial, which is the good of love, is presented in heaven as naked; but as clothed, by means of spiritual things, which are the truths of faith.

AC 9516. And their faces a man‘s to his brother. That this signifies the conjunction of truth and good, is evident from the signification of the “face,” as being the interiors, here looking to, and conjunction, for when two look at each other they conjoin themselves as to their interiors, and by the “face” are signified the interiors, (n. 1999, 2434, 3527, 3573, 4066, 4796-4805, 5102, 5165, 5168, 5695, 9306); and from the signification of “a man to his brother,” as being mutually (n. 4725), thus the conjunction of truth with good, for “man” signifies truth (n. 3134, 3309, 3459, 4725, 7716, 9007), and “brother” signifies good (n. 367, 2360, 3303, 3803, 3815, 4121, 4191, 5409, 5686, 5692, 6756).

AC 9517. Toward the propitiatory shall be the faces of the cherubs.  That this signifies the interiors continually looking to good, and thus to the Lord, is evident from the signification of “the propitiatory,” as being the good of love, from which is the hearing and reception of all things of worship (n. 9506), and thus also the Lord, because all the good of love is from the Lord, and is the Lord Himself with angel and man; from the signification of “faces,” as being the interiors (n. 9516); and from the signification of “the cherubs,” as being a guard from providence lest the Lord be approached except through the good of love (n. 9509).

[2] The case herein is this. Heaven and the church, or the angels of heaven and the men of the church, are guarded by the Lord by means of the elevation of their interiors to Himself; and when they are elevated, they are in the good of love to Him and in the good of love toward the neighbor.  Elevation to the Lord is attended with this; and in this way, as before said, the angels of heaven and the men of the church are guarded They who are elevated by the Lord, continually turn their faces to Him, because, by means of the good of love, the Lord keeps them conjoined with Himself; whereas those who are not elevated turn their faces away from the Lord.  From all this it can be seen what is signified by “the faces of the cherubs being toward the propitiatory.” But concerning this turning to the Lord, of the Lord’s Divine mercy more shall be told from experience elsewhere.

AC 9518. And thou shalt put the propitiatory upon the ark from above.  That this signifies thus the hearing and reception of all things of worship that are from the good of love, is evident from the signification of “the propitiatory,” as being the hearing and reception of all things of worship that are from the good of love (n. 9506); and from the signification of the ark,“ as being heaven where the Lord is. From this it is plain that by the joining together of the propitiatory with the ark is signified the hearing and reception of all things of worship from the good of love by the lord in heaven.

AC 9519. And unto the ark thou shalt put the Testimony. That this signifies by the lord in heaven, namely, the hearing and reception of all things that belong to worship from the good of love, is evident from the signification of ”the ark,“ as being heaven; and from the signification of ”the Testimony,“ as being the Lord (n. 9503).

AC 9520. That I shall give unto thee.  That this signifies the representative, may be seen above (n. 9504).

AC 9521. And there I will meet with thee.  That this signifies hearing and reception, is evident from the signification of ”meeting with,“ when said by Jehovah, as being hearing and reception.

AC 9522. And I will speak with thee from above the propitiatory. That this signifies conjunction, is evident from signification of ”speaking,“ when by Jehovah, as being influx (n. 2951, 5481, 5743, 5797, 7270), thus also conjunction; for where there is influx, there is conjunction.

AC 9523. From between the two cherubs.  That this signifies where celestial good and spiritual good have been conjoined, is evident from the signification of ”the two cherubs,“ as being celestial good and spiritual good, by means of which there is approach to the Lord (n. 9511).  That there is approach where celestial good and spiritual good have been conjoined, is because celestial good flows into spiritual good, and in this way is communicated.

AC 9524. Which are over the ark of the Testimony.  That this signifies with the Lord in heaven, is evident from the representation of the ark, as being heaven; and from the signification of ”the Testimony,“ as being the Divine truth, thus the Lord in heaven see (n. 9503).

AC 9525. All that I shall command thee for the sons of Israel.  That this signifies the worship of the representative church, is evident from the signification of ”commanding,“ when by Jehovah unto Moses, as being the things that belong to worship, for all the things Jehovah commanded Moses for the sons of Israel were such as concerned worship; and from the representation of the sons of Israel, as being the spiritual church (n. 9340), here the spiritual church represented; for all things instituted among the sons of Israel were external things that represented the internal things of the church; but they were not the internal things themselves in their essence (n. 9320).

AC 9526. Verses 23-30.  And thou shalt make a table of shittim wood; two cubits the length thereof, and a cubit the breadth thereof, and a cubit and a half the height thereof And thou shalt overlay it with pure gold, and make thereto a border of gold round about.  And thou shalt make unto it a closure of a handbreadth round about, and thou shalt make a border of gold for the closure thereof round about.  And thou shalt make for it four rings of gold, and shalt put the rings upon the four corners that are on the four feet thereof. Over against the closure shall the rings be, for houses for the staves to carry the table. And thou shalt make the staves of shittim wood, and overlay them with gold, and the table shall be carried with them. And thou shalt make the little dishes thereof and the cups thereof, and the salvers thereof, and the little brooms thereof, with which it shall be covered; of pure gold shalt thou make them.  And thou shalt set upon the table the bread of faces, unto My faces continually.  ”And thou shalt make a table,“signifies a receptacle of the celestial things that belong to the good of love; ”of shittim wood,“ signifies from mercy; ”two cubits the length thereof,“ signifies all in respect to conjunction with good; ”and a cubit the breadth thereof,“ signifies somewhat in respect to conjunction with truth; ”and a cubit and a half the height thereof,“ signifies full in respect to degrees; ”and thou shalt overlay it with pure gold,“ signifies what is representative of this good from mercy; ”and make thereto a border of gold round about,“ signifies a fixing of the bounds of the sphere of good by the Divine good of the Lord; ”and thou shalt make unto it a closure of a handbreadth round about,“ signifies conjunction there with truth from the Divine; ”and thou shalt make a border of gold for the closure thereof round about,“ signifies a fixing of the bounds of the sphere of Divine good; ”and thou shalt make for it four rings of gold,“ signifies the ultimate receptacle of the heavenly marriage, which is of Divine good with Divine truth; ”and shalt put the rings upon the four corners,“ signifies the consequent stability; ”that are on the four feet thereof,“ signifies in the natural sphere; ”over against the closure shall the rings be, for houses for the staves,“ signifies the consequent power; ”to carry the table,“ signifies for coming-forth and subsistence; ”and thou shalt make the staves of shittim wood,“ signifies the power of truth from good; ”and overlay them with gold,“ signifies what is representative of good; ”and the table shall be carried with them“ signifies the consequent endurance; ”and thou shalt make the little dishes thereof, and the cups thereof, and the salvers thereof, and the little brooms thereof, with which it shall be covered,“ signifies the knowledges of celestial good and truth; ”of pure gold shalt thou make them,“ signifies that which is from good; ”and thou shalt set upon the table the bread of faces,“ signifies the Lord there as to celestial good; ”unto My faces continually,“ signifies thus the presence of the Lord with peace and with heavenly joy from mercy.

AC 9527. And thou shalt make a table. That this signifies a receptacle of celestial things, is evident from the signification of the ”table,“ as being heaven, in respect to the reception of such things as are from the Lord there, which are the good of love and the good of faith, and the consequent blessedness and happiness. These things are signified by a ”table,“ because by ”foods“ are signified the celestial things that belong to the good of love and of faith, and the consequent wisdom and intelligence, which even in common speech are called heavenly foods, and are likewise meant by ”foods“ in the Word (n. 56-58, 680, 681, 1480, 4459, 4792, 5293, 5340, 5342, 5576, 5579, 5915, 8562, 9003). Moreover these things are sometimes exhibited representatively in heaven by a table upon which are foods of every kind. From this it is plain that by the ”table“ is signified a receptacle of celestial things, thus heaven in respect to the reception of such things as are from the Lord.  These things  are likewise signified by a ”table“ in the following passages:--

Jesus said, I appoint unto you, even as My Father appointed unto Me My kingdom, that ye may eat and drink at My table in My kingdom (Luke 22:29, 30).

Many shall come from the east and from the west, and shall recline with Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob, in the Kingdom of the heavens (Matt. 8:11).

I will fear no evil; Thou wilt set out a table before me in the presence of mine enemies; Thou wilt make fat my head with oil; my cup shall run over; goodness and mercy shall follow me (Ps. 23:4-6).

But in the opposite sense a ”table“ signifies a receptacle of such things as are in hell; as in the following passages:--

They go astray through strong drink; they wander about among those that see, they stagger in judgment. All tables are full of vomit. Whom shall He teach knowledge? and whom shall He make to under stand what he hath heard? (Isa. 28:7-9).

Ye that forsake Jehovah, that set out a table for Gad, and a drink-offering to Meni (Isa. 65:11).

They gave me gall for my meat; and in my thirst they gave me vinegar to drink.  Let their table before them become a snare (Ps. 69:21, 22).

AC 9528. Of shittim wood.  That this signifies from mercy, is evident from the signification of ”shittim wood,“ as being the good of merit which is of the Lord alone (n. 9472, 9486); and because the good of merit is mercy, therefore this also is signified by ”shittim wood.“ For from pure love, and thus from pure mercy, the Lord assumed the Human, and endured the most grievous temptations, and finally the passion of the cross, that He might save the human race; whereby merit and righteousness became His.  From this it is clear that the good of merit is mercy.  Mercy is the Divine love toward those who are set fast in a state of misery.  That the Lord underwent the most grievous temptations, and thereby reduced heaven and hell into order, and that He fought from Divine love to save those who receive Him with love and faith, (n. 1266, 1663, 1668, 1676, 1690, 1691, 1737, 1787, 1789, 1812, 1813, 1820, 1921, 2083, 2159, 2574, 2649, 2776, 2795, 2813, 2816, 3318, 4180, 4286, 4295, 5078).

AC 9529. Two cubits the length thereof. That this signifies all in respect to conjunction with good, is evident from the signification of ”two,“ as being conjunction, and as being each and all things. That it denotes conjunction, (n. 1686, 5194, 8423), and from this each and all things, (n. 9166); and from the signification of ”length,“ as being good (n. 9487). Consequently by ”a length of two cubits“ is signified all in respect to conjunction with good.  By conjunction with good is meant the conjunction of the receptacle, which is signified by ”the table,“ with the good of love, which is signified by ”the breads of faces“ upon the table.  For the receptacle must be accommodated to the things to be received, and the things to be received bear relation to good and to truth.  Accommodation and the consequent conjunction are described by the numbers by which the length and breadth are marked out. That in the Word real things are described by means of numbers, (n. 9488).

AC 9530. And a cubit the breadth thereof. That this signifies somewhat in respect to conjunction with truth, is evident from the signification of ”a cubit,“ or of ”one cubit,“ as being somewhat, for it is the half of the former number, and when the double signifies all, half of it signifies somewhat, consequently somewhat for conjunction; and from the signification of ”breadth,“ as being truth (n. 9487, 9488).

AC 9531. And a cubit and a half the height thereof, signifies full in respect to degrees (n. 9489).

AC 9532. And thou shall overlay it with pure gold.  That this signifies what is representative of this good from mercy, is evident from the signification of ”overlaying with gold,“ as being a representative of good; for by ”gold“ is signified the good of love (n. 113, 1551, 1552, 5658, 6914, 6917). Wherefore this good was represented by ”gold,“ when this was overlaid.  That it denotes from mercy, is because all the good of love is from mercy; which also is signified by ”shittim wood,“ in that it was overlaid with gold (n. 9528).

AC 9533. And make thereto a border of gold round about. That this signifies a bounding of the sphere of good by the Divine good of the Lord, is evident from the signification of ”a border of gold round about,“ as being a fixing of the bounds of the sphere of good by the Lord, lest they be approached and injured by the evil (n. 9492).

AC 9534. And thou shalt make unto it a closure of a handbreadth round about.  That this signifies conjunction there with truth from the Divine, is evident from the signification of ”a closure,“ as being the ultimate of the bounding, because it was outside the border, and thus it signifies conjunction with truth from the Divine.  That this is signified by the ”closure“ cannot be known unless it is known how the case is with the extension and the bounding by the Lord of the sphere of good which compasses and thus protects heaven. That the sphere of Divine good encompasses heaven and all the societies in heaven, and thus protects them from the breaking in of evils from hell, (n. 9490, 9492, 9498).

[2] This Divine sphere extends even into the hells, and likewise guards them. Hence it is that the Lord reigns also in the hells, but with this difference, that the Divine sphere which encompasses and protects heaven is a sphere of Divine truth conjoined with Divine good; whereas the sphere which guards hell is a sphere of Divine truth separate from Divine good. That this is the sphere in hell, is because all who are there reject Divine good; thus the Lord‘s mercy.  Such a sphere reigns in hell in the external form, but still in the internal form there reigns the sphere of Divine truth conjoined with Divine good; by which latter sphere those there are guarded lest one do evil to another beyond measure.

[3] From this it is evident that the sphere of Divine good in the external form ceases where heaven ceases; and that the sphere of Divine truth separate from Divine good begins where hell begins; and that in the interval between them there is conjunction, which is signified by ”the closure of a handbreadth round about.“

AC 9535. And thou shalt make a border of gold to the closure thereof round about.  That this signifies the bounding of the sphere of Divine good, is evident from the signification of ”a border of gold,“ as being the fixing of the bounds by the Divine good (n. 9533); and from the signification of ”the closure thereof,“ as being conjunction with truth from the Divine (n. 9534).

AC 9536. And thou shalt make for it four rings of gold.  That this signifies the ultimate receptacle of the heavenly marriage, which is that of Divine good with Divine truth, is evident from the signification of the ”four rings of gold,“ as being Divine truth conjoined with Divine good everywhere round about (n. 9493), thus the ultimate receptacle of the heavenly marriage, which is that of Divine good with Divine truth.

AC 9537. And thou shall put the rings upon the four corners thereof. That this signifies the consequent stability, is evident from the signification of ”the rings,“ as being stability (n. 9494), namely, from the conjunction of Divine truth with Divine good in ultimates, which is signified by ”the four rings of gold“ (n. 9536).

AC 9538. That are on the four feet thereof. That this signifies in the natural sphere, is evident from the signification of ”four,“ which involves conjunction (n. 1686, 8877); and from the signification of ”feet,“ as being the natural (n. 2162, 3147, 3761, 3986, 4280, 4938-4952, 5327, 5328).  That there is stability in the natural sphere, is because everything spiritual comes to a close in what is called natural truth, and everything celestial in what is called natural good, and there they subsist.  From this it is that the natural is a foundation, and consequently a support to them.  That this is so is as yet known to few; and therefore of the Lord’s Divine mercy it shall be told elsewhere from experience.

AC 9539. Over against the closure shall the rings be, for houses for the staves. That this signifies the consequent power, is evident from the signification of ”the closure over against which the rings were to be,“ as being the conjunction in ultimates with truth from the Divine (n. 9534); from the signification of ”the rings,“ as being the receptacle thereof (n. 9536); and from the signification of ”the staves,“ as being power (n. 9496). It is said ”for houses,“ because the subject treated of is celestial good and the power of its receptacle; for this good is signified by the ”bread of faces,“ and its receptacle by the ”table“ on which this bread was set; by ”houses“ also is signified this good in ultimates. That a ”house“ denotes good, (n. 2233, 2234, 2559, 3652, 3720, 4982, 7848, 7929).

AC 9540. To carry the table.  That this signifies for comingforth and subsistence, is evident from the signification of ”carrying,“ as being to hold together in a state of good, thus to come forth and subsist (n. 9500).

AC 9541. And thou shalt make the staves of shittim wood. That this signifies the power of truth from good, may be seen above (n. 9496), where the like words occur.

AC 9542. And shall overlay them with gold. That this signifies that which is representative of good, may also be seen above (n. 9532).

AC 9543. And the table shall be carried with them. That this signifies the consequent endurance, is evident from the signification of ”to be carried,“ as being to come forth and subsist (n. 9540), thus also endurance; and from the signification of ”the table,“ as being a receptacle of celestial things (n. 9527). This is described the inmost or third heaven in respect to the reception of good from the Lord.  For ”the breads of faces“ denote the celestial good that is from the Lord; and ”the table“ on which these breads were, denotes the receptacle of this good. But it is not allowable to set forth every detail as it really is, because very many things in the celestial kingdom of the Lord do not fall into any idea of human thought, and scarcely into the idea of the thought of the angelic spirits who are in the ultimate heaven. For all things in the Lord‘s celestial kingdom are founded upon the good which is of love, and not on the truth which is of faith.  Moreover they speak together by means of the goods which are of love, and not by means of the truths which are of faith, as do those who are in the Lord’s spiritual kingdom (n. 9277).

[2] The Lord‘s celestial kingdom is the inmost or third heaven, in which as is known are things incomprehensible and unutterable, that is to say which have never entered into the mind of anyone, and eye hath not seen, nor ear heard. And therefore the things that come forth in this heaven are presented to view before the spirits below by means of representatives, from which some idea may be formed of the incomprehensible and unutterable things which are there.  The same were represented in the world by the ark, the propitiatory, the cherubs, the table on which were the breads of faces, and by the lampstand.  By means of these are presented all things in that kingdom; and by means of the Habitation and the court of the tent, and by means of the curtains and veils therein, were represented the things in the Lord’s spiritual kingdom, which is the second or middle heaven.

AC 9544. And thou shalt make the little dishes thereof and the cups thereof, and the salvers thereof and the little brooms thereof with which it shall be covered.  That this signifies the knowledges of celestial good and truth, is evident from the signification of ”vessels“ in general, as being knowledges (n. 3068, 3079).  Thus the particular vessels here enumerated denote the knowledges of celestial good and truth.  Celestial good is the good of love to the Lord, and celestial truth is the good of mutual love; the knowledges of these goods are signified by the vessels in question.  And as knowledges are signified, and knowledges belong to the memory of the natural man, and the natural is external, therefore it is said, ”with which the table shall be covered;“ for as the natural is without, or beneath, and covers and closes that which is within or above, it is called a ”covering“ (n. 6377). The use of these vessels may be seen in (Leviticus 24:6, 7; Numbers 4:7, 8).

AC 9545. And thou shalt set upon the table the bread of faces.  That this signifies the Lord there in respect to celestial good, is evident from the signification of ”the table,“ as being a receptacle of celestial things; from the signification of ”the bread,“ as being in the supreme sense the Lord, and in the relative sense the good of love which is from Him, thus the Lord in respect to celestial good (n. 2165, 2177, 3464, 3735, 3813, 4211, 4217, 4735, 4976, 5915); that by ”bread“ is signified all heavenly food in general, that is, the food which nourishes man‘s spiritual life, (n. 3478, 6118, 8410, 9323); and from the signification of ”faces,“ when said of the Lord, as being all that is from the Divine love; such as innocence, peace, joy; and thus heaven itself with man and angel (n. 222, 223, 5585, 9306).

AC 9546. Unto My faces continually.  That this signifies thus the presence of the Lord with peace and with heavenly joy from mercy, is evident from the signification of the ”faces of Jehovah,“ or of the Lord, as being all things of the Divine love or mercy, such as innocence, peace, joy, and thus heaven itself with those who receive it.  For by ”faces,“ when said of man and angel, are signified the interiors which are of the will and thence of the understanding, thus which are of love and thence of faith (n. 1999, 2434, 3527, 3573, 4066, 4796, 4798, 5102, 5165, 5168, 5585, 5592, 6604, 6848, 6849, 9306).  From this it can be seen that by ”faces,“ when said of Jehovah or the Lord, are signified the things of the Divine love or mercy, thus all celestial good (n. 222, 223, 5585, 9306).

AC 9547. Verses 31-39. And thou shalt make a lampstand of pure gold; solid shall the lampstand be made, its shaft, and its reed, its cups, its pomegranates, and its flowers, shall be out of it; and there shall be six reeds going out of the sides thereof; three reeds of the lampstand out of the one side thereof”, and three reeds of the lampstand out of the other side thereof; three almond-shaped cups in one reed, a pomegranate and a flower; and three almond-shaped cups in one reed, a pomegranate and a flower; so for the six reeds, going out of the lampstand; and in the lampstand four almond-shaped cups, its pomegranates, and its flowers; and a pomegranate under two reeds out of it, and a pomegranate under two reeds out of it, and a pomegranate under two reeds out of it, for the six reeds going out of the lampstand. Their pomegranates and their reeds shall be out of it, all of them, one solid of pure gold. And thou shalt make the lamps thereof, seven; and it shall make its lamps go up, to give light over against the faces of it.  And the tongs thereof, and the basins thereof shall be of pure gold.  Of a talent of pure gold shall it be made, with all these vessels.  “And thou shalt make a lamb stand,” signifies the spiritual heaven; “of pure gold,” signifies that it is from celestial good; “solid shall the lampstand be made,” signifies that all is from good; “its shaft, and its reed, its cups,” signifies spiritual things in the natural; “its pomegranates,” signifies the memory-knowledges of good; “and its flowers,” signifies the memory-knowledges of truth; “shall be out of it,” signifies that they shall be from the spiritual which is from celestial good; “and there shall be six reeds going out of the sides thereof,” signifies all things of truth from good in the complex; “three reeds of the lampstand out of the one side thereof, and three reeds of the lampstand out of the other side thereof,” signifies full in respect to good and truth; “three almond-shaped cups,” signifies full in respect to memory-knowledges from good; “in one reed,” signifies the power of truth from good; “a pomegranate and a flower,” signifies the memory-knowledge of good and the memory-knowledge of truth; “and three almond-shaped cups in the other reed, a pomegranate and a flower,” signifies the like things; “so for the six reeds going out of the lampstand,” signifies the power of truth from good in respect to all things in the spiritual heaven; “and in the lampstand,” signifies the middle of it through which there is conjunction, and from which are powers; “four almond-shaped cups,” signifies the memory-knowledges of truth from good; “its pomegranates, and its flowers,” signifies the memory-knowledges of good and of truth; “and a pomegranate under two reeds out of it, and a pomegranate under two reeds out of it, and a pomegranate under two reeds out of it,” signifies the memory-knowledge of good for all the several truths; “ for the six reeds going out of the lampstand,” signifies the power of truth from good in respect to all things in the spiritual heaven; “their pomegranates and their reeds shall be out of it; all of it,” signifies that the memory-knowledges of good and the powers shall be from the Divine spiritual which is from the Lord; “one solid of pure gold,” signifies entire and perfect because from the same good; “and thou shalt make the lamps thereof, seven,” signifies holy spiritual things from thence; “and it shall make its lamps go up,” signifies the light of the spiritual heaven; “and it shall give light over against the faces of it,” signifies from the Divine good of the Divine Human of the Lord; “and the tongs thereof, and the basins thereof,” signifies the purifiers and evacuators in the natural; “shall he of pure gold,” signifies also from good; “of a talent of pure gold shall it be made, with all these vessels,” signifies celestial good from which is spiritual good together with its memory-knowledges.

AC 9548. And thou shalt make a lampstand.  That this signifies the spiritual heaven, is evident from the signification of the “lampstand,” as being the Divine spiritual in heaven and in the church from the Lord.  That by the “lampstand” is signified the Divine spiritual, is because by “the table on which were the breads of faces” is signified the Divine celestial, as was shown in what goes before.  The Divine celestial is the good of love, and the Divine spiritual is the truth of faith thence derived; both proceeding from the Lord.  That the “lampstand” denotes the Divine spiritual is from its illumination, for the Divine truth which proceeds from the Divine good of the Lord is what gives light in heaven, nor have the angels light from any other source.  Hence it is that in the Word the Lord is called “the Light,” and by “light” is signified faith, also the intelligence of truth and the wisdom of good, which are from the Lord alone (n. 1053, 1521-1533, 1619-1632, 2776, 3094, 3138, 3167, 3190, 3195, 3222, 3223, 3337, 3339, 3341, 3636, 3643, 3862, 3993, 4060, 4180, 4302, 4408, 4414, 4415, 4419, 4527, 4598, 5400, 6032, 6313, 6315, 6608, 6907, 7174, 8644, 8707, 8861, 9399, 9407).

[2] That the “lampstand” denotes the spiritual heaven from the Divine truth which is from the Lord, thus also the church; and that a “lamp” denotes faith, also the intelligence of truth and the wisdom of good, which are from the Lord alone; is evident from passages in the Word where a “lampstand,” and a “lamp,” are mentioned; as in John:--

I saw seven golden lampstands, and in the midst of the seven lamb stands one like unto the Son of man. The seven lampstands are the seven churches (Rev. 1:12, 13, 20).

I will remove thy lampstand out of its place, except thou repent (Rev. 2:5).

The church is here called a “lampstand” from the Divine truth which is there from the Lord; for it is said, “the seven lampstands are the seven churches;” that the church is from the Divine truth is plain from its being said, “I will remove thy lampstand except thou repent;” that it is from the Lord is also plain, for it is said, “in the midst of the lampstands was one like unto the Son of man.” That the Lord is called “the Son of man” from Divine truth, (n. 2803, 2813, 3704).

[3] In the same:--

I will give unto My two witnesses that they shall prophesy a thousand two hundred and sixty days.  These are the two olive-trees and the two lampstands that stand before the God of the earth (Rev. 11:3, 4);

the “two witnesses” denote the Word of both Testaments in respect to its witnessing concerning the Lord; it is called an “olive-tree” from the Divine good, and a “lampstand” from the Divine truth, which are from the Lord.

[4] In Zechariah:--

The angel said unto the prophet, What seest thou? to whom I said, I see, and behold a lampstand all of gold, with its flask upon the top of it, and its seven lamps thereon, and seven funnels to the lamps. Two olive-trees near it, one on the right side of the flask, and one on the left side thereof (Zech. 4:2, 3);

this is said of Zerubbabel, who was about to lay the foundation of the house of God and to complete it, by whom is represented the Lord in that He would come and restore the spiritual heaven and church, which are the “lampstand,” and the holy truths therein which are the “seven lamps.”

[5] That a “lamp” denotes faith, also the intelligence of truth and wisdom of good, which are from the Lord alone, is evident in these passages:--

The holy Jerusalem hath no need of the sun, neither of the moon, to shine in it; the glory of God shall lighten it, and the Lamb is the lamp thereof. The nations which are saved shall walk in His light (Rev. 21:23, 24).

There shall be no night there; and they need no lamp, neither light of the sun; for the Lord God giveth them light (Rev. 22:5).

In the former passage “the lamp” denotes the Divine truth which is from the Lord; and “the light,” faith, thus also intelligence and wisdom.  Again:--

The light of a lamp shall shine no more at all in thee; and the voice of the bridegroom and of the bride shall be heard no more at all in thee (Rev. 18:23).

[6] And in Jeremiah:--

I will take away the voice of joy and the voice of gladness, the voice of the bridegroom and the voice of the bride, the voice of the millstones, and the light of the lamp; that the whole land shall be a desolation and a devastation (Jer. 25:10, 11);

speaking of the extinction of faith and thereby of intelligence in spiritual things, which is meant by “the lamp which shall no longer be, and by the light of the lamp which shall be taken away.”

[7] In like manner in the following passages:--

How oft is the lamp of the wicked put out, and destruction cometh upon them (Job 21:17).

Thou lightest my lamp; Jehovah my God maketh my darkness to shine (Ps. 18:28; 2 Sam. 22:29).

From Thy commands I am become intelligent, Thy Word is a lamp to my foot, and a light to my path (Ps. 119:104, 106).

When God maketh His lamp to shine upon my head, by His light I walked in darkness (Job 29:3).

The lamp of the body is the eye; if thine eye be upright, thy whole body is full of light. But if thine eye be evil, thy whole body shall be darkened. If therefore the light that is in thee be darkness, how great is the darkness (Matt. 6:22, 23; Luke 8:16; 11:33-36);

by “the eye” is here meant faith and the intelligence from it.  That these things are meant in the internal sense by “the eye,” (n. 4403-4421, 4523-4534, 9051).  From this it is plain what is signified by “the whole body being full of light if the eye be upright, and by the whole body being darkened if the eye be evil.” As faith and the derivative intelligence and wisdom are signified by a “lamp,” therefore the kings of Judah are called “lamps for David” (1 Kings 11:36; 15:4; 2 Kings 8:19); and David is called “the lamp of Israel” (2 Sam. 21:16, 17); not that the kings of Judah, nor David, were lamps, but that by a “kind” is signified the Divine truth which is from the Lord (n. 6148); and by “David,” the Lord as to Divine truth, from which are faith, intelligence, and wisdom (n. 1888).

AC 9549. Of pure gold.  That this signifies that it is from celestial good, is evident from the signification of “gold,” as being the good of love, or celestial good (n. 113, 1551, 1552, 5658, 6914, 6917).  It shall here be briefly stated why the lampstand was to be of pure gold.  By “the lampstand” is signified the Divine spiritual, or the Divine truth which is from the Lord in heaven and in the church (n. 9548); and because this truth comes forth from the Divine good, the lampstand was of gold, for as before said, “gold” signifies good.  This is further manifest from the influx of the Lord into the heavens. The inmost or third heaven is celestial; the middle or second heaven is spiritual.  The Lord flows through the celestial heaven which is in the good of love to Him, into the spiritual heaven which is in the truth of faith in Him.  From this it is evident why the whole lampstand was to be of pure gold, as also the ten lampstands in the temple built by Solomon (1 Kings 7:49).  See (n. 9550, 9568).

AC 9550. Solid shall the lampstand be made.  That this signifies that all is from good, is evident from the signification of “solid,” as being wholly, thus all from good, which is signified by “gold.” For all the spiritual (which is signified by “the lampstand”), in so far as it illumines, comes forth from the celestial, and also continually subsists through the same, as all truth does from good; for if good is withdrawn, truth is extinguished in a moment, because good is the soul of truth. The case herein is like that of the affection of love in regard to thought; if the affection of love is withdrawn, thought is instantly extinguished; for affection is the very life or soul of thought.  All the affection that is of love is of good, and all the thought from it is of truth.  The truth which is from good is called the spiritual, and the good from which is truth is’ called the celestial.

AC 9551. Its shaft and its reed;   its cups.  That this signifies spiritual things in the natural, is evident from the signification of a “shaft,” a “reed,” and a “cup” (which are prolongations from the lampstand itself, just as the arms, the hands, and the palms of the hands are from the body), as being spiritual things in the natural; for the natural is produced and derived from the spiritual; as is the spiritual from the celestial (n. 9549).  From this it is plain that as “the lampstand” signifies the Divine spiritual, the prolongations and derivations, which are called “the shaft, the reed, and the cups,” denote spiritual things in the natural.

AC 9552. Its pomegranates.  That this signifies the memory-knowledges of good, is evident from the signification of “pomegranates,” as being the memory-knowledges of good.  There are memory-knowledges of good and memory-knowledges of truth; the former are signified by the “pomegranates,” and the latter by the “flowers,” with which the lampstand was encompassed and adorned.  That memory-knowledges of good are signified by “pomegranates,” is evident from other passages where these are mentioned; as in these passages:--

A land of wheat and barley, and of the vine, and the fig-tree, and of the pomegranate (Deut. 8:8).

The seed is not yet in the barn, yea, even to the vine, and the fig-tree, and the pomegranate (Hag. 2:19).

“Wheat, barley, and the seed in the barn” signify celestial things internal and external; “the vine, the fig-tree, and the pomegranate” signify spiritual and natural things in their order, the last of which are the memory-knowledges that belong to the natural and sensuous man; wherefore “the pomegranate” is‘ mentioned last.

[2] In Zephaniah:--

Jehovah will destroy Asshur. Flocks shall lie down in the midst of her, every wild animal of the nation, also the pelican and the bittern shall pass the night in the pomegranates thereof (Zeph. 2:13, 14);

where “the pelican and the bittern in the pomegranates” denote falsities of evil in the memory-knowledges of good.  In Amos:--

I saw the Lord standing upon the altar, who said, Smite the pomegranate that the posts may shake; that is, divide them in the head, all of thee; I will slay the last of them with the sword (Amos 9:1);

where “to smite the pomegranate” denotes to destroy the memory-knowledges of good by means of the falsities of evil; the posts are then said to “shake,” because “posts” denote the truths of the natural (n. 7847); “to slay the last with the sword” denotes in this way to destroy the ultimate things; for a “sword” denotes truth fighting against falsity and destroying it: and the converse (n. 2799, 4499, 6353, 7102, 8294).

AC 9553. And its flowers.  That this signifies the memory-knowledges of truth, is evident from the signification of “flowers,” as being the memory-knowledges of truth.  “flowers” have this signification, because flowers are growths which precede, and in their manner produce, the fruits and seeds; for, as is known, trees and plants blossom before they bear fruit. The case is the same with man in respect to intelligence and wisdom.  The memory-knowledges of truth precede, and in their manner produce with man, the things of wisdom; for they serve as objects to his rational, and thus as means for growing wise.  It is for this reason that the memory-knowledges of truth are as flowers; and the good of life, which is the good of wisdom, is as fruit.  As all things in the spiritual world bear relation to such things as are in man, for the reason that heaven bears relation to a man, and corresponds to each and all things with man, therefore also all things in the natural world have a correspondence, a representation, and a signification in accordance with their agreement with such things as are in man (n. 9496).  From this it can now be seen why “flowers” signify the memory-knowledges of truth, and in general truths; and why “fruits,” and likewise “seeds,” signify goods.

[2] That “flowers” denote the memory-knowledges of truth, and in general truths, is evident from the following passages:--

Their root shall be as rottenness, and their flower as dust; because they have rejected the law of Jehovah Zebaoth, and despised the discourse of the Holy One of Israel (Isa. 5:24).

Jacob shall cause those to come to take root; Israel shall blossom and flower; so that the faces of the world shall be filled with produce (Isa. 27:6).

Woe to the drunkards of Ephraim, and to the fading flower of his glory and comeliness (Isa. 28:1);

“drunkards” denote those who reason from falsities (n. 1072); “Ephraim” denotes the intellectual of the church, here perverted (n. 5354, 6222, 6234, 6238, 6267); “glory,” truth Divine (n. 4809, 5922, 8267, 8427, 9429); from which it is plain that a “flower” denotes the memory-knowledge through which is truth.  Again:--

The grass is withered, the flower faded, the people is grass; but the word of our God abideth forever (Isa. 40:7, 8).

The flower of Lebanon languisheth (Nahum 1:4);

where also “the flower” denotes memory-knowledges as means for growing wise.

[3] In Daniel:--

Nebuchadnezzar saw in a dream, and behold a tree in the midst of the earth, the height thereof great, the leaf thereof beautiful, and the flower thereof much; the beast of the field had shade under it, and the birds of heaven dwelt in the branches thereof, and all flesh was fed. But the Holy One from heaven, crying aloud, said, Hew down the tree, cut off his branches, shake off his leaf, scatter his flower; let the beast of the field flee from under it, and the birds from its branches (Daniel 4:10, 12-14);

by “the tree” and “the height thereof” is signified the increase of the religiosity signified by “Babel,” which is holy in externals, but profane in internals (n. 1182, 1283, 1295, 1304-1308, 1321, 1322, 1326); “the leaf” denotes memory-truth in general (n. 885); “the flower,” the memory-knowledge of truth in so far as it serves as a means for growing wise, but here in so far as it serves as a means for growing insane, because it is said that “the flower shall be scattered;” “the beast of the field” denotes those who are in affections of good; and in the opposite sense, those who are in affections of evil (n. 45, 46, 142, 143, 246, 714, 715, 719, 776, 1823, 2179, 2180, 3218, 3519, 5198, 7523, 9090, 9280); but “the birds of heaven” denote those who are in affections of truth, and in the opposite sense those who are in affections of falsity (n. 3219, 5149, 7441); therefore it is said that “under the shade of that tree dwelt the beast of the field,” and that “in its branches dwelt the birds of heaven,” and that “all flesh was fed;” and afterward that “the beast of the field should flee from under it, and the birds from its branches.”

AC 9554. Shall be out of it.  That this signifies that they shall be from the spiritual which is from celestial good, is evident from the signification of “the lampstand,” out of which the pomegranates and flowers were to be, as being the Divine spiritual which is from the Divine celestial (n. 9548). Hence it is evident that by “shall be out of it” is signified from the spiritual which is from celestial good.

AC 9555. And there shall be six reeds going out of the sides thereof.  That this signifies all things of truth from good in the complex, is evident from the signification of “six,” as being all things in the complex (n. 3960, 7973, 8148); and from the signification of “reeds going out of the sides,” as being truths from good. For by “the reeds out of the lampstand” is signified the like as by the arms and hands of a man, because each and all things in nature bear relation to the human form, and have their signification therefrom (n. 9496, 9553).  The “arms” and “hands” in man correspond to truths from good, and to the derivative power, (n. 878, 4931-4937, 5327, 5328, 6292, 6947, 7188, 7189, 7205, 7518, 7673, 8050, 8153, 8281, 9025, 9133). From all this it is evident that by “the six reeds going out of the sides” are signified all things of truth from good in the complex.

AC 9556. Three reeds of the lampstand out of the one side there of, and three reeds of the lampstand out of the other side thereof. That hereby is signified full in respect to good and truth, is evident from the signification of “three,” as being what is fall (n. 2788, 4495, 7715, 9198); from the signification of “the reeds of the lampstand,” as being truths from good and the consequent power (n. 9555); and from the signification of “out of the one side, and out of the other side,” as being from good and the derivative truth. For by the things on the right side of the body are signified goods, and by those on the left side the truths thence derived, as is the case with the right and left sides of the face, the right and left eyes, the right and left ears, the right and left feet, and in like manner with all other things in the body.

AC 9557. Three almond-shaped cups. That this signifies full in respect to memory-knowledges from good, is evident from the signification of “three,” as being what is full (n. 9556); from the signification of “cups,” as being memory-truths that are from the good of charity (n. 5120); and from the signification of “almonds,” as being the goods of life that correspond to the truths of interior natural good (n. 5622). From this it is evident that by “three almond-shaped cups” is signified what is full in respect to memory-truths from good.

AC 9558. In one reed.  That this signifies the power of truth from good, is evident from the signification of a “reed,” as being truth from good and the consequent power (n. 9555).

AC 9559. A pomegranate and a flower.  That this signifies the memory-knowledge of good and of truth, is evident from the signification of “a pomegranate,” as being the memory-knowledge of good (n. 9552); and from the signification of “a flower,” as being the memory-knowledge of truth (n. 9553).

AC 9560. And three almond-shaped cups in the other reed, a pomegranate and a flower.  That this signifies the like things as just above (n. 9557-9559), is evident without explication.

AC 9561. So for the six reeds going out of the lampstand. That this signifies the power of truth from good in respect to all things in the spiritual heaven, is evident from the signification of “six,” as being all things in the complex (n. 9555); from the signification of “the reeds,” as being truths from good and the consequent power (n. 9555, 9558); and from the signification of “the lampstand,” as being the spiritual heaven (n. 9548). From this it is evident that by “the six reeds going out of the lampstand” is signified the power of truth from good in respect to all things in the spiritual heaven.

AC 9562. And in the lampstand. That this signifies the middle of it through which there is conjunction, and from which are powers, is evident from the signification of “the lampstand,” as being the spiritual heaven (n. 9548), but here, because the middle part is meant from which the six reeds went out, by which reeds are signified powers (n. 9558), therefore the middle is signified through which there is conjunction, and from which are powers.

AC 9563. Four almond-shaped cups.  That this signifies the memory-knowledges of truth from good, is evident from the signification of “four,” as being conjunction (n. 8877); and from the signification of “almond-shaped cups,” as being memory-knowledges from good (n. 9557).

AC 9564. Its pomegranates, and its flowers.  That this signifies the memory-knowledges of good and of truth, is evident from the signification of “pomegranates,” as being memory-knowledges of good (n. 9552); and from the signification of “flowers,” as being memory-knowledges of truth (n. 9553).

AC 9565. And a pomegranate under two reeds out of it, and a pomegranate under two reeds out of it, and a pomegranate under too reeds out of it. That this signifies the memory-knowledge of good for all the several truths, is evident from the signification of “a pomegranate,” as being memory-knowledge of good (n. 9552); and from the signification of the “reeds,” as being truths from good (n. 9555).  Its being said three times signifies every thing, and in the internal sense complete conjunction; for by “three” is signified what is complete (n. 2788, 4495, 7715, 9198); and by “two” is signified conjunction (n. 1686, 5194, 8423).

AC 9566. For the six reeds going out of the lampstand, signifies the power of truth from good in respect to all things in the spiritual heaven (n. 9561).

AC 9567. Their pomegranates and their reeds shall be out of it; all of it. That this signifies that the memory-knowledges of good and the powers shall be from the Divine spiritual which is from the Lord, is evident from the signification of “pomegranates,” as being memory-knowledges of good (n. 9552); from the signification of the “reeds,” as being truths from good and the consequent powers (n. 9555, 9558); and from the signification of “the lampstand,” out of which they were to be, as being the Divine spiritual which is in heaven and in the church from the Lord (n. 9548). From this it is evident that by “the pomegranates and the reeds that were to be out of the lampstand,” is signified that the memory-knowledges of good and the powers shall be from the Divine spiritual which is from the Lord.  How the case is with these things may be seen in what now follows.

AC 9568. One solid of pure gold.  That this signifies entire and perfect because from the same good, is evident from the signification of “one solid thing,” as being wholly, thus all from the good which is signified by “gold” (n. 9550), thus what is entire and perfect; for that which is wholly from good is entire and perfect.  By that which is wholly from good, thus by that which is entire and perfect, is meant when good is the all in all, not only in the truths which are signified by “the reeds,” but also in the memory-knowledges which are signified by “the pomegranates and the flowers.” But how the case herein is shall now be stated. Good is the source of truths, and truths from good are the source of memory-knowledges. So is the one derived and produced from the other. Nevertheless good is everything in its products and derivatives, because these are from good. The case herein is like that with end, cause, and effect.

[2] The end is everything of the cause, and the cause is everything of the effect; whence it follows that the end is everything of the effect, insomuch that if the end or final cause is withdrawn, there is no efficient cause and do effect of it. In like manner do the celestial, the spiritual, and the natural succeed each other; from the celestial is all the spiritual, and from the spiritual is all the natural, that is, from the celestial through the spiritual. With man all is called “celestial” that is of the good of love, all “spiritual” that is of the truth of faith thence derived, and all “natural” that is’ of memory-knowledge. That memory-knowledge is natural, is because this knowledge is truth appearing in the light of the world; whereas the truth of faith, in so far as it is of faith with man, is in the light of heaven.

[3] From all this it can now be seen how one thing is produced and derived from another, and that the first is everything in the products and derivatives, insomuch that if the first is withdrawn, the things which follow from it perish. Everyone capable of perception can know that the Divine is the first of all things, and therefore is the all in all of the order of things, thus in all things of good and truth which make heaven, and which make the life of heaven, with man.  Consequently good from the Divine is in all the truths of faith, and if good is not everything in them, and if the Divine of the Lord is not everything in good, the man has in him nothing of heaven, thus nothing of the church.

[4] But the Divine of the Lord is in all things of good with a man, and from this in all things of truth with him, when he wills from love, and believes from the consequent faith, that all good and all truth, thus everything of love and everything of faith, are from the Lord, and absolutely nothing from himself; and also that he possesses the truth of faith in the exact proportion of his conception of good from the Lord; for, as before said, good is the all in all things of truth, and truth without good is truth without life.  From all this it can be seen what is meant by that which is entire and perfect because from the same good, which is signified by “one solid of pure gold.”

AC 9569. And thou shalt make the lamps thereof, seven.  That this signifies holy spiritual things from it, is evident from the signification of a “lamp,” as being the faith and intelligence of truth, which are from the Lord alone (n. 9548), thus what is spiritual, for the Divine truth which is from the Lord, and through which are faith, intelligence, and wisdom, is the spiritual; and from the signification of “seven,” as being what is holy (n. 395, 433, 716, 881, 5265, 5268).  The lamps were seven in number because the Divine truth, from which are faith, intelligence, and wisdom, is what is called “holy,” for the reason that it proceeds from the Divine good of the Lord‘s Divine love; and the Divine good of the Divine love is that which makes holy.  It was from this that sanctifications were effected with oil, as the sanctification of the tent, and of all things therein, of the altar, of Aaron and his sons, and of their garments, and afterward of the kings, from which they were called “the anointed;” for “oil” signifies the good of love (n. 886, 3728, 4582, 4638).

AC 9570. And it shall make its lamps go up.  That this signifies the light of the spiritual heaven, is evident from the signification of “making its lamps go up,” as being to kindle a light in them, that they may give light; and as the spiritual heaven was represented by the lampstand (n. 9548), therefore by “making the lamps go up” is signified the light of the spiritual heaven.  The light of the spiritual heaven is the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord, and the consequent faith, intelligence of truth, and wisdom of good (n. 9548).  How the case is with the light of the spiritual heaven shall be briefly stated.  In the Lord’s celestial kingdom, which is the inmost or third heaven, there is a light which immeasurably surpasses the light in the spiritual kingdom, which is the middle or second heaven.  The light of the celestial kingdom, that is, of the inmost heaven, does not appear as light, but as flame; the reason being that the good of love reigns in this heaven, and in heaven the good of love is presented to view as flame.  But in the Lord‘s spiritual kingdom, which is the middle or second heaven, there is a light which immeasurably surpass the light of the world, and yet it appears bright white, for the reason that in this heaven there reigns the truth of faith from the good of charity; and in heaven the truth of faith from this good is presented to view as a bright white light. From this in the Word also “light” signifies the truth which is from good, and in the supreme sense the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord’s Divine good.  From all this it can now be seen what is meant by “the light of the spiritual heaven,” and what by “the flame of the lamp,” from which is this light.

AC 9571. And it shall give light over against the faces of it. That this signifies from the Divine good of the Lord‘s Divine Human, is evident from the signification of “giving light,” as being the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord’s Divine good; for it is this which gives light to heaven and the angels themselves who are there, and also to the church and the men therein who are in faith from good. The illumination from this is the illumination of the mind, from which come intelligence and wisdom in the truths and goods of faith.  The mind is illuminated by means of the Word, because the Word is Divine truth from the Lord. And from the signification of “the faces,” when said of the Lord, as being all that which is from the Divine good of His Divine love (n. 9545, 9546).  The reason why it is from the Divine good of the Lord‘s Divine Human, is that the Lord’s Divine Human is the source of light in heaven, for it is the Sun of heaven, from which is light, and the light from this is Divine truth (n. 1053, 1521-1533, 1619-1632, 2776, 3094, 3138, 3167, 3190, 3195, 3222, 3223, 3337, 3339, 3341, 3636, 3643, 3862, 3993, 4060, 4180, 4302, 4408, 4414, 4415, 4419, 4527, 4598, 5400, 6032, 6313, 6315, 6608, 6907, 7174, 8644, 8707, 8861, 9399, 9407); and that the Lord is the Sun of heaven may also be seen above (n. 1053, 1521, 1529, 1530, 1531, 2441, 3636, 3643, 4321, 5097, 7078, 7083, 7171, 7173, 8644, 8812). The Divine Human of the Lord is the source of light in heaven, because the Divine cannot be seen except under a human form, as also the Lord taught in these passages:--

No man hath seen God at any time; the Only-begotten Son, who is in the bosom of the Father, He hath set Him forth (John 1:18).

Ye have not heard the voice of the Father at any time, nor seen His shape (John 5:37).

AC 9572. And the tongs thereof, and the basins thereof.  That this signifies the purifiers and evacuators in the natural, is evident from the signification of “tongs and basins,” as being things for cleansing, thus for purifying and emptying.  That these are in the natural, is because the natural is the emunctory, thus the place of purifying and evacuating; for all things that belong to the internal or spiritual man descend into the natural, and are purified; for there things filthy and superfluous are discharged, and things suitable for uses are disposed into order.  That this is done in the natural, can be seen from the fact that while the internal or spiritual man is in the body, it thinks in the natural, and sets forth or utters its thoughts in the corporeal; and that it also wills in the natural, and does what it wills in the corporeal; and therefore the evacuators and cleansers are there.  This is signified by “the washing of the feet,” of which the Lord thus speaks in John:--

He that is washed needeth not save to be washed as to his feet, and is clean every whit (John 13:10);

“washing” signified the purification of the internal man (n. 3147, 5954, 9088); and “the feet,” the natural (n. 2162, 3147, 3761, 3986, 4280, 4938-4952).

AC 9573. Shall be of pure gold.  That this signifies also from good, is evident from the signification of “gold,” as being the good of love (n. 9549).  The reason why the purifiers and evacuators must also be from good, is evident from what was shown above (n. 9568).

AC 9574. A talent of pure gold shall it be made, with all these vessels.  That this signifies celestial good, from which is spiritual good together with its memory-knowledges, is evident from the signification of “a talent of pure gold,” as being the one good from which are all things, for “a talent” denotes one, and “gold” denotes good (n. 9549); and “the vessels,” which were also to be of the same good, denote memory-knowledges (n. 9557, 9559, 9560, 9563, 9564); that “vessels” in general denote truths and memory-knowledges, (n. 3068, 3079, 9394, 9544). As good must be everything in all the products and derivatives, thus celestial good in spiritual goods, and from this in memory-knowledges (n. 9568), therefore it is said that the lampstand must be made of pure solid gold (n. 9549, 9550); and that the shaft, the reed, the cups, the pomegranates, and the flowers, must be from the same (n. 9551-9554); and here that it, together with all these vessels, must be made from a talent of pure gold.

AC 9575. Verse 40. And see and make them in their form which thou wast made to see in the mountain.  “And see and make them in their form,” signifies a representative of all things; “which thou wast made to see in the mountain,” signifies which were seen in heaven with the eyes of the spirit.

AC 9576. And see and make them in their form.  That this signifies a representative of all things, is evident from the signification of a “form,” as being a representative (n. 9481, 9482); here a representative of heaven where the Lord is, and of all things of heaven, or of all things of the Lord in heaven; for there is meant the form of the ark, of the Habitation, of the table for the breads of faces, of the lampstand, and of the vessels, by which are represented heaven where the Lord is, and also the things of heaven.

AC 9577. Which thou wast made to see in the mountain.  That this signifies which were seen in heaven with the eyes of the spirit, is evident from the signification of “seeing,” when said of the representatives in heaven, as being to see with the eyes of the spirit; and from the signification of “Mount Sinai,” as being heaven (n. 8805, 9420). With regard to the fact that “to see,” when said of the representatives that appear in heaven, denotes to see with the eyes of the spirit, be it known that the angelic spirits, who are in the ultimate or first heaven, constantly see forms of things like those which are in the world, such as paradises, trees therein with their fruits; flowers and plants; also houses, palaces, and likewise animals of many kinds; besides countless other things which are not seen in the world. All these things are representatives of the heavenly things in the higher heavens, and which in the first heaven are so presented in a form before the eyes of the spirits below, that an angelic spirit can know and perceive from them everything that is coming-forth in the higher heavens; for all things, down to the smallest particulars, are representative and significative.  From this it can be seen what is meant by the representative of heaven and of the heavenly things which are signified by the ark, the cherubs, the Habitation, the table therein, and the lampstand.

[2] Such things cannot be seen by the eyes of a man, so long as he is in the world, for these eyes have been formed to receive earthly and bodily, thus material things. They are therefore so gross that they cannot even compass with their vision the interior things of nature, as can be well enough seen from the lenses they need to be furnished with in order to see merely those things of interior nature that are nearest to them. In a word, these eyes are most dull, and being such, the representatives which appear to spirits in the other life cannot possibly be seen by them; and if they are to appear, the light of the world must be taken away from the eyes, and then the things which are in the light of heaven may be seen.  For there is a light of heaven, and there is a light of the world.  The light of heaven is for the spirit of man, and the light of the world is for his body.  The case herein is as follows.  The things that are in the light of heaven are in thick darkness so long as a man sees from the light of the world; and, conversely, the things that are in the light of the world are in thick darkness when a man sees from the light of heaven.  From this it is that when the light of the world is taken away from the sight of the bodily eye, the eyes of the man‘s spirit are opened, and those things are seen which are in the light of heaven; thus, as before said, the representative forms.

[3] From all this it can be known why it is that at the present day men are in thick darkness concerning heavenly things, and why some are in darkness so great that they do not even believe that there is a life after death, nor that they will live forever.  For at the present day man is so immersed in the body, thus in bodily, earthly, and worldly things, and is consequently in so gross a light of the world, that heavenly things are absolute thick darkness to him and therefore the sight of his spirit cannot be enlightened.  From all this it is now evident what it is to see with those eyes of the spirit with which Moses saw the form of the Tent on Mount Sinai.

ON THE EARTHS IN THE STARRY HEAVEN; HERE, ON THE FIRST EARTH SEEN THERE

AC 9578. By means of angels from the Lord I was conducted to a certain earth in the universe, where it was granted me to look at the earth itself; but not to speak with the inhabitants of it, but with the spirits who came from it. For after their life in the world is completed, all the inhabitants, or men, of every earth, become spirits, and remain about their earth. Nevertheless these give information about their earth, and the state of its inhabitants; for men who depart out of the body carry with them all their former life, and all their memory.

AC 9579. To be conducted to the earths in the universe is not to be conducted and transported there as to the body, but as to the spirit; and the spirit is not conducted through spaces, but through variations of the state of the interior life, which appear to him like progressions through spaces (n. 5605, 7381, 9440). Moreover, approaches take place in accordance with the agreements or likenesses of the states, for the agreement or likeness of the state conjoins, and disagreement or unlikeness disjoins. From this it can be seen in what manner removal as to the spirit from one place to another is effected, and also the approach of the spirit to distant regions, while the man still remains in its own place.

AC 9580. But to conduct a spirit outside his own world by means of variations of the state of his interiors, and to cause these variations to successively advance up to a suitable or like state with that of those to whom he is being led, is in the power of the Lord alone; for there must be a constant direction and foresight from first to last, both ways, especially when this is to be effected with a man who as to the body is still in the world of nature, and who is thereby in space.

AC 9581. That this has been done, no one who is in the sensuous things of the body, and who thinks from them, can be brought to believe. The reason is that these sensuous things cannot grasp progressions apart from spaces.  Nevertheless they who think from the sensuous of their spirit somewhat removed or withdrawn from that of the body, thus they who think interiorly within themselves, can be brought to believe and to apprehend it, because in the idea of their thought there is neither space nor time, but instead of these such things as are the sources of spaces and times.  Therefore the things which follow concerning the earths in the starry heaven are for these men, and not for those first mentioned, unless they are of such a character as to suffer themselves to be instructed.

AC 9582. In company with some spirits from this earth, and while in a state of wakefulness, I was conducted as to my spirit to a certain earth in the universe, by means of angels from the Lord.  The progression took place toward the right, and continued for two hours.  Near the end of our solar system, there first appeared a shining but dense cloud, and after it a fiery smoke rising up from a great chasm.  A vast abyss separated our solar world on that side from certain worlds of the starry heaven. The fiery smoke appeared for a considerable distance. I was being carried across this middle region, when underneath in that chasm or abyss there appeared very many men, who were spirits, for all spirits appear in the human form, and are actually men, (n. 322, 1881).  I also heard them speaking to each other there, but was not given to know whence they came and what was their nature; however, one of them told me that they were guards to prevent spirits from this world from passing into any other world in the universe without the needful facilities.

AC 9583. That this was so was also confirmed, for when certain spirits who were in the company came to that great interspace, and who had not received permission to pass over it, they began to cry out vehemently that they were perishing, for they were like persons struggling in the agony of death; and therefore they stayed on that side of the abyss, and could not be conveyed any further; for the fiery smoke which exhaled from the abyss filled them, and thus tormented them. The fiery smoke is falsity from the evils of concupiscences. So does this falsity appear.

AC 9584. A continuation about the first earth seen in the starry heaven will be found at the end of the following chapter.


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