HEAVENLY SECRETS
Emanuel Swedenborg

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AC EXODUS Chapter 27

THE DOCTRINE OF CHARITY AND OF FAITH

AC 9701. Something shall now be said about the Internal and the External Man.

AC 9702. They who have only a general idea about the Internal and the External Man, believe that it is the Internal Man which thinks and wills, and the External Man which speaks and acts; because to think and to will are internal, and from these to speak and act is external.

AC 9703. But be it known that it is not only the Internal Man that thinks and wills, but also the External; yet in one way when they are conjoined, and in another when they are separated.

AC 9704. When a man thinks intelligently and wills wisely, he thinks and wills from the Internal Man; but when he does not think intelligently and will wisely, he does not think and will from the Internal Man.  Consequently, when a man thinks well about the Lord and about what belongs to the Lord, and when he thinks well about the neighbor and what belongs to the neighbor, and when he also wills well to these, he then thinks and wills from the Internal Man. But when a man thinks evilly in regard to these, and bears them ill will, he then does not think and will from the Internal Man. To think well is from the faith of truth, and to will well is from the love of good; but to think evilly is from the faith of what is false, and to will evilly is from the love of what is evil.

AC 9705. In a word, in so far as a man is in love to the Lord and in love toward the neighbor, so far he is in the Internal Man, and thinks and wills and also speaks and acts from it; but in so far as a man is in the love of self and in the love of the world, so far he is in the External Man, and in so far as he dares, he also speaks and acts from it.

AC 9706. The reason is that man has been created according to the image of heaven and the image of the world; the Internal Man according to the image of heaven, and the External Man according to the image of the world. Wherefore to think and will from the Internal Man is to think and will from heaven, that is, through heaven from the Lord; but to think and will from the External Man is to think and will from the world, that is, through the world from self.

AC 9707. It has been so provided and ordained by the Lord that in so far as a man thinks and wills from heaven, that is, through heaven from the Lord, so far his Internal Man is opened: the opening is unto heaven, even unto the Lord Himself. Therefore, on the other hand, in so far as a man thinks and wills from the world, that is, through the world from self, so far the Internal Man is closed, and the External Man is opened: the opening is unto the world and unto self.

AC 9708. In order that the External Man may be reduced into order, it must be made subordinate to the Internal Man, and it is made subordinate when it obeys. So far as this is effected, so far the External Man also is wise.  This is meant by the old man with its evil affections needing to die in order that the man may become a new creature.

AC 9709. Those with whom the Internal Man has been closed, do not know that there is an Internal Man, neither do they believe that there is a heaven and an eternal life.  And wonderful to say they nevertheless suppose that they think more wisely than others; for they love themselves and what belongs to them, and these they worship.  It is otherwise in the case of those with whom the Internal Man has been opened toward heaven unto the Lord, for these are in the light of heaven, thus in illumination from the Lord; whereas the former are not in the light of heaven, but in the light of the world, and thus in illumination from self.  Those who are illumined from self, and not from the Lord, see falsity as truth and evil as good.

EXODUS 27:1-21

1. And thou shalt make the altar of shittim wood, five cubits the length, and five cubits the breadth; the altar shall be foursquare; and the height thereof shall be three cubits.

2. And thou shalt make its horns upon the four corners thereof; from it shall be its horns; and thou shalt overlay it with brass.

3. And thou shalt make its pans to take away its ashes, and its shovels, and its basins, and its fleshhooks, and its fire-tongs; all the vessels thereof thou shalt make of brass.

4. And thou shalt make for it a grating, a network of brass; and upon the net shalt thou make four rings of brass, upon the four extremities of it.

5. And thou shalt bestow it under the compass of the altar beneath, and the net shall be even unto the middle of the altar.

6. And thou shalt make staves for the altar, staves of shittim wood, and shalt overlay them with brass.

7. And the staves thereof shall be put into the rings, and the staves shall be upon the two side of the altar, in carrying it.

8. Hollow of boards shalt thou make it; as thou wast made to see in the mountain, so shall they make it.

9. And thou shalt make the court of the Habitation at the corner of the south southward; the hangings for the court shall be of fine twined linen, a hundred cubits the length at the one corner.

10. And the pillars thereof shall be twenty, and their bases twenty, of brass; the hooks of the pillars and their fillets shall be of silver.

11. And so at the corner of the north in length, there shall be hangings a hundred cubits in length, and the pillars there of twenty, and their bases twenty, of brass; the hooks of the pillars and their fillets of silver.

12. And the breadth of the court at the corner of the sea shall be hangings of fifty cubits; their pillars ten, and their bases ten.

13. And the breadth of the court at the corner of the east eastward shall be fifty cubits.

14. And the hangings for the one wing shall be fifteen cubits; the pillars thereof three, and their bases three.

15. And for the other wing shall be hangings of fifteen cubits; the pillars thereof three, and their bases three.

16. And for the gate of the court a covering of twenty cubits, of blue, and crimson, and scarlet double-dyed, and fine twined linen, the work of the embroiderer; its pillars four, and their bases four.

17. All the pillars of the court round about shall be filleted with fillets of silver; their hooks of silver, and their bases of brass.

18. The length of the court shall be a hundred cubits, and the breadth fifty by fifty; and the height five cubits, of fine twined linen, and their bases of brass.

19. And as for all the vessels of the Habitation in all the service thereof, all the pegs thereof, and all the pegs of the court, shall be of brass.

20. And thou shalt command the sons of Israel, and let them take unto thee olive oil, pure, beaten, for the luminary, to cause the lamp to go up continually.

21. In the Tent of meeting, without the veil which is over the Testimony, Aaron and his sons shall order it from evening until morning before Jehovah; a statute of an age for their generations with the sons of Israel.

THE CONTENTS

AC 9710. In this chapter, in the internal sense, the subject treated of is the worship of the Lord from the good of love. This worship is signified by “the altar,” and is described in general by all things relating to the altar.

AC 9711. Afterward the subject treated of is the ultimate heaven, which is represented and described by “the court.”

AC 9712. Lastly the subject treated of is the good of charity, through which the spiritual heaven is illumined by the Lord in the truths of faith; these things are signified by “the oil of olive,” and by “the luminary.”

THE INTERNAL SENSE

AC 9713. Verses 1-8.  And thou shalt make the altar of shittim wood, five cubits the length, and five cubits the breadth; the altar shall be foursquare; and the height thereof shall be three cubits.  And thou shalt make its horns upon the four corners thereof; from it shall be its horns; and thou shalt overlay it with brass.  And thou shalt make its pans to take away its ashes, and its shovels, and its basins, and its fleshhooks, and its fire-tongs; all the vessels thereof thou shalt make of brass. And thou shalt make for it a grating, a network of brass; and upon the net shalt thou make four rings of brass, upon the four extremities of it.  And thou shalt bestow it under the compass of the altar beneath, and the net shall be even unto the middle of the altar.  And thou shalt make staves for the altar, staves of shittim wood, and shalt overlay them with brass.  And the staves thereof shall be put into the rings, and the staves shall be upon the two sides of the altar, in carrying it.  Hollow of boards shalt thou make it; as thou wast made to see in the mountain, so shall they make it.  “And thou shalt make the altar,” signifies a representative of the Lord and of the worship of Him; “of shittim wood,” signifies righteousness; “five cubits the length, and five cubits the breadth,” signifies equally from good and from truth; “the altar shall be foursquare,” signifies thus what is righteous; “and the height thereof shall be three cubits,” signifies full in respect to degrees; “and thou shalt make its horns,” signifies power; “upon the four corners thereof,” signifies complete power; “from it shall be its horns,” signifies that the power shall be from good; “and thou shalt overlay it with brass,” signifies a representative of good; “and thou shalt make its pans to take away its ashes,” signifies what is to be removed after uses; “and its shovels, and its basins, and its fleshhooks, and its fire-tongs,” signifies memory-knowledges that contain and that are of service for every use; “all the vessels thereof thou shalt make of brass,” signifies all things from good; “ and thou shalt make for it a grating, a network,” signifies the sensuous, which is the ultimate; “of brass,” signifies which also is from good; “and upon the net shalt thou make four rings of brass,” signifies the sphere of good through which there is conjunction; “upon the four extremities of it,” signifies everywhere; “and thou shalt bestow it under the compass of the altar beneath,” signifies this in ultimates; “and the net shall be even unto the middle of the altar,” signifies the extension of the sensuous; “and thou shalt make staves for the altar,” signifies the power of keeping in a state of good; “staves of shittim wood,” signifies the good of righteousness and the consequent power; “and shalt overlay them with brass,” signifies a representative of good; “and the staves thereof shall be put into the rings,” signifies the power of the sphere of Divine good; “and the staves shall be upon the two sides of the altar,” signifies the power of good through truth, and of truth from good; “in carrying it,” signifies coming-forth and subsistence; “hollow of boards shalt thou make it,” signifies application; “as thou wast made to see in the mountain, so shall they make it,” signifies from the correspondence of Divine things in heaven.

AC 9714. And thou shalt make the altar.  That this signifies a representative of the Lord and of the worship of Him, is evident from the signification of “the altar which was for burnt-offerings and sacrifices,” as being a representative of the Lord; and as by “the burnt-offerings and sacrifices” were signified all things of the worship of the Lord, therefore also the altar was a representative of the worship of Him. The Lord however is not worshiped by means of burnt-offerings and sacrifices, but by means of those things which were represented thereby, which are celestial things of love and spiritual things of faith (n. 922, 923, 1823, 2180, 2805, 2807, 2830, 3519, 6905, 8680, 8936).

[2] There were two things by which was represented the Lord as to the Divine Human: the temple and the altar.  That this was represented by the temple, He Himself teaches in John:

Jesus said, Take apart this temple, and in three days I will raise it up. He spake of the temple of His body (John 2:19, 21).

That the same was represented by the altar, can also be seen from His own words when He speaks of the temple and at the same time of the altar, in Matthew:--

Ye fools and blind, because ye say, Whosoever shall swear by the temple, it is nothing; but whosoever shall swear by the gold of the temple, he is guilty. Which is the greater, the gold, or the temple that sanctifieth the gold? Likewise, Whosoever shalt swear by the altar, it is nothing; but whosoever shall swear by the gift that is upon it, he is guilty. Ye fools and blind; for which is the greater, the gift, or the altar that sanctifieth the gift? He that shall swear by the altar, sweareth by it, and by everything that is upon it. And he that shall swear by the temple, sweareth by it, and by Him that dwelleth therein. And he that shall swear by heaven, sweareth by the throne of God, and by Him that sitteth thereon (Matt. 23:16-22).

From this it is evident that, as the temple, so also the altar, was a representative of the Lord‘s Divine Human; for the same is said of the altar as of the temple, namely, that it is that which sanctifieth the gift that is upon it; thus that the altar was the subject from which came the sanctification; consequently that it also was a representative of the Lord’s Divine Human, from which all that is holy proceeds. But the altar was a representative of the Lord in respect to His Divine good; whereas the temple was a representative of Him in respect to His Divine truth, thus in respect to heaven; for the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord makes heaven. For this reason it is said of the temple that “he that shall swear by the temple, sweareth by it and by Him that dwelleth therein;” and it is added that “he that shall swear by heaven, sweareth by the throne of God, and by Him that sitteth thereon.” “The throne of God” denotes the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord, thus heaven, and “He that sitteth thereon”denotes the Lord (n. 5313). The same that was represented by the temple, was represented also by the Habitation; the Lord in respect to Divine truth being there denoted by “the Testimony” which was in the ark (n. 9503).

[3] As the altar represented the Lord in respect to Divine good, it was the very holy of holies, and sanctified everything that touched it; as can be seen from what follows in this book, where it is said, “Seven days thou shalt make atonement for the altar, and sanctify it; that the altar may be a holy of holies, and everything that shall touch it shall be made holy” (Exod. 29:37); and therefore the fire upon the altar was perpetually burning, and was never put out (Lev.  6:13); and from that fire was taken the fire for the incense, and from no other source (Lev. 10:1-6); for by “the fire of the altar” was signified the Divine good of the Lord‘s Divine love (n. 5215, 6314, 6832, 6834, 6849).

[4] That the altar was a representative of the Lord, is evident from the following passages in David:--

Let Thy light and Thy truth bring me unto the mountain of Thy holiness, and unto Thy habitations, that I may go In unto the altar of God, unto God (Ps. 43:3, 4).

I wash mine hands in innocency; and I compass Thine altar, O Jehovah (Ps. 26:6).

[5] But that the altar was a representative of the worship of the Lord, is evident from these passages:--

All the flocks of Arabia shall be gathered together to thee; the rams of Nebaioth shall minister to thee; they shall come up with acceptance on Mine altar (Isa. 60:7).

The Lord hath forsaken His altar, He hath abhorred His sanctuary (Lam. 2:7);

where “to forsake the altar” denotes to abolish the representative of the worship of the Lord from the good of love; “to abhor the sanctuary” denotes to abolish the representative of the worship of the Lord from the truths of faith.

[6] In Ezekiel:--

Your altars shall be destroyed; I will scatter your bones round about your altars; and your altars shall be laid waste, and made desolate; and your idols stall be broken, and shall cease (Ezek. 6:4, 5);

“to destroy, lay waste, and desolate the altars” denotes that so it shall be with representative worship. In Isaiah:--

The iniquity of Jacob shall not be expiated, when he shall put all the stones of the altar as chalkstones that are scattered (Isa. 27:9);

where “the stones of the altar that are scattered” denote all the truths of worship.

[7] Again:--

In that day shall a man look unto his Maker, and his eyes unto the Holy One of Israel. And he shall not look unto the altars, the work of his hands, and to that which his fingers have made (Isa. 17:7, 8);

where “the altars which are the work of his hands and that which his fingers have made” denote worship from one’s own intelligence.

[8] In Hosea:--

Ephraim hath multiplied altars for sinning (Hosea 8:11);

where “multiplying altars for sinning” denotes to invent worthless things of worship. In the same:--

The thistle and the thorn shall come up on their altars (Hosea 10:8);

denoting that evils and falsities shall enter in and make the worship.

[9] In Isaiah:--

In that day there shall be an altar to Jehovah in the midst of Egypt (Isaiah 19:19);

where “an altar to Jehovah” denotes the worship of the Lord.

[10] As the altar described in this chapter was portable, it was made of shittim wood, and was overlaid with brass; but the altar which was to remain in its place was made either of earth or of unhewn stones.  The altar made of earth was the principal representative of the worship of the Lord from the good of love; and the altar made of unhewn stones was a representative of worship from the goods and truths of faith (n. 8935, 8940); while the portable altar here described was a representative of the worship of the Lord from the good of love. For this reason it was of shittim wood and was overlaid with brass.

AC 9715. Of shittim wood.  That this signifies righteousness, is evident from the signification of “shittim wood,” as being the good of merit and of righteousness that belongs to the Lord alone (n. 9472, 9486); it shall here be stated what are the righteousness and the merit that belong to the Lord alone. It is believed that the Lord had merit and righteousness because He fulfilled all things of the law, and because by the passion of the cross He saved the human race; yet these things are not meant in the Word by the righteousness and merit of the Lord; but by His merit and righteousness is meant that He fought alone with all the hells, and subjugated them, and thus reduced into order all things in the hells, and at the same time all things in the heavens.  For with every man there are spirits from hell, and also angels from heaven; without these man cannot possibly live; and unless the hells had been subjugated by the Lord, and the heavens brought back into order, no man could have been saved.

[2] This could not have been effected except by means of His Human; that is, through combats with the hells from His Human.  And as the Lord did this from His own power, thus alone, therefore to the Lord alone belong merit and righteousness; and therefore it is He alone who still conquers the bells with man; for He who once conquers them, conquers them forever.  Wherefore absolutely nothing of merit and righteousness belongs to man; but the merit and righteousness of the Lord are imputed to him when he acknowledges that nothing is from himself, but everything from the Lord.  From this it is that the Lord alone regenerates man; for to regenerate man is to drive away the hells from him, consequently the evils and falsities which are from the hells, and to implant heaven in their stead; that is, the goods of love and the truths of faith, for these make heaven. Moreover by means of continual combats with the hells the Lord glorified His Human, that is, made it Divine; for as man is regenerated by means of combats which are temptations, so the Lord was glorified by means of combats which were temptations. Consequently the glorification of the Human of the Lord by His own power is merit and righteousness; for thereby man has been saved, for thereby all the hells are kept by the Lord in subjection forever.

[3] That this is so is evident from the passages in the Word where the merit and righteousness of the Lord are treated of; as in Isaiah:--

Who is this that cometh from Edom, with sprinkled garments from Bozrah? marching in the multitude of His strength? I that speak in righteousness, great to save. Wherefore art Thou red in Thy garments, and Thy garment like his that treadeth in the winepress? I have trodden the winepress alone; and of the people there was no man with Me; therefore I have trodden them in Mine anger; whence their victory has been sprinkled upon My garments, and I have soiled all My raiment. For the day of vengeance was in Mine heart, and the year of My redeemed had come. I looked around, but there was none to help; and I was amazed, but there was none to uphold; therefore Mine arm brought salvation to Me; and My wrath sustained Me. And I trampled the peoples in Mine anger, and I brought down their victory to the earth.  Therefore He became the Saviour (Isa. 63:1-8);

that these things are said of the Lord, is known; His combats with the hells are described by His “garments being sprinkled,” by His “being red in His garments,” by His “garments being like his that treadeth in the winepress,” and by “the days of vengeance.” His victories and subjugations of the hells are described by His “treading them in His anger,” whereby “their victory was sprinkled upon His garments,” by His “trampling the peoples in anger,” and “bringing down their victory to the earth.” That the Lord did these things from His own power, is described by His “treading the winepress alone,” and by “there being of the peoples no man with Him;” also by His “looking around, but there was none to help;” and by His “being amazed, but there was none to uphold;” likewise by His “own arm bringing salvation unto Him.” That from this came salvation, is described by His marching in the multitude of His strength, mighty to save,“ by ”the year of His redeemed being come,“ and by His ”therefore becoming the Saviour.“

[4] That all these things belong to righteousness, appears still more clearly in other passages in the same prophet:--

He saw that there was no man, and was amazed that there was none to intercede; therefore His arm performed salvation for Him, and His righteousness upheld Him; whence He put on righteousness as a coat of mail, and a helmet of salvation upon His head; He put on garments of vengeance, and covered Himself with zeal as with a cloak (Isa. 59:16, 17).

My righteousness is near, My salvation hath gone forth, and Mine arms shall judge the peoples; in Me shall the islands hope, and upon Mine arm shall they trust (Isa. 51:5);

”the arm which performed salvation for Him, and upon which they shall trust,“ denotes His own power, by which He subjugated the hells. That ”the arm“ denotes power, (n. 4932, 7205). From this it is clear what is meant by ”the righteousness and merit that belong to the Lord alone.“

[5] In like manner in other passages:--

Who hath stirred up one from the east, whom He hath called in righteousness to follow Him? He hath given nations before Him, and made Him to rule over kings (Isa. 12:2).

I have brought near My righteousness, it is not far off, My salvation shall not tarry (Isa. 46:13).

Jehovah will clothe me with garments of salvation, He hath covered me with the mantle of righteousness (Isa. 61:10).

My mouth shall recount Thy righteousness, Thy salvation all the day; I know not the numberings; I will make mention of Thy righteousness, forsake me not until I have declared Thine arm, Thy might, for Thy righteousness is even unto the height; Thou who hast done great things (Ps. 71:15, 16, 18, 19, 24).

Behold the days come when I will raise unto David a righteous offshoot, who shall reign as king, and shall prosper, and shall do judgment and righteousness in the earth. In those days Judah shall be saved, and Israel shall dwell securely; and this is His name whereby they shall call Him, Jehovah our Righteousness (Jer.  22:5, 6; 33:15, 16).

Seventy weeks have been decreed to expiate iniquity, and to bring in the righteousness of the ages (Dan. 9:24).

[6] That the subjugation of the hells, the setting in order of the heavens by the Lord, the glorification of His Human, and the consequent salvation for the man who receives the Lord in love and faith, are the righteousness and merit that belong to the Lord alone, can be seen from the passages above quoted. But those cannot apprehend this matter who are not aware that there are with man spirits from the hells, and that from them he has evils and falsities; and also that there are angels from heaven with him, and that from them he has goods and truths; and that thus on the one side the life of man is joined to the hells, and on the other to the heavens, that is, through the heavens to the Lord; and thus that man could not possibly be saved unless the hells had been subjugated, and the heavens reduced into order, and in this manner all things made subject to the Lord.

[7] From all this it can be seen why (n. 9486) the good of the Lord‘s merit is the only good that reigns in the heavens; for this good of merit is even now the continual subjugation of the hells, and thus the protection of the faithful.  This good is the good of the Lord’s love; for from the Divine love He fought and conquered in the world.  From the Divine power in the Human thence acquired, He alone forever fights and conquers for heaven and the church; and thus for the whole human race, and thereby saves them. This then is the good of merit, which is called ”righteousness,“ because it belongs to righteousness to restrain the hells which are endeavoring to destroy the human race; and to protect and save the good and faithful.  Concerning the combats or temptations of the Lord while He was in the world, (n. 1663, 1668, 1690-1692, 1737, 1787, 1812, 1813, 1820, 2776, 2786, 2795, 2803, 2814, 2816, 4287, 7193, 8273); and that the Lord alone fights for the human race against the hells, (n. 1692, 6574, 8159, 8172, 8175, 8176, 8273, 8969).

AC 9716. Five cubits the length, and five cubits the breadth. That this signifies equally from good and from truth, is evident from the signification of ”five,“ as being equally; for when two things are alike, as in this case the length and the breadth, there is equality. The length and the breadth of the altar were five cubits, because ”five“ signifies also the same as ”ten,“ ”a hundred,“ and ”a thousand,“ and by these numbers is signified much, all, what is full; and in the supreme sense which treats of the Lord, what is infinite; therefore such also is the signification of ”five;“ for compound numbers signify the like as the simple numbers of which they are composed, and therefore the simple numbers the like as their compounds (n. 5291, 5335, 5708, 7973). That ”ten,“ ”a hundred,“ and ”a thousand“ denote much, all, and what is full, (n. 2636, 3107, 4400, 4638, 8715); likewise ”five,“ (n. 5708, 5956, 9102); and that ”a thousand“ when said of the Divine denotes what is infinite, (n. 2575). And from the signification of ”length,“ as being good (n. 1613, 9487); and from the signification of ”breadth,“ as being truth (n. 1613, 3133, 3434, 4482, 9487).  From this it is evident that by ”five cubits the length, and five cubits the breadth“ is signified equally from good and from truth.  It is said ”equally from good and from truth,“ when truth is of good and good is of truth; thus when good and truth act as one, and form a marriage, such as is in heaven from the Lord.  This can be illustrated by the understanding and the will in man: when the understanding acts as one with the will, that is, when man perceives truth to be of good, and good to be of truth, then he partakes equally of good and of truth.  Moreover the understanding has been appointed for the perception of truth from good, and the will for the perception of good in truth.

AC 9717. The altar shall be foursquare.  That this signifies thus what is righteous, is evident from the signification of ”foursquare,“ as being what is righteous; and from the signification of ”the altar,“ as being a representative of the Lord, and of the worship of Him.  Consequently by ”the altar being foursquare“ is signified what is righteous in the Lord, and consequently in worship. Worship is said to be ”righteous“ when the good and truth which are in it are from the Lord, and not from man; for what is righteous is from the Lord alone (n. 9263). That ”foursquare“ denotes what is righteous, originates in the representatives in the other life. There, goods are presented as round, and the goods of the external man, which are called ”righteous,“ are presented as foursquare; but truths and rights are presented as linear and triangular. From this then it is that by ”foursquare“ is signified what is righteous, as also by ”the altar of incense being foursquare“ (Exod. 30:2), and by ”the breastplate of judgment being a doubled square“ (Exod. 28:16), and likewise by ”the New Jerusalem being foursquare“ (Rev. 21:16). The ”New Jerusalem“ here denotes the New Church of the Lord which is to succeed our present church; the external good of it, which is what is righteous, is signified by its being ”foursquare.“

AC 9718. And the height thereof shall be three cubits.  That this signifies full in respect to degrees, is evident from the signification of ”three,“ as being what is full (n. 4495, 7715, 9488, 9489); and from the signification of ”height,“ as being degrees in respect to good (n. 9489).

AC 9719. And thou shalt make its horns.  That this signifies power, is evident from the signification of ”horns,“ as being the power of truth from good (n. 2832, 9081).

AC 9720. Upon the four corners thereof.  That this signifies complete power, is evident from the signification of ”four,“ as being conjunction (n. 9601, 9674); and from the signification of ”corners,“ as being stability and strength (n. 9494), also all things of truth and of good (n. 9642).  Wherefore by ”the horns upon the four corners“ is signified complete power.

AC 9721. From it shall be its horns.  That this signifies that the power shall be from good, is evident from the signification of ”the altar,“ from which the horns were to be, as being a representative of the Lord, and of the worship of Him from the good of love (n. 9714); and from the signification of ”horns,“ as being power (n. 9719).  From this it is evident that by ”the horns being from it“ is signified that the power shall be from good. That in the spiritual world all power is of good through truth, (n. 6344, 6423, 9643).

AC 9722. And thou shalt overlay it with brass.  That this signifies a representative of good, is evident from the signification of ”brass,“ as being natural or external good (n. 425, 1551).  That the overlaying with, and putting on, of brass, is a representative of this good, is manifest.

AC 9723. And thou shalt make its pans, to take away its ashes. That this signifies what is to be removed after uses, is evident from the signification of ”the pans for taking away the ashes,“ as being the things that effect removal after uses. For ”ashes“ signify such things in man‘s natural or external memory as remain after uses, and have to be removed so as not to prevent other things from taking their place, by means of which there may again be uses.  The ”pans“ denote such things as effect removal, because by them the ashes are taken away.  That it may be known what is signified by the ”ashes“ which remained upon the altar after a burnt-offering or sacrifice, it shall first be told how the case is with the things which remain in man after uses. From his infancy up to the end of his life in the world, a man is being perfected as to intelligence and wisdom; and if it is well with him, as to faith and love. Memory-knowledges chiefly conduce to this use. These knowledges are imbibed by hearing, seeing, and reading, and are stored up in the external or natural memory.  These are of service to the internal sight or understanding as a plane of objects, from which it may choose and bring out such things as promote wisdom.  For by virtue of its light, which is from heaven, the interior sight or understanding looks into this plane, that is, into this memory, which is below itself; and from the various things which are there, it chooses and brings out such as agree with its love. These it calls forth to itself from thence, and stores them up in its own memory, which is the internal memory (n. 2469-2494). From this is the life of the internal man, and its intelligence and wisdom.  The case is the same with the things that belong to spiritual intelligence and wisdom, which are those of faith and love.  Memory-knowledges, that is to say, memory-knowledges from the Word, or from the doctrine of the church, which are called the knowledges of truth and good, are in like manner of service for implanting in the internal man these things of spiritual intelligence and wisdom. When these knowledges are stored up in the memory of the external man, they are in like manner of service as objects to the sight of the internal man, which sees from the light of heaven, and from them chooses and brings out such things as are in agreement with its love; for the internal man sees nothing else in, the external man. For the things which a man loves, he sees in the light, but the things which he does not love, he sees in the shade: the latter he rejects, but the former he chooses.

[2] From all this it can be seen how the case is with the truths of faith and the goods of love with the man who is being regenerated; namely, that the good of love chooses for itself suitable truths of faith, and by their means perfects itself; and thus the good of love is in the first place, and the truth of faith in the second, as often shown before (n. 3325, 3494, 3539, 3548, 3556, 3563, 3570, 3576, 3603, 3701, 4925, 4977, 6256, 6269, 6272, 6273). After the memory-knowledges, or the knowledges of good and truth, in the memory of the external man, have performed this use, they as it were vanish from this memory.  They are circumstanced like those matters of instruction which have served the man from infancy as means for perfecting his moral and civil life; after these have performed this use, and the man has acquired life therefrom, they perish from the memory, and remain only as a matter of practice or use. In this way man learns to speak, to think, to discriminate, and to judge, to lead a moral life, and to conduct himself becomingly; in a word, he learns languages, good manners, intelligence, and wisdom.

[3] The memory-knowledges which have served for these uses are signified by ”the ashes which are to be removed;“ and the knowledges of truth and of good, through which the man has gained spiritual life, after they have served this use, that is, after they have become of the life, are also signified by ”the ashes of the altar which were to be removed.“ But when they are being removed, they are first placed near the altar, and afterward are carried forth outside the camp into a clean place. Meanwhile the fire of the altar is always burning for the use of a new burnt-offering or sacrifice, according to the process described by Moses in Leviticus:--

The priest shall cause the burnt-offering to ascend upon the hearth upon the altar all night even unto the dawn.  Afterward he shall put on his linen clothing and his linen breeches, and he shall take up the ashes, into which the fire hath consumed the burnt-offering on the altar. Afterward he shall put off his garments, and shall put on other garments, and carry forth the ashes outside the camp into a clean place. But the fire upon the altar shall be burning, it shall not be put out; the priest shall burn wood on it at the dawn of every day; and he shall arrange the burnt-offering upon it, and shall burn upon it the fat of the sacrifices.  The fire shall be burning upon the altar continually; it shall not be put out (Lev. 6:9-13);

all these particulars involve  arcana of heaven, and signify the Divine things of the worship of the Lord from the good of love; what ”the ashes“ consequently signify has been told above.  That something heavenly is signified by ”the ashes of the altar“ can be seen by everyone who reflects, as that when the priest was to take away the ashes from the altar, he was to put on clothing of linen and breeches of linen, and afterward in other garments was to carry them outside the camp, and lay them in a clean place.  Nothing in the Word is worthless, not even any word, thus not any circumstance of this procedure.

[4] From all this it can in some measure be seen what is signified by ”the ashes of the red cow that was burnt,“ by means of which the water of separation and of cleansing was prepared, of which we read in (Numbers 19:2-10, 17); and what is signified by ”ashes“ in the opposite sense, namely, what is condemned that remains after the burning from the fire of self-love.  This is signified by ”the ashes“ which they carried on the head, and in which they rolled themselves when bewailing their sons (Jer. 6:26; Ezek. 27:30; Jonah 3:6)

AC 9724. And its shovels, and its basins, and its fleshhooks, and its fire-tongs.  That this signifies memory-knowledges that contain and that are of service for every use, is evident from the signification of ”vessels“ in general, as being the things of the external memory; that is, memory-knowledges (n. 3068, 3069); and, in holy things, as being the knowledges of good and truth, which are means for the worship of the Lord (n. 9544). Such also is the meaning of the vessels for ministration about the altar; but each vessel there must signify memory-knowledges for a particular use; thus all the vessels there signify memory-knowledges that are of service for every use.

AC 9725. All the vessels thereof thou shalt make of brass. That this signifies all things from good, is evident from the signification of ”vessels,“ as being memory-knowledges (n. 9724), here all such knowledges, because it is said ”all the vessels;“ and from the signification of ”brass,“ as being external or natural good (n. 425, 1551).

AC 9726. And thou shalt make for it a grating, a network.  That this signifies the sensuous, which is the ultimate, is evident from the signification of ”a grating, a network,“ as being the external sensuous, thus that which is the ultimate of life with man; and because it signifies the ultimate, it was put round about the altar. This sensuous was represented by ”the grating“ because in the first place it as it were sifts and separates the things which enter to man and are presented to the understanding and the will, thus truths and goods.  If the sensuous is from good, it admits nothing but goods and truths which are from good, and rejects evils and the falsities which are from evil; for the sensuous is the perceptive and sensitive itself of the things of the understanding and of the will in the extremes, being formed precisely according to their affections. The nature of it may be illustrated by very many things in’ the body; for everywhere in the extremes of the body there are net-like forms, and as it were sieves or gratings, which sift the things that flow in from the world, admitting, from desire, those which are suitable, and rejecting, from aversion, those which are not suitable.  There are such most exquisite forms in the stomach, which in accordance with the desires, and for the sake of use, admit into the blood what is suitable of the chyle, and reject what is unsuitable, in accordance with the aversion that is felt for things injurious.  The case is similar with the sensuous, which is the ultimate of man‘s life.  But with man this has been completely destroyed, for the reason that it stands out nearest to the world, and therefore is the last to be regenerated, and at this day scarcely anyone can be regenerated as far as this; and what in consequence is the nature of this sensuous with such persons can be seen from what has been already shown about it (n. 4009, 5077, 5081, 5084, 5094, 5125, 5128, 5580, 5767, 5774, 6183, 6201, 6310-6318, 6564, 6598, 6612, 6614, 6622, 6624, 6844, 6845, 6948, 6949, 7442, 7645, 7693, 9212, 9216).  Therefore man is raised by the Lord from this sensuous toward more inward things, in order that he may see and take hold of the truths which are of faith, and the goods which are of love.  But the sensuous which is signified by ”the grating, a network round about the altar,“ is the sensuous of the Lord’s Divine Human; for the altar is the representative of the Lord, and of the worship of Him from the good of love (n. 9714).

AC 9727. Of brass.  That this signifies which also is from good, is evident from the signification of ”brass,“ as being external or natural good (n. 425, 1551). As by the ”grating, a network round about the altar“ is signified the sensuous of the Lord‘s Divine Human (n. 9726), therefore the good which is here signified is the Divine good of His Divine love.  All things of the Lord’s Divine Human are from this good.

AC 9728. And upon the net shalt thou make four rings of brass. That this signifies the sphere of good through which there is conjunction, is evident from the signification of ”the net,“ as being the extreme of life that corresponds to the interior life, which is that of the understanding and of the will (n. 9726); from the signification of ”four,“ as being conjunction (n. 1686, 8877, 9601, 9674); from the signification of ”the rings,“ as being the sphere of Divine good and truth through which there is conjunction (n. 9498, 9501); and from the signification of ”brass,“ as being good (n. 9727).

AC 9729. Upon the four extremities of it.  That this signifies everywhere, is evident from the signification of ”the four extremities,“ as being everywhere (n. 9666).

AC 9730. And thou shalt bestow it under the compass of the altar beneath.  That hereby is signified this in ultimates, is evident from the signification of ”the grating, a network“ which was to be put under the compass of the altar, as being the sensuous (n. 9726); from the signification of ”the compass,“ when said of the sensuous, as being the ultimate.  That the external sensuous is the ultimate of life with man, (n 9726); and from the signification of ”beneath,“ as being outward, for by higher things are signified interior things, and by lower things are signified exterior ones (n. 6952, 6954, 7814-7821, 8604); consequently by ”above“ or ”upward“ is signified inward; and by ”beneath“ or ”downward“ is signified outward. By the external sensuous is not meant the sense of the body itself, as its sight, hearing, taste, smell, and touch, but that which is most nearly from these; for he is called a sensuous man who thinks and desires according to these senses of the body and their appetites, and considers no further.  He who considers further, and examines what the sensuous desires, and what he himself thinks from the sensuous, is said to be raised above the sensuous, or to be withdrawn from it, and to think interiorly.  This is the case with those at the present day who are in the good of charity and of faith.  When this is done, the sensuous is quiescent, and is deprived of its active life which it has from the world and its objects. There are with man two determinations of the things of the understanding and of the will; one determination is outward toward the world, and the other is inward toward heaven. With natural and sensuous men, the determination of the things of the understanding and of the will, thus of the thoughts and affections, is toward the world; but with spiritual and celestial men the determination of these things is toward heaven, and also alternately toward the world.  The hinge of the determinations turns inward when the man is being regenerated, and so far as it can then be turned inward, so far the man can be raised by the Lord toward heaven to Himself, and consequently be in the same proportion imbued with wisdom, faith, and love. For the man then lives in the internal man, consequently in his spirit, and the external man is subordinate thereto. But if a man does not suffer himself to be regenerated, then all his interiors remain determined toward the world, and then his life is in the external man, and the internal man is subordinate thereto. This is the case when the external man supplies reasonings which favor evil lusts.  These men are called natural, and they who abide in things most external are called sensuous; from which it can be seen what is meant by ”the sensuous.“

AC 9731. And the net shall be even unto the middle of the altar.  That this signifies the extension of the sensuous, is evident from the signification of ”the net,“ as being the sensuous (n. 9726); its extension is signified by its being ”unto the middle of the altar.“ The secret which this extension involves cannot be described to the apprehension unless it is known that this sensuous which is signified by ”the grating, a network,“ extends with man from the head down to the loins, and there ceases.  It is this extension that was represented by the extension of the net even to the middle of the altar; for the representatives which are in nature bear relation to the human form, and have a signification in accordance with their relation to this form (n. 9496).  But from the loins there is continued with man the sensuous which is the next inward, and which was represented by the general overlaying or covering of brass about the altar (n. 9722).

AC 9732. And thou shalt make staves for the altar.  That this signifies the power of keeping in a state of good, is evident from the signification of ” staves,“ as being power (n. 9496). That they denote the power to keep in a state of good, is because the staves belonged to the altar, and by the altar was represented the Lord and the worship of Him from the good of love.

AC 9733. Staves of shittim wood.  That this signifies the good of righteousness and the consequent power, is evident from the signification of ”staves,“ as being power (n. 9732); and from the signification of ”shittim wood,“ as being the good of merit, that is, the good of righteousness (n. 9472, 9486). That this good is the good of love of the Lord‘s Divine Human, see (n. 9715).

AC 9734. And thou shalt overlay them with brass, signifies what is representative of good (n. 9722).

AC 9735. And the staves thereof shall be put into the rings. That this signifies the power of the sphere of Divine good, is evident from the signification of ”staves,“ as being power (n. 9732); and from the signification of ”the rings,“ as being the sphere of Divine good and truth through which there is conjunction (n. 9728).

AC 9736. And the staves shall be upon the two sides of the altar.  That this signifies the power of good from which is truth, and of truth from good, is evident from the signification of ”the staves,“ as being power; and from the signification of ”the two sides,“ as being the good from which is truth, and truth from good; thus the marriage of good with truth and of truth with good. The reason of this is that the things which are on the right side in man bear relation to the good from which is truth, and the things which are on the left side hear relation to truth from good (n. 9604); and that by the conjunction of these is therefore signified the marriage of good and truth (n. 9495). Wherefore the same things are signified by the sides of the altar, where were the staves; for all the representatives in nature bear relation to the human form, and have a signification according to their relation to this form (n. 9496).

AC 9737. In carrying it.  That this signifies coming-forth and subsistence, is evident from the signification of ”to carry,“ as being to keep in a state of good and of truth, thus to come forth and subsist (n. 9500). The same is signified by ”crying“ in Isaiah:--

Attend unto Me, O house of Jacob, and all the remains of the house of Israel, which I have carried from the womb; and even to old age, I am the same, and even to hoar hairs will I carry you; I have made, and I will carry, and I will bear (Isa. 46:3, 4);

where ”to make“ denotes that it may come-forth; ”to carry,“ that it may subsist; and ”to bear,“ that it may come-forth perpetually.

AC 9738. Hollow of boards shalt thou make it.  That this signifies application, is evident from the signification of ”hollow of boards,“ when said of the altar on which the burnt-offerings were to be burned and the fat things of the sacrifices were to be offered, as being application; for the altar was thereby rendered applicable to this use. Consequently there is also signified application in respect to those things which belong to the worship of the Lord from the good of love, which were represented by the altar, and by the burnt-offerings and sacrifices upon it (n. 9714).

AC 9739. As thou wast made to see in the mountain, so shall they make it.  That this signifies from the correspondence of Divine things in heaven, is evident from the signification of ”the altar seen in the mountain,“ as being a form that corresponds to Divine things in heaven; for ”Mount Sinai“ denotes heaven (n. 8805, 9420); and the forms which appear in the heavens correspond exactly to the Divine celestial and Divine spiritual things themselves which belong to good and truth That these things are thus rendered visible before the internal sight of angels and spirits, can be seen from all those things which have been already stated and shown about the representation of heavenly things in natural forms (n. 1619, 1971, 1980, 1981, 2987-3003, 3213-3227, 3475, 3485, 6319, 9457, 9481, 9574, 9576, 9577). The Divine things to which the altar corresponded are those which have been thus far described.

AC 9740. Verses 9-19. And thou shalt make the court of the Habitation at the corner of the south southward; the hangings for the court shall be of fine twined linen, a hundred cubits the length at the one comer; and the pillars thereof shall be twenty, and their bases twenty, of brass; the hooks of the pillars and their fillets shall be of silver. And so at the corner of the north in length, there shall be hangings a hundred cubits in length, and the pillars thereof twenty, and their bases twenty, of brass; the hooks of the pillars and their fillets of silver.  And the breadth of the court at the corner of the sea shall be hangings of fifty cubits; the pillars thereof ten, and their bases ten. And the breadth of the court at the corner of the east eastward shall be fifty cubits. And the hangings for the one wing shall be fifteen cubits; the pillars thereof three, and their bases three. And for the other wing shall be hangings of fifteen cubits; the pillars thereof three, and their bases three. And for tile gate of the court a covering of twenty cubits, of blue, and crimson, and scarlet double dyed, and fine twined linen, the work of the embroiderer; its pillars four, and their bases four. All the pillars of the court round about shall be filleted with fillets of silver; their hooks of silver, and their bases of brass.  The length of the court shall be a hundred cubits, and the breadth fifty by fifty; and the height five cubits, of fine twined linen, and their bases of brass. And as for all the vessels of the Habitation in all the service thereof, all the pegs thereof, and all the pegs of the court, shall be of brass. ”And thou shalt make the court of the Habitation,“ signifies the ultimate heaven; ”at the corner of the south southward,“ signifies that is in the light of truth; ”the hangings for the court,“ signifies the truths of this heaven; ”shall be of fine twined linen,“ signifies from the understanding; ”a hundred cubits the length,“ signifies full of good from the Lord; ”at the one comer,“ signifies where truths are in light; ”and the pillars thereof shall be twenty,“ signifies the goods of truth fully supporting; ”and their bases twenty, of brass,“ signifies truths from good also fully supporting; ”the hooks of the pillars and their fillets shall be of silver,“ signifies the methods of conjunction by means of truth; ”and so at the corner of the north in length,“ signifies where the good of truth is in obscurity; ”there shall be hangings a hundred cubits in length,“ signifies also full of truths from good; ”and the pillars thereof twenty,“ signifies the goods of truth fully supporting; ”and their bases twenty, of brass,“ signifies truths from good also fully supporting; ”the hooks of the pillars and their fillets of silver,“ signifies the methods of conjunction by means of truth; and the breadth of the court at the corner of the sea,” signifies the state of this heaven in respect to memory-truths; “shall be hangings of fifty cubits,” signifies truths sufficient for uses; “the pillars thereof ten, and their bases ten,” signifies the supporting goods and derivative truths also sufficient for uses; “and the breadth of the court at the corner of the east eastward,” signifies the state of truth of this heaven, where goods are; “shall be fifty cubits,” signifies sufficient for uses; “and the hangings for the one wing shall be fifteen cubits,” signifies truths in light, as many as are sufficient; “the pillars thereof three, and their bases three,” signifies goods and the derivative truths fully supporting; “and for the other wing shall be hangings of fifteen cubits, the pillars thereof three, and their bases three,” signifies similar things where truths are in obscurity; “and for the gate of the court a covering,” signifies introduction into this heaven, and a guard lest it should be entered by any except those who are prepared; “of twenty cubits,” signifies to the full; “of blue, and crimson, and scarlet double-dyed, and fine twined linen,” signifies the goods of charity and of faith; “the work of the embroiderer,” signifies which are in memory-knowledge; “its pillars four, and their bases four,” signifies goods and the derivative truths supporting the conjunction; “all the pillars of the court round about,” signifies all the good that supports heaven; “shall be filleted with fillets of silver, and their hooks of silver,” signifies all the methods of conjunction by means of truth; “and their bases of brass,” signifies the supports by means of good; “the length of the court shall be a hundred cubits,” signifies the good of this heaven to the full; “and the breadth fifty by fifty,” signifies truth as much as is sufficient; “and the height five cubits,” signifies the degrees of good and truth, also as much as is sufficient; “of fine twined linen,” signifies from the understanding; “and their bases of brass,” signifies the support of all things by means of good; “and as for all the vessels of the Habitation in all the service thereof,” signifies the memory-truths and goods that belong to the external man; “all the pegs thereof, and all the pegs of the court, shall be of brass,” signifies all things conjoining and strengthening each heaven, the middle and the ultimate, by means of good.

AC 9741. And thou shalt make the court of the Habitation. That this signifies the ultimate heaven, is evident from the signification of “the court of the Habitation,” as being the external of heaven, thus the ultimate heaven. For there are three heavens - the inmost, the middle, and the ultimate; the inmost heaven was represented by the inmost part of the Habitation, where was the ark of the Testimony; the middle heaven, by the Habitation outside the veil; and the ultimate heaven by the court, which is now treated of.  This heaven is called “the court” because in it are those who are in the good of faith, and not yet in the good of charity toward the neighbor; those who are in the good of charity are in the middle heaven. Those who are in the ultimate heaven, which is called “the court,” are  called “ angelic spirits;” those who are in the middle heaven are called “spiritual angels;” but those who are in the inmost heaven are called “celestial angels.”

[2] Moreover the very good of faith, which is the good of the ultimate heaven, is a court, for through it man is introduced into the good of charity toward the neighbor, which is the good of the middle heaven. Be it known that the good with a man makes his heaven, and that his heaven is such as his good is. There are three goods which follow in order: the good of faith, the good of charity toward the neighbor, and the good of love to the Lord. The good of faith, as just said, makes the ultimate or first heaven; the good of charity toward the neighbor makes the middle or second heaven; and the good of love to the Lord makes the inmost or third heaven.

[3] A few words shall be said in order to make known still better how the case is with the heavens.  The heavens are distinguished into two kingdoms: the celestial kingdom, and the spiritual kingdom; and in each of these kingdoms there is an internal and an external.  In the internal of the celestial kingdom are those who are in the good of love to the Lord, and in its external are those who are in the good of mutual love; but in the internal of the spiritual kingdom are those who are in the good of charity toward the neighbor, and in its external are those who are in the good of faith (n. 9680). The external of both kingdoms is what is called the ultimate or first heaven, and was represented by the court.  It was for this reason that the court around the temple was twofold, outer and inner; the outer court denotes those who are in the external things of the spiritual kingdom, and the inner court those who are in the external things of the celestial kingdom.

[4] With respect to these two courts of the temple at Jerusalem, see (1 Kings 6:3, 36; 2 Kings 21:5). With respect to the outer court of the new temple in Ezekiel, see (Ezek. 40:17, 31, 34; 42:1-20); and with respect to the inner court there, (Ezek. 40:23, 28, 32, 44; 42:3; 43:5). From this it is evident that it is the good of faith which makes the ultimate heaven that was represented by the outer court of the temple, and that it is the good of mutual love which makes the ultimate heaven that was represented by the inner court.  Those who are in the good of mutual love are in the affection of good for the sake of good; but those who are in the good of faith are in the affection of truth for the sake of truth; for good rules in the celestial kingdom, but truth in the spiritual kingdom.

[5] That the ultimate heaven is signified by “the courts,” is evident from the passages in the Word where these are mentioned; as in Ezekiel:--

The glory of Jehovah lifted up itself above the cherub, over the threshold of the house; and the house was filled with the cloud, and the cloud filled the inner court, and the court was full of the brightness of the glory of Jehovah. And the voice of the wings of the cherubs was heard even to the outer court (Ezek. 10:3-5).

As the court was the representative of the ultimate heaven, therefore it was filled with the cloud and the brightness of the glory of Jehovah, as was the house itself; for “the cloud” and “the glory” denote Divine truth. That a “cloud” denotes this, (n. 5922, 6343, 6752, 8106, 8443); and also “glory,” (n. 8267, 8427, 9429); “the voice of the wings” denotes the truth of faith from good (n. 8764, 9514).

[6] Again:--

The spirit took me up, and brought me into the inner court of the temple, when behold the glory of Jehovah filled the house.  And I heard one speaking unto me out of the house, saying, Son of man, this is the place of My throne, and the place of the soles of My feet, where I will dwell in the midst of the sons of Israel forever (Ezek. 43:5-7);

here the temple together with the court is called “the place of the throne of Jehovah, and the place of the soles of His feet,” because the temple together with the court represented heaven; “the throne of Jehovah” denotes the spiritual heaven (n. 5313, 8625), and “the place of the soles of His feet” denotes the ultimate heaven.

[7] The ultimate heaven is also signified by “the court,” and by “courts,” in the following passages.  In David:--

Blessed is he whom Thou choosest, and causest to approach; he shall dwell in Thy courts; we shall be sated with the good of Thy house, with the holy of Thy temple (Ps. 65:4);

it is evident that to “dwell in the courts” denotes to dwell in heaven. Again:--

A day in Thy courts is better than thousands. I have chosen to stand at the door in the house of my God (Ps. 84:10).

Give unto Jehovah the glory of His name; bring an offering, and come into His courts (Ps. 96:8).

Praise ye the name of Jehovah; praise ye, O servants of Jehovah, who stand in the house of Jehovah, in the courts of the house of our God (Ps. 135:1, 2).

They shall gather the grain and the new wine; they shall eat it, and praise Jehovah, and they that shall gather it shall drink it in the courts of My holiness (Isa. 62:9).

In these passages “the courts” denote the ultimate heavens, for the interior heavens are called “the house of Jehovah,” and “His temple” (n. 3720).

[8] In John:--

The angel said, Arise and measure the temple of God, and the altar, and them that worship therein. But the court which is without the temple cast out, and measure it not; because it hath been given unto the Gentiles; and the holy city shall they tread under foot forty and two months (Rev. 11:1, 2);

“the temple, and the altar, and they that worship therein” denote the church and the worship of the church; “the court without the temple” denotes the good of mutual love; “the Gentiles, to whom it has been given to tread under foot the holy city,” denote the evils of self-love and of the love of the world, which destroy the church (n. 6306); “forty and two months” signify the like as six weeks, and six weeks the like as the six days of one week, for six multiplied into seven makes forty-two; “a week” signifies an entire period, greater or less (n. 2044, 3845); “the six days which precede the seventh,” which is the sabbath, signify the former church even to the end, and the setting up of a new church; “the sabbath” denotes the conjunction of good and truth, thus the church (n. 8495, 8510, 8889, 8893, 9274).

AC 9742. At the corner of the south southward.  That this signifies that it is in the light of truth, is evident from the signification of “the south southward,” as being where truth is in light (n. 9642). That the court was on this side, was because those who are in the court of heaven, that is, who are in the ultimate heaven, are in the good of faith, and the good of faith arises by illumination from the light which is from the Lord.  The light which is from the Lord is the truth of faith, and when this becomes of the will, it is called the good of faith. With those who are in the outer court, a new will is formed in the understanding (n. 9596), for the formation of which it is necessary that they be in the light of truth. From this it is that the court was made “southward” relatively to the Habitation.

AC 9743. The hangings for the court.  That this signifies the truths of this heaven, is evident from the signification of “curtains,” as being truths (n. 9595, 9596), thus also “hangings;” and from the signification of “the court,” as being the ultimate heaven (n. 9741).

AC 9744. Shall be of fine twined linen.  That this signifies from the understanding, is evident from the signification of “fine linen,” as being truth from a celestial origin (n. 5319, 9469); whence “fine twined linen” denotes the understanding, because this consists and is as it were twined, or woven, of truths from a celestial origin.  For there are two things to which all things in the universe bear relation, namely, truth and good; and therefore man has two faculties, one appointed for the reception of truth, and the other for the reception of good; the faculty appointed for the reception of truth is called the understanding, and the faculty appointed for the reception of good is called the will.  In so far therefore as the understanding has been formed from genuine truths, so far it excels, and so far it is “fine twined linen,” for “fine linen” denotes truth from the Divine (n. 5319); that from this the “fine twined linen” denotes the understanding, (n. 9596).

AC 9745. A hundred cubits the length.  That this signifies full of good from the Lord, is evident from the signification of “a hundred,” as being all, much, and what is full; and from the signification of “length,” as being good (n. 1613, 9487). That it denotes good from the Lord, is because the good of faith, in which are those who are in the ultimate heaven, which is represented by the court of the Habitation, is from the Lord. That “a hundred” denotes all, much, and what is full, is because “a hundred” has the same signification as “ten,” “a thousand,” and “ten thousand”. That by these numbers such things are signified, (n. 2575, 3107, 4638, 8715); and that the same is signified by “a hundred,” (n. 2636, 4400).

AC 9746. At the one corner.  That this signifies where truth is in light, is evident from the signification of “the corner of the south southward,” which is here “the one corner,” as being where truth is in tight (n. 9742).

AC 9747. And the pillars thereof shall be twenty.  That this signifies the goods of truth fully supporting, is evident from the signification of “the pillars,” as being the goods of heaven and of the church which support (n. 9674), here the goods of truth, because they are said of the ultimate heaven which is supported by the good of faith, which is the same as the good of truth; and from the signification of “twenty,” as being fully (n. 9641).

AC 9748. And their bases twenty, of brass.  That this signifies truths from good also fully supporting, is evident from the signification of “the bases,” as being truths of faith from good (n. 9643); from the signification of “twenty,” as being fully (n. 9747); and from the signification of “brass,” as being good (n. 425, 1551).

AC 9749. The hooks of the pillars and their fillets shall be of silver.  That this signifies the methods of conjunction by means of truth, is evident from the signification of “hooks,” and “fillets,” as being methods of conjunction. That “hooks” have this signification (n. 9676); and that “fillets” have the same, is by their application; and from the signification of “silver,” as being truth (n. 1551, 2954, 5658, 6112, 6914, 6917, 7999).

AC 9750. And so at the corner of the north in length.  That this signifies where the good of truth is in obscurity, is evident from the signification of “the corner of the north,” as being where truth is in obscurity; and from the signification of “length,” as being good (n. 1613, 9487).

AC 9751. There shall be hangings a hundred cubits in length. That this signifies also full of truth from good, is evident from the signification of “the hangings of the court,” as being the truths of the ultimate heaven (n. 9743); from the signification of “a hundred,” as being what is full (n. 9745); and from the signification of “length,” as being good (n. 1613, 9487).

AC 9752. And the pillars thereof twenty, signifies the goods of truth fully supporting (n. 9747).

AC 9753. And their bases twenty, of brass, signifies truths from good also fully supporting (n. 9748).

AC 9754. The hooks of the pillars and their fillets of silver, signifies the methods of conjunction by means of truth (n. 9749).

AC 9755. And the breadth of the court at the corner of the sea. That this signifies the state of this heaven in respect to memory-truths, is evident from the signification of “breadth,” as being truth (n. 1613, 3433, 3434, 4482, 9487); from the signification of “the court,” as being the ultimate heaven (n. 9741); and from the signification of “the sea,” as being where there is a collection of memory-knowledges, from which there is reasoning about truths, thus also the natural and the sensuous, because these are what contain them.  Here by “the corner of the sea” is meant the west corner, and by “the west” is signified good in obscurity. But when the west is not called “the west,” but “the sea,” then memory-knowledge is signified, which also is relatively in obscurity, because memory-knowledge belongs to the natural or external man; and the natural or external man is in the light of the world, which light relatively to the light of heaven, in which is the internal man, is like the shade when the sun is setting.

[2] This can also be seen from the things which appear in the other life.  The Sun of heaven, which is the Lord, appears at a middle altitude toward the right eye; from this the angels of the heavens have all light, and with the tight all intelligence and wisdom. But when the sun of the world is thought of, it does not appear; but in its stead there appears something dark which is in the opposite direction, at the back.  There also is the west to the heavens, for the Lord as a Sun is the east in heaven.  From this it can be seen that by “the west” is signified good in obscurity, and that the external or natural man is in this good, who as before said is in the light of the world, which light relatively to the light of heaven is like the shade when the sun is setting.  But the truth of the natural man is signified by “the water of the sea,” and this truth is memory-knowledge; for the truth in the natural or external man is truth in knowledge; whereas the truth in the spiritual or internal man is the truth of faith. Truth in knowledge also becomes truth in faith when it is raised out of the natural or external man into the spiritual or internal man. Hence the truths with a man in his youth are truths in knowledge; but in adult age, if he suffers himself to be regenerated, they become truths in faith; for the internal man is successively opened even to this age.

[3]  That “the sea” denotes a collection of memory-knowledges, comes from the fact that “waters,” “springs,” and “rivers,” signify truths, and therefore collections of these are signified by “seas.” That this is so, is also evident from passages in the Word where mention is made of “the sea” and of “seas;” as in David:--

The earth is Jehovah’s, and the fullness thereof; the world, and they that dwell therein.  He hath founded it upon the seas, and established it upon the streams (Ps. 24:1, 2);

where “the earth” and “the world” denote the church; “the seas upon which He hath founded the world,” denote memory-truths; “the streams upon which He hath established it,” denote the truth of faith. That the earth, the world, seas, and rivers are not meant here, is evident, for the world is not founded upon the seas, nor is it established upon the streams.

[4] Again:--

Thou didst break through the sea by Thy strength; Thou hast broken the heads of the whales upon the waters.  Thou hast broken the heads of Leviathan, Thou gavest him for meat to the people Ziim, Thou hast dried up the rivers of strength (Ps. 74:13-15);

in the internal sense, the subject here treated of is the memory-knowledges that destroy the truths of faith; “the whales whose heads are broken,” denote memory-knowledges in general (n. 42, 7293); in like manner “Leviathan” (n. 7293); “the people Ziim to whom he was to be given for meat,” denote those who are in falsities, or the falsities themselves.  From this it is evident what is denoted by “the sea,” namely, memory-knowledge misapplied to weaken and destroy truths.  In Habakkuk:--

Thou didst tread the sea with Thy horses, the mire of many waters (Habakkuk 3:15);

where “treading the sea with horses,” when spoken of Jehovah, denotes to instruct the natural man who has memory-knowledges.

[5] In Zechariah:--

In that day, living waters shall go out from Jerusalem; part of them toward the eastern sea, and part of them toward the hinder sea (Zech. 14:8);

“living waters from Jerusalem” denote truths of faith made living from the good of love; “the eastern sea and the hinder sea” denote the natural and sensuous in which are memory. knowledges, which are collections of truths. In Hosea:--

They shall walk after Jehovah, and the sons shall come with honor from the sea. They shall come with honor as a bird out of Egypt (Hosea 11:10, 11);

“sons from the sea” denote the memory-truths that belong to the natural man; for this reason it is said that “they shall come as a bird out of Egypt,” for “Egypt” in the Word denotes memory-knowledge (n. 9340, 9391).

[6] In Ezekiel

All the princes of the sea shall come down from upon their thrones, and shall cast away their mantles, and put off the garments of their embroidery; they shall be clothed with terrors; they shall say, How hast thou perished that wast inhabited in the seas, the renowned city, that wast strong in the sea (Ezek.  26:16, 17);

where the subject treated of is the vastation of the knowledges of good and truth, which are “Tyre” (n. 1201); the knowledges of good and truth are the memory-knowledges of the church; “the princes of the sea” denote the primary knowledges (n. 1482, 2089, 5044); “to cast away the mantles and garments of embroidery” denotes to cast away memory-truths (n. 9688). As these things are signified by “Tyre,” therefore Tyre is said to be “inhabited in the seas, and to be a city strong on the sea

[7] In Jeremiah:--

The sea is come up upon Babylon; she is covered with the multitude of the waves thereof. Her cities have been brought into desolation (Jer. 51:42, 43);

”Babylon“ denotes worship which in externals appears holy, but in internals is profane (n. 1182, 1326); ”the sea upon Babylon“ denotes falsity from memory-knowledges; its ”waves“ denote reasonings therefrom, and the consequent denials; ”the cities which are brought into desolation“ denote doctrinal things.

[8] In like manner in the Revelation:--

Every pilot, and everyone who is employed upon the seas, and mariners, and all they who trade upon the sea, stood afar off, when they saw the smoke of the burning of Babylon, saying, Woe, woe, the great city, wherein were made rich all that have ships in the sea by reason of her costliness! Then an angel took up a stone as it were a great millstone, and cast it into the sea, saying, Thus with violence shall Babylon be cast down (Rev. 18:17-21).

”ships“ denote doctrinal things from the Word (n. 6385); hence it is plain what is meant by a ”pilot,“ and a ”mariner,“ also by ”the sea,“ and ”those who trade upon it;“ ”a stone as it were a millstone,“ denotes the truth through which is faith; ”being cast into the sea,“ denotes into the falsity of memory-knowledges.  In the other life there appear seas, and also ships upon them; as has often been granted me to see.  The seas there in a bad sense signify the falsities of memory-knowledges, and those who are in the ships signify those who boast of having such things, and teach them.

[9] In Jeremiah:--

Thus said Jehovah, that giveth the sun for a light by day, the statutes of the moon and of the stars for a light by night, who throweth into commotion the sea, that the waves thereof are tumultuous (Jer. 31:35);

”the sun for a light by day“ denotes the good of love from which comes the light in truths; ”the statutes of the moon and of the stars for a light by night“ denote the goods of faith and of knowledges, from which comes the light of truth in the dark; ”to throw the sea into commotion that the waves thereof are tumultuous,“ denotes to dispel the falsities of memory-knowledges from which come reasonings about truth.

[10] In Isaiah:--

By shortening is My hand shortened, that there is no redemption? or is there no power in Me to rescue?  Behold by My rebuke I dry up the sea, I make the rivers a wilderness; their fish shall rot, because there is no water, and it dieth of thirst (Isa. 1:2);

”to dry up the sea“ denotes to destroy the good and truth of memory-knowledges; ”to make the rivers a wilderness“ denotes to vastate the truths themselves; ”the fish which shall rot“ denotes the memory-knowledge that belongs to the natural man (n. 40, 991); ”because there is no water“ denotes that there is no truth (n. 2702, 3058, 3424, 4976, 5668, 8568).

[11] In like manner elsewhere in the same:--

The waters shall fail from the sea, and the river shall be made quite dry and shall dry up. And the streams shall recede; the rivers of Egypt shall be diminished and dried up (Isa. 19:5, 6);

”the waters that shall fail from the sea“ denote truths where there is a collection of them; ”the rivers of Egypt which shall be dried up,“ denote memory-knowledges.  Again:--

The earth is full of the knowledge of Jehovah, as the waters cover the sea (Isa. 11:9);

”the waters“ denote truths; ”the sea,“ a collection of them, that is, of memory-knowledges; therefore it is said, ”the earth is full of the knowledge of Jehovah.“

[12] In John:--

The second angel sounded, and as it were a great mountain burning with fire was cast into the sea; and the third part of the sea became blood; whence there died the third part of the creatures that were in the sea having souls; and the third part of the ships was destroyed (Rev. 8:8, 9);

”a great mountain burning with fire“ denotes the love of self; ”the sea into which it was cast“ denotes memory-knowledge in general; ”the blood which was from it“ denotes truth falsified and profaned (n. 4735, 6978, 7317, 7326); ”the creatures which thereby died“ denote those who are in the doctrinal things of truth.

[13] In like manner elsewhere in the same:--

The second angel poured out his vial into the sea; and it became blood as of a dead man; whence every living soul in the sea died (Rev. 16:3);

here by ”the sea“ is meant memory-knowledge that is of service to evils to destroy truths, and to confirm falsities.  Again:--

A beast coming up out of the sea speaking blasphemies (Rev. 12:1);

”a beast out of the sea“ denotes memory-knowledge destroying the truths of faith.  From all this it can be seen that ”the sea“ denotes where there is a collection of memory-knowledges, from which there is reasoning about the truths of faith.

[14] As ”the sea“ has this signification, it is said of Zebulun:--

He shall dwell at the shore of the seas, and at a haven of ships (Gen. 49:13).

He shall suck the affluence of the sea, and the covered things of the hidden things of the sand (Deut. 33:19);

by ”Zebulun“ in the representative sense are meant those who draw conclusions from memory-knowledges about the truths of faith; wherefore it is said that ”he should dwell at the shore of the seas.“

[15] But in the opposite sense ”the sea“ denotes memory-knowledge which looks to the world; its ”waves“ are in this case reasonings from worldly things about Divine ones; consequently ”to be sunk in the sea“ denotes to be immersed in memory-knowledges from worldly and earthly things even to the denial of truth Divine; as in Matthew:--

Whoso shall cause to stumble one of these little ones that believe in Me, it is expedient for him that an ass millstone be hanged about his neck, and that he be sunk in the depth of the sea (Matt. 18:6);

”a millstone“ denotes the truth that is of service to faith (n. 4335, 7780); ”an ass“ denotes the natural, because it is a beast of service (n. 2781, 5741, 5958, 6389, 8078); consequently ”an ass millstone,“   denotes memory-knowledge that is natural and worldly; ”the neck“ denotes the conjunction of things interior and exterior (n. 3542); ”being hanged there“ denotes the shutting off and interception of good and truth (n. 3542, 3603); ”being sunk in the depth of the sea“ denotes in what is merely worldly and bodily, thus into hell.  These things spoken by the Lord, like all other things spoken by Him, are therefore significative.

[16] But memory-knowledge is signified by ”the sea“ in accordance with the density and blackness of its waters; and on the other hand, in accordance with their tenuity and transparence. From this it is that the memory-knowledge which looks to heaven, which is spiritual in the natural man, is called ”a glassy sea“ (Rev.  15:1, 2). That there shall be no reasoning about the truths of faith from memory-knowledges; but that truths shall be impressed on the heart, is signified by, ”the sea shall be no more“ (Rev.  21:1).

AC 9756. Shall be hangings of fifty cubits.  That this signifies truths sufficient for uses, is evident from the signification of ”the hangings of the court,“ as being truths such as are in the ultimate heaven (n. 9743); and from the signification of ”fifty,“ as being all things of one side, and likewise as much as is sufficient; for ”fifty“ signifies the like as ”five,“ and that ”five“ has this signification, see (n. 9604, 9689); thus also sufficient for uses, for this is as much as is sufficient.

AC 9757. The pillars thereof ten and their bases ten.  That this signifies the supporting goods and derivative truths also sufficient for uses, is evident from the signification of ”the pillars,“ as being supporting goods (n. 9747); from the signification of ”the bases,“ as being truths from good also supporting (n. 9748); and from the signification of ”ten,“ as being as much as is sufficient, that is, sufficient for uses.  The case with the goods and truths which support is the same as with the truths themselves which are supported (n. 9747).  ”Ten“ therefore here involves the like as ”fifty,“ or ”five,“ namely, sufficient for uses.  Moreover ten arises out of five by multiplication, being its double; and numbers multiplied have the like signification as the simple numbers (n. 5291, 5335, 5708, 7973).

AC 9758. And the breadth of the court at the corner of the east eastward.  That this signifies the state of truth of this heaven, where goods are, is evident from the signification of ”breadth,“ as being a state of truth (n. 1613, 3433, 3434, 4482, 9487); from the signification of ”the court,“ as being the ultimate heaven (n. 9741); and from the signification of ”the east“ and ”the sunrise,“ as being the good of love (n. 1250, 3249, 3708).

AC 9759. Shall be fifty cubits, signifies sufficient for uses (n. 9756).

AC 9760. And the hangings for the one wing shall be fifteen cubits.  That this signifies truths in light, as many as are sufficient, is evident from the signification of ”fifteen,“ as being as much as is sufficient; from the signification of ”the hangings,“ as being truths (n. 9743); and from the signification of a ”wing,“ as being where truth is in light.  That the ”wing“ has this signification is because by the ”wing“ is signified one side of the breadth of the court toward the corner of the east; for its breadth was fifty cubits, and in the middle of the breadth was the gate, the covering of which was twenty cubits (verse 16).  The two sides, one to the right of the gate, and the other to the left, are called the ”wings,“ the hangings for each being fifteen cubits; therefore as before said the whole breadth was fifty cubits.  It is plain therefore that one wing was toward the south, and the other toward the north.  Consequently by ”the hangings of the wing toward the south“ are signified truths in light, for ”the south“ denotes where truth is in light (n. 9642); and by ”the hangings of the wing toward the north“ are signified truths in obscurity, for ”the north“ denotes where truth is in obscurity (n. 3708).

AC 9761. The pillars thereof three, and their bases three. That this signifies goods and the derivative truths fully supporting, is evident from the signification of ”the pillars,“ as being goods supporting (n. 9747, 9757); from the signification of ”the bases,“ as being truths from good likewise supporting (n. 9748); and from the signification of ”three,“ as being what is full (n. 2788, 4495, 7715).

AC 9762. And for the other wing shall be hangings of fifteen cubits, the pillars thereof three, and their bases three.  That this signifies similar things where truths are in obscurity, is evident, for they are the same words as those which were unfolded just above. And that by ”the hangings of this wing“ are signified truths in obscurity, see just above (n. 9760).

AC 9763. And for the gate of the court a covering.  That this signifies introduction into this heaven, and a guard lest it should be entered by any except those who are prepared, is evident from the signification of a ”gate,“ as being communication and introduction (n. 8989); from the signification of ”the court,“ as being the ultimate heaven (n. 9741); and from the signification of ”the covering,“ as being a guard lest it he entered; for the gate was guarded by the covering. That it denotes a guard lest it should be entered by any except those who are prepared, is because no one is introduced into heaven unless he is prepared. The case herein is this. Those who come from the world into the other life, which takes place immediately after their decease, bring with them worldly and earthly things which do not agree with the spiritual and celestial things in which the angels are; and therefore those who are to be raised into heaven are first prepared, which is effected by the separation of the worldly and earthly things which they have brought with them; for if they were taken up into heaven sooner, they could not possibly remain in the societies there, because they have a taste and love for grosser things than are suited to the purity in which the angels are. But after they have been prepared, they are taken up and introduced by the Lord into heaven, and are admitted into those angelic societies with which they are in agreement in respect to the truths and goods of faith and of love. From all this it can be seen what is meant by a guard lest heaven should be entered by any except those who are prepared.

AC 9764. Of twenty cubits.  That this signifies to the fall, is evident from the signification of ”twenty,“ as being what is full (n. 9641).

AC 9765. Of blue, and crimson, and scarlet double-dyed, and fine twined linen.  That this signifies the goods of charity and of faith, is evident from what has been already shown (n. 9687), where the same words occur.

AC 9766. The work of the embroiderer.  That this signifies which belong to memory-knowledge, is evident from the signification of ”the work of the embroiderer,“ as being memory-knowledge (n. 9688).

AC 9767. Its pillars four, and their bases four.  That this signifies goods and the derivative truths supporting the conjunction, is evident from the signification of ”pillars and their bases,“ as being goods and the derivative truths which support (n. 9761); and from the signification of ”four,“ as being conjunction (n. 8877, 9601, 9674).

AC 9768. All the pillars of the court round about.  That this signifies all the good that supports heaven, is evident from the signification of ”all the pillars round about,“ as being all the good that supports (that ”the pillars“ denote goods supporting, (n. 9747, 9757); and from the signification of ”the court,“ as being the ultimate heaven (n. 9741).

AC 9769. Shall be filleted with fillets of silver, and their hooks shall be of silver. That this signifies all the methods of conjunction by means of truth, is evident from the signification of ”fillets,“ and of ”hooks,“ as being methods of conjunction (n. 9749); and from the signification of ”silver,“ as being truth (n. 1551, 2954, 5658, 6112, 6914, 6917, 7999).

AC 9770. And their bases of brass.  That this signifies supports by means of good, is evident from the signification of ”the bases,“ as being supports (n. 9643); and from the signification of ”brass,“ as being good (n. 425, 1551).

AC 9771. The length of the court shall be a hundred cubits. That this signifies the good of this heaven to the full, is evident from the signification of ”length,“ as being good (n. 1613, 9487); from the signification of ”the court,“ as being the ultimate heaven (n. 9741); and from the signification of ”a hundred,“ as being to the full (n. 9745).

AC 9772. And the breadth fifty by fifty.  That this signifies truth as much as is sufficient, is evident from the signification of ”breadth,“ as being truth (n. 1613, 3433, 3434, 4482, 9487); and from the signification of ”fifty,“ as being as much as is sufficient (n. 9756).

AC 9773. And the height five cubits.  That this signifies the degrees of good and truth also as much as is sufficient, is evident from the signification of ”height,“ as being degrees in respect to good (n. 9489), and because this is predicated of the ultimate heaven, it denotes degrees also in respect to truth, for this heaven is in the good and truth of faith; and from the signification of ”five,“ as being as much as is sufficient (n. 9689). The reason why by ”height“ are signified degrees in respect to good and truth, is that by ”what is high“ is signified what is internal (n. 1735, 2148, 4599); therefore the higher anything is, so much the more interior it is. In heaven that which is more interior is nearer to the Lord, for the Lord is in the inmost, and from the inmost all things proceed. Distances from the inmost are degrees of good and truth from Him. As the Lord is the inmost, He is also the Highest, for He is the Sun of heaven, from which is all height in the heavens. For this reason it is that the Lord is called in the Word ”the Highest.“

AC 9774. Of fine twined linen.  That this signifies from the understanding, is evident from the signification of ”fine twined linen,“ as being what belongs to the understanding (n. 9596, 9744).

AC 9775. And their bases of brass, signifies the supports of all things by means of good (n. 9770). That it denotes of all things, is because all the things of the court are treated of in this verse.

AC 9776. And as for all the vessels of the Habitation is all the service thereof.  That this signifies the memory-truths and goods that belong to the external man, is evident from the signification of ”vessels,“ as being memory-knowledges (n. 3068, 3079, 9394, 9544); from the signification of ”the Habitation,“ as being heaven (n. 9594, 9596, 9632); and from the signification of ”service,“ as being the external or natural of man (n. 3019, 3020, 5305, 7998). That man‘s external or natural is denoted by ”service,“ is because it ought to serve the internal or spiritual of man.  For man has been created according to the image of heaven and the image of the world, the internal or spiritual man according to the image of heaven, and the external or natural man according to the image of the world (n. 9279). Just as the world ought to serve heaven, so man’s external or natural ought to serve his internal or spiritual. Moreover the natural was created for service; for it does not live from itself, thus can do nothing from itself; but from the internal or spiritual, that is, through this from the Lord. From this it is also evident that man‘s external or natural is nothing unless it is of service to the internal or spiritual, and that it becomes something in proportion as it is of service.  To he of service is to obey, and the natural obeys when it does not take for itself from the understanding reasons which favor the evils of the loves of self and of the world; but when it complies with the dictates of reason and the doctrine of the church, which declare that good and truth ought to be done, not for the sake of self and the world as ends, but for the sake of good and truth itself. In this manner the Lord does these through man’s heaven, that is, through his internal; for all good and truth are from the Lord, insomuch that good and truth with man are the Lord Himself. From all this it can be seen why it is that the external man must be a thing of service to the internal man.

AC 9777. All the pegs thereof and all the pegs of the court, shall be of brass.  That this signifies all things which conjoin and strengthen each heaven, the middle and the ultimate, by means of good, is evident from the signification of ”the pegs,“ as being things that conjoin and strengthen; from the signification of ”the Habitation,“ which is here meant by ”thereof,“ as being heaven, specifically the middle heaven (n. 9594, 9596, 9632); from the signification of ”the court,“ as being the ultimate heaven (n. 9741); and from the signification of ”brass,“ as being external good (n. 425, 1551).

[2] That ”pegs,“ ”stakes,“ or ”nails,“ denote things which conjoin and strengthen, is because they do conjoin and strengthen.  Similar things are also signified by them in the Word throughout; as in Isaiah:--

Enlarge the place of thy tent, and let them stretch forth the curtains of thine habitations; forbid not; lengthen thy cords, and strengthen thy stakes (Isa. 54:2);

a new church from the Lord is here treated of; ”enlarging the place of the tent, and stretching forth the curtains of the habitations,“ denotes the doctrine of good and truth, and the consequent worship (n. 9596); ”long cords,“ and ”stakes,“ denote an ample connection and confirmation of truths. That the court also had its cords may be seen in (Exodus 35:18; Numbers 3:37; 4:32).

[3] Again:--

Look upon Zion; thine eyes shall see Jerusalem a quiet habitation, a tabernacle that shall not be dispersed; the stakes thereof shall never be removed, neither shall any of the cords thereof be pulled away (Isa. 33:20);

where ”stakes,“ and ”cords,“ in like manner denote things which strengthen and conjoin. ”Nails“ also denote strengthening and conjunction in (Isaiah 41:7, Jeremiah 10:4); but are there used in regard to idols, by which are signified doctrines of falsity, because from own intelligence (n. 8941, 9494). By ”the nail“ however on which anything is hung, is signified affixing and adjoining, in (Isaiah 22:23, 24; Ezekiel 15:3).

AC 9778. Verses 20, 21. And thou shalt command the sons of Israel, and let them take unto thee olive oil pure, beaten, for the luminary, to cause the lamp to go up continually. In the Tent of meeting, without the veil which is over the Testimony, Aaron and his sons shall order it from evening until morning before Jehovah; a statute of an age for their generations with the sons of Israel.  ”And thou shalt command the sons of Israel,“ signifies the church through the Word from the Lord; ”and let them take unto thee olive oil,“ signifies the good of charity and of faith; ”pure, beaten,“ signifies consequently genuine and clear; ”for the luminary,“ signifies the spiritual heaven; ”to cause the lamp to go up continually,“ signifies the consequent faith, and through faith intelligence of truth and wisdom of good from the Lord; ”in the Tent of meeting,“ signifies where is the presence of the Lord; ”without the veil which is  over the Testimony,“ signifies where there is communication, and, through the uniting intermediate, conjunction with the Lord in the inmost heaven; ”Aaron and his sons shall order it,“ signifies perpetual influx from the Lord; ”from evening until morning before Jehovah,“ signifies continually in every state; ”a statute of an age,“ signifies Divine order; ”for their generations with the sons of Israel,“ signifies what is eternal in the spiritual kingdom.

AC 9779. And thou shalt command the sons of Israel.  That this signifies for the church through the Word from the Lord, is evident from the representation of Moses, who is meant by ”thou,“ as being the Lord in respect to the Word, or the Word which is from the Lord (n. 4859, 5922, 6752, 7014, 7089, 9372); and from the representation of the sons of Israel, as being those of the spiritual church (n. 9340).  From this it is plain that by ”Moses commanding the sons of Israel“ is signified that it was commanded for the church through the Word by the Lord.

AC 9780. And let them take unto thee olive oil.  That this signifies the good of charity and of faith, is evident from the signification of ”olive oil,“ as being the good of celestial love (n. 886), but here the good of spiritual love, which is the good of charity toward the neighbor and the good of faith.  That this good is here signified by ”olive oil,“ is because it was for the luminary, that is, for the lampstand, and by the ”lampstand“ is signified the spiritual heaven (n. 9548).  The spiritual heaven on earth is the spiritual church.  ”Oil,“ and ”the olive-tree,“ in the Word signify both celestial good and spiritual good; celestial good where the subject treated of is the celestial kingdom or the celestial church, and spiritual good where it is the spiritual kingdom or the spiritual church. These kingdoms or churches are distinguished by their goods. The goods of the celestial kingdom, or of the celestial church, are the good of love to the Lord and the good of mutual love; and the goods of the spiritual kingdom, or of the spiritual church, are the good of charity toward the neighbor and the good of faith (n. 9741).  These goods and the truths therefrom are treated of in the Word throughout, for the Word is the doctrine of good, because it is the doctrine of love to the Lord and of love toward the neighbor (Matt. 22:35-40); and all good is of love, even the good of faith, for this comes forth from the good of love, and not without it.

[2] As the Word is the doctrine of good, therefore in order that the Word may be understood, it must be known what good is; and no one knows what good is unless he lives in good according to the Word; for when anyone lives in good according to the Word, then the Lord insinuates good into his life, from which the man perceives it and feels it, and consequently apprehends the nature of it; otherwise it does not appear, because it is not perceived. From this it can be seen in what state they are who merely know what is in the Word, and persuade themselves that it is so, and yet do not do it. They have no knowledge of good, consequently none of truth; for truth is known from good, and never without good, except as memory-knowledge devoid of life, which perishes in the other life.

[3] That ”oil“ and also ”the olive“ denote good, is evident from the passages in the Word where they are mentioned, as in Zechariah:--

I saw a lampstand of gold. Two olive-trees were beside it; one on the right side of the flask, and the other on the left side thereof. These are the two sons of oil that stand beside the Lord of the whole earth (Zech. 4:2, 3, 14);

where ”the two olive-trees,“ and ”the two sons of oil,“ denote the good of love to the Lord, which is on His right, and the good of charity toward the neighbor, which is on His left.  In like manner in John”:--

The two witnesses prophesied a thousand two hundred and sixty days. These are the two olive-trees and the two lampstands that stand before the God of the earth (Rev 11:3, 4);

where “the two olive-trees and the two lampstands” denote these same goods, which, being from the Lord, are called “the two witnesses.”

[4] Again:--

I heard a voice in the midst of the four living creatures, saying, Hurt not the oil and the wine (Rev. 6:6);

where “the oil” denotes the good of love and charity, and “the wine,” the good and truth of faith.  Again:--

I will set in the wilderness the cedar of Shittah, and the myrtle, and the wood of oil (Isa. 41:19)

They shall come and sing in the height of Zion, and shall flow together unto the good of Jehovah, to the wheat, and to the new wine, and to the oil (Jer. 31:12).

The field is wasted, the land mourneth; for the grain is wasted, the new wine is dried up, the oil languisheth (Joel 1:10).

The floors are full of pure grain, and the presses overflow with new wine and oil (Joel 2:24).

I will give the rain of your land in its season, that thou mayest gather in thy grain, thy new wine, and thine oil (Deut.  11:14).

[5] “Grain, new wine, and oil” are here spoken of, but that these things are not meant can be seen by everyone who considers; for the Word, being Divine, is spiritual, not worldly, and therefore it does not treat of the grain, the new wine, and the oil of the earth, in so far as these are of service to the body for foods, but in so far as they are of service to the soul; for all foods in the Word signify heavenly foods, as do the bread and the wine in the Holy Supper. What “the grain” and “the new wine” signify in the passages here quoted, may be seen above (n. 3580, 5295, 5410, 5959); from this it is evident what “the oil” signifies.

[6] The case is the same with all things spoken by the Lord while He was in the world, as when He said of the Samaritan that “he came to the man who was wounded by thieves, and bound up his wounds and poured in oil and wine” (Luke 10:33, 34).  Here are not meant oil and wine, but the good of love and of charity, by “oil” the good of love, and by “wine” the good of charity and of faith; for the subject treated of, is the neighbor, thus charity toward him. That “wine” has this signification, (n. 6377).

[7] In like manner what the Lord said of the ten virgins, of whom “five took their lamps and no oil with them, and five took also oil,” and that the latter were admitted into heaven, but the former rejected (Matt. 25:3, 4), and following verses); “oil in the lamps” denotes the good of love and of charity in the truths of faith; “the virgins who took their lamps and no oil” denote those who hear the Word, read it, and say that they believe, and yet do no good in consequence, and if they do any good, it is not done from the love of good or of truth, but from the love of self and of the world.

[8] As “oil” signified the good of charity, therefore also the sick were anointed with oil and were healed, as we read of the Lord‘s disciples, who “went  forth and cast out demons, and anointed with oil them that were sick, and healed them” (Mark. 6:13).  And in David:--

Thou wilt make fat my head with oil; my cup shall run over (Ps. 23:5);

where “to make fat the head with oil” denotes to endow with celestial good.  In Moses:--

Jehovah fed him with the produce of the fields; He made him to suck honey out of the rock, and oil out of the stone of the rock (Deut. 32:13);

speaking of the Ancient Church; where “sucking oil out of the stone of the rock” denotes to be imbued with good through the truths of faith.

[9] In Habakkuk:--

The fig-tree shall not blossom, neither shall produce be in the vines; the labor of the olive shall lie, and the fields shall yield no food (Habakkuk 3:17);

here neither fig-tree, nor vine, nor olive, nor fields are meant, but heavenly things to which they correspond; as also everyone is able to acknowledge from himself who acknowledges that the Word treats of such things as belong to heaven and the church, thus as belong to the soul.  But they who think of nothing but worldly, earthly, and bodily things, do not see the internal things, and even do not wish to see them, for they say within themselves, What are spiritual things? What are celestial things? and so, What is heavenly food?  That these are such things as belong to intelligence and wisdom they indeed know when it is so said; but that they belong to faith and love, they do not desire; for the reason that they do not imbue their life with such things, and therefore do not attain to the intelligence and wisdom of heavenly truths and goodnesses.

[10] In Ezekiel:--

I washed thee with waters, and I washed away thy bloods from upon thee, and I anointed thee with oil.  I clothed thee with broidered word Thy garments were fine linen, silk, and broidered work; thou didst eat fine flour, and honey, and oil.  But thou didst take thy broidered garments, and coveredst images; and didst set Mine oil and Mine incense before them (Ezek. 16:9, 10, 13, 18);

who cannot see that in this passage are not meant garments of broidered work, fine linen, and silk, nor oil, honey, or fine flour; but Divine things which are of heaven and the church; for the subject treated of is Jerusalem, by which is meant the church; and therefore by the several things mentioned are meant such things as are of the church. That by each particular is meant some special thing of the church, is evident; for in the Word, which is Divine, there is not a word that is worthless.  That “Jerusalem” denotes the church, (n. 3654); also what is meant by “ broidered work,” (n. 9688); by “fine linen,” (n. 5319, 9469); by “fine flour,” (n. 2177); by “honey,” (n. 5620, 6857); by “washing with waters,” (n. 3147, 5954, 9088); and by “washing away bloods,” (n. 4735, 9127).

[11] In Hosea:--

Ephraim feedeth on wind, they make a covenant with the Assyrian, and oil is carried down into Egypt (Hosea 12:1);

these things are quite unintelligible unless it is known what is meant by “Ephraim,” what by “the Assyrian,” and what by “Egypt;” yet there is here described the understanding of the man of the church, which is perverted through reasonings from memory-knowledges; for “Ephraim” denotes this understanding (n. 3969, 5354, 6222, 6238, 6267); “the Assyrian,” reasoning (n. 1186); and “Egypt,” memory-knowledge (n. 9391); consequently “to carry down oil into Egypt” denotes to defile in this way the good of the church.

[12] That the Lord so often went up the Mount of Olives (Luke 21:37; 22:39), was because “oil” and “the olive” signified the good of love, as also does a “mountain” (n. 6435, 8758). The reason was that while the Lord was in the world all things respecting Him were representative of heaven; for thereby the universal heaven was adjoined to Him; wherefore whatever He did and whatever He said was Divine and heavenly, and the ultimate things were representative. The Mount of Olives represented heaven in respect to the good of love and of charity; as also can be seen in Zechariah:--

Jehovah shall go forth, and fight against the nations.  His feet shall stand in that day upon the Mount of Olives, which is before the faces of Jerusalem, and the Mount of Olives shall be cleft asunder, that a part thereof shall recede toward the east, and toward the sea, with a great valley; and a part of the mountain shall recede toward the north, and a part of it toward the south (Zech. 14:3, 4);

[13] here the Lord and His coming are the subject treated of; by “the Mount of Olives” is signified the good of love and of charity; thus the church, for these goods make the church. That the church would recede from the Jewish nation, and would be set up among the Gentiles, is signified by “the mountain being cleft asunder toward the east, toward the sea, and toward the north, and the south;” in like manner as by the words of the Lord in Luke:--

Ye shall be cast down outside; whereas they shall come from the east, and the west, and from the north, and the south, and shall sit down in the kingdom of God (Luke 13:28, 29).

In a universal sense by “Jehovah going forth and fighting against the nations,” and by “His feet standing upon the Mount of Olives which is before the faces of Jerusalem,” is meant that the Lord from Divine love would fight against the hells; for “the nations” denote evils which are from the hells (n. 1868, 6306), and “the Mount of Olives,” on which were His feet, denotes the Divine love.

AC 9781. Pure, beaten.  That this signifies genuine and clear, is evident from the signification of “pure,” when said of the good which is signified by “oil,” as being genuine; for the more celestial good is -- thus the more genuine -- so much the purer it is; and from the signification of “beaten,” when said of the good which is signified by “oil,” as being clear.  Good is said to be clear when it becomes truth; for good appears by means of truth, because truth is the form of good; and good does not appear in light except in n form.  The better therefore that good is presented in a form, the more clearly it appears, for the result is that good itself shines forth, even so as to affect both the understanding and at the same time the will of others.  For as is the case with good and truth, so it is with the will and the understanding in man, because the will has been appointed for the reception of good, and the understanding for the reception of truth; and the will does not appear in light except through the understanding, for it is understanding which gives form to what is of the will, and presents it in clearness. That which is formed is as it were divided into parts, and among these parts, which are analytically associated together, there are established various regards or relations.  In this manner good is presented to view in the understanding and is rendered clear.  When good has been rendered clear in the understanding, it is the truth of this good.  From this then it is that the oil was to be beaten, as also the frankincense, of which it is said that it shall be pure, and that some of it shall be beaten very small, and thus burned as incense (Exod. 30:34-36).  The like that is signified by “beaten” is also signified by being “ground in a mill,” as can be seen from the signification of “wheat” and of “fine flour;” “wheat” signifying good, and “fine flour” its truth.  Just as that which is beaten and ground signifies in the genuine sense good made clear, so what is beaten and ground, in the opposite sense signifies evil made clear.  This is signified by Moses beating the golden calf, and grinding it very small; and when it was as fine as dust, casting it into the brook that descended from the mountain (Deut. 9:21): (n. 9391).

AC 9782. For the luminary.  That this signifies the spiritual heaven, is evident from the signification of “the luminary,” or “lampstand,” as being the spiritual heaven (n. 9548).

AC 9783. To cause the lamp to go up continually.  That this signifies the consequent faith, and through faith the intelligence of truth and wisdom of good from the Lord, is evident from the signification of a “lamp,” as being faith and the consequent intelligence of truth and wisdom of good (n. 9548). That a “lamp” denotes faith, is because the Divine truth that proceeds from the Lord is light in the heavens; this light, when received by the angels who are there, or by man, is like a lamp, for it illuminates all things of the mind, and imparts intelligence and wisdom. This light when received is faith. But be it known that faith is not a lamp, that is, does not illuminate the mind, unless it is from charity; thus unless it is charity. The case with faith and charity is the same as with truth and good; truth is the form of good, that is, it is good so formed as to appear in light. So faith is the form of charity, or charity formed. Moreover truth pertains to faith, and good to charity; for that which is true is believed, and becomes of faith; and that which is good is loved, and becomes of charity.  The truth and good itself which are loved are the neighbor, and the love of these is charity.

AC 9784. In the Tent of meeting.  That this signifies where is the presence of the Lord, is evident from the fact that the Tent was made in order that the Lord might there meet Moses and Aaron, and also the sons of Israel.  Therefore also what is holy of worship was instituted there, as can be seen from the following passages in Exodus:--

They shall make a continual burnt-offering at the door of the Tent of meeting before Jehovah; where I will meet with you, to speak there with thee.  And there I will meet with the sons of Israel; and it shall be sanctified by My glory. And I will sanctify the Tent of meeting, and the altar. Aaron also and his sons will I sanctify, that they may minister to Me in the priesthood. And I will dwell in the midst of the sons of Israel (Exod. 29:42-45).

And that the Lord met with them there, that is, that He was present there, can be seen from this passage:--

When all things were finished, the cloud covered the Tent of meeting, and the glory of Jehovah filled the Habitation.  And Moses could not enter into the Tent of meeting, because the cloud dwelt upon it, and the glory of Jehovah filled the Habitation.  The cloud of Jehovah was upon the Habitation by day; and there was fire therein by night, in the eyes of all the house of Israel (Exod. 40:33-38).

From all this it can be seen that by “the Tent of meeting” is signified where the presence of the Lord is.  The reason was that the Tent represented heaven, and heaven is heaven by virtue of the presence of the Lord in it, on which account also it was called “the Habitation of Jehovah.”

AC 9785. Without the veil which is over the Testimony. That this signifies where there is communication, and, through the uniting intermediate, conjunction with the Lord in the inmost heaven, is evident from the signification of “the veil,” as being the intermediate that unites the inmost heaven and the middle heaven (n. 9670, 9671), thus where there is communication and conjunction; and from the signification of “the Testimony,” as being the Lord in respect to Divine truth.

AC 9786. Aaron and his sons shall order it.  That this signifies perpetual influx from the Lord, is evident from the signification of “ordering,” when said of the Lord, who was represented by Aaron, as being influx; for all communication of Divine good and Divine truth from the Lord, and all conjunction with Him, are effected through influx.  Angels and men are recipient forms.  That perpetual influx is signified, is because the  subject treated of is the ordering of the lamp from evening until morning, by which is signified continually and perpetually.  That the influx is from the Lord, is because by Aaron was represented the Lord as to Divine good, and by his sons the Lord as to Divine truth.

AC 9787. From evening until morning before Jehovah. That this signifies continually in every state, is evident from the signification of “evening,” as being the end of one state (n. 8426); and from the signification of “morning,” as being the beginning of another (n. 8427).  That it denotes continually in every state, is because “evening” involves every state of shade which is signified by the following night; and “morning” involves every state of light which is signified by the following day; for with the Lord things following and future are together in the present, because everything which the Lord ordains, that is, provides with man and angel, is eternal. From this it can be seen that by the “ordering of the lamp from evening until morning” is signified the perpetual influx of good and of truth from the Lord continually in every state.

AC 9788. It shall be a statute of an age. That this signifies the Divine order, is evident from the signification of “a statute,” as being Divine order (n. 7884, 7995, 8357); and from the signification of “age,” as being what is eternal; moreover what is Divine is eternal.

AC 9789. For their generations with the sons of Israel. That this signifies what is eternal in the spiritual kingdom, is evident from the signification of “generations,” as being what is eternal; and from the signification of “the sons of Israel,” as being the spiritual church (n. 9340), and therefore the spiritual kingdom; for the spiritual kingdom of the Lord in the heavens is the spiritual heaven, and on earth it is the spiritual church.  “Generations” denote what is eternal, because by them in the internal sense are meant the generations of faith and charity (n. 613, 2020, 2584, 6239, 9042, 9079), thus the things which are of heaven and the church, which are eternal.  Moreover by “the sons of Israel,” of whom the “generations” are predicated, is signified the church (n. 9340). That by “ generations” is signified what is eternal, is plain from the following passages in the Word:--

My righteousness shall be to eternity, and My salvation unto generations of generations.  Awake as in the days of antiquities, the generations of eternities (Isa. 51:8, 9).

I will set thee for a magnificence of eternities, a joy of generation and generation (Isa. 60:15).

The smoke thereof shall go up to eternity; from generation to generation it shall be laid waste, none shall pass through it for everlasting of everlastings (Isa. 34:10).

The counsel of Jehovah shall stand to eternity, the thoughts of His heart to generation and generation (Ps. 33:11).

I will praise Thy name to eternity and forever, generation to generation shall praise Thy works (Ps. 145:2, 4).

They shall fear Thee with the sun, and before the moon, from generation of generations (Ps. 72:5).

This is My name to eternity, and this My memorial unto generation and generation (Exod. 3:15);

besides many other passages.  It is said “to eternity,” and “to generation and generation,” and “eternity” is predicated of the Divine celestial, or good; and “generation,” of the Divine spiritual, or truth; for in the Word, especially in the prophetic Word, there are for the most part two expressions relating to one and the same thing, as in the passages above quoted, “to eternity,” and “to generation and generation;” and this on account of the heavenly marriage in each and all things of the Word.  The heavenly marriage is the marriage of good and truth, or the conjunction of the Lord and heaven (n. 9263).

CONTINUATION ABOUT THE FIRST EARTH SEEN IN THE STARRY HEAVENS

AC 9790. It has also been granted me to see some of the inhabitants of a lower class. They were seen in a garment such as is worn by rustics in Europe.  There was also seen a man with his wife.  She appeared of handsome figure and becoming mien, as did likewise the man.  But I was surprised at his grand style of walking, with steps as it were haughty, while on the other hand the woman walked with a lowly gait. The angels said that such is the custom on that earth, and that the men who are like this are loved, because they are nevertheless good. It was said further that they are not allowed to have more wives than one, because this is contrary to the laws.

AC 9791. A man who is in the spirit, when allowed to do so by the Lord, can look at what occurs in the earth to which he is near; for in the other life there is no space, thus no distance between those who are in a similar state (n. 9579-9581). What I have just mentioned took place in the same way as with the spirits of some of the earths in our solar system, to whom it was given by the Lord to see through my eyes many things in our earth, as already stated in several places.

AC 9792. The woman who was seen had a wide garment in front of her bosom, behind which she could hide herself. It was so made that she could insert her arms, and clothe herself with it, and so go away.  The lower part of it could be drawn up; and when drawn up and applied to the body, it appeared like a stomacher, such as is worn by the women of our earth. But the same garment served the man also for a covering, and he was seen to take it from the woman and apply it to his own back, loosening the lower part, which then flowed down to his feet like a gown, and in this manner he walked clad.

AC 9793. Afterward I spoke with spirits who were from that earth, and told them many things about our earth; as that there are sciences here which do not exist elsewhere, such as astronomy, geometry, mechanics, physics, chemistry, medicine, optics, and philosophy; besides arts which also are unknown elsewhere, as the art of ship-building, of casting metals, of writing on paper, and of printing what is written, and thus of communicating it to all in the whole earth, and of preserving it to posterity for thousands of years; and that it has been so done with the Word, which is from the Lord, and that therefore the revealed Word remains unchanged in this earth (n. 9350-9360).

AC 9794. Lastly there was shown me the hell of those who are from that earth.  Those who were seen from it excited the greatest terror. I would not venture to describe their monstrous faces.  Sorceresses also were seen there who practice direful arts; they appeared clad in green, and excited horror.

AC 9795. The second earth that was seen in the starry heaven will be described at the end of the following chapter.


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